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Mr.

Skeleton
Display the Mr. Skeleton pattern on
the classroom bulletin board and list
names of important bones on strips of
paper. Students will enjoy researching
these bones and labeling the various
areas of the skeleton.

Skull

(Head)

Make enough copies of Mr. Skeleton


for everyone in the class. Children will
love assembling their own skeletons
with brass fasteners and displaying
them at home, on Halloween.

Vertebrae

(Neck)

Humerus

(Upper Right Arm)

Humerus

(Upper Left Arm)

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October Idea Book

AR BONE
)
(COLL

ER
LD
OU E)
(SH LAD
B

SC
AP
UL
A

CLAVICLE

RIBS
RIBS

STERNUM
(BREAST BONE)

(left foot)

(right foot)

(toes)

(toes)

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October Idea Book

FEMUR
FEMUR

ULNA

(right arm)

(left arm)
(left leg)

(right leg)

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(THIGH
BONE)

RADIUS

ULNA

(FOREARM)

RADIUS

(FOREARM)

(THIGH
BONE)

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October Idea Book

WRIST

A
LL
TE
PA

g)
le
ft
(le

(left hand)
(FINGERS)

IN
H
(S

E)
N
BO
F
AL
(C

E)
N
BO

(ri
gh
tl
eg
)

LA
U
B
FI

F
I
BU
LA

A
BI
I
T

(K
CANE
P) E

T
I
BI
A

F
AL
(C
(S
H
IN

E)
N
BO

(right hand)

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PHALA
NGES

METACARPA
LS

BO
N
E)

CARPALS

October Idea Book

VERTEBRAE

(SPINAL COLUMN)

HIP BONE

PELVIS

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October Idea Book

Skeleton Activities!
BODY
MATH
When a
baby is born,
he has 300
bones in his body.
As an adult, he will have only 206.
The reason he has fewer is that many
of the bones will fuse together as he
grows.

LIFE-SIZED SKELETONS
Motivate your students into learning
about the human body with a lifesized skeleton!
Have students trace around
each other's bodies on large
sheets of butcher paper and
cut them out. Give the children
the Mr. Skeleton patterns to
cut out and paste on top of
their body shapes. (The Mr.
Skeleton patterns contained in
this unit are just the right size
for most kindergartners.
Enlarge the patterns for older
students.) The skeletons can be
displayed on the class board as
an informative but fun way to
learn the bones of the body.

Using the following count of bones in


the body, ask your student to calculate a variety of math problems.
32
31
29
26
25

FLASHLIGHT X-RAY
After a discussion about the
human skeleton, have your students experience viewing their
own bones with this intriguing
activity.

in
in
in
in
in

each arm
each leg
the skull
the spine
the chest

Here are some other body statistics


that can be used for math word problems and at the same time provide
knowledge of the human body.
The human body contains about 8
pints of blood.

Darken the room and ask each


child to take a turn holding the
palm of their hand over a
flashlight. If they look carefully,
the children will be able to see
the bones and joints connecting the fingers. Students can
draw pictures of what they see.

About 400 gallons of blood flows


through your kidneys each day.
The small intestine is 20 feet long
and the large intestine is 5 feet long.
The body is made up of about 70%
water, or about 3/4 of your body
weight.

DID YOU KNOW...


The largest bone in the body is
the thigh bone, or femur. It measures
about 20 inches long in a person six
feet tall. The smallest bone in the
body is the stirrup bone. It is found in
the ear and is only one-tenth of an
inch long.
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bones
bones
bones
bones
bones

Your heart beats about 100,000


times a day.
You blink your eyes about 20,000
times a day.

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October Idea Book