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www.offshore-mag.com
August 2015

World Trends and Technology for Offshore Oil and Gas Operations

North Sea outlook

Subsalt imaging
Reservoir modeling
Heavy lift
Marginal field
development

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When you choose a DRIL-QUIP Wellhead System


Setting the standards for safe, reliable and fully validated subsea wellhead systems
enables DRIL-QUIP to deliver peace of mind.
We are committed to providing the most dependable subsea wellheads in the industry. The company utilizes
technologically advanced design practices consistent with industry standards for design verifcation and system
level analysis. We have taken the process one step further our design integrity check includes physical
system validation testing in accordance with API Technical Report 1PER15K-1 recommendations. Our subsea
wellhead systems are compliant to the latest editions of API 17D and API 6A (PR2). DRIL-QUIPS BigBore II-H
subsea wellhead casing hanger and seal arrangement is now qualifed to API 6A Appendix F Group 4 dynamic
test requirements. The knowledge obtained through this process enabled us to develop the next generation
35-inch mandrel wellhead system, suitable for HPHT applications. This wellhead system, with a new and highly
engineered wellhead profle, provides sufcient structural capacity and fatigue resistance to meet industry
needs for future decades of drilling and production.
Our Quality Management System utilizes Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) methodology to ensure
design and process tasks produce reliable, quality wellhead components each and every time.
Come see us at the following events:
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International Edition
Volume 75, Number 8
August 2015
CONTENTS

Celebrating 60 Years of Trends, Tools, and Technology

38

GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS


Mexico opens up offshore areas
for new seismic surveys ......................................................... 46
Mexicos National Hydrocarbons Commission recently opened its
waters to allow international seismic companies to shoot and sell acquired data, for the first time in over 75 years, ahead of prospective new
bidding rounds. The event is the first in a series of petroleum auctions
that opened the nations energy industry to new investment, which is
expected to bring in an estimated $62.5 billion by 2018 and increasing
annual output by 500,000 b/d.

Baker Hughes, Shell release


jointly developed reservoir modeling software ...................... 50

NORTH SEA
UK operators reviewing costs
at all levels to sustain future activity ..................................... 34
Britains North Sea producers face a struggle to remain in business.
The sectors operating costs are among the worlds highest, with some
of the older, higher-maintenance fields becoming a liability at the current oil price despite falling rig and service rates. At the same time, it is
in the operators interest to keep their facilities running as long as possible to avoid sky-high decommissioning bills. Oil & Gas UKs recent
Cost Efficiency conference in London outlined ways in which operators
and contractors on the shelf are managing the situation.

Lundin joining major league


of Norway offshore producers ................................................ 38
Lundin Norway is on a steeply upward production curve after converting its first two major exploration successes offshore Norway into new
development hubs. With the Edvard Grieg field in the central Norwegian North Sea on track to produce first oil later this year, development
is under way of the nearby giant Johan Sverdrup field, and appraisal
continuing of the significant Alta discovery in the Barents Sea, the
company has a very bright future, according to Managing Director
Kristin Frvik.

Baker Hughes recently introduced its JewelSuite 6 modeling software


to the oil and gas industry. JewelSuite 6 is the first result of its collaboration with Shell under a software license and joint development
agreement that reaches back to 2013. The new version is based upon
the JewelEarth 6 platform and offers users a first version of a suite of
fully-integrated applications, including Subsurface Modeling, Reservoir
Stimulation, GeoMechanics, and more.

Depth domain inversion bridges the divide


between seismic imaging, rock properties ............................ 54
Schlumberger has recently developed a depth domain inversion technique aimed at improving the consistency between structural imaging
and rock property estimation. The technique performs amplitude
inversion directly in the depth domain, with a workflow that uses point
spread functions to capture and correct for space-, depth-, and dipdependent illumination effects resulting from the acquisition geometry
and complex geology.

50

Industry reassessing potential


of Irish Atlantic Margin ........................................................... 42
The Irish offshore Atlantic Margin is one of the final frontier regions
in northwest Europe and one that is largely underexplored. However,
there are signs that this may change as a result of improvements in
Irelands fiscal regime, advances in geological understanding, and the
development of new technologies. Recent successful exploration on
the conjugate margins of the Atlantic offshore Canada in the west,
the west of Shetland region to the north, and West Africa to the south
has drawn attention to the prospectivity of the Irish Atlantic Margin.
There is a sense of anticipation as the Sept. 16 deadline approaches
for Irelands 2015 Atlantic Margin Licensing Round, with all the basins
opened for licensing.

