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INDEX

SR. NO

TOPICS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

OBJECTIVES
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

3
4

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

COMPANY PROFILE

PRODUCT PROFILE

DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION

LIMITATION

CONCLUSIONS

10

BIBLOGRAPHY

11

ANNEXURE

PAGE NO

Executive summary

Joseph Priestley invented carbonated water in the year 1767 in England. Soft
drink has become worlds leading beverage sector and is expected to lead the market
value. The specific objectives of the project were to determine the factors influencing
consumers choice of soft drinks products and as well as brands and to identify the
customers buying pattern related to soft drinks products. The research design used in
this project was Descriptive research and the research method used was questionnaire
method. A survey was conducted and feedback collected from 50 respondents. The
data was analyzed with the help of statistical package SPSS. The findings revealed that
the majority of the respondents are making their purchase on occasion. The majority of
the respondents are doing planned purchase. They buy soft drinks for family use. The
majority of the respondents are purchasing Carbonated drinks. They buy soft drinks
mainly for taste. The majority of the respondents preferred Cola drinks category . Their
purchasing occasions were during offer period. The majority of the respondents
purchase soft drinks from super markets. Most of the respondents are attracted by
advertisement through different media like Television ,Newspaper, pamphlets, word of
mouth. Most of the respondents liked celebrity for endorsing products. Majority of the
respondents are Male, belonging to age group of 15-20 years, majority are students.
Company must concentrate on creating awareness about the product, and should
maintain the price of the product because of the competitors. The report also includes
about the respondents influence by packaging of the products, what type of packaging
do the consumer mostly preferred. These report also include the flavors and packaging
of different categories of soft drinks which is preferred by different age groups.

Objective of the project:

To study the market share of the soft drinks industries in India

To study the softdrinks preference among the youth

Impact of packaging on sales of soft drinks

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
2.2 Literature Review:
1) Nandagopal and Chinnaiyan (2003) studied that the level of awareness among the
rural consumers about the brand of soft drinks was high which was indicated by the
mode of purchase of the soft drinks by "Brand Name". The major source of brand
awareness was word of mouth followed by advertisements, family members, relatives
and friends. Singh (1983) analysed the consumers store loyalty and their preferences.
It was revealed that among the reasons for their store selection, nearness of the store,
reputation of the store and acquaintance with the store owner, are the factors that play
an important role in store selection. It was also concluded that the existence of store
loyalty was found more among educated families. It was quite possible that some more
distinguishing characteristics could be identified by studying the loyalty behavior of
people who were not educated and comparisons could be made between the loyalty
behaviour of educated versus uneducated consumers.

2) Sitamber and Manoher (1980) conducted a study on shopping behaviour of


consumers and revealed that Indian consumers had no special choice in choosing his
particular shop for making a purchase. In most of the families, the male head makes the
purchases, restricting the choices of other members of the family to limited variety of
goods. He generally selects a shop, which is near to his residence and where he goes
on feet and occasionally uses a bicycle. Generally the average consumers prefer to buy
from the shop, where a credit facility is available and which is easily approachable.

3) Sampathkumar (2003) studied about brand preference in soft drinks in Telangana


region of Andra Pradesh. He found that in rural market about 37.50 per cent of
consumers preferred Thumbs-up (urban 30%), followed by Coca cola (28.50%) (urban
37.50%), Pepsi (12.50 %) (urban 9.00%), Limca (4.00%) (urban 8.50%). Most of the
urban consumers (67.00%) purchased soft drinks in nearest Kirani stores (rural
73.00%), followed by super bazaar (27.00%) (rural 26.00%) and others (6.00%) (rural
1.00%). The method of physical distribution played very vital role in company's success
and failure in the market. Transportation was among the major functions of physical
distribution. Transport adds time and place utility for the product.

4) Brand preference in soft drinks sector:


By William R. George Reveals purpose of study of factors responsible for brand
preference in soft drink industry, increasing competition more, due to globalization is
motivating many companies to base their strategies almost entirely on building brands.
Brand preference means to compare the different brands and opt for the most preferred
brand. This brand preference is influenced by various factors. In the identification of
factors affecting the brand preference, it was concluded that Brand persona is the most
effective factor that affects the brand preference. This Brand persona deals with the
personality aspects or the external attributes of brand, thus it can be said that consumer
prefer any brand by looking at the external attributes of a brand.

5) Colour and flavour rule consumer preferences:


By Donnelly said intensity of colour and the flavours are the key drivers behind
consumer acceptance of soft drinks. But packaging and labelling are not as important
for winning over consumers, according to findings published in the journal Food Quality
and Preference, The study involved consumers at different stages of development and
highlights the importance of adopting a sensory marketing approach, said the
researchers from French research organisation Adriant, the University of Rennes.
Companies need to continuously innovate to maintain market leadership, wrote the
researchers. When the market is overloaded the challenge consists in creating
innovative products able to attract and satisfy consumers. This experiment showed the
feasibility of the proposed multi-sensory design method based on mixed qualitative and
quantitative approaches. The study also demonstrates the importance of flavour and
colour selection for new products. The global flavours market was been valued at some
US$18bn in 2006 (Business Insights). Meanwhile, the value of the international
colourings market was estimated at around $1.15bn in 2010, up 2.5% from $1.07bn in
2007, according to Leatherhead Food International (LFI). Natural colours now make up
31 per cent of the colourings market, compared with 40 per cent for synthetics,
according to LFI.

