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Sample Comprehensive School Counseling Program

Middle School Level


Foundation
Beliefs of Maura J. Francis Middle School
1. All students can accomplish personal, vocational and academic success, which can be fostered by school
counselors, teachers and administrators.
2. Students needs can be met through the collaborative and advocacy efforts of administrators, teachers, parents,
school counselors and the school counseling curriculum.
3. School counselors work to meet these needs through working as socioemotional, academic and professional
advocates for their students. This advocacy can be assumed through collaboration with families, professionals and
other school personnel, as well as through the implementation of comprehensive guidance programs in a way that
meets student needs.
4. With the support of administrators and school personnel, counselors are responsible for the development,
management and delivery of the program. However, evaluation is done by school counselors, and with the input of
students and families.
5. Collecting and analyzing data is the foundation of a comprehensive school counseling program, which guides the
development of goals and proposals for systematic change that fosters successful student development.
6. School counselors aspire to the ethical standards set by ASCA. Abiding by these ethical standards is fundamental
to the accountability, management, and delivery of our program.
Vision Statement
Maura J. Francis Middle School strives to provide a comprehensive guidance program which focuses on
collaboration, leadership and advocacy to foster our students innate ability to academically succeed, become
prepared for the professional world, and live as successful and contributing members of society. With the help of a
safe and supportive environment, and the involvement of our students families, school personnel, administrators,
and outside professional sources, counselors are able to fully implement school counseling programs that enhances
students socioemotional, academic and professional needs. This in turn allows each and every student to reach their
fullest advantage and become future lifelong leaders in the workplace, community and school.
Maura J. Francis Middle School Mission Statement
The mission statement of Maura J. Francis Middle School is focused on:
Implementing research-based learning strategies that are currently adjusted to improve the instructional programs
and student performance.
Creating an environment that has a clear and articulated focus towards student achievement.
Facilitating proficient teaching and learning utilizing core curriculum strategies.
Promoting opportunities for social, emotional, and physical growth of every individual.
Providing avenues for students, staff, and parents to mutually explore learning and foster the desire to expand their
goals.
Inspiring the community to be involved through collaborative and responsible partnerships and activities.
Providing professional development for the staff that is aligned with Wilson Middle School's vision.
(Woodrow Wilson Middle School, 2015)
Reference
Woodrow Wilson Middle School (2015). About us. Retrieved from
http://webgui.phila.k12.pa.us/schools/w/wilson/about-us
Mission Statement of the Comprehensive School Counseling Program
As a diverse program, the goal for the Maura J. Francis school counseling curriculum is to support the
administrative staff, teachers, parents, and the community to promote a safe and caring environment which
encourages student learning and development through meeting each students socioemotional, academic and
vocational needs. We recognize that these needs must be met for students at all levels of cognitive, emotional, and
intellectual development. This in turn helps them to advance and allows them to develop into happy, independent,
connected, and contributing members of society. In order to address the needs of the students in meeting these long
term goals, evidence based practices will be implemented to improve the quality and effectiveness of our

comprehensive school counseling program.


In addition, the school counseling program will ensure that each student is an equal member of the school
community and receives the same access to resources to promote success for all. This mission statement reflects the
middle school's and the Pennsylvania Department of Education's mission regarding school support, which
emphasizes individual student growth in all domains, professional development of counselors, teachers, and
administrators, and that it is our responsibility as school counselors to make resources available to students to help
them achieve academic success. This will be established based on the Pennsylvania Department of Education's
response to intervention and instruction (RTII).
Statement of Philosophy
Maura J. Francis Middle School believes that every child is unique and to optimize their academic, personal/social,
and career success, they require an environment that is safe, stimulates growth in the areas of intellectual, emotional,
social, and physical functioning. We describe our role as school counselors as multifunctional in that we support,
guide, and model with the goal our extrapolating the potential in every student. Our department also believes in
emphasizing collaboration and consultation between stakeholders to effectively address the varied needs of the
student and to provide adequate resources. Using the knowledge, skills and expertise of the teachers, administration,
parents, and other faculty, we incorporate a well rounded curriculum to create life long learners and functional and
engaged citizens.
The goals, vision, and mission statement for our program were developed and aligned with our district's core
standards and the ASCA National Model. When reviewing the developmental level of our school and demographic
needs of our students, we aimed to create a philosophy that coincides with a systems-focused guidance program
curriculum. All of the school counselors in Maura J. Francis Middle School will collaborate to plan and manage the
school counseling program. Program data provides our counseling program with accountability. The advisory board,
which includes all four stakeholder groups, are encouraged to review the outcome data and provide feedback about
the school counseling program.
The outcome data from our program will assist us in making further decisions based on the needs of the students,
effectiveness of our program, and considering the limitations and modifications of our program. During program
development and implementation, the school counselors will demonstrate ethical competence to uphold integrity,
professional, and competence.
ASCA Standards/Competencies of Focus
Academic Standard/Competency
Career Standard/Competency
Standard A: Students will acquire the attitudes,
Standard B: Students will
knowledge and skills that contribute to effective
employ
learning in school and across the lifespan.
strategies to achieve future
Competency A2: Acquire Skills for Improving Learning
career goals
with success and satisfaction

Personal Standard/Competency
Standard A: Students will acquire t
attitudes and interpersonal skills to
understand and respect self and ot

Competency A1: Acquire Self-Kno

Competency B1: Acquire Career


Information
Narrative: The Standards and Competencies were selected and aligned with the school counseling program goals.
These competencies and standards were chosen based on the needs of the school, which is reflected in the School
Profile Data. Following careful consideration, the competencies were selected based on the developmental levels of
our students, through the use of the ASCA National Standards: Developmental Crosswalk Tool. These standards will
provide a foundation to the development, management and delivery of the program, which will also be used in
conjunction with the support of administrators and staff. The competencies in the Academic, Career and
Personal/Social domains will be achieved through classroom guidance lessons, small groups, individual counseling
sessions and daily interactions with students, which is ultimately based on the response to instruction and
intervention, as mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
ASCA National Standards: Developmental Crosswalk Tool:

ASCA National Standards_ Developmental Crosswalk Tool.pdf


DetailsDownload3 MB
The ASCA standards and competencies noted in the Developmental Crosswalk Tool were deemed by the counselors
at Maura J. Francis Middle School to be imperative in middle school counseling programs.
High Value ASCA National Standards:

High Value Student Standards.xls


DetailsDownload71 KB
Reference
American School Counselor Association (2004). ASCA National Standards for Students. Alexandria, VA: Author.
Program Goals
Our program goals Maura J. Francis' students and examination of the ASCA National Model.
Based on the school's 2014-2015 data, our counseling goals address the students' needs in the academic,
personal/social and career domains. To develop our academic goals, we specifically reviewed attendance,
standardized test scores, and promotion to determine our academic needs.
To determine the career goals, we reviewed the outcome data from the 2014-2015 school year from our career
development programs. We have recognized the need to incorporate more career development programs to improve
a student's personal working knowledge of careers, career readiness skills, and the relationship between academic
subjects and the world of work.
To develop our personal and social goals, we reviewed misconduct offenses during the 2014-2015 school year. By
reviewing the needs assessments and outcome data from the previous year's guidance curriculum, we have
recognized the need to focus on emotional regulation, distinguishing appropriate behavior, and positive social and
emotional growth. We will collaborate with the administration to discuss the school's data and how our program
plans to best meet the needs of the students in all domains. The advisory board supports the goals developed for the
2015-2016 school year.
Academic Domain
Maura J. Francis Middle School will develop students learning by improving their self-concept and learning skills
for student success.
During the 2014-2015 school year, an average of 53.8% of students at MJFMS were proficient in math, based on
PSSA results. This average is below the school district's annual yearly progress objectives. Based on these results, it
is the goal of MJFMS school counseling program to provide a foundation on which math success can be built upon.
Included in this is collaboration with 6th, 7th, and 8th grade teachers. In order to meet the district's AYP math
objectives, students will meet proficiency in math at a 60% average. This objective will be met by teaching 6th, 7th,
and 8th grade students study skills, effective time management, and test taking strategies through classroom
guidance lesson.
During the 2014-2015 school year, an average of 41.6% achieved proficiency in reading, based on PSSA results.
Based on these results, the school counseling program at MJFMS will provide a foundation that can create higher
rates of reading success. Students will meet a proficiency in reading at a 50% average. This goal will be maintained
by teaching 6th, 7th and 8th grade students academic skills, such as time management, study skills and test taking
skills.
Based on the data collected during the 2014-2015 school year, approximately 50% of students have inadequate rates
of homework completion (less than 4 out of 5 nights per week). Due to these high rates, the school counseling
program will help address this issue so that homework rates increase to 65% for each grade level. This goal will be
met by teaching 6th, 7th and 8th grade students specific skills that will increase homework completion, such as time
management and study skills.
Corresponding PA Standards:

13.1.8.F: Analyze the relationship of school subjects, extracurricular activities, and community experiences to career
preparation.
Career Domain
Maura J. Francis Middle School will prepare students to become civically engaged members of the community.
60% of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students will obtain a working knowledge of careers based on their interests, abilities,
and aptitudes using various career inventories and assessments. This goal will be met through career guidance
lessons that target career exploration.
Based on the 2014-2015 school year data, only 20% of students were engaged in school sponsored extracurricular
activities. The counseling program will address this need using Tier 1 engagement activities, which will increase
participation in extracurricular activities to 30%.
60% of sixth, seventh and eighth grade students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between
school subjects and the world of work upon completion of the world of work curriculum. This goal will be met by
the school counseling staff through Tier 1 guidance lessons, which provides an introduction to various careers and
the connection to academics.

Corresponding PA Career Standards and Related Academic Standards:


Relating School and Community Experiences to Career Preparation
Career Awareness and Preparation
13.1.8.A Relate careers to individual interests, abilities, and aptitudes.
13.1.8.B Relate careers to personal interests, abilities and aptitudes.
13.1.8.D Explain the relationship of career training programs to employment opportunities.
13.1.8.F Analyze the relationship of school subjects, extracurricular activities, and community experiences to career
preparation.
13.1.8.H Choose personal electives and extracurricular activities based upon personal career interests, abilities and
academic strengths
13.2.8.C Prepare a draft of career acquisition documents, such as, but not limited to:
Job application
Letter of appreciation following an interview
Letter of introduction
Request for letter of recommendation
Resume
Personal/Social Domain
Maura J. Francis Middle School will acquire the self knowledge to demonstrate self-control and emotional
regulation through the ability to recognize and utilize intra and interpersonal skills.
During the 2014-2015 school year, 160 attendance referrals were reported. This high rate evidences a need for an
intervention that will be addressed through the counseling program's engagement activities. The majority of these
attendance referrals were given to eighth grade students, which reflects greater need for this level. Therefore, the
counseling department will implement a Tier 1 intervention for specifically the eighth to promote school
engagement and decrease these attendance rates as a result. It is the goal of the counseling program that the
attendance referrals for eighth grade students will decrease by 5%.
The 2014-2015 Data Profile indicated 125 behavioral referrals. Many of these referrals involve student offenses
against peers. This need will be addressed through Tier 1 and 2 evidenced-based practice programs, which will
decrease this rate by 5%.
The results revealed 22 incidents involving safety. As a school, safety is paramount to academic success and school
belonging. Therefore, our counseling program will collaborate faculty members to facilitate guidance lessons that
target safety, social responsibility and healthy relationships. As a result, reports of safety referrals will decrease by
5% during the following school year.
Corresponding PA Standards
Subject Area - 1: Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening
Standard Area - 1.6: Speaking and Listening

