Sie sind auf Seite 1von 10

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.

Series on the Historic Liturgy


Session 1: True Worship Divine Service
True worship always originates from God, is for our benefit, and ends with God.
Foundationally, worship is God giving and us receiving.
The liturgy is where Jesus is present and gives out his gifts.
The pattern for the liturgy is set on the road to Emmaus Jesus reveals himself
through Gods Word and Jesus reveals himself in a meal.
[The Invocation]
(This was not included as part of the series. So I added it.)
[The service begins with the naming of the God who has gathered us together: In
the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.]
[Gods name reminds us that God has claimed us as his own in Baptism. We belong
to him.]
[Where two or three are gathered together in the name of Jesus, God promises to be
present. Since we have gathered together in his name he is now present with us.]
Session 2: Confession
The very first thing we become aware of when we gather in the presence of holy
God is our sinfulness.
In Confession, we simply say back to God the truth of what he has already said to
us, You are a poor, miserable sinner.
In confession its not that we are confessing specific sins, but that we are confessing
that we are sinners. We are not sinners because we sin. We sin because we are
sinners. So in public, corporate confession we confess that we are sinners.
When we ask for mercy in the confession, we are not just saying, Father be lenient
or kind. We are saying, Father look upon the atonement, look upon the blood that
Jesus offered, be gracious to us on account of the blood Jesus shed for us.
Session 3: Absolution
Absolution is never free. It is free to you the sinner, but it was paid for by the Son of
God, who bore the sins of the world and died the death that we deserved.
Absolution removes the weight of sin from you because the load has been placed on
Jesus.

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
A pastor can forgive you of your sins because Jesus authorized pastors to do so
when he instituted the Office of the Keys: If you forgive the sins of any, they are
forgiven them; if you withhold forgiveness from any, it is withheld.
In the Absolution, the pastor speaks Gods Word and Gods Word is performative,
not just informative. It does what it says; it forgives sins.
The audible hearing of the Absolution delivers the certainty of the forgiveness of
sins.
Session 4: The Introit and the Gloria Patri
During the singing of the Introit, the pastor, representing the people, moves up to
the altar. In doing so, it signals that we are joining the whole Church of Christ at the
throne of the Lamb.
The Introit is made up of an Antiphon, which is a short verse that announces the
theme for the day, part of a psalm, and the Gloria Patri. The psalm also picks up on
the theme for the day.
The Introit is tied to the Gospel lesson and teaches us about Jesus.
The churchs practice whenever she uses the psalms, as it does in the Introit, is to
end it by singing the Gloria Patri. It communicates that we are praying to the Triune
God.
Whether it be for the Introit or at other times, whenever the clergy approach the
altar, they will stop and bow in reverence, acknowledging the presence of the Holy
Trinity.
Session 5: The Kyrie
The Kyrie is shorthand for Lord have mercy. The Kyrie is a prayer to God, who is
the fountain of mercy, to be merciful to us and the world.
The Kyrie can be prayed by the church and individual Christians in all occasions,
good and bad, because begging for Gods mercy is always the right thing to ask for.
Our singing of the Kyrie is addressed to Christ who is our Lord.
In the Kyrie the church cries out for mercy and in the Gloria that follows the church
acknowledges that God has shown mercy in his Son. Therefore Mercy is just another
name for Jesus.
The Churchs cry for mercy includes the world. It is vital that the Church reach out to
God on behalf of the world. It is the vocation of the church.
Session 6: The Gloria

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
This is the song that the angels sang on the day of Jesus birth and the church
delights to repeat and to expand the song of the angels.
We follow the example of the blind beggar. We cry for mercy, and then having
received it, we give glory to God. That is why we pray the Kyrie and then give glory
to God.
Gods answer to our cry for mercy in the Kyrie is God giving his Son into our flesh to
bring us every good blessing. Jesus is the ultimate answer to all of our cries for
mercy and that is expressed in the Gloria.
The entrance of the Redeemer among the race of men spelled out two things: glory
for God and peace for man.
Jesus presence among men as Gods glory and peace causes this explosion of
praise from men.
This song moves us from Christmas to Good Friday to Ascension. So we have the
whole scope of salvation before us in one song.
Session 7: Worthy is Christ
This hymn comes from Rev. 5 where the Lamb who was slain opens the scroll which
reveals the very meaning and plan of life (the scriptures). This is what Jesus is about
to do in the readings and sermon in our service.
The song extols the Lamb as being worthy to open the scroll, because he gave his
life and blood in order to ransom the people of God.
In Revelation the angels, the saints, and all living creatures praise the Lamb. And so
when we sing this song we join them in praising the Lamb.
This song functions exactly like the Gloria. It focuses us on the Lamb who is Gods
answer to our cry for mercy.
In this song and in the Eucharist we celebrate the Lambs victory won through his
death and resurrection. And because of it, he reigns as Servant of all.
Session 8: The Salutation and Collect
The Salutation occurs in Divine Service Three in 3 different spots. Each time it
occurs, it occurs just before an invitation for the congregation to act together
corporately in some way.
The Salutation is more than a greeting. It is saying the Lord is with us.
The Collect is a prayer which is in the form of: an address to God the Father and a
request to him, which is asked for in Jesus name.