6) Sense of consumers:
By Stephen Daniells said these four factors were identified for the formulation:
four colour intensities), three flavourings, two label types (soft versus hard), and two
pack sizes (standard versus oversize). By using both quantitative (hedonic testing) and
qualitative (focus groups) approaches, the researchers found that the main factors
which drive consumer preference for this concept are colour intensity and flavouring.
Indeed, colour intensity accounted for 43% and flavour 32% of the consumers overall
liking. Pack size and label type are taken into account by the consumer to a lesser
extent, they added. This methodology of a qualitative screening associated to a
conjoint analysis on relevant sensory attributes has shown good performances to fit
consumers expectation: it has now to be reproduced, as every brand, concept and
product is a unique combination designed for a specific consumer group, concluded the
researchers.

7) Taste or health:
Beverly J. Tepper (1998) examined the relative contributions of taste and health
considerations on consumer liking and purchase intent of cola drinks. Eight types of
commercial cola drinks were evaluated by 305 adult consumers who also completed a
brief questionnaire on soft drink consumption habits. Data were analyzed using factor
analysis. Results revealed that purchase intent of cola drinks was strongly related to
degree of liking and to several key sensory attributes including saltiness, drinks flavor
and greasiness. These variables emerged as the first factor in the analysis, suggesting
that consumers perceive these characteristics as being most important in their choice of
cola drinks. Second described a health dimension and was related to respondents'
attitudes toward fat in the diet. Third factor comprised two remaining sensory attributes
(color and crunchiness), which apparently were of minor importance to the respondents.
These data suggest that in spite of current concern about reducing dietary fat, health
remains secondary to taste in the selection of cola drinks for consumers in this
population.
8) Consumer awareness and consumption pattern of soft drink product:
Mita Sujan (1990) aimed to investigate the degree of brand awareness of various
soft drink products in relation to background and education of the household, the
consumption pattern of various soft drink products consumed by respondents in the light
of their areas, income levels and education. a sample of 200 respondents comprising
100 form rural area and 100 from urban area were taken. Data are analyzed with the
help of mean. The finding of this study reveals that there is low degree of brand
awareness in rural areas, whereas there is a moderate degree of brand awareness in
urban area. The highly educated rural and urban respondents have high degree of
brand awareness for soft drink products, and the less educated rural and urban
respondents have low degree of brand awareness for soft drink products.

9) Review of Literature Advertising is more than a tool for selling foods and services. It
has one overriding task, to position a brand in the prospectus perception or perceptual
space in relation to competitors, so as to created distinctiveness and preference. To
formulate the problem scientifically, and to point out the importance of undertaking this
study, it is essential to present a brief review of Researches undertaking in this area.

Although the review involved a large number of studies only a few studies which have a
direct and indirect bearing in the present study have been reviewed.
10) Eva-Lena (2006): International Advertising and International sponsorship
respectively influence the local target group in different ways, but also affect
International brand , they have an impact on brand image and brand equity. More over
depending on a persons age consumers view brands differently and thus have an effect
on International brand alone, but also in combination with International Advertising and
International sponsorship together these factors influence the way in which a brand is
perceived and consequently influence consumers preferences

11) Strout R (2008) in his case material Pepsi and Madonna examines the use of
entertainment personalities in advertising commercial products through the example of
Pepsi's use of Madonna. It illustrates how companies try to tie the success of the artist
to their product. The paper demonstrates the need for clear evaluation of the celebrity
endorser, their public image, and if the relationship between the artist and the product
applies to the advertising rules. When Pepsi picked Madonna, the choice turned out to
be too hot to handle. The $5 million campaign featuring the extravagant vocalist had to
be scrapped because of its links to Madonna's highly controversial "Like a Prayer"
music video."
12) David H. Silvera, Austad B (2008) in their research topic have examined whether
consumers infer that celebrity endorsers like the products they endorse, and presents a
model using these inferences and other characteristics of the endorser to predict
attitudes toward the endorsed product. Participants in two experiments examined
written endorsement advertisements and were asked to infer the extent to which the
endorser truly liked the advertised product and to rate the endorser's attractiveness,
similarity to themselves, and knowledge of the product. Attitudes toward the
advertisement, the endorser and the product were also measured. The resulting model
indicated that product attitudes were predicted by inferences about the endorser's liking
for the product and by attitudes toward the endorser.

13) Goddard L, Wilbur N (2009) in their study provide a starting-point for further
research on negative information transference in the celebrity endorsement relationship.
It is crucial that organisations be aware of the risks associated with using celebrities to
endorse their stores and products. Given that these results provide tentative support for
the commonly held belief that a decline in the celebrity's image can impact the image of

the brand, it is important that retailers carefully choose an endorser who currently has a
good image and will likely be able to uphold this image in the future.

14) Dix S, Pougnet S (2009) in their research have found that Athlete role model
endorsers have a positive influence on young adults' product switching behaviour,
complaint behaviour, positive word-of-mouth behaviour and brand loyalty. This confirms
the assumption that sports celebrities are important socialisation agents and can have
significant impact on purchase intentions and behaviours. This research provides useful
insight into the influence of athlete endorsers on young adults and suggests athletes
have a positive influence on young adults' behavioural intentions in switching products,
generating word-of-mouth and establishing brand loyalty.