Offshore (ISSN 0030-0608) is published 12 times a year, monthly by PennWell, 1421 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa, OK 74112. Periodicals class postage paid at Tulsa, OK, and additional offices.
Copyright 2015 by PennWell. (Registered in U.S. Patent Trademark Office.) All rights reserved. Permission, however, is granted for libraries and others registered with the Copyright Clearance
Center, Inc. (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, Phone (978) 750-8400, Fax (978) 646-8600 to photocopy articles for a base fee of $1 per copy of the article plus 35 per page.
Payment should be sent directly to the CCC. Requests for bulk orders should be addressed to the Editor. Subscription prices: US $123.00 per year, Canada/Mexico $ 145.00 per year, All other
countries $202.00 per year (Airmail delivery: $283.00). Worldwide digital subscriptions: $123.00 per year. Single copy sales: US $12.00 per issue, Canada/Mexico $13.00 per issue, All other
countries $17.00 per issue (Airmail delivery: $26.00). Back issues are available upon request. POSTMASTER send form 3579 to Offshore, P.O. Box 3264, Northbrook, IL 60065-3264. To
receive this magazine in digital format, go to www.offshoresubscribe.com.

the heart of the matter

International Edition

CUSTOM
REPRINTS
Take Advantage of your
Editorial Exposure

Volume 75, Number 8


August 2015
DRILLING & COMPLETION
MWD/LWD advances should help boost a depressed market .................................. 58
One sector that seems to be retaining its strength in the face of depressed prices is the measurement-while-drilling and the logging-while-drilling market. For its part, the service industry
knows that it must invest in new technology whose principle objectives are cost-reduction, dry
hole reduction, and/or improvement of field recovery factors. And they have achieved some
notable successes in delivering on these results.

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory ........................................................................... 60


Get the latest information on measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling
(LWD) tools and services for 2015.

Downhole deployment valve improves efficiency in underbalanced operations .... 72

REPRINTS ARE IDEAL FOR:


New Product Announcements
Sales Aid For Your Field Force
PR Materials & Media Kits
Direct Mail Enclosures
Customer & Prospect
Communications/Presentations
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Engagements
Recruitment & Training
Packages
For additional information, please

Deepwater prospects and high-pressure/high-temperature wells are prone to serious health,


safety, and environmental risks, including potential damage to the formation itself. Adding more
equipment and bringing on more personnel is one way to manage these challenges, but that just
incurs more expense to an already costly endeavor. A new generation of sophisticated drilling
methods, procedures, and specially designed equipment has been introduced to the region to
help contain costs and mitigate risks inherent in precarious environments like the North Sea.

ENGINEERING, CONSTRUCTION, & INSTALLATION


Giant Mariner jacket designed for longevity, stability in severe storms .................. 74
This summer, Saipem is due to launch and install the jacket for the Mariner field platform east of
the Shetland Isles. The $7-billion project is the largest current greenfield development in the UK
North Sea, and Statoils first as operator in the UK sector. The 22,400-ton jacket and the 54,000ton topsides, to be installed next spring, will form the production, drilling and quarters platform,
with produced oil stored on a floating storage unit alongside for offloading to a shuttle tanker.

Detailed crane analysis critical to platform life extension, decommissioning ........ 76


Understanding structural fatigue in offshore cranes and their overall condition is necessary to
safeguard the integrity of deck operations and to comply with safety requirements. It may also
prove to be critical as many of these cranes and their components are yet to enter the toughest stage of their life cycle. During the decommissioning of platforms, the demands placed on
offshore cranes can be greatest at the very end of their working lives.

More UK operators submitting plans for platform, subsea removal programs ....... 80
Decommissioning activity is accelerating on the UK continental shelf. According to industry
association Oil & Gas UK, the number of fields expected to cease production in 2014-19 is now
close to 80, up 6% on last years estimate, as rising operating costs and lower oil prices shorten
fields economic lifespans. The total estimated decommissioning bill to 2040 has also increased
by around 11% to 46 billion ($71.4 billion).

contact Rhonda Brown at Foster


Printing Service, the official reprint
provider for Offshore.

Call Rhonda at
866.879.9144 ext. 194
or pennwellreprints@
fosterprinting.com
4 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

PRODUCTION OPERATIONS
Concept, design key to developing marginal fields .................................................. 82
Management of the project delivery phases is well understood, with focus on fixed scope,
management of change, and schedule risk. How to best tackle the conceptual phases of project
development is not so well defined. Marginal field development in many ways focuses the engineering challenge into the early phase of the project. In a mature basin like the UK continental
shelf, the design will often be heavily influenced by access to infrastructure, either to host,
control, process or export the hydrocarbon, meaning that the design will also need to overcome
additional constraints over and above greenfield development.