Grade Level - 1.6.6: GRADE 6


Standard
1.6.6.A:
Listen critically and respond to others in small and large group situations.
Respond with grade level appropriate questions, ideas, information, or opinions.
1.6.6.B: Demonstrate awareness of audience using appropriate volume and clarity in formal speaking presentations.
Grade Level - 1.6.7: GRADE 7
Standard
1.6.7.A:
Listen critically and respond to others in small and large group situations.
Respond with grade level appropriate questions, ideas, information, or opinions.
1.6.7.B: Demonstrate awareness of audience using appropriate volume and clarity in formal speaking presentations.
Grade Level - 1.6.8: GRADE 8
Standard
1.6.8.A:
Listen critically and respond to others in small and large group situations.
Respond with grade level appropriate questions, ideas, information, or opinions
1.6.8.B: Demonstrate awareness of audience using appropriate volume and clarity in formal speaking presentations.
*These goals will be reassessed in June of 2016.
References
Pennsylvania Department of Education. (2015). Pennsylvania Academic Standards. In Pennsylvania Department of
Education: Standards Aligned System. Retrieved from http://pdesas.org/Standard/Views#111,112,113|0|0|0
Pennsylvania Department of Education. (2015). Pennsylvania Academic Standards. In Pennsylvania Department of
Education: Standards Aligned System. Retrieved from http://pdesas.org/Standard/Views#111,112,113|0|0|0
Setting & Evaluating Goals
Goals will be set on the basis of meeting student need and the vision/mission of the program. The goals for each
academic year are developed and set at the beginning of each school year, and are maintained on the basis of
Dorans (1981) SMART goal system acronym (as cited in ASCA, 2012).
1.S-Specific
2.M-Measurable
3.A-Attainable
4.R-Results-oriented
5.T-Time oriented
Goals are also set as a result of examining student/school data, listing current interventions within the program,
identity specific plans that improve upon the program and writing new goals based on the SMART acronym.
Smart Goal Worksheets
Academic Domain
Reading PSSA Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-ReadingPSSA.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload79 KB
Homework Completion

SMARTgoalworksheethomeworkcompletion.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload67 KB
Reading PSSA Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-ReadingPSSA.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload79 KB
Career Domain
Career Interests, Interests, and Aptitude Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-Careerinterestsabilitiesandaptitudes.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload82 KB
School Subject and the World of Work Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-SchoolSubjectsandWorldofWork.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload76 KB
Extracurricular Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-Extracurricular.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload63 KB
Personal/Social Domain
Behavioral Referral Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-BehavioralReferrals.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload74 KB
Safety Referral Goal

SMARTgoalworksheet-SafetyReferrals.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload82 KB
Attendance

SMARTgoalworksheet-AttendanceReferrals.docx.pdf
DetailsDownload80 KB
Reference
American School Counselor Association. (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd.). Alexandria, VA: Author.

Ethical Standards
Responsibilities to Students (ASCA Ethical Standard A)
School counselors will maintain professional boundaries with students and parents.
School counselors will maintain student confidentiality, breaking confidentiality only when the student poses a
danger to themselves or others.
Through the therapeutic relationship and intervention, school counselors will take the appropriate measures to
ensure student safety as to facilitate the students optimum school experience.
Responsibilities to Parents/Guardians (ASCA Ethical Standard B)
School counselor will acknowledge the rights and responsibilities of and will strive to building collaborative
relationships with parents.
Responsibilities to Colleagues and Professional Associates (ASCA Ethical Standard C)

School counselors will treat their colleagues with respect and aspire to develop collaborative professional
relationship in building a positive school culture.
School counselors will appropriately share important/pertinent information to adhere to best practices and benefits
the student.
Responsibilities to School, Communities, and Families (ASCA Ethical Standard D)
School counselors will be knowledgeable of the schools vision and mission.
School counselors will educate teachers, administrators, students, and parents regarding the role of the school
counselor.
School counselors will provide equal access to community resources for all students and families.
Responsibilities to Self (ASCA Ethical Standard E)
School counselors will continually seek professional development to sustain their competence in the field.
The competence of a school counselor includes appropriate referrals, self-awareness, and civic engagement.
School counselors will continually develop their multicultural and social justice awareness in order to effectively
advocate for students and their families.
Responsibility to the Profession (ASCA Ethical Standard F)
School counselors must adhere to ethical standards established by the profession as well as additional policies and
statements (i.e. ASCA position statements).
School counselors will participate in professional school counseling associations.
School counselors must contribute to the profession in their respective areas of competence (i.e. attendance of
professional meetings, mentoring other professionals, supervision of school counseling candidates of internship and
practicum).
Maintenance of the Standards (ASCA Ethical Standard E)
School counselors will strive to maintain ethical behavior and appropriate respond to any type of poor ethical
behavior committed by their colleagues.
School counselors refer to the appropriate resources when faced with an ethical dilemma in order to make the most
appropriate and responsible decision possible.
Reference
American School Counselor Association. (2010). Ethical standards for school counselors. Retrieved from
https://www.schoolcounselor.org/asca/media/asca/Resource%20Center/Legal%20and%20Ethical%20Issues/Sample
%20Documents/EthicalStandards2010.pdf
American School Counselor Association. (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd.). Alexandria, VA: Author.

Ethical Decision Making Model


Identify the problem
Identify the all parties involved
Identify all parties involved in the problem/issue.
Who needs to be notified and involved in the process?
Integrity: aim to maintain the confidentiality of student and respect the rights of all parties involved.
Diagnose the situation
Think about the ethical standards, code of conduct, and legislature, and moral principles that addresses the situation.
Consider the setting and the constitutional rights of the student and parents.
Consider the students age and developmental abilities (cognitively, socio-emotionally, and physical).
Assess the needs of the student.
Analyze all the options
Consider all potential positive and negative consequences regarding each option.
Make a choice
In making a choice, school counselor needs to consult and collaborate with other professionals and administration (if
needed).
Evaluate the course of action
How is the decided course of action best implemented?
Implement the course of action
Evaluate the outcomes regarding the course of action

Once the course of action has been implemented, all parties/stakeholders will reconvene to evaluate the outcome of
the action that has been taken.
Narrative: Per ASCA standards, school counselors are tasked with acting in an ethical manner. Therefore, it is
important for school counselors to familiarize themselves with the ethical code and a constructive method of making
ethical decisions.
References
American School Counselor Association. (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd.). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Dollarhide, C. T., & Saginak, K. A. (2012) Comprehensive school counselor programs. (2nd ed.). New York:
Pearson, Inc.
Stone, C. S. (2013). School counseling principles: Ethics and law (3rd ed.) Alexandria, VA: American School
Counselor Association.

Management

Appropriate Activities for School Counselors


The following list of activities include those deemed appropriate for the school counselors' use of time:
Providing counseling to students who experience truancy, disciplinary, academic or socioemotional issues.
Provide individual and/or small group counseling.
Serving as an advocate for students during meetings regarding IEPs, SAP and child study team, as well as team and
faculty meetings.
Creating needs assessments, analyze student data and its relationship to student behavior, achievement, etc.
Collaborating with teachers, administrators and other faculty members to develop guidance curriculums.
Analyzing student records, current grade point averages and engagement information, and their relationship to
student achievement.
Helping faculty members and administrators to identify/address student needs and coordinate guidance programs to
match these needs.
Maintain student records to meet state and federal regulations.
Interpret cognitive, aptitude and achievement tests, and explain results to students and parents via collaboration with
the school psychologist.
Collaborate with teachers to provide classroom management advice and offer input regarding student behavior and
achievement
Inappropriate Activities for School Counselors
The following list of activities include those deemed inappropriate for the school counselors use of time:
Providing long term therapy to students
Reason for inappropriate status: Our counseling model utilizes Solution- Focused Brief Therapy. Students with
intensive psychological needs will be referred to the schools SAP (Student Assistance Program) team to obtain
outside mental health resources.
Limitations of counselor role: Our school counseling team will be responsible for collaborating with the SAP team
and community resources to ensure that the needs of each student are being met. When referred to the SAP team, the
teams objectives will provide students with extended support, which may be beyond the competency and ethical
standards of the school counselor. However, the counselor will provide assistance with coordinating communication
between the team, parents/guardians and community resources.
Exceptions: The school counselor may provide counseling from the Solution-Focused Brief Therapy orientation to
students who also receive outside long term therapy services, in order to further support them while at school and
ensure their sufficient adjustment and development.
2. Teaching classes and supervising students when teachers are absent
Reason for inappropriate status: Fulfilling these duties are beyond the general training and professional development
than professional school counselors typically receive, and also have the potential to impede the counselor from
carrying out comprehensive school counseling programs.
Limitations of counselor role: Our counseling team will work closely with teachers and other educators, in order
ensure that students will be efficiently monitored and supported at all times while at school.
Exceptions: Counselors will cover classrooms when emergency/critical situations arise, in which respective teachers
are unable to do so.

3. Assisting with school wide clerical or administrative responsibilities, which comprise duties that include but are
not limited to:

Calculating grade point averages

Inputting data

Organizing new student information

Maintaining records
Reason for inappropriate status: These responsibilities are deemed inappropriate by the American School Counselor
Association (2012), and fulfilling these roles may obstruct a counselors ability to fulfill necessary duties to
effectively carry out counseling programs.
Limitations of counselor role: Our counseling team will work closely with the administration and clerical staff to
ensure that student records are consistently updated and adequately maintained.
Exceptions: Counselors may fulfill these responsibilities during critical situations in which the administrative staff
may otherwise unable, in order to safeguard the accuracy of student records.
4. Acting as a disciplinarian and assigning disciplinary referrals or punishments.
Reason for inappropriate status: Taking on disciplinary responsibilities may greatly hinder counseling relationships
with students, and will therefore be avoided by the counseling staff.
Limitations of counselor role: Counselors will directly collaborate with administration upon assigning disciplinary
referrals, and meet with students during private counseling sessions, in order to ensure the direct support of all
stakeholders.
Exceptions: The counseling staff will only be involved with disciplinary processes to provide counseling and other
support to students following disciplinary referrals.
5. Managing student IEPs, attendance review committees and student study teams.
Reason for inappropriate status: These responsibilities are defined as irresponsible by the American School
Counselor Association (2012) and often fall within the scope of training that administrators and special educators
take on, which is out of the bounds of that of the school counseling profession.
Limitations of counselor role: Counselors will collaborate with administrators and other educators to provide their
professional opinions and assistance,which will further support the students involved. However, this role will only
be collaborative rather than direct.
Exceptions: Counselors will provide counseling services to students involved with attendance issues, IEPs and study
teams, to help ensure their adequate adjustment and development in respect to their school careers.
Reference
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author.

Advisory Council
Goals and Specified Objectives
1 Ensure that the mission and vision of the school counseling program is upheld
2 Evaluate progress of set goals
3 Increase access to resources necessary to support the school counseling program
4 Review collected data and evaluate effectiveness of school counseling program
5 Strategize methods of improving the school counseling program
2 Functions
1 Provide assistance regarding:
1 Program relevance and efficacy to the needs of the school.
2 The relationship of basic skills such as problem-solving, communications,
mathematics, and employability skills and habits to job and education needs.
2 Determine community needs so that students can learn:
1 Civic duty/ citizenship
2 Exposure to experiences that will build values in the areas of multiculturalism
and broader worldviews.
3 Assist in the preparation and selection of program material to assure it meets the
needs of students and reflects industry needs.
4 Review program objectives/goals

3
4
5
6
7
8
9

5 Review present activity outlines and resources


6 Assist in identifying competencies to be taught
7 Suggest revisions or additions
Assist with program evaluation.
Provide inservice/professional development opportunities for teachers, counselors and
administrators.
Recommend and assist in obtaining resource personnel and guest speakers.
Become advocates for students.
Help plan special events:
1 Red Ribbon Week
2 Career Days
Determine data to be collected
Suggest methods of securing, collecting, assessing and evaluating data.