15) Biswas S, Hussain M, O'Donnell K say that here is a positive, although moderate,
impact of celebrity endorsements on attention and exposure of consumers. Implications
for marketers as well as suggestions for future research are discussed. The article is of
the view that although there is considerable risk in endorsing celebrities for products
and services, the firms need to analyze the various factors that can reduce such risks
and hence increase the likeability of transfer of leverage of the brand image from the
celebrity to the products and services.

16) John Dighton: The Effect of advertising on brand switching and repeat purchasing,
the authors examine switching and repeat purchase effects of advertising in mature,
frequently purchased product categories. They draw on consumer behavior theories of
framing and usage dominance to formulate a logic choice model for measuring these
effects. They estimate the model using single-source scanner data. Their results
suggest that advertising induces brand switching but does not affect the repeat
purchase rates of consumers who have just purchased the brand, a result consistent
with usage dominance rather than framing. They find the switching influence to be
largely confined between the current and previous purchase occasions. They illustrate
the magnitude of this effect and explore potential profitability.
17) Lalitha Balakrishnan* and C.Shalini Kumar: Effect of Celebrity Based
Advertisements on the Purchase Attitude of Consumers towards Durable Products (A
study with reference to the city of Chennai Celebrity Endorsements act as a credible
means of spending money .This is because this is a world of products for which the

value a consumer obtains from purchasing any given variety. This could be for reasons
of social standing-People want to wear the right clothes, drink the right beverages
and use the right fragrances. Specifically a consumer that observes messages for two
different firms products, one products message containing a celebrity endorsed and the
other not, believes the celebrity endorsed product will have more purchases and so be
of higher value.(Clark & Horseman, 2003) Celebrity endorsement is more likely to be
observed for those products having a high price-production cost margin and on a large
customer base. In short, celebrity endorsements are more typical for nationally
marketed products then for local or niche market products and for products such as
running shoes, soft drinks and the like for which the price cost margins are apparently
large.

18) Thomas Michael: Impact of Media on Consumers Brand Preference - A Study on


Carbonated Beverage Market with Reference to Coca-Cola The collected data from the
survey shows that brand preference exists in the carbonated beverage market and the
media efforts affects consumer preferences and their brand choice. Out of 8 different
carbonated beverage brands which featured in this study, Coca-Cola topped the brand
preference table in carbonated beverage industry. Hence it is clear that Coca-Cola is
the favorite carbonated beverage among consumers. Based on this study,
advertisement and taste are the major factors responsible for the success of Coca Cola.
The implication of this is that, other variables does not influence much when brand is
supported by heavy advertisements and appeals to consumers taste buds which
persuades them to continue buying. Majority of the respondents claimed to have known
Coca-Cola over 15 years and Coca-Cola having been in existence for more than 20
years still remain the delight of many consumers of carbonated beverage. It is evident
that the brand has enjoyed a relatively prolonged life cycle. The study also showed that
advertisement is the major source of awareness of Coca-Cola and Television is the
most effective medium as cited by most of the respondents.

Research Methodology

SAMPLE SIZE

The sample size is 50. The questionnaire filled by respondents living


in Mumbai.

SAMPLING TECHNIQUE
Sampling technique used in the survey is convenience sampling considering
the scope and size of survey.
PRIMARY DATA
Data used in the survey is primary data that is collected by administering a
questionnaire to the different age group. The questionnaire was administered
manually
SECONDARY DATA
Secondary data is collected from review of literature from previous studies.

CHAPTER 1

COMPANY PROFILE
Industry Profile:
A soft drink (also called soda, pop, coke, soda pop, fizzy drink, tonic, seltzer,
mineral, sparkling water, lolly water or carbonated beverage) is a beverage that typically
contains water (often, but not always carbonated water), usually a sweetener and
usually a flavoring agent. The sweetener may be sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit
juice, sugar substitutes (in the case of diet drinks) or some combination of these. Soft
drinks may also contain caffeine, colorings, preservatives and other ingredients.
Soft drinks are called "soft" in contrast to "hard drinks" (alcoholic beverages). Small
amounts of alcohol may be present in a soft drink, but the alcohol content must be less
than 0.5% of the total volume if the drink is to be considered non-alcoholic. Fruit
juice, tea, and other such non-alcoholic beverages are technically soft drinks by this
definition but are not generally referred to as such.
Soft drinks may be served chilled or at room temperature, and some, such as Dr.
Pepper, can be served warm. The first marketed soft drinks in the Western
world appeared in the 17th century. They were made of water and lemon juice
sweetened with honey. In 1676, the Compagnie des Limonadiers of Paris was granted a
monopoly for the sale of lemonade soft drinks. Vendors carried tanks of lemonade on
their backs and dispensed cups of the soft drink to thirsty Parisians.