LINER HANGER SYSTEMS

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Drilling & Formation Evaluation

Well Construction

Completion & Stimulation

Production

International Edition

The Petroleum Industry

Volume 75, Number 8


August 2015

BIG PICTURE
Youve Been Seeking!

COVER: While the North Sea is facing


significant E&P challenges, some operators are still finding new opportunities and developing new resource plays
in the region. One example can be seen
with Lundin Norways development of
the Edvard Grieg field in the central
Norwegian North Sea, which is on track
to produce first oil later this year. In
early July, the final (accommodation)
module for the Edvard Grieg topsides
left the Kvaerner shipyard in Stord,
Norway, bound for the Edvard Grieg oil
field in block 16/1 in production license
PL338, 45 km (28 mi) south of the Grane
and Balder fields and 180 km (112 mi)
west of Stavanger. The topsides will
consist of a main deck module, a combined utility module and living quarters,
a process module and a flare tower.
(Photo courtesy Lundin Norway)

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SUBSEA
Unconventional methods offer wax remediation options ......................................... 86

Joseph Hilyards timely


book provides a broad
perspective on the oil and
gas industry, with primary
focus on the United States.
It takes the reader on a tour
of the operations used to
fnd and evaluate resources,
and then to produce, store,
and deliver oil and gas.

FLOWLINES & PIPELINES


Operators planning more than 6,500 miles of offshore pipelines through 2019 ..... 90

ORDER YOUR
COPY TODAY!

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1.800.752.9764

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6 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

In recent years, wax control and remediation have become serious issues in deepwater fields,
especially if long tiebacks are involved. Wax reduces the flowline cross sectional area, restricting and in some cases completely impeding the flow of produced hydrocarbons. This article
discusses unconventional wax remediation methods that have been developed to address the situations in which traditional methods are not usable or not effective, along with the new techniques
to determine the locations of the wax deposits along a flowline, and the thickness of the deposits.

Operators and developers are studying, planning, and building just over 6,577 mi (10,582 km) of
oil and gas pipelines to bring these supplies from offshore fields to onshore markets. The total
reflects a decrease from last years offshore pipeline construction survey, which showed a total
of 7,057 mi (11,355 km). This years total represents a 6.8% decrease from last year.

2015 Global Offshore Pipeline Construction Survey ................................................. 92


The fourth annual Global Offshore Pipeline Construction Survey provides a detailed project-byproject listing of all the major large-diameter offshore oil and gas pipeline systems being built,
planned, and studied.
D E P A R T M E N T S

Online .................................................... 8
Comment ............................................. 10
Data ..................................................... 12
Global E&P .......................................... 14
Offshore Europe .................................. 18
Gulf of Mexico ..................................... 20
Subsea Systems ................................. 22
Vessels, Rigs, & Surface Systems ...... 24

Drilling & Production .......................... 26


Geosciences ........................................ 28
Offshore Automation Solutions .......... 30
Regulatory Perspectives..................... 32
Business Briefs ................................. 105
Advertisers Index............................. 111
Beyond the Horizon .......................... 112

PennWell

1455 West Loop South, Suite 400, Houston, TX 77027 U.S.A.


Tel: (01) 713 621-9720 Fax: (01) 713 963-6296

Available at

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Offshore-mag.com

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8 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

The latest news is posted daily for the offshore oil and gas industry covering
technology, companies, personnel moves, and products.

New tools and resources


Offshore Learning Center
Offshore magazine has partnered with the University of Houston to research
segments of the offshore oil and gas industry and evaluate and organize the
best available online videos into special collections. The Offshore Learning
Center currently contains six major collections with 279 videos, 62 posters, 19
featured articles, and other related links to materials and professional events.
http://www.offshore-mag.com/learning-center/learn-more.html

New upcoming webcasts


Offshore Design Optioneering using Cloud Computing
Cloud computing opens up to offshore engineering teams the opportunity to
take advantage of almost unlimited computing power and data storage capability to support their analyses. This webinar will demonstrate how this computing power can be applied to optimize the design of offshore structures and to
automate the process of quality assurance for engineering analysis.
Register now to attend the August 19th webcast where, using Bentley Systems
CONNECT cloud services as an example, this presentation will explain how
specialist engineering analysis software can be extended to the cloud to investigate more design alternatives and produce a more optimal result. It will also
review how automating the quality assurance process associated with adopting
new technology on a project can allow one to take advantage of new software in a
more timely fashion and with lower overhead.
http://www.offshore-mag.com/webcasts/offshore/2015/08/
offshore-design-optioneering-using-cloud-computing.html