Members
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

One student from each grade level and diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds (3)
One parent/guardian from each grade level and diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds (3)
Principal (1)
One school counselor representative from Maura J. Francis Middle School (1)*
One Philadelphia public high school counselor (1)
One middle school counselor from another school in the district (1)
Community members: Pastor, Business Owner, Non-Profit Organization Community Member
(from Goodwill, YMCA or United Way) (3)
8 Advisors from Post-Secondary Institutions (i.e., Community College of Philadelphia and Temple
University) (2)
9 One professional from the Mayor of Philadelphias Office of Education (1)
10 School Social Worker (1)
11 School nurse (1)
*Chairperson
Terms of Membership
The membership status and terms of each individual will be staggered in order to have professionals who are
experienced and new to the council serving each year. Meaning, each member will serve a term of 3 years after
being appointed, with 6 people entering and leaving the council at the beginning of each school year. Appointments
can be made by anyone on the council and will be officially offered after collaboration with all members. Appointed
individuals will receive a letter by mail detailing the purpose of the council and the time commitment required after
being appointed by the group, who will then invite them to interview for the position. Following an executive
session with all members to discuss the interview, an official offer will be made and candidates will have two weeks
to accept.
Meetings
The advisory council will meet three times per year. The first will be held at the beginning of the school year
(August) to prepare for the new school year. The second meeting will take place at the midpoint of of the school
year (January/February), in order to assess the mid-year progress of the the program. However, the final meeting
will take place at the end of the school year (June) to evaluate the entire programs effectiveness and create new
goals for the following year. As Maura J. Francis Middle School has a diverse student population, our advisory
council will reflect the diversity of our student population.
1 Minutes
1 Minutes will be documented at each meeting. This information will report the topics
discussed at each meeting, how this information was received by other members and the
accomplishments made. The minutes of previous meetings will be sent to each member
one week prior to subsequent meetings, and reviewed and voted on at each meeting. The
minute reports will also be made available to students, parents, counselors, faculty,
administration and community members upon request.
Narrative: The input of the Advisory Council will directly guide the management and delivery of the school
counseling program. The council is made up of several stakeholders from the administration, community, student
body and counseling staff, which will provide diverse and objective input into the effective implementation of our
school counseling program.At counseling department meetings, the minutes of each Advisory Council meeting will
be discussed and methods of carrying out the input provided will be delineated from the perspective of each

counselor. The duties of the council members will include scheduling and planning of special events and analyzing
the program's data. Ultimately, the purpose of the advisory council is to improve and direct the counseling
department.

Sample August Agenda


Objectives:
I. Call to order.
1 Identify council members,
2 Introduce program, goals and ASCA National Model, data
3 Plan counseling goals for school year
II. Attendance.
III. Introduction of each council member.IV. Introduction of the counseling program and purpose of the advisory
council.
1 a. Brief introduction of employed school counselors.
V. Introduction of the ASCA National Model
1 a. What is ASCA?
2 b. What is the ASCA National Model?
3 c. What is RAMP?
4 d. Process of the RAMP Application
5 e. ASCA & the Maura J. Francis Comprehensive School Counseling Program
VI. Review of Data from 2014-2015 School YearVII. Goals setting for 2015-2016 School Year
1 a.Identify gaps
2 b.Assess needs for new school year
3 c. Review program effectiveness
VIII. Assess opportunities for community engagement to provide students, teachers and administrators the
opportunity to exercise civic duty.IX. Date/Time of January Meeting
1 a. Community service
2 b. Post-secondary exposure
3 c. Community days
4 d. Field trips
X. Adjourn
Sample January/February Agenda
Objectives:
I. Call to Order
1 Assess data shifts/identify newfound needs
2 Assess program effectiveness
II. Attendance
III. Review of minutes of August Meeting
1 a.Voting
IV. Review goals of school year.V. Brainstorm new programs/activities to take place at second half of school year.
1 a.Review how goals are being met at half-year point
2 b.Identify any newfound gaps
3 c.Brainstorm how gaps can be filled during second half of school year.
VI. Assess how civic engagement opportunities are being met.
VII. Other BusinessVIII. Date/Time of June Meeting
1 As deemed necessary by council members.
IX. Adjourn
Sample June Agenda
Objectives:I. Call to Order
1 Assess effectiveness of program for entire year
2 Assess gaps in data, newfound needs
3 Identify potential needs for following school year
II. Attendance
III. Review of minutes
1 a.Voting
IV. Review data of 2015-2016 school year

1 a.Assess effectiveness of programs/interventions


2 b.Identify gaps
V. Determine potential needs of 2016-2017 school year
1 a.Brainstorm potential goals and programs
VI. Assess civic engagement of students, faculty and administrators
VII. Acknowledgement of retiring council members
1 a.Identify new opportunities
VIII. Other BusinessIX. Date/Time of August Meeting
1 As deemed necessary by council members.
VIIII. Adjourn
References
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Idaho Division of Professional-Technical Education. (2010). School counseling program handbook. Retrieved from
http://www.pte.idaho.gov/pdf/career_guidance/counselor_advisory_handbook.pdf__
Summerville High School. (2011). Summerville High School Advisory Council Meeting Agenda. Retrieved from
http://dorchester.shs.schoolfusion.us/modules/groups/homepagefiles/cms/754112/File/Guidance%20files/6g.
%20advisory%20council%20agenda.pdf
Annual Agreement
Narrative: The Annual Agreement was developed to outline both the organization and focus of the school
counseling program at Maura J. Francis Middle School. The Annual Agreement was created and reviewed by Ms.
Francis, Mrs. Henninger, Ms. Jones, Ms. Witt, and the school principal. The principal and all four school counselors
signed the agreement on 9/18/2015. The Annual Agreement describes the time spent on direct and indirect services,
the program's goals, the documents that have been developed for the school counseling program, the meeting dates
of the advisory council, and the frequency of professional collaboration meetings throughout the year. The annual
agreement also outlines the office organization and counselor availability of the school counseling office. This
annual agreement is helpful because this specific information educates the principal about the activities, roles, and
duties of the school counselor throughout the year.

AnnualAgreement-signed.pdf
DetailsDownload732 KB
Needs Assessments
Student Needs Assessment
http://tinyurl.com/ob42mqx
Parent Needs Assessment
https://qtrial2015q4az1.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0k20le7r9H6X99H
Teacher Needs Assessment
https://az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/preview/SV_6tWz5rcYpTHKSwJ
*Needs assessments were developed by the school counseling team of Maura J. Francis Middle School
Calendars
Narrative: For our comprehensive school counseling program, we included examples of two weekly calendars for
each counselor, a monthly calendar, and an annual calendar. Based on our weekly calendars, 73.54% of our time is
shown providing direct services to students. Delivering guidance lessons is our second biggest facet of direct
services that we provide to students. Other direct services that appear on our calendar include individual student
planning, with the purpose of helping students plan, monitor, and manage their own learning as well as to achieve
academic, career, and personal/social competencies aligned with the school counseling core curriculum (ASCA,
2012, p. 85). Responsive services are an important part of the school counselors responsibilities and represents the

biggest part of what we do as school counselors. These responsive services include individual and group counseling
that is brief and focused on meeting the goals of students. The groups specifically conducted for the weeks evaluated
is aimed at improving student behavior, which in turn affects our safety and behavioral referrals. Individual
counseling was provided to help student address the issues they are confronted with, which act as obstacles to their
success at school. As previously noted working as a team within the school community is important, which requires
our time being spent supporting the vision of our school, which is aligned with our vision and goals as a school
counseling department. This involves activities such as collaboration, consultation, parent meetings, etc. This
represents 15.32% of our time, which is comparable to the 20% goal we as a department set out to achieve. An
analysis of the use of time represented by our calendars can be reviewed within the "Use of Time" section within the
"Accountability" tab.
Sample Weekly Calendars
Miss Laura Witt

Laura Sample Weekly Calendar 1 - Sheet1.pdf


DetailsDownload140 KB

Laura Sample Weekly Calendar 2 - Sheet1 final.pdf


DetailsDownload134 KB
Sample Monthly Calendar

Sample Monthly Calendar - Sheet1.pdf


DetailsDownload67 KB
Sample Annual Calendar

Sample Master Calendar - Sheet1.pdf


DetailsDownload62 KB
Small Group Action Plans
Please refer to the "Group Counseling Program Curriculums" page located on the right hand side or click the link
provided below to review the Small Group Lesson Plans.
Group Counseling Program Curriculums
Grab Bag Small-Group Action Plan

Grab Bag Small-Group Action Plan.docx


DetailsDownload233 KB
Student Success Skills Small-Group Action Plan

Small-GroupActionPlan- Student Success Skills final.pdf


DetailsDownload391 KB
Girl's Group Small-Group Action Plan

Small-GroupActionPlan- Girls Group final.pdf


DetailsDownload301 KB
Anti-Bullying Small-Group Action Plan

Anti-Bullying Small-Group Action Plan.docx


DetailsDownload231 KB
Core Curriculum Action Plans
Academic Domain Goals
Math PSSA Goal Action Plan

Math PSSA Goal Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload261 KB
Reading PSSA Goal Action Plan

Reading PSSA Goal Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload261 KB
Homework PSSA Goal Action Plan

Homework Completion Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload249 KB
Career Domain Goals
Career Interests, Abilities Goal Action Plan

Career Interests, Abilities Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload244 KB
Extracurricular Goal Action Plan

Extracurricular Goal Action Plan .pdf


DetailsDownload57 KB
School Subjects and Work World Action Plan

School Subjects & World of Work Action Plan -Final.docx


DetailsDownload241 KB
Personal/Social Domain Goals
Attendance Referrals Action Plan

Attendance Referrals Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload234 KB
Behavioral Referrals Action Plan

Behavioral Referral Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload245 KB
Safety Referrals Action Plan

Safety Referrals Action Plan-Final.docx


DetailsDownload244 KB

Closing-the-Gap Action Plans


Closing-the-Gap Action Plan- Discipline

Closing-the-GapActionPlan Discipline.pdf
DetailsDownload259 KB

School_Climate_Bullying_Survey_Description_for_Distribution_5-22-12.pdf
DetailsDownload31 KB

Closing-the-GapActionPlan-Attendance.pdf
DetailsDownload57 KB

Truancy_BEC.pdf
DetailsDownload11 KB
References
Cornell, D. (2012). The school climate bullying survey: Description and research summary. Retrieved
from http://antibullyingsoftware.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/06/School_Climate_Bullying_Survey_Description_for_Distribution_5-22-12.pdf
Crocker Flerx, V., Limber, Mullin, S., Riese, J., Snyder, M., & Olweus, D. (2009). Class Meetings that Matter:A
Year's Worth of Resources for Grades 6-8. Center City, MN: Hazelden.Retrieved from
file:///C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/OLWEUS%20Trust%20Lesson%20Pg%20125%20(1).pdf
Pennsylvania Council of Children, Youth, and Family Services. (2015). Truancy elimination plan. Retrieved from
http://www.pccyfs.org/practice_resources/Truancy_BEC.pdf
The Southern Poverty Law Center and the Study Circles Resource Center. (2005). Mix It Up: Activity Booklet for
the Middle and Upper Grades.Retrieved from
http://worldroom.tamu.edu/Workshops/CommOfRespect07/CurriculumGuides/Mix%20It%20Up%20Activity
%20Planner%20Upper%20Grades.pdf
Delivery
The guidance curriculum of Maura J. Francis Middle School will serve as a psychoeducational and developmentally
responsive plan through a means of individual planning, responsive services and prevention.
The Developmental Guidance and Counseling Model closely matches the philosophy of the program, which
encourages the growth of developmentally appropriate skills to personal and academic success through building
positive attitudes about self and school and presenting students with the resources necessary to do so. The primary
modalities of this school counseling within this framework include, individual counseling, small group counseling,
classroom guidance, consultation, coordination and peer facilitation (Dollarhide & Saginak, 2012, p. 89).
Reference
Dollarhide, C. T., & Saginak, K. A. (2012). Comprehensive school counseling programs. (2nd ed.). New York:
Pearson, Inc.

Commercially Successful Programs


The following is an analysis of several commercially success evidence-based programs, whose advantages and
drawbacks have been analyzed by the Counseling Department at Maura J. Francis Middle School, in order to reflect
upon their potential utility.
Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
Pros
Has proven to elicits long term change that creates
safe school environments.

Cons
Websites promote webinars and online courses, which gives
off the impression that the program requires a great deal of training
from stakeholders.

Designed for grades K-12.

Program highly focused on personal/social domain of the


ASCA National Model, lacks emphasis on academic and career domains.
The bulk of the research surrounding this program seems to focus
on elementary and middle school students, which may lack clear
validity from an entire K-12 perspective.

Has been found to improve bullying behaviors,


improve school climate and reduce antisocial
behaviors (i.e., truancy, vandalism, etc.).
Studies in Pennsylvania: 12 elementary schools in
Philadelphia experienced reduced rates of observed
bullying behaviors at lunch and recess. 72,000
students in grades 3-11 at 214 schools in the
commonwealth of PA experienced positive effects in
reports of victims and perpetrators of bullying.
Program effects have proven to be more substantial
the longer program had been put in place
Also focuses on dating violence and suicide issues.
Has been researched for over 35 years.
Student Success Skills
Pros
Proven to elicit academic engagement, high levels of
academic success and connectedness to school

Multi-tiered RTI aligned program

Cons
Not directly focused on enhancing career domains of t
he ASCA National Model.
Enhances academic and professional domains,
which influences career success. However, the program
is not directly focused on this domain.
Site promotes counselor/teacher training, may be highly
demanding

Proven effective for grades K-12.