Carbonated drinks:
In the late 18th century, scientists made important progress in replicating
naturally carbonated mineral waters. In 1767, Englishman Joseph Priestley first
discovered a method of infusing water with carbon dioxide to make carbonated
water when he suspended a bowl of distilled water above a beer vat at a local brewery
in Leeds, England. His invention of carbonated water (also known as soda water) is the
major and defining component of most soft drinks.
Priestley found that water treated in this manner had a pleasant taste, and he offered it
to friends as a refreshing drink. In 1772, Priestley published a paper
entitled Impregnating Water with Fixed Air in which he describes dripping oil of
vitriol (or sulfuric acid as it is now called) onto chalk to produce carbon dioxide gas, and
encouraging the gas to dissolve into an agitated bowl of water.
Another Englishman, John Mervin Nooth, improved Priestley's design and sold his
apparatus for commercial use in pharmacies. Swedish chemist Torbern
Bergman invented a generating apparatus that made carbonated water from chalk by
the use of sulfuric acid. Bergman's apparatus allowed imitation mineral water to be
produced in large amounts. Swedish chemist Jon Jacob Berzelius started to add flavors
(spices, juices, and wine) to carbonated water in the late eighteenth century.
Soda fountains vs. bottled sodas:
In 19th century America, the drinking of either natural or artificial
mineral water was considered a healthy practice. The American pharmacists selling
mineral waters began to add herbs and chemicals to unflavored mineral water. They
used birch bark (see birch beer), dandelion, sarsaparilla, fruit extracts, and other
substances. Flavorings were also added to improve the taste. Pharmacies with soda
fountains became a popular part of American culture. Many Americans frequented the
soda fountain on a daily basis. Due to problems in the U.S. glass industry, bottled drinks
were a small portion of the market in the 19th century. (However, they were known in
England. In The Tenant of Wild fell Hall, published in 1848, the caddish Huntingdon,
recovering from months of debauchery, wakes at noon and gulps a bottle of sodawater.) In America, most soft drinks were dispensed and consumed at a soda fountain,
usually in a drugstore or ice cream parlor. In the early 20th century, sales of bottled
soda increased exponentially. In the second half of the 20th century, canned soft drinks
became an important share of the market.

Soft drink bottling industry:


Over 1,500 U.S. patents were filed for a cork, cap, or lid for the carbonated
drink bottle tops during the early days of the bottling industry. Carbonated
drink bottles are under great pressure from the gas. Inventors were trying to find the
best way to prevent the carbon dioxide or bubbles from escaping. In 1892, the "Crown
Cork Bottle Seal was patented by William Painter, a Baltimore, Maryland machine shop
operator. It was the first very successful method of keeping the bubbles in the bottle.
Automatic production of glass bottles:
In 1899, the first patent was issued for a glass-blowing machine for the automatic
production of glass bottles. Earlier glass bottles had all been hand-blown. Four years
later, the new bottle-blowing machine was in operation. It was first operated by the
inventor, Michael Owens, an employee of Libby Glass Company. Within a few years,
glass bottle production increased from 1,400 bottles a day to about 58,000 bottles a
day.
Soft drink production:
Soft drinks are made by mixing dry ingredients and/or fresh ingredients (for
example, lemons, oranges, etc.) with water. Production of soft drinks can be done at
factories or at home.
Soft drinks can be made at home by mixing either a syrup or dry ingredients with
carbonated water. Carbonated water is made using a soda siphon or a home
carbonation system or by dropping dry ice into water. Syrups are commercially sold by
companies such as Soda-Club; dry ingredients are often sold in pouches, in the style of
the popular U.S. drink mix Kool-Aid.
Ingredient quality:
Of most importance is that the ingredient meets the agreed specification on all
major parameters. This is not only the functional parameter (in other words, the level of
the major constituent), but the level of impurities, the microbiological status, and
physical parameters such as color, particle size, etc.

Soft drinks Industry in India:


Soft Drinks in India industry profile provide top-line qualitative and quantitative
summary information including: market size. The profile also contains descriptions of
the leading players including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures
within the market. Essential resource for top-line data and analysis covering the India
soft drinks market.
The soft drinks market consists of retail sale of bottled water, carbonates,
concentrates, functional drinks, juices, RTD tea and coffee, and smoothies. However,
the total market volume for soft drinks market excludes the concentrates category. The
market is valued according to retail selling price (RSP) and includes any applicable
taxes. Any currency conversions used in the creation of this report have been calculated
using constant 2012 annual average exchange rates. The Indian soft drinks market
generated total revenues of $3.8 billion in 2012, representing a compound annual
growth rate (CAGR) of 11% for the period spanning 2009-2012.

Beverage Industry:
The beverage industry is a shifting landscape as volume leading categories such
as soft drinks continue to lose volume versus prior year while functioning and health and
wellness oriented categories enjoy strong volume growth. Functional beverages
continue to be the hottest segment in beverage. Market research firm Zenith
International estimates global per capita consumption of functional beverages will
increase 25% from 2010 to 2013, roughly from 5.5 liters per person to 6.9 liters. Industry
giants Coca Cola (www.coke.com) and Pepsi (www.pepsico.com) continue to diversify
their portfolios, as evidenced with Cokes acquisitions involving Glaceaus vitamin water
(www.glaceau.com), Fuze (www.drinkfuze.com) and its recent investment in Zico
coconut water (www.zico.com).
The beverage industry refers to the industry that produces drinks. Beverage
production can vary greatly depending on which beverage is being made. The website
ManufacturingDrinks.com explains that, "bottling facilities differ in the types of bottling

lines they operate and the types of products they can run". Other bits of required
information include the knowledge of if said beverage is canned or bottled, hot-fill or
cold-fill, and natural or conventional. Innovations in the beverage industry, catalyzed by
requests for non-alcoholic beverages, include: beverage plants, beverage processing,
and beverage packing.