Anadarkos decommissioning
of the first-ever cell spar in the Gulf of Mexico
The Red Hawk spar made history throughout its design life, commissioned
and decommissioned as the first of its kind. Heralded as the first cell spar ever
built, it remains the lone cell spar ever fabricated just slightly 10 years after its
inception. Decommissioned in September 2014, it then earned distinction of
being the deepest floating production unit to be retired in the Gulf of Mexico.
Register now to attend the August 26th webcast where Ryan Kavanagh, a facilities engineer and project manager working in Anadarko Petroleum Corp.s
Deepwater Facilities group, will discuss the decommissioning of the first-ever
cell spar in the GoM.
http://www.offshore-mag.com/webcasts/offshore/2015/08/anadarkosdecommissioning-of-the-first-ever-cell-spar-in-the-gulf-of-mexico.html

New maps, posters, and surveys


2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory
2015 Brazil Oil & Gas Concession Map
2015 Worldwide Survey of Deepwater Jack-Up Rigs
2015 Worldwide MODU Construction/New Order Survey
2015 Worldwide Survey of Subsea Construction Vessels
2015 Worldwide Survey of Stimulation Vessels
http://www.offshore-mag.com/maps-posters.html

    
 
  

   

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Opportunities still to be found in North Sea E&P


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The North Sea is this months geographic nexus, but operations there range from
field abandonment to frontier exploration. In this sense, most every operating arena
in the world has something in common with some portion of the North Sea. What the
conditions are in the North Sea very much depends upon ones point of view. Looking at the UK sector, the service growth area seems to be in decommissioning. While
decommissioning is an income stream to some, it is a big expense to operators already
dealing with declines in oil sales revenues. On the plus side, Ireland is taking steps to
foster exploration of its offshore Atlantic Margin, a comparatively frontier region with
potential growth. Looking into the Norwegian sector of the North Sea, circumstances
vary greatly; some operators expect strong production from new projects in the north,
while others face declines in older fields.

Decommissioning costs
Taking a closer look at UK North Sea decommissioning, estimates call for billions in
spending as existing fields age and the cost of maintaining production goes up in the
face of soft oil prices. At this writing, Britains Oil and Gas Authority has in hand 23 decommissioning applications. The Oil & Gas UK counts about 80 fields that are expected
to stop producing by 2019, and the estimate has been rising. To 2040, spending on decommissioning could exceed $70 billion. Offshore Contributing Editor Nick Terdre
delves deeper into the circumstances starting on page 80.

Change Culture
The change in the nature of the economics of operations in the UK sector has led Total, for one, to adapt its approach to operating with the squeeze of costly decommissioning, maintaining production in older fields on one side, and the price of oil on the other.
Cost reduction and cost control are becoming the by-words. Total calls its response to
lower prices and higher maintenance costs Change Culture. The company notes that
similar factors exist elsewhere in the world and that the approach could have applications in offshore arenas outside the North Sea. Jeremy Beckman, Offshores EditorEurope, spoke to Total officials, and presents his findings on page 34.

Good news
Ireland, on the other hand, is looking forward to a licensing round this year, and has
made efforts to spur interest by making fiscal conditions more attractive and by providing seismic data for prospective bidders. One reason for the optimism is the success on
the conjugate margins of the Atlantic Ocean. The Irish Atlantic Margin encompasses a
number of basins that have seen little exploration, but do offer working petroleum systems and billions of barrels of estimated recoverable volumes. Hannon Westwoods
Catherine Caulfield and John Corr describe these prospects on page 42.
And, there is the $7-billion Mariner project under way east of the Shetland Isles.
Statoil is the operator and expects to complete installation of the platform in 2017. The
22,400-ton jacket and the 54,000-ton topsides, to be installed next spring, will form the
production, drilling, and quarters platform, with oil stored on an FSU alongside for
offloading to a shuttle tanker. Statoil aims to start production in early 2017 and to keep
the field in production for 30 years. Offshore Editor-Europe Jeremy Beckman has
the details on page 74.

Prospects to the north


In the Norwegian North Sea, Lundin is working on a project that could boost its total
production numbers three-fold with the Edvard Grieg development joining Johan Sverdrup and its Barents Sea discovery at Alta. Norways government has authorized Phase
1 of Johan Sverdrup. Offshore Contributing Editor Nick Terdre explains the current
and potential operations by Lundin in these northern arenas starting on page 38.

To respond to articles in Offshore, or to offer articles for publication,


contact the editor by email (davidp@pennwell.com).