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
Most of the Collects are centuries old and have been developed from the riches of
Gods word and not from the poverty of our own hearts.
The historic Collects have really important theological content, combating
Pelagianism and Semi-Pelagianism.
Amen is the peoples word. In it they are saying, in this prayer weve asked a big
thing of God and its no problem for him. Its a word of faith and conviction.
Session 9: The Old Testament Reading
It is indispensable for the Church that Gods Word be read out loud. Faith comes by
hearing. In the early Church the OT was the only Scriptures they had and it was read
out loud.
In the historic one-year lectionary, the OT was no longer read. (Possibly because the
Church considered itself NT Christians and not OT Christians.)
The one-year lectionary had assigned readings for every Sunday of the church year.
The stories read were learned and became the foundation for understanding the
rest of the Scriptures. But large chunks of the Scriptures were never read.
The three-year lectionary was introduced in the 1960s. Much more of the Scriptures
were read in church. But with sporadic attendance Biblical literacy suffered as some
texts might be heard only once every ten years.
Using a lectionary provides a good sampling of reading throughout the Bible and it
protects the people from the pastors whims by forcing him to deal with all kinds of
Scripture instead of just his favorites.
Session 10: The Gradual and Alleluia
The Gradual is two verses of psalmody chanted in between the OT and Epistle
readings. It was once sung from the gradus (the step) by the altar.
The heart of the Gradual is to help us find Christ in the Psalms.
The Alleluia is sung in between the Epistle and Gospel readings. Alleluia is a Hebrew
word that means praise the Lord.
Alleluia is the norm for the church. It expresses the churchs overflowing joy.
In the Alleluia the Church confesses the real presence of Christ. And the Churchs
response of faith in Christ is to praise God.
Session 11: The Epistle and Gospel

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
We need to hear Gods Word read because through it God pours faith into us. We
need his Law to expose our sin and kill us. We need his Gospel to raise us up and
restore us.
The epistles are letters from the apostles to churches which were meant to be read
out loud in the liturgical assembly.
The purpose of the epistles is to depict for us what it means to be the Church of
Christ.
The Gospel readings are primarily the words of Jesus. In the Gospel lesson, Christ
himself speaks to us. And when his words find a home in you, Jesus comes with
them.
All words of Scripture are not equal. Jesus speaks of the importance of his word. His
words do not pass away. We should not be ashamed of them. We should abide in his
word. We should hear and believe his word. We should keep his word.
Session 12: The Creed
The Creed very simply states the Christian faith that all Christians everywhere
believe. The Creeds are a faithful summary handed down by our forefathers of the
faith into which we have been baptized and which can save us.
Reciting the Creed just before or after the sermon provides the pastor and people a
standard to judge the sermon by.
In the Lutheran Church, the Apostles Creed is associated with Baptism and is used
when only the Service of the Word is used. The Nicene Creed, which has a fuller
description of Jesus, tends to be used in services where the Lords Supper is
celebrated.
If a church changes or leaves out the Creed, it is a pretty clear sign that they do not
hold Lutheran beliefs.
Session 13: The Sermon Hymn and Hymns
Hymns are rhyming poetry texts set to music. Hymns are a great vehicle for
delivering Gods Word and for teaching the faith.
The Hymn of the Day connects the gospel reading with the sermon.
Luther viewed the hymn as the peoples preaching, the peoples proclamation out
loud to themselves and the world the incredible Good News of what God has done
for us in Jesus Christ.
Hymns are an expression of the faith of the whole congregation and not the
experience of an individual. Hymns are corporate in nature.