Beverage Production:
Beverage production can be a complicated process if you are new to the
industry. Bottling facilities differ in the types of bottling lines they operate and the types
of products they can run: cans vs bottles, hot-fills vs cold-fill, natural vs conventional etc.
It is critical to understand the requirements of your beverage brand before you begin the
production process. Demand for non-alcoholic beverages has been the catalyst for
innovations in drink production in recent years, including beverage plants, beverage
processing and beverage packing.
No two beverage plants are alike. The beverage process each beverage
production facility specializes in can vary greatly as can the beverage packing
equipment available. There are many types of beverage processing equipment, some of
the capabilities you may need to consider given the requirements of your brand include:

Cold Fill

Hot Fill

Carbonation

Aseptic or tetra pack

Tunnel Pasteurization

Other key considerations are the contract manufacturing fees charged by the beverage
production company to run your product and the geographic location of the facility. If
you wish to distribute your brand in the Northeast but the only facility that can run your
product is located in Southern California, then you need to account for the freight
expense of raw materials as well as finishes product.

Beverage Industry in India:


The food processing industry in India has a total turnover of around USD 65
billion which includes value added products of around USD 20.6 billion. The beverage
industry in India constitutes of around USD 230 million among the USD 65 billion food
processing industry. The major sectors in beverage industry in India are tea and coffee
which are not only sold heavily in the domestic market but are also exported to a range
of leading overseas markets. Half of the tea and coffee products are available in
unpacked or loose form. Among the hot beverages manufactured in India, tea is the
most dominant beverage that is ruling both the domestic and international market even
today.
The taste factor in tea varies according to the taste of individuals in different
countries and the beverage companies in India manufacture the products in accordance
with the taste of the individuals. For example, the inhabitants in the southern parts of
India prefer dust tea whereas the inhabitants in the western part of India prefer loose
tea. The Southern India also prefers coffee a lot. The production capacity of the total
packaged coffee market is 19,600 tones which is approximately a USD 87 million
market. The soft drink market such as carbonated beverages and juices constitutes
around USD 1 billion producing 284 million crates per year. In the peak season, the
consumption capacity reaches 25 million creates per month and during off season the
same goes down to 15 million crates in a month. Pepsi and Coca cola are the two
leading brands in the Indian market. The mineral water market in India is a USD 50
million industry and produces 65 million crates. Around 4.9 million crates is usually
consumed each month but it rises to 5.2 million crates in the peak season.

Chapter 2
Products Profile

Appy Fizz by Parle

Agua Blue (Natural Mineral Water By LR Beverages Pvt Lttd)

Banta (lemon-flavoured soft drink

Bovonto (grape soda produced by Kali Mark)

Campa Cola (popular Indian soda introduced in 1977)

Cloud 9 (energy drink)

Frooti (mango-flavoured drink from Parle Agro)

Frams (Local drink from Pune)

Gold Spot

Grappo Fizz

Ganga (Local drink of Haryana)

Guptas (8 flavoureds soft drinks introduced in 1947)

Juicila (Powdered Soft Drink Concentrate available in Orange, Mango, Lemon, Cola,
Masala, Jaljira )

Limca (lemon-lime soda)

LMN (lemon drink produced by Parle Agro)

Kalimark

Duke's Mangola (mango drink from Dukes bought by PepsiCo)

Duke's Lemonade

Maaza (mango drink from Parle bought by Coca-Cola)

Rasna (powdered soft drink)

Real (fruite juice from Dabur)

Red bull (energy drink)

Thums Up (Cola drink from parle argo then bought by coca cola)

777 (soft drink) (Panner,Cola,Orange,Lemon,Clear Lemon Lime,Mango)

Product Profile:
Coca Cola:
It was launched in the year 1886. It is the flagship brand of the largest
manufacturer, marketer and distributor of nonalcoholic beverages in the world.
Variety:
Cans: 330ml
RGB: 200ml, 300ml,
PET: 500ml, 600ml, 1250ml, 1500ml, 2000ml, 2250ml
Fountain glass: Various sizes
Diet coke:
Diet coke contains plenty of taste but no calories. Diet coke is also known as
Coke light in some countries. It was launched in 1982 in America has become the third
largest soft drink.
Variety:
PET: 600ml
Can: 300ml, 330ml
Thums Up:
Originally introduced in 1977. Thums Up was acquired by the Coca Coal
company in 1993.
Variety:
Cans: 300ml, 330ml
RGB: 200ml, 300ml, 330ml
PET: 500ml, 600ml, 1250ml, 1500ml, 2000ml, 2250ml

Sprite:
Since its inception is 1999, Sprite has not only established itself as a brand which
successfully boasts it's 'cut-thru' perspective with an authentic, edgy, irreverent, urban
and straight forward style, but has also achieved status of an undisputed youth 'badge'
brand. Today Sprite is the most preferred and fastest growing soft drink in India and has
become the second largest soft drink in 2009, aiming for the No.1 spot.
Variety:
Cans: 300ml, 330ml
RGB: 200ml, 300ml, 330ml
PET: 500ml, 600ml, 1250ml, 1500ml, 2000ml, 2250ml
Fountain glass: Various sizes
Fanta:
Fanta entered the Indian market in the year 1993. Perceived as a fun youth
brand. Fanta stands for its vibrant color, tempting taste and tingling bubbles.
Variety:
Cans: 300ml, 330ml
RGB: 200ml, 300ml, 330ml
PET: 500ml, 600ml, 1250ml, 1500ml, 2000ml, 2250ml
Fountain glass: Various sizes
Limca:
It was launched in 1971; Limca has remained unchallenged as the No.1
Sparkling Drink in the Cloudy lemon Segment. The success formula is the sharp fizz
and lemoni bite combined with the single minded proposition of the brand as the
provider of "Freshess".

