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School District Leadership Team

Professional Development

Cultural Competence
For Culturally Responsive

Teaching
Developed by
Karrie Snider, Ph.D.
Erica Hernandez-Scott, ABD
Carla Williams, Ed.D. &
Jovanna Rohs, Ph.D.

Cultural Competence for Culturally Responsive Teaching


Rationale:

Teachers hold particular beliefs, knowledge and skills


related to teaching (Banks & Banks, 2004; Fang, 1996;
Pajares, 1992, Vartuli, 1999) and related to teaching
students of diverse populations in specific contexts (Gay &
Howard, 2000; Kumar & Hamer, 2012; Ladson-Billings,
1995; Siwatu et al., 2011; Snider, 2015). Because beliefs
are fundamental to teaching (Lortie, 1975; Nespor, 1987;
Nieto, 2010; Pajares, 1992), it is critical for adults to
engage in reflective professional learning and dialogue.
Through such critical reflection, teachers and leaders
develop knowledge and skills for being effective teachers
for diverse populations (Banks, 2004; Cochran-Smith et al.,
2004; Howard, 2006; Sleeter & Delgado Bernal, 2004;
Villegas & Lucas, 2002). This transformative approach to
reflective learning enables the development of cultural
competence, leading to the actions and implementation of
culturally responsive teaching (Howard, 2006) (as cited in
Snider, 2015).

Guiding Question:
achieve equitably?

What does it mean to ensure that ALL learners

Content Focus: Components of Multicultural Education, Cultural


Competence & Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT)
Key Strategies: Research & Theory Regarding CRT Beliefs and Practices
Motivation in
Learning Practice-Based Applications
Anchor Text:

Gay, G. (2010). Culturally responsive teaching: Theory,


research and practice, 2nd Ed. New York, NY: Teachers
College Press.

Supporting Texts:
Selected readings for teacher-leader levels and
practitioner levels are included on the Reading Matrix that
begins on page 2. The Reading Matrix provides a glimpse
of how community professional development can occur for
multiple levels and roles within the public school setting.
Participants in the professional development will read the
Anchor, Teacher-Leader, and Practitioner Texts for each
face-to-face session.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

Reflection Protocol: An example of the Reading Response Organizer is


provided on page 5. In conjunction with completing topic
readings, adult learners record reflections, questions and
contextual content in order to engage in dialogue at faceto-face session.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

Reading Matrix:
Session

Session 1

Session 2

Learner Objectives

Anchor Text
Chapter

Teacher Leader Text

Practitioner
Text

Engage in
foundational
knowledge of
multicultural
education and
establish a common
framework for
engaging ones own
story with the story of
diverse PK-12 learners

Chapter 1.
Challenges and
Perspectives, 1-21

Brown, M. R. (2007).
Educating all students:
Creating culturally
responsive teachers,
classrooms, and
schools.

Wlodkowski &
Ginsberg (1995).
A framework for
culturally
responsive
teaching.

Dive into the


assumptions and
myths that create a
pedagogical
transformation
towards culturally
responsive teaching

Chapter 2.
Pedagogical Potential
of Cultural
Responsiveness, 2245

View first: Peggy


McIntosh TedTalk
http://tedxtalks.ted.co
m/video/How-StudyingPrivilege-Systems

Gorski, P. (2008).
The myth of the
culture of
poverty.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

Then, read: McIntosh,


P. (1989). White
Privilege: Unpacking
the Invisible Knapsack

Session
Date

Learner Objectives

Anchor Text
Chapter

Teacher Leader Text

Practitioner
Text

Session 3

Develop a pedagogy
of caring by
1) recognizing the
characteristics of
caring; 2)
understanding
pervasive teacher
attitudes and
expectations that
impact caring; and
3) recognizing how
the effects of teacherstudent interactions
on student outcomes
can lead to culturally
responsive teaching

Chapter 3. The Power


of Culturally
Responsive Caring,
47-75

Soto, N. E. (2005).
Caring and
relationships:
Developing a
pedagogy of caring.