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
Session 14: The Sermon
The sermon is a public proclamation connected to the public reading of Scripture.
Jesus commanded his disciples to preach the Good News of the forgiveness of sins.
The sermon shows how all of the Scriptures tell us about the forgiveness Jesus won
through his death and resurrection. The rising of Christ from the dead is at the heart
of reading, understanding, and preaching the Scriptures.
In the sermon the pastor explains and applies the sacred Scriptures just read
(another term for this is homily). The scripture used as the text for the sermon
shapes the structure and content of the sermon.
Good preaching is more concerned about preaching strong Law followed by sweet
Gospel than it is about using good oratory technique.
Session 15: The Intercession and Prayers
Prayer is first and foremost a conversation between Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
And in prayer we are invited by the Triune God to enter into this conversation.
As the Son and the Spirit intercede for us, so in prayer we intercede for the world.
This is the vocation of the Church. The Church has the privilege of going before the
Father and speaking on behalf of the world.
In the Prayer of the Church, the Churchs prayer is both universal in scope, praying
for the whole world, and yet individual in nature, bringing the specific needs of
individuals before God.
When we pray, we pray to the Father in and through the Son by the Spirit. We take
our needs to the Father, but we do not tell him how to fix it. He is more than capable
of taking care of it.
We pray from the riches of Gods Word and not from the poverty of our own hearts.
Scripture guides our prayers not our emotions and feelings.
Session 16: The Offering and Offertory
The world has become disconnected from God and needs to be given back to him,
to be put back in his hands. In his life, death, and resurrection Jesus made the
perfect offering, purchasing the world for his Father. In the offering each Sunday,
Jesus, working through the Church in its prayers and offerings, gives the world back
to God, its Creator.
God has graciously provided all that we need, both physically through his good
creation and spiritually through his Son. As a result we thankfully and joyfully give
our full selves, body, soul, heart, and mind, back to him.

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
The offering of our material goods that God has given us is a token of us giving our
whole life to God and points to the all availing offering that Jesus made, giving up
his life that we might have eternal life.
God uses our offerings to provide life. Our offerings support the Church which
proclaims the life-giving Gospel. God also uses the Church to provide for his
servants, the pastors, and for the poor and needy.
The offertory is sung while the gifts of the people are brought forward to God. In the
offertory we recognize that what we give to the Lord is what he has first provided to
us. And as a result we give him our thanks and praise for the wonderful gifts he has
given us.
Session 17: The Preface and Proper Preface
We have been given everything in Jesus and all there is left for us to do is to thank
and praise God. So the whole life of the Christian and Church is one of thanksgiving.
The Preface is all about thanksgiving.
The table was literally set during the offering and now the Preface is a call to come
and eat.
Jesus said, Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. Jesus is our treasure. And Jesus
is now coming to us (real presence) in this Meal (Lords Supper). The Preface focuses us on Jesus, our
treasure. And we thank the Father for the great gift of his Son.

During different seasons of the church year different things are emphasized about
Jesus in the Proper Preface. Our thanksgiving is shaped by these different aspects of
Gods gift of Jesus.
In the Preface and Proper Preface we join with the angels and saints in thanking and
praising God. We will continue to do this throughout eternity.
Session 18: The Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy)
The Sanctus joins the song of the angels (Holy, Holy, Holy) with the cry of the
people (Hosanna).
The angels continually praise God singing, Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts; the
whole earth is full of his glory! (Is. 6:3; Rev. 4:8). In the Sanctus the Church on
earth joins with them to make one gigantic choir.
In the Divine Service we stand before holy God. As a sinner we ought to be terrified
like Isaiah. Yet, like Isaiah, our sin is taken away and atoned for by Jesus and
therefore we are filled with and sing with joy.
As the crowds welcomed Jesus as their King come to save them (Palm Sunday) in
fulfillment of Ps. 118, so we do the same. The Sanctus begins and ends with