Variety:
Cans: 300ml, 330ml
RGB: 200ml, 300ml, 330ml
PET: 500ml, 600ml, 1250ml, 1500ml, 2000ml, 2250ml
Fountain glass: Various sizes

Maaza:
It was introduced in the year 1970. Universally loved for its taste, color, thickness
and wholesome properties. Maaza is the mango lovers first choice. In India introduced
in 1976.
Variety:
RGB: 200ml, 250ml
PET: 600ml, 1.2lt
Pocket pack: 200ml
Minute maid Pulpy Orange:
The history of the Minute Maid brand goes as far back as 1945 when the Florida
Food Corporation developed orange juice powder. They branded it Minute Maid, a
name connoting the convenience and the ease of preparation (In a minute). Launched
in 2009.
Variety:
PET: 400ml, 1lt, 1.25lt

Minute maid Nimbu Fresh:


It was launched first in South of India in January 2010. Minute Maid Nimbu Fresh
started refreshing the whole India by April 2010.

Variety:
PET: 400ml
RGB: 200ml
Tetrapack: 200ml

Burn:
Burn is the Coca cola Companys most successful energy drink brand.
Successful world over sold in over 80 countries across the world. Launched in North
Europe in the year 2000 and it has expanded to over 80 countries over a short 10 year
period.
Variety:
Can: 300ml

Kinley Water:
Kinley water comes with the assurance of safety from The Coca-Cola Company.
That is why we introduced Kinley with reverse osmosis along with the latest technology
to ensure purity of our product. Because we believe that right to pure, safe drinking
water is fundamental.
Variety:
PET: 500ml, 1000ml, 2lt, 20lt, 25lt

Kinley Soda:
Launched in 2002 Kinley soda today no:1 national soda brand.

Variety:
PET: 500ml

Schweppes:
Schweppes was launched in India in 1999 after the international take over of the
brand from cadbury schweppes.
Variety:
Bitter Lemon: (Glass bottle 250ml)
Tonic Water: (Glass bottle 250ml)
Ginger Ale: (Glass bottle 250ml)
Soda Water: (Glass bottle 250ml)

Georgia Gold:
Introduced in 2004, Georgia Gold range of tea and coffee beverages is the
perfect solution for your office and restaurant needs.
Variety:
Hot beverages:
Coffee, Tea, Hot chocolate. Available in 90-150ml.
Cold beverages:
Lemon Iced tea, Peach Iced tea, Cold coffee. Available in 200-400ml.
Bottlers:
In general, The Coca-Cola Company (TCCC) and/or subsidiaries only produces
(or produce) syrup concentrate which is then sold to various bottlers throughout the
world who hold a Coca-Cola franchise. Coca-Cola bottlers, who hold territorially
exclusive contracts with the company, produce finished product in cans and bottles from
the concentrate in combination with filtered water and sweeteners.
The bottlers then sell, distribute and merchandise the resulting Coca-Cola
product to retail stores, vending machines, restaurants and food service distributors.

One notable exception to this general relationship between TCCC and bottlers is
fountain syrups in the United States, where TCCC bypasses bottlers and is responsible
for the manufacture and sale of fountain syrups directly to authorized fountain
wholesalers and some fountain retailers.
In 2005, The Coca-Cola Company had equity positions in 51 unconsolidated
bottling, canning and distribution operations which produced approximately 58% of
volume. Significant investees include:
36% of Coca-Cola Enterprises which produces (by population) for 78% of USA,
98% of Canada and 100% of Great Britain (but not Northern Ireland), continental France
and the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Belgium and Monaco.

CHAPTER NO 3

Data analysis & interpretation

Consumption of soft drinks according to gender

gender
Male
Female
Total

percentag Frequency
e
58%
29
42%
21
100%
50

Interpretation & Findings


According to the above graph 58% of the respondents consuming soft drinks are male
And 42% of the respondents consuming soft drinks are female.

Age of the respondents ?


Age
15-20
20-25
25-30
above 30
Total

Percentage Frequency
44%
22
22%
11
28%
14
6%
3
100%
50

Interpretation & Findings


The above chart is about the age group of the respondent.i.e 44% of the respondent
belong to the age group 15-20,22% of the respondents belong to the age group
20-25,28% of the respondant belong to age group 25-30, 6% of the respondents
belong to age group above 30.

Which drinks do you prefer ?

Q3)
Carbonated
drinks
Energy drinks
Fruit drinks
dairy drinks
Total

Percentage Frequency
44%
22
22%
16%
18%
100%

11
8
9
50

Interpretation & Findings :


According to the survey. 44% of the respondents Prefer carbonated drinks ,22% of the
respondents prefer Energy drinks,18% of the respondents prefer Dairy drinks and the
least preferable drinks is Fruit drinks which is only 16% of the total respondents.

Rank your preference among the following soft drinks variants 1-3, 1is the most
Preferred, the 2 is the least preferred and 3 is the not preferred ?