10 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

14

PROBLEM:

How can we conduct a class inspection


of an FPSO when we dont have suffcient
deck space for a large ROV?
SOLUTION:

Fugro Subsea provides ROV systems


of various sizes and capabilities, including
smaller vehicles ideal for FPSO inspection.

www.fugro.com/problem-solved

G L O B A L D ATA
Worldwide day rates
Average

Maximum

$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$151,000
$97,000
$97,000
$97,000

$500,969
$503,126
$498,942
$504,222
$508,930
$507,138
$502,764
$508,093
$506,789
$504,891
$503,090
$510,625

$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$735,000
$708,000
$670,000

$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$30,000
$51,405
$51,405

$134,760
$137,577
$140,919
$142,547
$143,053
$144,121
$142,843
$143,534
$144,160
$142,452
$143,680
$144,774

$365,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$389,000
$414,000

$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000
$145,000

$395,346
$392,877
$387,635
$389,381
$391,838
$389,993
$397,075
$397,727
$403,899
$401,190
$401,444
$404,255

$643,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$641,000
$626,790
$626,790

July 2013 June 2015


Contracted fleet utilization

Total supply

Total contracted

Working

100

No. of rigs

1,000

900

90

800

80

700

70

600

60

500
ly
Ju

Fleet utilization rate %

Drillship
2014 July
2014 Aug
2014 Sept
2014 Oct
2014 Nov
2014 Dec
2015 Jan
2015 Feb
2015 Mar
2015 Apr
2015 May
2015 June
Jackup
2014 July
2014 Aug
2014 Sept
2014 Oct
2014 Nov
2014 Dec
2015 Jan
2015 Feb
2015 Mar
2015 Apr
2015 May
2015 June
Semi
2014 July
2014 Aug
2014 Sept
2014 Oct
2014 Nov
2014 Dec
2015 Jan
2015 Feb
2015 Mar
2015 Apr
2015 May
2015 June

Worldwide offshore rig count & utilization rate

Minimum

Source: IHS RigBase

Year/Month

50
13
O

13
ct

n
Ja

14
Ap

14
ril

ly
Ju

14
O

14
ct

n
Ja

15
Ap

15
ril

Number of operational fxed platforms


aged 25 years and over in the NWECS (%) by country

Source: Rigzone.com

This month, Infield Systems looks at offshore aging


infrastructure in the northwest European continental
shelf (NWECS), with specific focus on offshore fixed platforms. According to Infield Systems data, around 46%
of operational fixed platforms in the NWECS are 25 years
and older, surpassing their original design life. With the
UK being one of the first countries to exploit offshore reserves in the region it is no surprise that the country has
the largest amount of operational fixed platforms aged 25
years and over. This means that the UK will likely become
an increasingly important market for IRM and offshore
decommissioning in the future. The vast majority of
platforms in the NWECS region that are 25 years old and
over are piled platforms, with 46% of them weighing less
than 3,000 metric tons (3,306 tons). Besides the UK, the
Netherlands, Norway, and Denmark also have a number
of aging fixed platforms which support potential opportunities for future IRM and decommissioning contractors.

12 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Source: Offshore Platforms Database

In terms of operator exposure to aging fixed platforms, Infield Systems data shows that Perenco currently operates the largest number of offshore platforms within the aforementioned age range (17%), all
of which are situated in the UK on fields such as Leman and Indefatigable. Perenco also currently operates
three of the oldest operational platforms in the region (49 years), located at its West Sole gas field in the
southern North Sea. IRM will likely increase as platforms are extended beyond their original design life.
Historical high oil prices had enabled operators to extend the life of fixed platforms past their original design life. However, when the global oil price collapsed in 2014, the economic benefits of extending the life
of some aging fixed platforms has likely become more difficult, which could prompt operators to evaluate
their options for keeping aging assets at marginal fields in production.
George Griffiths, Senior Energy Researcher, Infield Systems

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North America

Shell aimed to re-start exploration drilling


offshore Alaska last month, assuming sea
ice had cleared. The company had conditional approval from the US Department of
the Interior to use the Polar Pioneer and another rig for a campaign in the Chukchi Sea,
which could continue until late-September.

Husky Energy has started production


through the first well of its South White
Rose project in the Jeanne dArc basin offshore Newfoundland and Labrador via a tieback to the SeaRose FPSO. A second well is
due to come online later this summer.

PEMEX has discovered four shallow-water


fields in the Gulf of Mexico, reportedly with
combined production potential of 200,000
b/d of oil and 170 MMcf/d (4.8 MMcm/d)
of gas. All are close to shallow-water blocks
newly opened to bidding under Mexicos first
international licensing round.
Dragados Offshore has won a contract
to build and install a drilling platform for
PEMEXs Tekel field, 13 km (8 mi) west of
the offshore Maloob field. Work is expected
to be completed next summer.