Ready to Learn (K-1st)
Ready for Success (2nd-3rd)
Student Skills (4th-12th)
Second Step
Pros
Instills socioemotional skills in elementary and middle school
Elementary school skills- making friends, emotional
management, problem solving
Middle school skills- communication skills, coping skills,
decision making skills
Program has been highly researched to validly prove these
results.
Program provides student assessments, which makes it more
simplistic to evaluate results.
Crosswalk Evaluations of Commercially Successful Programs
Student Success Skills

Student Success Skills Crosswalk.pdf


DetailsDownload3 MB
Second Step

Cons
Program only focuses on elementary and middle school
Lacks K-12 perspective

Requires staff training


May provide time constraints.
Teachers must be consistent when facilitating
these interventions
Limited to two languages
Lacks comprehensive multicultural approach

Second Step ASCA Curriculum Crosswalking Tool.pdf


DetailsDownload2 MB
Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Crosswalk.pdf


DetailsDownload2 MB
We will utilize Student Success Skills and the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program throughout our program
as Tier 2 and Tier 1 interventions.
References
Clemson University. (2015). Olweus bullying prevention program. Retrieved from
https://www.clemson.edu/olweus/
Espelage, D.L., Low, S., Polanin, J.R., & Brown, E.C. (2013). The impact of a middle
school program to reduce aggression, victimization, and sexual violence. Journal of Adolescent Health, 53, 180-186.
Committee for Children. (2015). Second step. Retrieved from http://www.cfchildren.org
Hazelden Foundation. (2015). Olweus bullying prevention program. Retrieved from
http://www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/olweus_bullying_prevention_program.page
Student Success Skills. (n.d.)Student success skills. Retrieved from http://studentsuccessskills.com
Webb, L. D., & Brigman, G. A. (2006). Student success skills: Tools and strategies for improved academic and
social outcomes. Professional School Counseling, 10(2), 112-120.
Research Comparing Commercially Available Programs
Research has demonstrated the following programs are related to positive outcomes: Student Success Skills and
Second Step. The first program, Student Success Skills, is a counselor led intervention program. Recent evidence
has shown that the Student Success Skills Program has positive impacts on students academic achievement and
social competence. There are different versions of The Student Success Skills Program that correspond to different
age levels. For example, Student Success Skills is designed for students in 4th through 12th grade, but Ready for
Learn (K-1st) and Ready for Success (2nd 3rd) are other program branches.
The program is designed to be administered through classroom guidance lessons. If students need additional help
after the classroom guidance lessons, they can participate in a group counseling component. A sample classroom
guidance lesson or small counseling group lesson has a beginning, middle, and end of lesson model structure (Webb
& Brigman, 2006), each section adding up to a total of 45 minutes. There is a total of 8 sessions in counseling small
group, followed by 4 booster sessions that occur once a month (Villares, Lemberger, Brigman, & Webb, 2011).
For the classroom guidance, there is a total of 5 lessons and 4 "booster" sessions (Webb & Brigman, 2006).
An underlying principle of Student Success Skills is students can be taught learning, social, and self-management
skills. The skill areas include: 1. Goal reporting, progress monitoring, success sharing, and goal setting, 2. Creating a
caring, supportive, and encouraging classroom community, 3. Cognitive and memory skills, 4. Performing under
pressure managing test anxiety, and 5. Building healthy optimism (Webb & Brigman, 2006).
Various research studies demonstrated the positive student outcomes that were associated with Student Success
Skills. Lemberger et al. (2015) implemented the Student Success Skills Program in a low socioeconomic middle

school with Hispanic students. The outcomes demonstrated increases in academic achievement on mathematics and
reading standardized tests. In addition, Lemberger and Clemens (2012) researched the effectiveness of the Student
Success Skills Program with 53 inner-city, 4th- and 5th-grade African American students. Students who participated
in the program experienced an increase in their metacognitive skill and feelings of connectedness to school in
comparison to those in the control group. In addition, the students in the Student Success Skills program achieved
higher post-test change scores on particular executive functioning subscale items. This result was reported by their
classroom teachers (Lemberger & Clemens, 2012).
A last research study that supports positive outcomes of Student Success Skills is reviewing the performance of fifth
of sixth grade students that participated in the program (Webb, Brigman, & Campbell, 2005). In comparison to the
control group, the Student Success Skills students had significantly higher math and reading scores on the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment Test. In addition, Webb, Brigman, & Campbell (2005) reported positive personal/social
outcomes. Teachers assessed the students academic, social, and self-management skills as it related to school
success. The teachers reported a 72 % improvement of the students that participated in the program.
The goal of the second program, Second Step, is to teach middle school students communication, coping, and
decision making skills that help protect the students against peer pressure, aggression, substance abuse, and online
and in-person bullying (Committee for Children, 2015). The Second Step Program is designed for students in
Kindergarten through 8th grade. There are different lessons themes for students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade. The
classroom lessons aim to address the following protective factors and risk factors. The protective factors include
social skills, school connectedness, and adoption of conventional norms about substance abuse. The risk factors
include inappropriate classroom behavior, such as aggression and impulsivity, favorable attitudes toward problem
behaviors, such as violence or substance abuse, friendships with others who engage in a problem behavior, early
initiation of a problem behavior, peer rewards for antisocial behavior, peer rejection, and impulsiveness. To facilitate
these factors, Second Step has lessons that discuss the following themes: 1. empathy and communication, 2. bullying
prevention, 3. emotion management, 4. problem solving, decision making, and goal setting, and 5. substance abuse
prevention. (Committee for Children, 2008).
Sullivan et al. (2015) researched the effectiveness of Second Step of 457 sixth grade students. Those who with a
learning, cognitive, or behavioral disability who participated in the program experienced lower levels of relational
victimization than the control group. Those without disabilities who participated in the program had an even greater
decrease in overt aggression. Therefore, there were positive outcomes for students with and without disabilities.
Espelage et al. (2015) researched the impact of Second Step on middle school students from 36 schools. There were
a total of 3,658 students that participated in the study from the 6th and 7th grade. The results revealed that students
who participated in the intervention were 56 % less likely to participate in name calling victimization (as measured
by self-report). In addition, 39 % of the students were less likely to self-report participating in sexual violence
(Espelage, et al. 2015).
Although the goal of these two programs may be different, both of them aim to help the students succeed in school.
Depending on the needs of the students and within the school, these two evidence based research programs may be
helpful. The Maura J. Francis program assessed that the Student Success Skills Program is helpful to serve the needs
of our students, and more specific lessons plans for this program can be viewed underneath the "Group Counseling
Program Curriculums" page or by clicking on the following link: Group Counseling Program Curriculums.
References
Committee for Children (2008). Second step middle school complete review of research. Retrieved from
http://www.cfchildren.org/Portals/1/SS_MS/MS_DOC/MS_Review_Research_SS.pdf
Committee for Children (2014). Lesson Scope and Sequence (EL-8). Retrieved from
http://www.cfchildren.org/second-step
Committee for Children (2015). Second step middle school (grades 6-8) respectful, self-motivated, prepared to
succeed. Retrieved from
http://www.cfchildren.org/second-step/middle-school

Espelage, D. L., Low, S., Polanin, J. R., Brown, E. C. (2015). Clinical trial of Second Step middle-school program:
Impact on aggression & victimization. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 37, 52-63.
Lemberger, M. E. & Clemens, E. V. (2012, October). Connectedness and self-regulation as constructs of the student
success skills program in inner-city African American elementary school students. Journal of Counseling &
Department, 90(4), 450-458.
Sullivan, T. N., Sutherland, K. S., Farrell, A. D., & Taylor, K. A. (2015, October). An evaluation of second step:
What are the benefits for youth with and without disabilities? Remedial and Special Education, 36(5) 286-298.
Villares, E., Lemberger, M., Brigman, G., & Webb, L. (2011). Student success skills: An evidence-based school
counseling program grounded in humanistic theory. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, 50, 42-55.
Webb, L. D. & Brigman, G. A. (2006, December). Student success skills: Tools and strategies for improved
academic and social outcomes. Professional School Counseling, 10(2).
Webb, L. D., Brigman, G. A., Campbell, C. (2005, June). Linking school counselors and student success: A
replication of the student success skills approach targeting the academic social competence of student. Professional
School Counseling, 8(5).

Available Middle School Curricula


Gwinnett County Public Schools
Pros
Provides transition programs, which may provide students both
academic and personal support upon transitioning to new middle
school environments.
Programs and services have proven to better school
environments.
Focuses on portfolio development, which provides students with
assistance with post-secondary application and selection.

Cons
The counseling website makes no mention to ASCA
or any national standards, which provides doubts for the
comprehensiveness of the program
The counseling website also does not mention the use
of commercially successful programs.

Newberg County Public Schools


Pros
Cons
Emphasizes district wide comprehensiveness within the
The information provided regarding the comprehensiveness
counseling programs.
of the school counseling programs is not specific to each
development level (i.e., elementary, middle, high school)
Focuses on students fostering strong community involvement.
Counseling website seems to lack focus on academic
development.
Focuses on career and personal domains
The counseling website also seems focused on curriculum
involving alcohol and drug education, which many may lack.
Springfield Public Schools
Pros
Programs closely align with
ASCAs Standards
Provides a focus on
workshops and seminars.

Cons
The comprehensive elements within each program seem to encompass the
counseling programs from K-12 rather than specifically focusing on comprehensively
serving a particular grade level.
The programs may not explicitly emphasize the ASCA National Model, yet their
facilitation seems to exemplify each domain
References

Gwinnett County Public Schools. (n.d.). Middle school counseling. Retrieved

http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/advcounselweb.nsf/pages/MSCounseling
Newberg Public Schools. (2011). Newberg public schools K-12 guidance and counseling programs. Retrieved
http://www.newberg.k12.or.us/sites/default/files/fileattachments/district/page/3753
Springfield Public Schools. (2009). Comprehensive school counseling program guide. Retrieved
https://www.springfieldpublicschools.com/sites/default/files/comprehensive_school_counseling_program_guide_ap
pendix.pdf
Counselors will work alongside teachers, administrators and other counselors to develop comprehensive programs
that are representative of ASCAs themes, and objectively focus on the needs and developmental levels of students.
At the middle school level, it is essential for parents to have open communication with school personnel. Through
this, workshops will be held in order to educate and support parents, while also relaying important information
regarding school climate and student developmental concerns.
The students of Maura J. Francis Middle School will be effectively service by the comprehensive counseling
program through both direct and indirect modalities of service. However, at least 80% of each counselor's time will
be spent in direct service of students. The method delivery will be determined through the use of school profile and
the particularly issues within this data set.
Service Delivery Breakdown
Recipient

Item

Elements

Direct student services

Curriculum
-Instruction
-Group activities

All students

Interactions include:
-Large group
-Classroom
-Small group
-Individual

All students

Interactions with others

Individual student planning


-appraisal
-advisement

Indirect student services

Responsive Services
-Counseling
-Crisis Response
-Referrals
-Consultation
-Collaboration

Methods

Direct Student Services


School Counseling Core Curriculum Delivery Services

Instruction- The counseling department at Maura J. Francis Middle School will provide direct instruction of
classroom guidance lessons that aim to inspire the academic, personal and career development of sixth, seventh and
eighth grade students. As a part of the programs core curriculum, the lessons will closely align with the programs
goals and the ASCA Standards that provide its foundation. Each lesson will take place during one period of English
and Social Studies courses for all grade levels, in order to ensure that each student is exposed to its instruction.
Effectively facilitating these lessons to the general student population will provide the counseling department with a
Tier 1 intervention that directly meets its essential objectives.