Carbonate
d
Energy
Fruit
Dairy

Interpretation :

Percentage
Most
Least
preferre preferre
d
d
38%
46%

Dont
preferre
d
16%

Most
preferre
d
19

28%
56%
26%

30%
8%
32%

14
28
13

42%
36%
42%

Frequency
Least
preferre
d
23
21
18
21

Total
Dont
preferre
d
8

100% 50

15
4
16

100% 50
100% 50
100% 50

In the above graph the respondents are asked to rank the soft drinks according
to their preference, and they have to rank the categories of soft drinks according to
their preference, i.e most preferred, least preferred, dont preferred. In carbonated
drinks among the 50 respondents 38% of them mostly prefer,46% of them prefer least,
16% of them dont prefer. In energy drinks 28% mostly prefer, 42% prefer least, 30%
dont prefer, In fruit drinks 56% mostly prefer,36% prefer least , 32% dont prefer, in
dairy drinks 26% mostly prefer 42% prefer least, 32% dont prefer.

Which flavour do you prefer among the carbonated drinks ?

Q5)
Orange
Cola
Lime
Total

percentag Frequency
e
34%
17
48%
24
18%
9
100%
50

Interpretation & findings :


According to the survey, 34% of the respondents prefer Orange flavor, 48%, of
the respondents prefer cola flavour, 18% of the of the respondents prefer lime flavour

Which brands do you prefer among the carbonated drinks ?

Q6)
Coca Cola
Thumps up
Mirinda
Sprite
Total

Percentage Frequency
22%
11
32%
16
28%
14
18%
9
100%
50

Interpretation & findings


In the above diagram.22% of the respondents prefer Coca Cola brand,32% of the
respondents prefer Thumps up,28% of the respondent prefer Miranda, and 18% of the
respondents prefer Spirit.

Which types of packaging do you prefer ?

Q7)
Glass bottle

Percentage Frequency
20%
10

Can
Tetra pack
Pet
Total

62%
14%
4%
100%

31
7
2
50

Interpretation & Findings


According to the above graph, 20% of the respondents like to prefer Carbonated soft
drinks in Can packaging, 62% of the respondents prefer can packaging, 14% of the
respondents prefer tetra pack packaging,4% of the respondents prefer pet packaging.

Which brands do you prefer among Energy drinks ?

Q8)
Red bull

Percentage Frequency
50%
25

Monster
Urzza
Cloud 9
Total

22%
20%
8%
100%

11
10
4
50

Interpretation & Findings :


As per the survey, 50% of the respondents prefer red bull ,22% of the respondents
prefer monster,20% of the respondents prefer urzza and 8% of the respondents prefer
cloud 9.

Which brand do you prefer among Fruit drinks?

Q9)
Maaza

Percentage Frequency
30%
15

Tropicana
Minute Mad
Real
Total

42%
10%
18%
100%

21
5
9
50

Interpretation & Findings :


In the above diagram, 38% of the respondents prefer Maaza brand ,42% of the
respondents prefer Tropicana ,10% of the respondents prefer Minute mad, 18% of the
respondents prefer Real brand.

Which flavour do you like to have in fruit drinks ?

Interpretation & Findings :


As the above, 28% of the respondents prefer strawberry flavour in fruit drinks,
36% of the respondents prefer lime essence, 18% of the respondents prefer rose
essence,22% of the respondents prefer vanilla essence.

Which product do you prefer in Dairy drinks ?

Q11)
Lassi
Butter Milk
Flavoured
milk
Amul cool
Total

Percentage Frequency
50%
25
18%
9
14%
7
18%
100%

9
50

Interpretation & Findings :


According to the survey,50% of the respondents prefer lassi,18% of the respondents
prefer buttermiklk,14% of the respondents prefer flavoured milk,18% of the respondents
prefer Amul cool.

Which type of packaging do you prefer in Dairy products?

Q12)
Glass bottle

Percentage Frequency
46%
23

Plastic pouch
Tetra pack
Total

24%
30%
100%

12
15
50

interpretation
According to the above diagram,46% of the respondent are like to have dairy product in
glass bottle packaging, 24% of the respondents like to have dairy product in Plastic
pouch,30% of the respondents like to have dairy product in Tetra pack

Q13)

Do you think that soft drinks are good substitute for natural home drinks?
Percentage Frequency

Yes
No

40%
60%

20
30

Interpretation:
In the above diagram, 60% of the respondent think that soft drinks are not good
substitute for natural home drinks, and 40% of the respondent think that soft drinks are
good substitute for natural home drinks.

Q14) why do you purchase soft drinks for ?

Q14)
When you
thirsty
Addiction
On occasion
Total

Percentage Frequency
22%
11
30%
48%
100%

15
24
50

Interpretation:
According to the above diagram,22% of the respondent purchase when they are
thirsty,30% of the respondent purchase because of addiction,48% of the respondent
purchase on occasion.

Q15) from where do you prefer purchasing soft drinks?

Q15)
Super Market
D-mart
Retail
Other
Total

Percentage Frequency
40%
20
16%
8
36%
18
8%
4
100%
50

According to the above survey, 22% of the respondent purchase from super
market,16% of the respondent purchase from D-mart, 36% of the respondent purchase
from retail shop, 8% of the respondent purchase from other.

