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Chapter 3
Freedom of Choice, Rights
and Justice
Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.
Publishing as Prentice Hall

Chapter Objectives
1.

2.

3.

To understand that freedom of choice is


limited by the condition of truth and
good.
To explain that all humans, as citizens of
countries and members of organizations,
in the exercise of their rights are also
bound by the duties attached to those
rights; and
To present that many interpretations of
justice and its requirements.

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Publishing as Prentice Hall

Freedom of Choice
Choice implies responsibility for its consequences
Are we really free?

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


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Freedom of Choice
Free means beloved (free from
bondage)
doom means judgment
Put together, the word freedom means
the condition of being judged to be

free.

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall

Freedom of Choice
Freedom is sometimes interchanged with liberty which
stresses the power of free choice as in being able to think
and act without restraint.

Note: problem often lies in the interpretation of


without restraint.

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall

Freedom of Choice
Freedom is really limited to what is good for the others.
Freedom is not really a license to do whatever we want
but to do what is true and good.

The exercise of freedom is coupled with


responsibility. There is no freedom without
responsibility.

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall

Freedom of Choice
Choices that we can no longer exercise responsibility:

(evidence of the failure in the freedom of choice)


(1)Addiction

to smoking, alcohol, or drugs.


(2)Deception or when there is a deliberate attempt at
withholding information.
e.g. advertisement (cigarette company).

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


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Rights
Rights refer to our entitlements as citizens of a
country and as human beings. legal rights or
constitutional rights.
Rights give the power to the individual to
exercise his freedom of choice.

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall

Rights
Rights and duties are like two sides of a coin. No one
can demand for his right without being bound to the
duty attached to it.

e.g. right to vote


Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.
Publishing as Prentice Hall

JUSTICE
Justice is always interchanged with the concept
of fairness.

Three kinds of Justice:


1.
2.
3.

Distributive justice
Compensatory justice
Punitive/Retributive justice

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JUSTICE
Distributive Justice
- the just or fair distribution of benefits and
burdens.

Egalitarianism
Contribution or Capitalism
Needs and Abilities
Libertarianism
Fairness

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JUSTICE
Compensatory Justice
- refers to the reparation for a wrong committed
or the restoration of loss of property as a consequence
of a wrong committed

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall

JUSTICE
Three conditions to be compensated:
1) The action that caused the injury should be wrong or
negligent;
2) The action of the person is the real cause of the
injury; and
3) The person acted voluntarily and consciously.

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


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JUSTICE
Retributive Justice
- refers to the just or fair way of determining
blame or punishment for the committed.

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JUSTICE
Three conditions for the punishment to be just
and fair:
1) That the person who committed the
wrongdoing knowingly and voluntarily did
the wrong act;
2) There must be certainty that the person
accused of the wrongdoing really committed
the act beyond reasonable doubt. (right to

due process)

3) The punishment that should be met must be


consistent and proportioned to the wrong
committed.
Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.
Publishing as Prentice Hall

JUSTICE
Right to due process:
1. The right to an impartial tribunal;
2. The right to notice; and
3. The right to hearing (including the right to present
ones case and submit evidences in support of the
case)

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Publishing as Prentice Hall

THANK YOU

NAMASKAR

Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc.


Publishing as Prentice Hall