South America

Eni and Repsol have started gas production from the Perla field in the Cardn IV
block in the Gulf of Venezuela, the countrys
first offshore gas field development. Perla
holds an estimated 17 tcf within a Mio-Oligocene carbonates reservoir, in a water
depth of 60 m (197 ft). Development is in
three phases, involving four relatively light
platforms connected to 26 wells, with gas
exported through a 30-in. subsea pipeline to
a new two-train treatment complex onshore
at Punto Fijo. PDVSA has contracted the gas
for all three phases until 2036.

The FPSO Cidade de Maric berthed at


the Brasa shipyard in Nitero-Rio, Brazil early
last month following a 19,678-km (12,227-mi)
voyage from the CXG yard in China. Some of
the topsides modules were already fitted to
the vessel the remainder, built by Brasa and
Rio-based EBSE, will be integrated in phases
to the hull, with all work due to be completed
by the end of this year. It will then be ready to
start work for Petrobras on the Lula field in the
presalt Santos basin. SBM Offshore, which will
own and operate the FPSO under a joint venture, says its production capacity of 150,000 b/d
of oil is the largest of its entire fleet.
Another newly-converted FPSO, Cidade
de Itagua, was preparing to start production
on the Iracema Norte area of the Lula field,
following integration work at the BrasFELS
shipyard in Angra dos Reis. The Schahin-Modec consortium-built and operated floater,
14 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Construction of modules for the FPSOs Cidade de Maric and Cidade de Saquarema at the Brasa
shipyard. (Photo courtesy SBM Offshore)

moored in 2,240 m (7,349 ft) of water, can


produce 150,000 b/d of oil and compress 8
MMcm/d (282 MMcf/d) of gas. This will be
exported to the shore via a subsea pipeline.

West Africa

African Petroleum (AP) has agreed to farm


out a 45% operated interest in block CI-513 offshore Cte dIvoire to an unnamed oil company. Assuming government approval, AP would
retain 45%, with state-owned Petroci holding
10%. AP is negotiating further farmouts of its
concessions offshore Senegal and Gambia.

Tullow Oil has suspended gas exports


from the Jubilee field offshore Ghana to the
gas plant at Atuabo due to technical issues
with gas compression systems on the FPSO
Kwame Nkrumah. Gas production began in
March. Tullow expects production to resume
by mid-August. The company and its partners
are working on a next-phase development of
Jubilee, taking in the nearby Akasa, Mahogany, and Teak discoveries. They plan to submit
their plan to the government by year-end.

Nigerian fabricator Aveon Offshore has


dispatched the completed suction piles, production and water-injection manifolds, and
riser base lift module for ExxonMobils Erha
North Phase 2 project offshore Nigeria. Additionally, Aveon will supply components for
the christmas trees. OneSubsea Offshore
Systems commissioned the equipment.

Ophir Energy has awarded upstream frontend engineering and design (FEED) contracts for its Fortuna floating LNG (FLNG)

project in block R offshore Equatorial Guinea.


Under a competitive process, the McDermott
Marine Construction/GE Oil & Gas UK and
Subsea 7/Aker Solutions consortia are working on the subsea design scope, focusing in
particular on cost and the number of wells
required at start-up. Both are due to submit
EPCIC tenders next March, with a final investment decision following in mid-2016.
Golar LNG will build and operate the 2.2
MMt/yr FLNG vessel Gimi, which is due to
start operating in mid-2019. Ophir is additionally considering a second FLNG vessel
to process currently unallocated resources
from block R, probably operating from the
mid-2020s.

Mediterranean Sea

PA Resources and state oil company ETAP


have completed work on their proposals for the
southern tract of Zarat, one of Tunisias largest
undeveloped offshore oil and gas fields. They
plan a two-stage program involving standalone
fixed facilities tied back to the BG-operated Miskar field platform, which has a pipeline link
to the onshore Hannibal gas processing plant.
Assuming agreement by Zarats northern tract
partners, they aim to submit an overall unit development plan to Tunisias authorities.

Northern Petroleum was seeking a farm-in


partner to co-fund a 3D seismic survey over
two permits in the southern Adriatic Sea, after receiving approval from Italys authorities
for the environmental impact assessment of
the program. Northern aims to improve delineation of the 26-MMbbl Giove oil discovery and the 446-MMbbl Cygnus prospect.

GLOBAL E&P

Black Sea
Petroceltic has sold its Romanian subsidiary to GVC Investment,
thereby exiting the Romanian sector. The main interests transferred
under the deal included shares of offshore blocks 27 Muridava and
28 Est Cobalcescu.

Gazprom has canceled Saipems contract to lay the first four lines
of the South Stream offshore gas pipeline following the European Unions imposition of sanctions last year against Russia. Work had been
suspended from June 2014 Saipem, which will receive compensation, had mobilized the Castoro Sei pipelay vessel to Russian waters.