Core Curriculum ASCA Crosswalk.xlsx


DetailsDownload17 KB
ASCA Standards retrieved from, American School Counselor Association (n.d.)
Group activities- Group activities that are planned by the counseling staff will take place several times throughout
the school year. These include Career Day, Red Ribbon Week, No Name Calling Week and the Eighth Grade

Transition Program. All of these programs will be provided as Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions that are directed at
meeting the goals that drive the entire program and elicit the development of student across academic, career and
personal/social domains.
Individual Student Planning
School counselors will develop holistic activities that help the middle school students develop goals begin to plan
their future as they move on to the high school level and beyond. This is known as advisement. School counselors
will individualize their interactions with the students based on the students needs. School counselors will help each
student prepare to manage and build the skills to help them succeed in academic, career, and personal/social
domains. Appraisal is helpful in this endeavor by assisting the students to evaluate their own skills, interests,
abilities, and achievement in various domains.
The key to being successful at creating individual plans for each student is to incorporate time into the schedule in
order to meet with each student. See calendar example for In the calendar, it will be necessary to block out sections
of time and create a plan on how many students you would like to meet with during that time. The plan will most
likely be fairly organized and developed by that time, but the counselor will ensure that there have been no
significant or new changes that need to be addressed.
Before the meeting, the school counselor should interpret any assessment scores that the students have received and
check their grades. The school counselor should also examine any academic and behavior plans that are in place.
The school counselor can also look at the students progress in these plans. During the meeting, the counselor can
help the student either recreate, refine, or review the academic courses that he or she will be taking during that time
period. Since the student is in middle school, the school counselor can also begin preparing students to think about
what classes they would like to take when they enter high school.
Stakeholders can assist in the planning process. By obtaining information about the students both in the classroom
and at home, the school counselor can learn a lot more about the students functioning. In addition, having parents
and other stakeholders involved in the individual planning process will help everyone to be on the same page to try
and promote the students success in and out of school. Standardized tests, interest inventories, and other
information sources can help direct the school counselor and the students discussions and assist in the planning
process.

Appraisal- Career and interest inventories will be used in several guidance lesson that target development across
ASCAs career domain. As these inventories drive individual planning services, counselors will also meet privately
with students to discus the results of these inventories and how they will apply to life post-high school graduation.
Pennsylvania Career Education and Work Standards require students to have career programs beginning in eighth
grade, and these inventories will provide an establishment of this portfolio. Assessments done by the school
psychologist will be performed in conjunction with the services of the counseling staff, who will work with students
and parents to convey test results that guide their entrance to gifted or learning support services. As these programs
so heavily foster both personal and academic development, counseling services will provide further support that
inspires the growth of both of these domains.

Advisement- Students will have at least one meeting with their designated school counselorduring the school year to
discuss the status of their grades, personal develop, current needs and career plans. This will allow counselors to
both provide direct services to students and also assist them in making plans that will guide their future.
Responsive Services

Counseling- Due to the specific developmental needs of middle school students, individual counseling and group
counseling will be an effective intervention facilitated by school counselors. In addition to classroom lessons, group
and individual counseling are effective strategies to help establish and build positive personal/social, career, and
academic attitudes, behaviors, and skills. In terms of the degree, small group and individual counseling should be
provided on an as-needed basis to students that demonstrate they require some additional help in particular
developmental areas.

Group Curriculum ASCA Crosswalk.xlsx


DetailsDownload17 KB
ASCA Standards, retrieved from American School Counselor Association (n.d.)
Six scenarios that a school counselor should not provide individual counseling include but are not limited to:
1. The student needs counseling on whether or not to have an abortion
2. The student with a mental health diagnosis that requires intense mental health counseling services that would
require multiple sessions a week
3. Dual relationships with the student that would impact the counseling process
4. The student is threatening the school counselor.
5. The student needs counseling on a topic that is outside of the knowledge base on the school counselor
6. If the student has experienced a great degree of trauma that inhibits his daily mental health functioning
Crisis Response- The school counseling department will provide direct services to students to guide crisis situations.
The occurrence of these situations will take top priority over any other counseling services, and counselors will
immediately clear their daily calendars in order to respond. During crises, counselors will provide responsive
services, advisement, referrals, consultation and counseling services in order to meet the immediate needs of
students. Such situations can include but are not limited to death, suicidal ideation, trauma and community, national
and international events. The school counseling department will follow Maura J. Francis Middle School's crisis plan
protocol.
Modeled from the PA Companion Guide, the Maura J. Francis school counseling team developed the following chart
that organizes the different services provided through our program.

Students Served

All students

Intervention
Intervention is a "safety net" that
ensures all students meet the standards
within the school. The intervention is
usually implemented to meet needs of
students that are identified throughout
the year.
Referred students

Delivery Setting

Classroom or Large group

Small group, Individual, Consultation

Academic Domain
Examples

Time Management Lesson


(Tier 1-6th, 7th, and 8th
grade students)
Career Portfolio Lesson
(Tier 1-6th, 7th, and 8th
grade)
Safe & Healthy
Relationships Lessons (6th,
7th, and 8th grade)

Student Success Skills (Tier 2- 8-9


students in 6th, 7th, & 8th grade
students)

Definition

Career Domain
Examples
Personal/Social
Domain Examples

Prevention
The purpose of prevention
is to help all students meet
standards within the school.

Responsive Services
The purpose of responsive services
are to meet the specific and
immediate needs of students.

Students that are in crisis or need


individualized help
Small group, individual, consultation,
referral
Testing accommodations for
students
Being a career mentor to students

"Girl's Group" Small Group (8-9 girls


in the 6th grade)

SAP referral

References
American School Counselor Association. (n.d.). ASCA national standards: Developmental crosswalk tool. Retrieved
from https://www.nd.gov/dpi/uploads/193/ASCA_dev_crsswlk.pdf
Pennsylvania School Counselors Association (2011). Pennsylvania Companion Guide to the ASCA National Model:
A Framework for School Counseling Programs. Harrisburg, PA: Author.
Pennsylvania Companion Guide.

Indirect Services
Referrals- If a student has a need that the school counselor is not able to address or is beyond the school counselors
competence, referral is a great option. The student should be briefed on why the referral is happening to decrease the

perception of abandonment by the school counselor. They should also understand that the school counselor is still
available if needed. However, if the school counselor can consult and collaborate with another professional and
competently provide a service, the school counselor should continue providing that service. For example, a school
counselor cannot send a referral to another school counselor if he/she just doesnt feel like dealing with the student.
As competent school counselors it is our responsibility to make appropriate and unbiased decisions. If the school
counselor cannot embody the role of the expert, it is ultimately in the best interest of both the student and the school
counselor to refer out, and should be done when necessary. In the event a school counselor needs to refer out, a list
of resources is provided in the "Referral Resource" page.

Consultation- The role of the middle school counselor is to consult other stakeholders within the school (i.e.
teachers, administrators, parents, school psychologists, school-based therapists, community agencies, and students to
provide effective, competent, and developmentally appropriate services to our students. In addition, the school
counselor is able to serve as a great resource and consultant to others in the school due to their expertise in
child/adolescent behavior, cognitive development, and attitudes. Another role of consultation is the case of solving
ethical dilemmas. It is vital that school counselors not only use the ethical problem solving model, but also to
consult with colleagues and administration to address ethical issues. Consultation ensures we are utilizing evidencebased practices and acting in a ethical manner.

Collaboration- In order to meet the holistic and systemic needs of all students, school counselors will collaborate
with all community stakeholders. Collaboration with these stakeholders will serve to establish and build the
relationship between Maura J. Francis Middle School and the community to ensure referral sources for parent to
these community agencies. These referrals pertain to meeting the mental health needs of the student and their
families. Collaboration also includes communication between the counseling department and the advisory counsel.
At least one counselor from the department will also serve on the departments Advisory Council, which will direct
the mission and vision of the counseling program. This individual will serve as a liaison between the counseling
department and advisory council, in order to guarantee a positive and open communicative relationship between all
parties.
Reference
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author.
Potential Barriers to Delivery
Systemic barriers can greatly impede the progress, delivery, management and effectiveness of comprehensive school
counseling programs. However, the counselors of Maura J. Francis Middle School have reflected upon the barriers
that may affect their program in order to remain cognizant in avoiding them.
One barrier that might prevent a counselor from being able to implement the desired degree of intervention is time.
School counselors are often given various non-school counseling activities that interfere with their ability to conduct
basic, desired, and often necessary school counseling duties. Therefore, facilitating a conversation with an
administrator and explaining how your time can be better spent doing other activities may alleviate some of the time
concerns.
A second barrier is the lack of support from other stakeholders within the school. This also interferes with the degree
of school counseling interventions. One method to help overcome this issue is to present data on the positive
outcomes of the interventions that you plan on doing with the students. This may increase the willingness of teachers
and administrators to cooperate with you and your activities.
A third barrier is a large caseload. This often inhibits a school counselors ability to adequately address the needs of
all students. Unfortunately, identifying a way to overcome this barrier is not as easy. An obvious method would be to
hire another counselor. However, this is not always possible. Therefore, one way to overcome this barrier is to
address the first two possible barriers. If a school counselor is given very few non-school counseling related duties
and has cooperative stakeholders, they could manage the larger number of students more effectively. Conversations
with administration and data supporting low caseloads may also bring a greater degree of awareness to this issue,
which ultimately is a step closer to solving the problem.

System Support
Opportunities for Professional Development
The school counselors at Maura J. Francis Middle School strive for continuing education
opportunities. Through research, courses, local, and national conferences, the school counseling
team incorporates current knowledge of the field of school counseling into our daily practices.
Community Involvement
School counselors are dedicated to awareness of the local communities, referral agencies,
outreach programs, businesses, employment opportunities, higher education, and opportunities
that will foster student growth and development in the academic, social/ emotional, and career
domains.
Research/Data Analysis
An essential component of the school counseling department of Maura J. Francis Middle
School is the implementation of practices that are evidence-based. Through data collection and
analysis, the school counseling curriculum and responsive services are designed to best fulfill the
needs of the students and the school community.
Collaboration and Consultation
The school counseling team of Maura J. Francis Middle School are committed to
opportunities to collaborate, partner, and consult with knowledgeable sources and contributors to
the healthy development of the school community. The school counselors work with parents, guardians, community
members, teachers, and members of the advisory council to make important contributions to the school system.
Program Management
This is inclusive of all planning and management relevant to the structure of the school
counseling program.
Types of system support that lend to the success of school counseling programs focus on professional development,
consultation and collaboration, and data analysis as predominant features. Professional development is an integral
component of sustaining effective counselors with the more up to date knowledge of field related research as well as
trends in education and student development. Consultation and collaboration are essential to implementing a team
approach to the delivery of a comprehensive school counseling curriculum. Programs that are data driven highlight
the effectiveness of curriculum and interventions while targeting needs that arise within the school community.
Who is important to include (e.g, school counseling interns, parent volunteers, etc.)?
When conceptualizing system support, the number of resources utilized should not be limited to those within the
school setting. Reaching out to parents, guardians, community members with a vested interest in the school
community, local professionals, and students and faculty of higher education establishments establishes a strong
level of system support.
What needs could you see being met by the various groups in this category?
An effective school counseling program relies on resources supplemented by the school community. In terms of
student growth, local business professionals and those in higher education contribute to the opportunities for
enhanced career development. Parent/Guardian involvement is optimal when considering the holistic experience of
the students of Maura J. Francis Middle School. The interconnectedness between the school and local community
grants students an opportunity to be contributors to society while the community, in turn, supports the psychological,
sociological, and educational growth of the students.
Reference
Williamston Middle School (2015). System support. Retrieved from
http://williamston.mi.schoolwebpages.com/education/components/scrapbook/default.php?sectio
detailid=16609&

Accountability
School Counseling Program Assessment

The School Counseling Program Assessment indicated several strengths and weaknesses that are held by the
counseling program at Maura J. Francis Middle School. These implications not only exemplify various significant
components of the program, but also demonstrate goals to move toward and areas to be considered for professional
development opportunities.
Major Strengths of the Program
A prominent strength of the program is its reliance on School Profile Data, as well as process, perception and
outcome data. This focus on data allows the program to benefit all students and also provides support for the Tier 1,
Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions utilized. In essence, the strong sense of accountability within the program's
foundation validates the role of the school counselor, as well as the usefulness of the program overall.
Program Areas in Need of Strengthening
Some areas within the program's management and accountability indicate areas that are in need of development. For
instance, at this point the Use-of-Time Assessments for individual counselors are only conducted at one point
throughout the school year. However, it seems that in order to increase the effectiveness of the program, this
assessment could be completed two or more times per year.Currently, there is also only one general Annual
Agreement put in place by the school counseling program. This indicates another area of the program that could be
better developed, as having an agreement that is specific to each counselor could more closely align the goals of the
program with that of each professional, and also open more direct communication between counselors and
administrators.
Short-Range Goals for Improvement
The results of the program assessment also imply several short-range goals that would immediately improve the
program. For instance, as Use-of-Time Assessments are currently only conducted once per year, during the
following school year, the counselors at Maura J. Francis Middle School could reflect on these assessment 2-3 times
in order to ensure that their use of time is efficiently benefiting all students and stakeholders. At the beginning of the
2016-2017 school year, the counseling department and administrators could also work closely in order to develop
more effective and specific Annual Agreements. This would ensure open and direct communication between all
administrators and counselors, as well as closely align counselors with their important responsibilities to students.
Long Range Goals for Improvement
The School Counseling Program Assessment also indicated that presently, the counseling department closely
scrutinizes current data to develop program goals. However, the program is also in the process of utilizing this
information to understand implications over time. It seems that by setting long range goals to do so, counselors
could also be led to solidify future or long term objectives.
Areas to Consider to Professional Development Though school counseling competencies and the ethical standards
of ASCA have both been closely studied and upheld by the counseling program staff, it seems that review of these
important ideologies would only benefit the practice of the school counselors and in turn advance the progress of the
department. Therefore, both of these areas may be important considerations for professional development
opportunities, which could greatly enhance the program's success and service to stakeholders.