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
Hosanna (Lord save us). In answer to our cry, He comes to us now in the name of
the Lord to save us. For this great gift we praise God.
The whole earth is full of Gods glory. Jesus is the glory of God. Wherever Jesus is
present, there is the glory of God. The Holy One, the King come to save, Jesus,
comes from on high to be with us in the flesh displaying Gods hidden glory.
Session 19: The Lords Prayer and Words of Institution
The Lords Prayer and words of institution are Christs words. And because they are
Jesus words and because he commanded them, they are the heart of Christian
worship.
The words of institution are the answer to what was asked for in the Lords Prayer.
When we pray for the kingdom, Gods will, daily bread, forgiveness, and
deliverance, the answer is Jesus and what he did for us.
In the words of institution, Jesus is speaking pure Gospel through the pastor. The
Word joined with visible elements make it a sacrament.
The words of Jesus are powerful and effective. The words of Christ convey exactly
what they promise. Jesus words provide certainty that the promise is for you.
Session 20: The Pax Domini and Agnus Dei
After the miracle of the bodily resurrection, Jesus came to his disciples and offered
them peace. Now, after the miracle of his bodily real presence, he comes to us and
offers us peace.
Jesus is peace. Jesus has brought together that which was separated God to man
and man to man. Jesus peace flows from him to us and through us to others.
The peace Jesus gives as a gift does what it says. It conveys the forgiveness of sins.
It is an absolution.
After receiving Jesus peace, we sing about how he accomplished that peace. Peace
was made possible because of what he did as the Lamb of God. He died and rose
again to take away the sins of the world.
Lambs are used as sacrifices throughout the Scriptures. All sacrifices, from Abel, to
Abraham, to the Passover, to the temple, to the lamb led to slaughter in Isaiah,
point forward to Jesus, the Lamb of God. He willingly sacrificed his life in order that
we might have life.
In the Agnus Dei we petition the slain yet victorious Lamb for mercy and peace. He
answers our petitions by giving us his body and blood. Jesus is mercy and peace.
Session 21: The Distribution and Distribution Hymns

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
The pastor is the steward of this great mystery. He is responsible for admission of
penitent sinners to the Lords Supper. The words he uses are a paraphrase of Jesus
words, emphasizing forgiveness for you.
In this feast, Christ comes to us and is really, physically present in the Sacrament.
For the forgiveness of sin, we receive his holy body and blood that was on the cross
in, with, and under the bread and wine.
Our actions in the reception of his body and blood confess the real presence and our
trust in Jesus: kneeling, sign of the cross, open hands and mouths, speaking an
affirming Amen.
During the distribution, we sing the adoration of the One whom has come to us,
whom is present with us, and whom we are receiving. Because of all he has done for
us, we cant help but sing.
We sing of who Jesus is (our Savior) and what he has done for the world and for us
(willingly sacrificed himself for us). He took the punishment we deserved: forsaken
by God and death.
We sing in response to the good and gracious gifts he gives us: forgiveness, eternal
life, peace, unity, and Holy Spirit. We sing because we are overwhelmed with joy
and thankfulness.
Session 22: The Nunc Dimittis, Post-Communion Canticles and Collects
The Nunc Dimittis was sung by Simeon who saw and held his Savior and was ready
to die in peace. In the Supper, we do the same. Jesus fulfilled Simeons song,
therefore we too are ready to die in peace.
In this song, we recognize that this life which has been given to us in Jesus cannot
be taken away from us. Not even death can take that life.
The Nunc Dimittis ties in well with the end of the day and the end of life. Whatever
may befall us we can be at peace knowing that because of Jesus we have been
reconciled to the Father.
The thanksgiving of the Supper continues in the post-Communion prayer. We thank
God for the wholesome and saving gift we have just received.
The fulfillment of the Sacrament is outward. Vertically we live by faith in Christ and
horizontally we live loving others. We ask for strength to live in an outward way.
The Christian is on a pilgrimage to heaven. In this prayer we thank God for feeding
us holy food along the way to refresh us and strengthen us.
Session 23: The Benediction [and Closing Hymn]

A Summary of the Divine Service as Presented in the Issues Etc.


Series on the Historic Liturgy
In the Aaronic Benediction God has the last word in the service and it is
sacramental, unconditional, and powerful. It does what it says. It gives blessing and
peace.
God puts his name (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) on the people and sends his people
forth in peace.
Having had Gods name placed upon them and received his blessing, Gods people
walk out into the world with an unshakeable peace.
The people respond by crossing themselves and saying Amen. This says, This
blessing belongs to me, a baptized child of God!
Having received Gods blessing the people cant help but erupt in one last hymn of
praise and thanksgiving to the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
Session 24: Conclusion of the Series on the Historic Liturgy
In the liturgy our Lord freely gives us the gift of life. He gives us life through Jesus. In
the liturgy Jesus comes to us and gives us salvation.
What we believe and how we worship go hand in hand. Our worship is a confession
and witness to the world.
The liturgy brings Gods Word to us, which is useful throughout life, all the way up to
the grave. Wherever the Word and Sacraments are rightly administered the Holy
Spirit is present and active.
In the liturgy God dishes out his gifts and we receive them by faith.