Pang, Rivera, &


Mora. (1999).
The ethic of
caring: Clarifying
the foundation of
multicultural
education

Session 4

1) Examine the
relationship between
culture and
communication
2) identify and explain
the implications for

Chapter 4. Culture
and Communication
in the Classroom, 76125

Delpit, L. (1988).The
silenced dialogue:
Power and Pedagogy in
Educating Other
Peoples Children

Schmidt (1999).
Know thyself and
understand
others.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

schooling

Session
Date

Learner Objectives

Anchor Text
Chapter

Teacher Leader Text

Practitioner
Text

Session 5

1) Examine the
relationship between
motivation and
diversity
2) identify a
framework for
motivating diverse
learners

Wlodkowski, R,
(1999). Motivation
and Diversity: A
Framework for
Teaching.

Wlodkowski, R, (1999).
Motivation and
Diversity: A Framework
for Teaching.

Davis, Bonnie
(2007). Chapter
2: Understanding
Diverse Learners
in How to teach
students who
dont look like
you.

Session 6

1) Examine
approaches to
multicultural
curriculum reform
2) determine
authentic ways to
include multiple
perspectives in the
curriculum

Chapter 5. Ethnic and


Cultural Diversity in
Curriculum Content,
127-171

Banks, J. Chapter 10:


Approaches to
multicultural
curriculum reform, in
Multicultural
education: Issues and
perspectives.

Morgan, H., and


York, K.C. (2009).
Examining
multiple
perspectives with
creative thinkalouds.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

Session 7

Chapter 8. Epilogue:
Looking Back and
Projecting
Forward,236-250

CRIOP Pillar
Reflections, Adapted
from Correll, P., Powell,
R., & Cantrell, S.
(2015).

Reading Response Organizer


Intellectual Response: How does this reading fit with my background knowledge
of effective teaching?

Cognitive Dissonance: How is this reading incongruent with what I currently


believe, know or understand?

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

CRIOP Pillar
Reflections

Affective Response: What kind of emotional response do I have to this reading?

Action: How do we apply this to past and present our challenges?

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

Reading Reference List:


Anchor Text
Gay, G. (2010). Culturally responsive teaching: Theory, research and practice, 2nd Ed. New York, New York:
Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 1: Challenges and Perspectives. In Culturally responsive teaching: Theory,
research and practice (2nd
Ed), (pp. 1-21). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 2. Pedagogical Potential of Cultural Responsiveness. In Culturally responsive
teaching: Theory,
research and practice (2nd Ed), (pp. 22-45). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 3. The Power of Culturally Responsive Caring. In Culturally responsive
teaching: Theory, research and
practice (2nd Ed), (pp. 47-75). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 4. Culture and Communication in the Classroom,. In Culturally responsive
teaching: Theory, research
and practice (2nd Ed), (pp. 76-125). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 5. Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Curriculum Content. In Culturally
responsive teaching: Theory,
research and practice (2nd Ed), (pp. 127-171). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Gay, G. (2010). Chapter 8. Epilogue: Looking Back and Projecting Forward. In Culturally responsive
teaching: Theory, research
and practice (2nd Ed), (pp. 236-250). New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Teacher Leader Text
Banks, J. A., & Banks, C. A. M. (2009). Approaches to multicultural curriculum reform. In Multicultural
education: Issues and
perspectives (pp. 242-263). John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved from
http://www.pcc.edu/resources/tlc/anderson-conference/documents/multicultural-banks.pdf
Brown, M. R. (2007). Educating all students: Creating culturally responsive teachers, classrooms, and
schools. Intervention in School
and Clinic, 43(1), 57-62. Retrieved from