Maura J. Francis School Counseling Program Assessment.xls


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*This assessment will be updated annually in order to appraise the development of the counseling program.
Program Evaluation Reflection
Throughout the 2015-2016 school year, the counseling program at Maura J. Francis Middle School was able to meet
a significant number of its foundational goals. The effectiveness of the program provides significant evidence that
the counseling staff effectively upholds the important elements of the American School Counselors Associations
(2012) National Model. These components include leadership, advocacy, collaboration that lends itself to systematic
change. It appears that the professionalism of the counselors, which closely aligns with the National Model
standards and competencies is a distinctive quality of the program that facilitates its strong effect on students and
stakeholders. Mason and McMahon (2009) believes that leadership is essential to the practice of professional school
counseling, while Shillingford and Lambie (2010) writes that leadership in school counseling is exemplified through
support of academic and student development, effective delivery systems, etc. (as cited in American School
Counselor Association, 2012). Upon evaluation through the Program Analysis, the counseling program at Maura J.

Francis Middle School has proven to be highly effective and closely supports the needs of students that are
demonstrated throughout the schools datasets. By effectively serving students and delivering services to students
through Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions, it seems that the program is exemplifying leadership through their
beneficence toward students, which in turn demonstrates leadership within the counseling program.
A second theme of ASCAs National Model is advocacy. Advocating for the academic achievement of every
student is a key role of school counselors and places them at the forefront of efforts to promote school reform
(American School Counselor Association, 2012, p. 4). In order advocate for our students, it is import to be
knowledgeable about the needs of our students. Therefore, as evidenced through the programs foundation, delivery,
management, and accountability components the needs of our students are addressed through the use of data. In
addition, in order to advocate for our students, we have to address the gaps in our program and the effectiveness of
our program to meet the needs of our students. This provides each counselor with the awareness regarding the
unique needs of the students whom they serve, which provides them with effective means to meet these needs
ethically and according to the ASCA National Model standards. Through this process, the counselors at Maura J.
Francis become strong advocates to student populations, which satisfies this theme of the ASCA National Model.
Along with leadership and advocacy, collaboration is another pivotal theme of the ASCA National Model.
Collaboration involves counselors cooperatively and effectively working alongside other stakeholders to provide
versatile input that meets the needs of student populations (American School Counselor Association, 2012).
Throughout the program at Maura J. Francis, collaboration is a highly valued and universal them throughout its
foundation, delivery, management, and accountability systems. An example of collaboration within our counseling
department was when the counseling staff worked closely together in order to develop the schools comprehensive
counseling program. This required collaboration with students, administration, teachers, and community members.
Moreover, one representative from the counseling staff will also work closely with the Advisory Council to direct
the progression and development of the program. However, collaboration will also serve to align the communication
of parents and other stakeholders as a means of directly meeting the needs of students. In this way, this component is
highly evident within the counseling program and greatly benefits all stakeholders.
It seems that the coordination of all of these themes will create a premise of systematic change within the entire
counseling program. The American School Counselor Association (2012) writes that the counseling program should
act as an agent of change within the school system that positively impact the achievement and development of all
students. It appears by working to implement the themes that are described above, counselors can inspire this type of
development in their students, which would in change the school atmosphere for the better.
Reference
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author.
School Profile Data Analysis
*School Data Profiles from 2013-2014 and 2014-2105 school years are based off of basic demographic, attendance,
behavioral, and achievement data from Woodrow Wilson Middle School in the School District of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. Additional information and all information from the 2015-2016 data profile are based entirely on
projected and estimated figures.
This analysis highlights the existing strengths of Maura J. Francis Middle School while bringing attention to
concerns, trends, and themes present in the school data profile. With the information provided by the school data
profile from 2013 to 2016, the school counseling team at Maura J. Francis Middle School can better assess the needs
of the school community including gaps and opportunities for enhanced development of the comprehensive school
counseling program. (ASCA, 2012)
Introduction
The school counseling department of Maura J. Francis Middle School assessed the school data profiles from the
2013-2014, 2014-2015, and 2015-2106 school years. MJFMS currently serves students in grades six, seven, and
eight. The students at MJFMS come from a predominantly economically disadvantaged population in an urban
setting. Among the various roles of the school counseling team, it is imperative to address the needs of students in

terms of their academic, personal/social, and career development. Some emergent themes from the school data
profile analysis include the need for strategies to improve academic achievement, to provide greater encouragement
of students and parents to seek involvement opportunities, the need for a stronger behavioral support system, and
increased support, consultation, and collaboration with teachers particularly to meet the needs of students with
disabilities.
Demographics
Enrollment decreased between 2013 and 2016 by 118 students. During this time, enrollment of Asian students
decreased by 2.3% and students from Hispanic or Latino backgrounds increased by 3.6%. Students identifying as
other, which includes mixed races, sharply increased between 2013 and 2014 then decreased again in 2015. The
racial demographics of MJFMS are representative of the larger school community. The majority of students are
economically disadvantaged and it is important to note that the percentage of students with a disadvantaged status
rose from 90% during the 2013-2014 school year to 96% in the 2015-2016 school year. The implications of this
information for the school counseling program are that school counselors must be responsive to the needs of the
school community. When designing yearly program goals, expectations of student progress should be congruent
with existing information regarding student achievement and accessibility of resources. The school counseling
program of MJFMS is designed to be developmentally responsive, an important consideration for early adolescence.
Additionally, the program should strive to connect students with community resources and aide students in
becoming knowledgeable consumers of options available to them. As it stands, the school counseling program needs
further improvement in bridging the school to home and school to community gaps. Although program goals were
designed with the specific demographic population in consideration, it is apparent that school counselors should
remain readily cognisant of the systems that affect student development, as suggested in Bronfenbrenner's ecological
systems theory. With this additional lens, the school counseling team can address gaps in academic and career
preparation while establishing connections between students and their community.
Retention and Promotion
The school data profile looks at students who were promoted at the end of each school year to the next grade level.
The retention rates, conversely include students who were not promoted to the next academic level due to academic
failure or truancy. The trends in this area are not as salient, however, students of African American background
consistently have the highest retention rate averaging 7.8% of African American students. Additionally, the retention
rates steadily increased for sixth graders, failing to promote to the seventh grade. This information suggests that
further counselor involvement is needed in both the encouragement for success of African American students and
perhaps stronger transition services between elementary and middle school. Although Maura J. Francis Middle
School has a Black Student Union which is designed to empower students of African American backgrounds,
student involvement in extracurricular activities is low, average 29.3% of students. The school counseling team can
address this gap through further through more detailed needs assessments, increased academic tutoring
opportunities, small group interventions, and increased exposure to extracurricular opportunities. Currently, the
Student Success Skills curriculum is outlined to support students in obtaining the skills they need to achieve
academic success. It would be advisable to invite retained students to participate in small group lessons to gain
access to some of these skills. In addition to this form of intervention, stronger transition services are warranted to
better support sixth grade students. MJFMS currently implements an eighth grade transition program to prepare
students for high school. Utilizing a similar structure, an elementary to middle school transition program can easily
be adapted. The school counseling team must also prioritize the collaboration and consultation processes, working
closely with teachers to decrease retention and increase promotion.
Special Education
The special education department at Maura J. Francis Middle School serves, on average, 147 students with
disabilities each school year. The larger majority of students with disabilities are male, which parallels to larger
demographic population statistics. Evidence of school counselor involvement with the special education department
is not supported through program goals, curriculums, or accountability measures. Although the school counseling
team works closely with special education teachers and paraprofessionals, students with disabilities would benefit
from specifically designed interventions and curriculum. Furthermore, the need for continuing counselor education
is apparent considering the lack of attention devoted to promoting success for students with disabilities.
Additionally, the Gifted and ESOL populations should not be discluded from programmatic considerations.
Counselor led social skills groups and classroom lessons on social emotional learning for these students should be
considered in future program design opportunities.

School Safety and Behavioral Data


Between 2013 and 2016, 581 discipline referrals for safety and behavior were made. Furthermore, 100 students
received out of school suspensions and an additional 194 detentions. The rate of detentions decreased from 104
incidents during the 2013-2014 school year to 41 incidents in the 2015-2016 school year. A Closing-the-Gap action
plan was implemented during the 2015-2016 school year targeted to decrease safety and behavioral discipline
referrals. Although the interventions to address interpersonal skills were deemed effective, a wider variety of
interventions and more comprehensive evaluation tools would be useful to consider in the future. School safety and
behavioral data remain under constant scrutiny by the school counseling team. Classroom guidance lessons and
small group intervention are in place to address bullying and regulating emotions. It is the goal of Maura J. Francis
Middle School to address interpersonal skills through the personal/social domain. Effective interpersonal skills
contribute to improved focus, learning, academic achievement, and career readiness.
Student Engagement
During the 2013-2014 school year, 39% of the student population participated in extracurricular activities at Maura
J. Francis Middle School. That number dropped to by 19% the following year. The school counseling team made a
conscious effort to address limited student engagement by hosting an involvement/school spirit day during Red
Ribbon Week in October of 2015. The set goal was to achieve a minimal participation of rate of 30%. At the
completion of the 2015-2016 school year, 29% of students were on record for enrollment in extracurricular
activities, club, organizations, or sports. During Red Ribbon Week, a survey on student involvement was given to
students. The majority of students not involved in extracurricular activities noted lack of financial or family
resources (i.e. transportation) and lack of involvement by friends as barriers to participation. Involvement in
extracurricular activities can positively impact an adolescents socioemotional development and can contribute to
career readiness. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the school counseling team to address this gap. Surveys and
involvement days are an effective starting off point, but promotion for extracurricular activities should continue
throughout the school year through assemblies, classroom guidance lessons on drug and alcohol abuse prevention,
and through individual response services as a recommendation for improving academic achievement, social skills,
and career readiness.
Parental Engagement
Parent teacher association (PTA) involvement decreased from 81 members during the 2013-2014 school year to 27
members during the 2015-2016 school year. Additionally, less than 70% of parents attend parent-teacher conferences
each year. Parental involvement could increase students perceptions of connectedness to the school environment.
Through the processes of collaboration and consultation, school counselors have a responsibility to work with
parents to address concerns and meet the needs of students. A parent needs assessment was given in September 2015
with a completion rate of 53%. Most parents completing the survey, however, expressed willingness to attend
workshops but noted time constraints and resources as preventative factors. It is not evident that the school
counseling team at Maura J. Francis Middle School has implemented strategies to promote parental involvement.
This may be addressed in revised program design by incorporating parent workshops on topics such as
developmental needs of adolescents, career preparation, and academic achievement among other topics. Needs
assessments should be modified and given in multiple formats (i.e. paper, electronic, oral, or newsletter) to expand
opportunities for response. When evaluating parental involvement, it is crucial to consider limitations of families
with economically disadvantaged families. In addition to a community resource guide sheet, provided by Ms.
Francis, speaking to parents and communicating competency and eagerness to connect them with community
resources could help bridge this gap in the school data profile.
Attendance
Overall attendance at Maura J. Francis Middle School represents a high percentage of the student population,
averaging over 90% of students with adequate attendance. However, between the 2013-2014 and the 2014-2015
school years, attendance rates dropped. In that time, a 5% decrease in absences under ten occurred implying that a
great percentage of the student population attained a truant status. Attendance referrals are made when a student has
three or more unexcused or illegal absences. These students meet with the principal and school truancy officer to fill
out a truancy elimination plan. Students with ten illegal absences are considered truant. This status has detrimental
implications including fines, parental incarceration, and retention. School counselor involvement in this process is
both limited and reactive in nature. Upon assessing this information, a Closing-the-Gap action plan was
implemented for the 2015-2016 school year to decrease the number of discipline referrals for attendance. The

