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Econ 41 (Winter 2014)

Department of Economics, UCLA


Instructor: Zhipeng Liao

Practice Mid-Term Exam

The problems in this exam only have one correct answer among the choices a, b, c and d. You
will get 1 credit if your choice is correct and 0 credit otherwise.
1. Suppose that A; B are two events with P (A) = 0:4, P (B) = 0:5 and P (A \ B 0 ) = 0:1. Then:
(i) the probability of A0 equals:
(a) 0.1

(b) 0.3

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.6

(ii) the probability of A \ B equals:


(a) 0.1

(b) 0.2

(c) 0.3

(d) 0.4

(iii) the probability of A [ B equals:


(a) 0.2

(b) 0.3

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.6

(iv) the probability of A0 \ B 0 equals:


(a) 0.2

(b) 0.3

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.5

(v) the probability of A0 [ B 0 equals:


(a) 0.2

(b) 0.3

(c) 0.7

(d) 0.8

2. Suppose that A; B are two events with P (A) = 0:2 and P (B) = 0:4.
(i) Which of the following number could be the possible value of P (A \ B)?
(a) 0:1

(b) 0:3

(c) 0:5

(d) 0:6

(ii) Which of the following number could be the possible value of P (A [ B)?
(a) 0:2

(b) 0:3

(c) 0:7

(d) 0:6

3. Suppose that you have 6 dierent books to be distributed to 3 students waited in a line.
Then:
(i) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 books to 3 students with each student
having 2 books?
(a) 90

(b) 180

(c) 270

(d) 540

(ii) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 books to 3 students with the rst student
having 1 book, the second student having 2 books and the third student having 3 books?
(a) 15

(b) 60

(c) 120

(d) 360

(iii) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 books to 3 students with the rst student
having 1 book, the second student having 1 books and the third student having 4 books?
(a) 15

(b) 30

(c) 60

(d) 80

4. Suppose that you have 6 dierent books to be distributed to 3 indierent groups. Then:
(iv) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 books with each group having 2 books?
(a) 15

(b) 30

(c) 60

(d) 90

(v) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 book with 1 book in the rst group, 2
books in the second group and 3 books in the third group?
(a) 15

(b) 60

(c) 120

(d) 240

(vi) how many possible ways to distribute these 6 books with 1 book in the rst group, 1
book in the second group and 4 books in the third group?
(a) 15

(b) 30

(c) 60

(d) 80

5. Suppose that n and r are two natural numbers with 0


(i) the value of
(a)

r2 =n

(a)

n
r

n 1
r 1

n
r

(b) r(r

1)=n

(c) r(r

1)=(n

1)

(d) 1

1)=n

(c) r(r

1)=(n

1)

(d) r=n

(b) 1=3

r=n

is:

6. Suppose that A; B are two events with P (A) =


P (A [ B) equals
(a) 1=2

n. Then:

is:

(b) r(r

(ii) the value of


r2 =n

n 1
r

(c) 2=3

1
4,

P (BjA) =

1
3

and P (AjB) =

1
2.

Then

(d) 1=4

7. Suppose that A; B are two mutually independent events. Which of the following choice
contains two events which are not independent?
(a) A0 and B

(b) A0 and B 0

(c) A and B 0

(d) A and A0 \ B

8. Roll two dice and the sum of numbers on the two dice is 7. Then the probability of one die
having number 1 equals to
(a) 1=2

(b) 1=3

(c) 2=3

(d) 1=4

9. Suppose that A and B are two events with P (A) = 0:2, P (B) = 0:4 and P (A \ B) = 0:1.
Then which of the following claim is wrong?
(a) P (A [ B) = 0:5 (b) P (A [ B) = 0:6 (c) P (BjA) = 0:5

(d) P (AjB) = 0:25

10. Suppose that X is a random variable with support Sx = f1; 2; 3; 4g p.m.f. f (x) =
x 2 Sx . Then

1
4

for any

(i) E[X] equals to:


(a) 1.5

(b) 2.5

(c) 3.5

(d) 4

(c) 7.5

(d) 8

(ii) E[X 2 ] equals to:


(a) 5.5

(b) 6.5

(iii) E[(1 + X)2 ] equals to:


(a) 9.5
(iv) E[2(1

(b) 10.5

(c) 11.5

(d) 13.5

X)2 ] equals to:

(a) 2

(b) 3

(c) 6

(d) 7

11. Let X be the sample mean of a random sample of size 9 from a distribution with support
Sx = f 2; 1; 0; 1; 2g and p.m.f. f (x) = 51 for any x 2 Sx . Then:
(i) E[X] equals to:
(a) 0

(b) 7/3

(c) 8/3

(d) 4

(ii) E[X ] equals to:


(a) 2/9

(b) 10/9

(c) 9/10

(d) 0.5

12. Suppose that X is a random variable with support Sx = f1; 2; 3g. The C.D.F. of X is dened
as F (x) = P (X x) and p.m.f. of X satises f (1) = 0:2 and f (3) = 0:4.
(i) f (2) equals to:
(a) 0.1

(b) 0.2

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.6

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.6

(c) 0.4

(d) 0.6

(ii) F (2) equals to


(a) 0.1

(b) 0.2

(iii) F (1:5) equals to


(a) 0.1

(b) 0.2

13. Let X be the sample mean of a random sample of size 10 from a Binomial distribution
B(10; 0:2). Then:
(i) E[X] equals:
(a) 1

(b) 2

(c) 3

(d) 4

(ii) the variance of X equals:


(a) 0.1

(b) 0.16

(c) 0.2

(d) 0.25