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Tutorial 1 3D Models

CHAPTER 5: Optimization

Chapter Summary: In this chapter, the concept of design optimization is explored. The questions
on what is optimization and why we need it are answered. The tutorial outlines procedure for optimizing
the shaft of the previous chapter. The mass of the shaft is optimized to its minimum value, without
exceeding the maximum VMS value that was determined in the static analysis.
5.1 Optimization - An Overview
Optimization allows you to refine your design so that the final model consists of the best possible design
without violating a set limit. For example, if you wish to design a plate with holes, your objective will be
to select dimension for the plate such that the part is safe and the maximum VMS do not exceed the
yield strength of the part. However, if you are concerned with the weight of the plate, either for
economic reason or meeting the requirement that the weight of the plate be as light as possible, you will
run several static analyses by varying one or more parameters, e.g., hole radius, plate thickness, location
of the holes, etc. The number of static analyses to achieve the optimum results would be formidable and
very time consuming.
Creo automates the process of optimizing the given parameters by using an algorithm and varying the
parameters in selected combinations to achieve the same goal as mentioned above. In Optimization
Design Analysis, user is required to define a goal and a limit for the design. In the example cited above,
we might be interested in finding the lowest mass (Goal) without compromising the maximum VMS
(Limit).
We will use the same part that was used in the previous chapter, Figure 5.1. We will optimize the weight
of the shaft by changing the fillet radius and the hole radius.
Goal: Make the shaft lightest possible (Total Mass)
Limit: VMS < 25, 200 psi (see chapter 3)

Figure 5.1: Shaft with a fillet and hole

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Tutorial 3: Optimization
5.2 Problem Definition
Optimize the design of the part shown in Figure 5.1 by varying the fillet and hole radii so that the part
has the lowest possible mass without exceeding the maximum VMS value of 25,200 psi.

Solution
We will create the parameter range which does not violate the model geometry.
Table 5.1: Parameters and their ranges
Parameter Value
Current
Parameter
Value

Start
Value

End
Value

Units

Fillet Radius (frad)

1.0

0.5

1.5

in

Hole Radius (hrad)

1.0

0.5

1.5

in

Note: The validity of the parameters ranges


was verified in the Global Sensitivity study,
they do not violate the model geometry.
Optimization analysis requires that we run a
static analysis first. We have already done it in
Chapter 3, so we will use it here.
Create a New Optimization Design Study by
clicking on the Analysis and Studies icon.
Click on File > New Optimization Design
Study.
This will open the Optimization Study
Definition window. Enter the data as shown in
the completed window of Figure 5.2.
Close the window by clicking OK.
In the Analysis and Design Studies window,
run the analysis by clicking on the green flag.
As mentioned earlier, Creo has a built in
algorithm that varies the parameters so that the
new values that are generated will move
towards the optimization. The process
5.2: Optimization Study window.
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involves several runs and will take some time before you will see the familiar message, Run
Completed.
If the run is successful, the .rpt file will list the best design and the new
parameter values, as shown below:
Your final parameter values will be similar to the above values. The
analysis has optimized and reduced the mass to 7.5488e-01 (the original
value was 7.960070e-01, see Chapter 3), fillet radius as 1.5, and the hole
radius as 1.24411 units. Your result may differ from these values,
depending on the algorithm, which varies the parameters in your analysis.
Also, the Goal can be satisfied by several different values of the parameters, as well as, there may not be
any mass reduction because the given range of parameters violates the selected Limit. There is another
possibility you should keep in mind, your design might be already an optimum design, in which case
you, you will see a statement in the .rpt file that No Improvement to the design is found.

5.3 Results
Let us look at the results. We will create two plots: 1. Parameter variation (Pass) versus mass and, 2.
Parameter variation versus maximum VMS.
In the Analysis and Design Studies window, make sure the shaft3d_opt file is highlighted. Click
on the Review Results
icon.
Complete the Results Window Definition, as follows:
Name: Mass_graph
Display: Graph
Quantity: Measure
Measure: total_mass (select it from the list of the Measures)
Click OK and Show. Creo will graph the variation is the mass of the model as the parameters are varied.
Figure 5.3(a).
Repeat the procedure to graph maximum VMS. Figure 5.3(b).
If you would like to show only one graph in separate windows, you can do so by following these steps:
In the Creo Simulate Results window, click the Display Definition icon on top of the screen
In the Display Results window, select the graph you would like to see and click OK. Your graph will be
displayed in a single window.

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Figure 5.3(a): Mass Optimization

Figure 5.3(b): VMS Variation

Note the variations in the mass values. The mass is lowest at Pass 2, but the VMS violates the Limit (see
the .rpt file). Also, at Pass 6, the VMS is lowest but the mass isnt, so the analysis goes to the 7th pass
where the Limit and the Goal are both satisfied, and the analysis terminates.
This concludes our discussion on Optimization.

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