Middle East
Saudi Aramco has signed three long-term agreements with international offshore contractors. McDermott International will be
allowed to bid for future EPCI contacts for brownfield projects on
various fields offshore Saudi Arabia. Wood Group Mustang in the
US will provide greenfield and brownfield engineering and construction management support services, and will establish an offshore
engineering center in Al Khobar with its Saudi joint venture Mustang-HDP. Finally, the Ezra Holdings/Larsen & Toubro consortium
will jointly execute offshore projects, including construction and
transportation of platforms and subsea pipelines and cables.

East Africa
Orca Exploration Group has contracted Paragon Offshores mobile drilling/workover rig M826 for the shallow-water phase of the
Songo Songo gas field development offshore Tanzania. The rig will
likely remove and replace existing production tubing strings and
drill up to three new wells.

Houlders pin pile installation for the new Shah Deniz platform jackets.
(Photo courtesy Houlder Marine Equipment)

Caspian Sea
Houlder has delivered a pin pile installation and restraining frame
to Saipem for the Shah Deniz field development in the Azeri sector.
The equipment is being used to install foundations for eight steel
jacket foundations for two new platforms. The frame has been operating on the deck of the Derrick Barge Azerbaijan.

In the Kazakh sector, Eni and KazmunayGas will form a joint venture to operate the Isatay block, thought to hold large oil resources.

India
ONGC has contracted Larsen & Toubro to construct and install
three new platforms for the Bassein field offshore western India.
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ing, and accommodation. The project, due to be completed by end2016, is designed to extend the fields productive life through 2027-28.
Additionally, ONGC and partners BG and Reliance Industries
have produced first oil through the new unmanned Mukta-B wellhead platform serving the Panna-Mukta fields in the Bombay basin.
The program included reactivating production from the MA platform which had been shut in for more than two years due to pipeline
integrity issues.

Asia/Pacific

Mubadala Petroleum has produced first oil from the Nong Yao
field in the G11/48 license in the Gulf of Thailand. Three producer
wells were online initially with a further 20 wells to be added eventually, connected to a wellhead processing platform and a wellhead
platform. Oil is exported via an FSO. At peak, the facilities will produce up to 15,000 b/d.

PetroVietnam has acquired Chevrons assets offshore Vietnam.


These include operated interests in three offshore production-sharing contracts in the Malay Tho Chu basin off the southwest coast
in water depths of up to 80 m (262 ft). PetroVietnam estimates potential recoverable resources at 3.78 tcf of gas and 12.65 MMbbl of
condensates, with further potential following additional exploration.

CNOOC has started production from two more projects offshore


China. The company added a new wellhead platform with seven producer wells in 70 m (229 ft) of water at the Dongfang 1-1 gas field in the
Beibu Gulf in the South China Sea. At the Bozhong 28/34 oil fields in
the Bohai area, the company installed six platforms which will eventually be linked to 79 wells. Output should peak next year at 30,000 b/d.

Kebabangan Petroleum Operating Co. has commissioned Wood


Group Kenny (WGK) to provide pipeline engineering and flow
assurance studies for the Kamansu East field offshore Sabah, Malaysia. WGKs work scope includes examining subsea heating options to prevent hydrates forming in the 30-km (18.6-mi) gas pipeline that will run from the field, in 750 m (2,460 ft) of water, to the
new shelf-edge Kebabangan platform. Petronas is project operator.
Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard in South Korea has cut first
steel for Petronas second FLNG vessel, destined for the Rotan gas
field, 130 km (80.7 mi) offshore Sabah.

Pertamina will become operator of the Mahakam block offshore


East Kalimantan, Indonesia when existing contracts expire at end2017. Currently, Total and INPEX are joint operators of the block,
Indonesias largest. Both will be retained as partners. Pertamina has
also agreed to contract 1.4 MM metric tons/yr (1.54 MM tons/yr)
of LNG from 2017 from the Jangkrik and Jangkrik North-East fields
that Eni is currently developing in 400 m (1,312 ft) of water in the
Muara Bakau block, 100 km (62 mi) east of Bakikpapan.

Australasia

Woodside and its partners have started awarding FEED contracts


for the Browse FLNG development offshore northwest Australia. This
will process resources from the offshore Brecknock, Calliance, and
Torosa fields, estimated at 15.4 tcf of dry gas and 453 MMbbl of condensate. The Technip Samsung consortium has two contracts one related
to engineering issues concerning gas composition and local weather
conditions. The other is an EPCI award to provide three FLNG vessels
pending next years final investment decision.