outcomes of this plan exceeded the goals and it is pertinent to examine the factors that contributed to the success of
the intervention. Small group Student Success Skills interventions, token economy systems, and counselor check ins
were put in place to address this gap. It is likely that the increased interactions with school counselors served as a
form of incentive and accountability for students that did not exist prior to the plan. Given the effectiveness of the
small scale intervention, the school counseling team can further develop proactive interventions. It is critical that the
school counselors are involved in the process of working with administration, the truancy officer, and students when
an attendance referral occurs to provide additional insight, consultation, and strategies for student success.
PSSA/ Academic Achievement Data
Continuous efforts are in place to improve PSSA test scores at MJFMS. Between the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016
school years student proficiency ratings increased from 41.6% to 62% in Math and 50.4% to 52% in Reading. While
the efforts of educators should be applauded, it would be neglectful to discount additional academic data. The
average homework completion rate for this data set is 50% of students completing all homework assignments three
out of four days each week. Furthermore, an average of 121 students each year achieve a distinguished Grade Point
Average, earning an A average for all four marking periods. While the improvement in PSSA data has promising
implications for student success and effective teaching skills, the remaining areas of academics need to remain in
focus. Educators have the responsibility to adhere to state and federal standards for academic curriculum design, but
school counselors maintain more lenience in implementing developmentally appropriate curriculums. The goal for
homework completion, set by the school counseling team for the 2015-2016 school year, projected 65% homework
completion rates for each grade level. Only students in the eighth grade met and surpassed that goal, achieving a
75% homework completion rate. With the information provided in these data sets, the school counseling team can
investigate the differences in motivation, resources, and skills between those who did not meet academic goals and
those who did. Additional lessons or small groups focusing on study skills, time management, and test taking could
greatly benefit students at MJFMS.
Conclusion
The school data profile analysis served to highlight trends, gaps, and strengths of the student population. This
information is a tool that can be utilized by the school counseling team to modify the existing comprehensive school
counseling program to better support the needs of the students at Maura J. Francis Middle School. It is evident that
the holistic student is often overlooked and the interventions may appear disjointed. While this program is designed
to be developmentally responsive, addressing the changing needs of adolescents, it is critical to not lose sight of all
systems that may influence the lives of these students. If, in the future, the school counseling team integrated an
approach grounded in ecological theory with consideration for demographic needs, the response to interventions
could exceed expectations. The school counselors need to be invested in the potential of each student, understanding
limitations of the environment as well as resources accessible to them. Further accountability efforts would benefit
the comprehensive school counseling program. Increased efforts in collaboration and consultation with all
stakeholder groups will provide a more holistic perspective to the needs of the students which, in turn, will lend to
stronger proactive interventions.
References
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA National Model: A Framework for
School Counseling Programs, Third Edition. Alexandria, VA: Author.
Bronfenbrenner, U. (1994). Ecological models of human development. In International
Encyclopedia of Education, Vol. 3, 2nd Ed. Oxford: Elsevier. Reprinted in: Guavain, M. &
Cole, M. (Eds.), Readings on the development of children, 2nd Ed. (1993, pp. 37-43).
NY: Freeman.
The School District of Philadelphia. (2015). School profile data: Woodrow wilson middle school. Retrieved from
https://webapps.philasd.org/school_profile/view/8120

Program Goals Results


The following section notes the extent to which the counseling program met and /or surpassed that goals that

established its foundation.


Academic Goals
During the 2014-2015 school year, an average of 53.8% of students at MJFMS were proficient in math, based on
PSSA results. This average is below the school district's annual yearly progress objectives. Based on these results, it
is the goal of MJFMS school counseling program to provide a foundation on which math success can be built upon.
Included in this is collaboration with 6th, 7th, and 8th grade teachers. In order to meet the district's AYP math
objectives, students will meet proficiency in math at a 60% average. This objective will be met by teaching 6th, 7th,
and 8th grade students study skills, effective time management, and test taking strategies through classroom
guidance lesson.

Through the evaluation of the School Profile Data for the 2015-2016 school year, it was found that 62% of sixth,
seventh and eighth grade students achieved proficient math scores on the PSSA, which surpassed the counseling
program's original goal. It appears that the program's use of Tier 1 interventions, such as classroom guidance lessons
that promoted academic achievement through the acquisition to study skills, time management skills and test taking
skills, and Tier 2 intervention that included Student Success Skills directly enabled students to achieve such results.
During the 2014-2015 school year, an average of 41.6% achieved proficiency in reading, based on PSSA results.
Based on these results, the school counseling program at MJFMS will provide a foundation that can create higher
rates of reading success. Students will meet a proficiency in reading at a 50% average. This goal will be maintained
by teaching 6th, 7th and 8th grade students academic skills, such as time management, study skills and test taking
skills.

The School Profile Data for the 2015-2016 school year also indicated that an average of 52% of students at Maura J.
Francis Middle School achieved proficiency ratings in reading scores on the PSSA. Similar to the math goal, it is
believed that this increase in scores can be attributed to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions used by the counseling
program aimed at academic development
Based on the data collected during the 2014-2015 school year, approximately 50% of students have adequate rates
of homework completion. Due to these high rates, the school counseling program will help address this issue so that
homework rates increase to 65% for each grade level. This goal will be met by teaching 6th, 7th and 8th grade
students specific skills that will increase homework completion, such as time management and study skills.
Approximately 69% of students across each grade level demonstrated homework completion rates during the 20152016 school year, as indicated by School Profile Data. It is believed that this goal was met and surpassed as a result
of the implementation of Tier 1 interventions, such as Study Skills and Time Management guidance lessons.
Career Domain
60% of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students will obtain a working knowledge of careers based on their interests, abilities,
and aptitudes using various career inventories and assessments. This goal will be met through career guidance
lessons that target career exploration.
62% of students expressed a working knowledge of careers based on their interests, abilities, and aptitudes using
various career inventories and assessments. These results were attributed to the Tier 1 Career guidance lessons that
were delivered by the counseling staff. This result was indicated by the assessment of various activities that were
assigned through these interventions.
Based on the 2014-2015 school year data, only 20% of students were engaged in school sponsored extracurricular
activities. The counseling program will address this need using Tier 1 engagement activities, which will increase
participation in extracurricular activities to 30%.
Through the use of Tier 1 activities, such as Engagement Week, the 2015-2016 School Profile Data indicated that
29% of students were currently and actively involved in school-sponsored extracurricular activities.
60% of sixth, seventh and eighth grade students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between
school subjects and the world of work upon completion of the world of work curriculum. This goal will be met by
the school counseling staff through Tier 1 guidance lessons, which provides an introduction to various careers and
the connection to academics.

The assignments from this Tier 1 program indicated that 62% of students demonstrated an understanding of the
relationship between school subjects and the world of work.
Personal Domain
During the 2014-2015 school year, 160 attendance referrals were reported. This high rate evidences a need for an
intervention that will be addressed through the counseling program's engagement activities. The majority of these
attendance referrals were given to eighth grade students, which reflects greater need for this level. Therefore, the
counseling department will implement a Tier 1 intervention for specifically the eighth to promote school engagement
and decrease these attendance rates as a result. It is the goal of the counseling program that the attendance
referrals for eighth grade students will decrease by 5%.
During the 2015-2016 school year, attendance referrals for eighth grade students decreased by 7%, which surpassed
the programs goal. It is believed that this goal was met as a result of Tier 1 interventions that directly focused on
eighth grade student populations, such as the Eighth Grade Transition program, which aimed to promote school and
peer engagement and in turn affect student attendance.
The 2014-2015 Data Profile indicated 125 behavioral referrals. Many of these referrals involve student offenses
against peers. This need will be addressed through Tier 1 and 2 evidenced-based practice programs, which will
decrease this rate by 5%.
This goal was met and surpassed, as behavioral referrals during the 2015-2016 school year decreased by 6.2%. It
appears that these results are the direct effect of the Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions that were facilitated by the
counseling program, including Safety, Diversity and Anti-Bullying Guidance Lessons, and Tier 2 small groups that
also address these topics.
The results revealed 22 incidents involving safety. As a school, safety is paramount to academic success and school
belonging. Therefore, our counseling program will collaborate faculty members to facilitate guidance lessons that
target safety, social responsibility and healthy relationships. As a result, reports of safety referrals will decrease by
5% during the following school year.
During the 2015-2016 school year, safety incidents also decreased by 10%. It seems that these effects are the direct
results of Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions that addressed safety and anti-bullying issues.

Small Group Results Report


Analysis of the Small-Group Results Report
Grad-Bag Guidance Group
Narrative: The results report of the Grab Bag guidance group evidenced significantly effective results. This
effectiveness will guide the use of this type of group in the future of the Maura J. Francis counseling program. It
seems that the correct goals were identified for this intervention, as the group intervention was proven enhance
students' engagement with peers and the program specifically fulfilled this goal. Through analyzing the process,
perception and outcome data, it seems that delivering this group intervention to ten students was also effective, as
the group generated efficient results for this population overall and allowed the program to surpass its goals of
increasing extracurricular involvement by 10% and decreasing safety referrals by 5%.

Grab Bag Small-Group ResultsReport.docx


DetailsDownload232 KB
Anti-Bullying Guidance Group
Narrative: The results report of the Anti-Bullying group led by Mrs. Henninger demonstrated highly effective
results. This success of this intervention provides a foundation for the use of this type of group in the future of the
counseling program at Maura J. Francis Middle School. In terms of process and perception data, the ways in which
the group was delivered to the population of students and the manner in which it was directly evaluated all evidence
effectiveness for this form of intervention. Moreover, its behavioral and attendance outcome data also evidenced the
success of this group, as the use of this the group enabled the general counseling program to surpass its attendance
and behavioral goals of decreasing referrals by 5%.

Anti-Bullying Group Results Report.docx


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"Girl's Group" Small Group
Narrative: The results report of the Girl's Group group implemented by Ms. Jones demonstrated effective results.
The effectiveness of these small group demonstrates the value of this group and will be considered when developing
the 2016-2017 school year curriculum. The girls from this group met the intervention's goals, however, it may be
helpful to consider conducting a longitudinal based study. This longitudinal study will help us determine if the small
group has lasting effects of the girl's disposition and confidence throughout the rest of middle school and helped the
program meet its safety goals of decreasing referrals by 5 %.

Small-GroupResultsReport- Girls Group.pdf


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Student Success Skills Group


Narrative: The Student Success Skills small group, an evidence based practice program, implemented by Ms. Jones
was a highly effective intervention. The students in the group met all of the ASCA competencies outlined and also
helped the program's homework completion goal increase to 65 %. The success of this intervention for each of the
groups demonstrates that it should be considered for future implementation in the school counseling program at
Maura J. Francis Middle School. The perception data was valued as an adequate measure of the program's success
and will be used in the future.