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

http://achieve.lausd.net/cms/lib08/CA01000043/Centricity/Domain/173/Intervention%20BROWN
%20article.pdf
Delpit, L. (1988).The silenced dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating other peoples children. Harvard
Educational Review,
58(3), 280-298. Retrieved from
http://schoolandsociety2014.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/85462453/Delpit-SilencedDialogue.pdf
McIntosh, P. (1989). McIntosh, P. (1998). White privilege. Race, class and gender: An anthology, 94-105.
Retrieved from
http://www.allenbrizee.com/InvisibleKnapsack.pdf
McIntosh, P. (2012 ). How studying privilege systems can strengthen compassion: TEDxTalk Timberlane
Schools. Retrieved from
http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/How-Studying-Privilege-Systems
Soto, N. E. (2005). Caring and relationships: Developing a pedagogy of caring. Villanova Law Review,
50(4), 859-874. Retrieved from
http://digitalcommons.law.villanova.edu/vlr/vol50/iss4/11
Wlodkowski, R, (1999). Motivation and diversity: A framework for teaching. New Directions for Teaching
and Learning, 78, 7-16.
Practitioner Text
Gorski, P. (2008). The myth of the culture of poverty. Educational Leadership, 65(7), 32-36. Retrieved from
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/apr08/vol65/num07/The-Myth-of-the-Culture-ofPoverty.aspx
Wlodkowski & Ginsberg (1995). A framework for culturally responsive teaching. Educational Leadership, 53(1), 1721. Retrieved from
http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept95/vol53/num01/A-Framework-for-CulturallyResponsive-Teaching.aspx
Pang, Rivera, & Mora. (1999). The ethic of caring: Clarifying the foundation of multicultural education. The
Educational Forum, 64(1),
25-32. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00131729908984722
Schmidt (1999). Know thyself and understand others. Language Arts, 76(4), 332-340

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

10

Davis, Bonnie (2007). Chapter 2: Understanding Diverse Learners. In How to teach students who dont look
like you: Culturally
relevant teaching strategies (pp.13-23). Thousand-Oakes, CA: Corwin Press.
Morgan, H., and York, K.C. (2009). Examining multiple perspectives with creative think-alouds. The Reading
Teacher, 63(4), 307311
DOI:10.1598/RT.63.4.5 ISSN: 0034.
Instrumentation
Correll, P., Powell, R., & Cantrell, S. (2015). The culturally responsive instruction observation protocol: A
training guide for CRIOP
observations. Corell, Powell & Cantrell.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)

UMKC Consultants for the school district project


Karrie Snider, Ph.D.

As a Research Associate at the UMKC Institute for Human Development, Dr. Snider
worked with a variety of local, regional and state programs providing consultation, technical assistance, program
development and evaluation. Her research interests include culturally responsive teaching beliefs and practices,
high quality teaching and learning, and factors that contribute to the parallel processes of learning and development
for teachers, families and children. Consultation work included design of state-wide professional development for
Missouri regional professional development consultants and K-12 grade school staff for the Missouri Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Special Education. Dr. Snider has worked in education for the past 20
years, during which time she has contributed her expertise in child development, program evaluation, and adult
learning and development. Dr. Snider continues integrating her experiences from the various roles she has held in PK8th grade education and higher education settings; including classroom teacher, school administrator, and teacher
educator for early childhood and elementary education classrooms in rural, suburban and urban settings.

Carla Williams, Ed.D.

Dr. Williams has served as a classroom teacher, instructional coach, consultant for the
Kansas State Department of Education, University Professor and an educational researcher at both the University of
Kansas and the University of Missouri Kansas City. Currently, the scope of her work focuses on effective teaching
and learning practices, data-based decision making, developing collaborative cultures, inclusive practice and
building a statewide system of high-quality professional development in conjunction with the Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). Dr. Williams has also had extensive experience in early childhood
and implementation coaching. She uses her journey through the educational system as the lens for the
development and application of her research projects.

Erica Hernandez-Scott, ABD

Erica Hernandez-Scott received her B.A. in Elementary Education from


Rockhurst University and her M.A. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Multicultural Education from the
University of Missouri Kansas City (UMKC). Ms. Hernandez-Scott brings many years of experience in urban
education to her current position as an Associate Teaching Professor for the School of Education. She is a graduate of
the Kansas City, Missouri School District, and she has served as an urban elementary teacher in the Hickman Mills
School District and as an Instructional Guide at a UMKC-sponsored charter school, Tolbert Preparatory Academy. Her
academic focus is on using culturally responsive practices to improve the quality of urban schools by increasing
student achievement and parent involvement, as well as preparing teachers to support diverse learners. She is
currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Education at UMKC.

Snider, K., & Hernandez, E. (2016)