Q16) what is your buying pattern ?


Q16)
Regularly
Frequently
Occasionally
Total

Percentage Frequency
34%
17
42%
21
24%
12
100%
50

Interpretation :
The above diagram is about the buying pattern of soft drinks,42% of the respondents
buy frequently,34%of the respondents buy regularly, and 24% of the respondent buy
occasionally when they have parties or birthday etc.

Q17) Does the advertising plays important role towards brand preference ?

Q17)
Yes
No
Total

Percentage Frequency
58%
29
42%
21
100%
50

According to the above diagram,58% of the respondent agree or tick that advertisement
plays an important role and 42% of the respondent are not agree or not tricked.

Q18) If yes, which media influenced your brand preference?

Q18)
Television
Newspaper
Pamplets
Word of
mouth
Total

Percentage Frequency
40%
20
8%
4
4%
2
6%
3
58%

29

Interpretation & finding:


According to the survey,40% of the respondent get influenced by television,8% of the
respondent get influenced by newspaper,4% of the respondent get influenced by
pamphlets,6% of the respondent are influenced by word of mouth.

Q19) Does packaging affect your choice when it comes to choosing Soft drinks ?
Q19)
Yes

Percentage Frequency
66%
33

No
Total

34%
100%

17
50

INTERPRETATION :
According to the above diagram 66% of the respondents choice are affected by the
packaging of the soft drinks. and 34% of the respondents choice are not affected by the
packaging of soft drinks.

20) Are you willing to spend more if most packaging is more appealing ?
Q20)
Yes

Percentage Frequency
42%
21

No
Total

58%
100%

29
50

Interpretation :
In the above diagram 58% of the respondent not willing to pay more for appealing
packaging, and 42% of the respondent are ready to pay extra or more for appealing
packaging.

LIMITATIONS OF THE PROJECT :

Time and money are critical factors limiting this study.

The data provided by the prospects may not be exact as they too have their
limitations.

Different demographic groups and geographic location could be included but this
research topic is restricted to Mumbai city only.

SCOPE OF STUDY

The main aim of the study is to find out preferred brand of cold-drinks by the consumers
in Mumbai City. This study is helpful to the manufactures to identity the consumer
perception, taste, beliefs, and behaviour for improving
1. SAMPLE SIZE
The sample size is 50 respondents taken from Mumbai city
2. SOURCES OF DATA
The data has been collected from both :

The primary data are collected from the respondents directly.


The secondary data was collected from the review of literature.

CONCLUSION

The Sampling activity was a good first step into the area of Marketing and Sales.
A good understanding of the market was accomplished as around 50 people were
questionaire. This even helped in the polishing of communication skills, a must-have to
survive and make it big in the present world. It even gave a good understanding of
behavior of consumers when placed in different situations. It was a good opportunity to
work on the skill of patience, as a large number of customers. It helped in developing
the kind of relations one needs to uphold in the corporate world and it helped in building
up the right attitude.
As all the points in the above mentioned paragraph, are the must-have skills for
anyone in the field of Marketing and Sales, the project period was a good experience
and a good stepping stone into the real business world.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Websites:

www.coca-colaindia.com

www.manufacturingdrinks.com

http://www.euromonitor.com/soft-drinks-in-india/report

www.inventors.about.com

ANNEXURE

CONSUMER PREFERENCE AMONG SOFT DRINKS VARIANTS AND BRANDS

NAME :

GENDER :

Male

Female

Age :

15-20

20-25

25-30

Above 30 [

Which drinks do you prefer?

Carbonated drinks

Energy drinks

Fruit drinks

Dairy drinks

Rank your preference among the following soft drinks variants1-3, 1 is the
most preferred, the 2 is the least preferred and 3 is the not preferred?
1 Most
preferred

2 Least
preferred

3 dont prefer

a)Carbonated
drinks
b)Energy drinks
c)Fruit drinks
d)Dairy drinks

Which Flavour do you prefer among the carbonated drinks?

Orange

Cola

Lime

Which brands do you prefer among the carbonated drinks?

Coca Cola

Thumps up[

Mirinda

Sprit

Which types of packaging do you prefer?

Glass bottle

Can

Tetra pack

Pet

[
[

Which brands do you prefer among Energy drinks?

Red bull

Monster

Urzza

Cloud 9

Which brand do you prefer among Fruit drinks?

Maaza

Tropicana

Minute mad

Real

Which Flavour do you like to have in Fruit drinks?

Strawberry essence

Lime essence

Rose essence

Vanilla essence

Which product do you prefer in Dairy drinks?

Lassi

Butter milk

Flavored milk

Amul cool

Which type of packaging do you prefer in Dairy products

Glass bottle

Plastic pouch

Tetra pack

Do you think that soft drinks are goods substitutes for natural home
drinks?

Yes

No

Why do you purchase soft drinks for?

When you feel thirsty

Addiction

On occasion

]
[

From where do you prefer purchasing soft drinks?

Super market

D-mart

Retail

Other

What is your buying pattern?

Regularly

Frequently

Occasionally

Does the advertising plays important role towards brand preference?

Yes

b)

No

If yes, which media influenced your brand preference?

Television

Newspaper

Pamphlets

Word of mouth

Does packaging affect your choice when it comes to choosing soft drinks?

Yes

No

Are you willing to spend more if most packaging is more appealing?

Yes

No