Small-GroupResultsReport.pdf
DetailsDownload308 KB

Closing-the-Gap Results Reports


Closing-the-Gap Results Report-Discipline
Narrative:
At the completion of the 2014-2015 school year, the school data profile was examined, highlighting concerns related
to school safety and discipline data. During the 2014-2015 school year, there were 22 school safety incidents with
the highest number (13) involving offenses against other students. Furthermore, there were 55 total discipline
incidents that deemed a detention status, with 50 of those incidents resulting in detention. An additional 30 discipline
related incidents warranted suspension, resulting in a total of 29 suspensions during the 2014-2015 school year.
These violations are a marginalized example of the total number of disciplinary referrals to the principals office. A
total of 284 students were referred via either a written disciplinary notice or a recommendation from faculty or staff
members in matters of school safety or behavior. Disciplinary incidents ranged from classroom disruption to
weapons offenses and threats. Some of the offenses were in direct violation of the school safety policy.
The goal of the 2015-2016 Closing-the-Gap Action Plan was to decrease the number and frequency of discipline
referrals by 10% thus improving classroom environment and lending to increased instructional time in the
classroom. When a student is referred for disciplinary reasons, their education can be negatively impacted, most
often as a result of missed lessons. Furthermore, the learning of others is the classroom can be disrupted by the
continuation of acting out behaviors. For this plan, only regular education students are targeted for the intervention

as students receiving special education accommodations have a different process for disciplinary referrals. Of the
284 total disciplinary referrals for safety and behavior during the 2014-2015 school year, 237 referrals were from
students regular education setting. For the purpose of this Closing-the-Gap action plan, only the data from sixth and
seventh grade discipline referrals are relevant as 8th grade students transitioned to high school for the 2015-2016
school year. Of the total students referred for disciplinary reasons, 52 were in the sixth grade and 65 were in the
seventh grade. Currently those students are in the seventh and eighth grades at Maura J. Francis Middle School.
The school counseling team requested that students check in on a weekly basis with the counselors. When students
did not check in, counselors sought out to check in with students who did not have an opportunity to stop in the
school counseling office. School counselors used a shared checklist with the names of 117 students targeted for this
Closing-the-Gap action plan. Of the 117 students, 101 checked in on a consistent basis, missing no more than three
check in opportunities. Students from this population who continued to be referred for disciplinary reasons at a rate
of three or more instances were invited to either the Anti-Bullying group led and developed by J. Henninger or one
of the Grab Bag Guidance groups led and developed by L. Witt. Seven out of ten students successfully completed all
seven Anti-Bullying group sessions and nine out of ten students successfully completed all Grab Bag Guidance
group sessions. Additional evaluation measures included the School Climate Bullying Survey given to all students at
the beginning of the school year and again at the completion of the school year. Students invited to participate in the
Anti-Bullying group were given the School Climate Bullying Survey as a pre and post test evaluation for the
effectiveness of the group. The results of the survey show a 25% decrease in perceptions of being bullied and a 11%
decrease in perceptions of bullying others. Reports from seventh and eighth grade classroom teachers provided
further insight into behavior in classroom. In terms of peer interactions and the impact on instructional time, 18 out
of 24 teachers reported less disruption to classroom instruction with more positive or neutral peer interactions.
With the data provided from the evaluation measures, the goal of decreasing discipline referrals by 10% was not
achieved. There was a 6.2% decrease in discipline referrals which suggests that interventions were moderately
effective with need for refinement. Additional small groups would be beneficial to reach more students on the tier
two intervention level. Furthermore, it is evident that teachers may benefit from teacher classroom management
training, or counselor led workshops to improve teachers response to conflict in the classroom. It is recommended
that follow up measures are taken in the 2016-2017 school year to further decrease discipline referrals through
responsive curriculum, small groups, and potentially teacher and student workshops.
See attached report:

Closing-the-GapResults-Report- Discipline.pdf
DetailsDownload59 KB
*All results are estimated based on anticipated outcomes from the Closing-the-Gap Action Plan
References
Cornell, D. (2012). The school climate bullying survey: Description and research summary. Retrieved
from http://antibullyingsoftware.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/06/School_Climate_Bullying_Survey_Description_for_Distribution_5-22-12.pdf
Crocker Flerx, V., Limber, Mullin, S., Riese, J., Snyder, M., & Olweus, D. (2009). Class Meetings that Matter:A
Year's Worth of Resources for Grades 6-8. Center City, MN: Hazelden.Retrieved from
file:/C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/OLWEUS%20Trust%20Lesson%20Pg%20125%20(1).pdf
The Southern Poverty Law Center and the Study Circles Resource Center. (2005). Mix It Up: Activity Booklet for
the Middle and Upper Grades.Retrieved from
http://worldroom.tamu.edu/Workshops/CommOfRespect07/CurriculumGuides/Mix%20It%20Up%20Activity
%20Planner%20Upper%20Grades.pdf
Closing-the-Gap Results Report-Attendance

Narrative:
Based on the 2014-2015 school data profile, 110 students had ten or more absences during the school year. With
further investigation, it was determined that the status of these absences were illegal/unexcused. Therefore, it was
evident that the rate of truancy, 110 out of 1,134 students or 9.7%, was at an alarming level. During that year, 160
students received discipline referrals related to attendance accounting for over one third of all disciplinary referrals
at Maura J. Francis Middle School. The criteria for a discipline referral includes three unexcused/ illegal absences.
Of the 160 students with three or more illegal absences, 110 went on to exceed more than ten illegal absences during
the 2014-2015 school year. Students with ten or more illegal absences are considered truant.
Programming that targeted student involvement or specified responsive interventions from the school counseling
team were not evidently in place during the 2014-2015 school year. The comprehensive school counseling program
goals were revisited in June 2015 and edited to include a goal of decreasing attendance referrals by 5%. As a further
measure of intervention, this closing-the-gap action plan was devised to decrease the truancy rate among students
with a truancy status during the previous school year. Sixty-eight of these students were on the roster for the 20152016 school year. Based off the projected enrollment data, the estimated decrease in attendance referrals would
represent 4.7% of the student population or approximately 49 students referred for attendance related concerns.
Specifically, this plan sought to decrease the overall rate of truancy from 9.7% to 7.1%.
The outcomes for this closing-the-gap action plan exceeded the goals set by the school counseling team at the
beginning of 2015-2016. Of the 68 students targeted for this intervention, twelve of those students or 17.6%
received disciplinary referrals related to attendance. Furthermore, only seven reached truancy status with ten or more
illegal absences. All twelve of the students referred were given Truancy Elimination Plans by the school truancy
officer. Three students requested the help of either J. Henninger or L. Witt to complete the forms. Student check ins
occurred regularly, on a weekly basis, at a rate of 88.2% with 60 students missing less than three check in
opportunities. Per student self report, the use of a token economy system was motivating. When presented with the
option of a token economy system, 55 students agreed to incorporate one into their plan and 46 of those students
worked with either J. Henninger or L. Witt to come up with their own concept of rewards and actions leading to
those rewards. Of the nine students who did not assist in personalizing the token economy, four received disciplinary
referrals for attendance and one attained a truant status. The remainder of students attaining a truant status did not
participate in the token economy system. Evidence for the token economy system is clear but direct counselor
interaction may have contributed its success.
It is critical from this point to maintain the success of the interventions put into place during the 2015-2016 school
year to decrease the rate of truancy. With the knowledge that this set of interventions prompted effective outcomes
with the 68 students targeted for intervention, this can be addressed school wide as a preventative and responsive
measure. Future recommendations include continued access to and availability of the school counseling team, the
utilization of resources such as the districts truancy officer and the Truancy Elimination Plan, the use of token
economy systems designed collaboratively with students to ensure personalization and meaningful connections are
made, and further efforts to improve student involvement in school and through extracurricular activities. Students
who feel that they are part of a school community will likely help contribute to the success of the school community.
Using the framework of Alfred Adlers Social Interest Theory, the school counseling team can work in conjunction
with teachers, parents, and administrators to decrease the rate of both attendance referrals and truancy at Maura J.
Francis Middle School.
See attached report:

Closing-the-GapResults-Report-Attendance.pdf
DetailsDownload58 KB
*All results are estimated based on anticipated outcomes from the Closing-the-Gap Action Plan
References
Pennsylvania Council of Children, Youth, and Family Services. (2015). Truancy elimination plan. Retrieved from

http://www.pccyfs.org/practice_resources/Truancy_BEC.pdf
Core Curriculum Results Reports
Academic Domain Goals
Math PSSA Goal Results Report

Math PSSA Goal Curriculum Results.docx


DetailsDownload253 KB
Reading PSSA Results Report

Reading PSSA Goal Curriculum Results Report.docx


DetailsDownload255 KB
Homework Goal Results Report

Homework Completion Goal Results Report.docx


DetailsDownload245 KB
Career Domain Goals
Career Interests, Abilities Goal Results Report

Career Interests and Abilities Goal Results Report.docx


DetailsDownload241 KB
Extracurricular Goal Results Report

Extracurricular Goal Curriculum Results Repor.pdf


DetailsDownload56 KB
School Subjects and Work World Results Report

School Subjects & World of Work Results Report.docx


DetailsDownload236 KB
Personal Domain Goals
Attendance Referrals Results Report

Attendance Referrals Curriculum Results Report.docx


DetailsDownload231 KB

Behavioral Referrals Results Report

Behavioral Curriculum Results Report-1.docx


DetailsDownload240 KB
Safety Referrals Results Report

Safety Referral Goal Results Report .docx


DetailsDownload242 KB
Narrative: Generally, the Tier 1 guidance programs described in the Core Curriculum Results Reports and Action
Plans proved to be effective and worked to allow the counseling program to meet its essential goals. It seems that
this efficacy proves how valid these interventions can be when working with sixth, seventh and eighth grade
students, which also provides a sound foundation for their future use.
Use of Time Assessments and Analysis

Use of time assessment Laura Witt.xlsm


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Use of time assessment table and narrative.docx


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As encouraged by the American School Counselor Association (2012), the use of time assessments evaluate each
counselor's work over a period of two weeks within one month of the school year.
Reference
American School Counselor Association (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Author.
TeachersPayTeachers. (n.d.) School counseling time log (excel spreadsheet) by Todd Lawson. Retrieved
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/School-Counseling-Time-Log-Excel-Spreadsheet-458521

School Counselor Competencies Analysis


Laura Witt

Laura Witt School Counselor Competencies.doc


DetailsDownload120 KB

Professional Development Plan-Witt.docx


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School Counselor Performance Appraisal
The school counselors at Maura J. Francis Middle School completed self evaluations at the beginning of the 20152016 school year. In this process, each school counselor addressed areas of strength and potential growth. Areas
identified as potential growth points were outlined as yearly goals. The school counselor performance appraisal
reflects duties and responsibilities within each system of the ASCA National Model. At the end of the 2015-2016
school year, an administrative evaluation was completed for each counselor by Dr. Rupert Dre, school principal. An
assessment of counselor goal attainment was then completed for the 2015-2016 school year. This information will
guide revisions to the CSCP in subsequent school years.
Laura Witt
Self-evaluation

Laura Witt Self-Evaluation Performance Appraisal.xls


DetailsDownload58 KB
Administrative Evaluation

Laura Performance Appraisal.pdf


DetailsDownload130 KB
Assessment of Goal Attainment

Witt Assessment of Goal Attainment.pdf


DetailsDownload101 KB
Program Goal Analysis
All goals of the counseling program were met at the culmination of the school year, which provides evidence for use
of the associated Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions for following school years and with other student
populations. When setting goals, all were set within the context of the SMART goal system (ASCA, 2012).
Meaning, all were evaluated as being specific, measurable, attainable, results-oriented and time oriented. The
programs closing-the-gap goals involved attendance issues and behavioral referrals. These goals were addressed
through the program goals regarding attendance, safety and behavioral referrals. As all of these goals were met, as
indicated in the results reports, it appears that these gaps have been closed.
For the following school year, it seems that the foundation of these goals provides evidence for the importance of
setting and aligning SMART goals. This method was highly successful within the counseling program during this
school year, and allowed the counseling staff to develop interventions that would closely align, which could also be
utilized for future programmatic implications. The success of each Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3 intervention also proves
that these specific programs are generally efficacious. Therefore it also seems that these same interventions could
also be used to benefit future populations of students.
Reference
American School Counselor Association. (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling

programs (3rd.). Alexandria, VA: Author.


Sharing Results
In order to solidify the program's accountability, results will be widely shared with students, administrators, parents
and community members. After analyzing Results Reports and the extent to which the counseling program achieved
its fundamental goals, results will be disseminated through the counseling department's webpage, presentations to
the PTO, faculty members and the school board, as well as handouts and newsletters addressed to parents and the
community. These results will be shared at the culmination of the school year, which will also address the objectives
for the following year. It is the goal of the guidance department that communicating with stakeholders in this way
will promote effective collaboration and greatly aid student success.
Reference
American School Counselor Association. (2012). The ASCA national model: A framework for school counseling
programs (3rd.). Alexandria, VA: Author.