OFFSHORE EUROPE

Johan Sverdrup gets official go-ahead


Norways Parliament (Storting) has approved Statoils plan for
development and operation of the Johan Sverdrup field in the Norwegian North Sea, the countrys largest-scale offshore project for
many years. The Petroleum and Energy Ministry also issued a final
re-determination of the partners various interests, as Johan Sverdrup
extends across several licenses. While Lundin Norway and Maersk
Oil expressed satisfaction over the outcome, Det norske oljeselskap
which earlier this year criticized the allocation process said it would
consider its position after being allotted an 11.573% stake.
Statoil has since issued most of the major engineering design, construction and installation contracts, while Gassco has been confirmed
as operator of the new 156-km (97-mi), 18-in. pipeline that will take gas
from the fields riser platform to a connection point on the Statpipe
rich gas system, west of Karmy. The line will have capacity to accommodate gas from other new projects in the Utsira High area.
Elsewhere in the North Sea, Statoil has submitted a plan to extract 18 MMboe from the Gullfaks fields previously undeveloped
Shetland group/Lista formation reservoir. This interval is characterized by thin, fractured limestone beds (the main Gullfaks reservoirs
are in deeper Brent group deposits). Development would involve
re-use of 15 existing wells drilled from Gullfaks platforms, with no
need for any new infrastructure.
The worlds first subsea wet gas compressor station was recently
installed on the seafloor near the Gullfaks C platform and is expected to be operational before year-end, eventually allowing Statoil to
produce a further 22 MMboe from the field.

Dutch operators opt for minimized facilities


Wintershall has started production from the L6-B gas field, the
first development in a restricted military zone in the Dutch North
Sea. For this reason, the unmanned mini-platform needed to be
as small as possible, the company said, and its three-deck, 100-ton
topsides may be the smallest ever built. The substructure, weighing 1,100 tons, is anchored to the seafloor via suction piles. Gas is
exported through a subsea pipeline to the nearby L8-P4 complex
which controls the facility and supplies it with electricity.
Another Dutch sector operator, Orange-Nassau Energi has contracted Heerema Zwijndrecht to build a 1,650-ton unmanned satel-

Schematic of A18 platform. (Image courtesy HSM Offshore)

18 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Jeremy Beckman London

lite platform to serve the P11-E field, 55 km (34 mi) northwest of


Rotterdam. The installations solar panels and wind turbines should
make it self-sufficient in electricity generation operations will be
controlled from a base on the coast.
Schiedam-based HSM, one of Heeremas main competitors in
the sector, was due to deliver a new 330-metric ton (364-ton) compressor last month to GDF Suez E&P Nederlands E17a-A platform,
which HSM also built in 2009. This month the fabricator hoped to
complete construction of the 2,200-metric ton (2,425-ton) A18 platform for installation in the northern part of the Dutch North Sea.
Operator Petrogas Transportation acquired A18 and other B block
production facilities last September from previous owner Chevron.

Risk-based approach could slash P&A costs


DNV GL Oil & Gas aims to publish new guidelines later this
year to operators seeking to lower the cost of plugging and abandonment (P&A) of offshore wells. Throughout the Norwegian continental shelf around 2,350 wells will have to be P&Ad at some point, with
3,000 more to be drilled in the future. Based on current practice, 15
rigs would have to operate full time for the next 40 years to complete
the program, DNV GL claimed, at an estimated cost of $108 billion.
The purpose of P&A is to create a permanent barrier in decommissioned wells that prevents hydrocarbons migrating to the surface. Traditional techniques are time-consuming as well as expensive and have remained basically unchanged despite advances in
most other aspects of well engineering. The main barrier to change,
DNV GL argues, is the prevailing prescriptive approach to the regulations based on a conservative interpretation of prior experience.
The company suggests adopting an alternate approach taking into
account environmental and safety risk aspects, which it believes could
cut expenditure by 30-50%. It has been working with various international operators to develop initial criteria for this approach, which
would involve paying due attention to hazardous wells while avoiding
excessive rig time on benign wells.

Components in place
for major Norwegian projects
The jackup Maersk Integrator was due to arrive at the Gina Krog
field in the central Norwegian North Sea to start development drilling. Earlier, Heerema Marine Contractors heavy-lift vessel Hermod
had installed the 17,000-metric ton (18,739-ton) jacket, built by Heerema Fabrication Group in Vlissingen, and the 250-metric ton (275ton) pre-drilling module.
Another Heerema vessel, Thialf, has had a busy summer season in
the North Sea, installing the 8,900-ton steel jacket built by Saipem for
Det norske oljeselskaps Ivar Aasen project. This is due to be mated
next year with the platform deck, still under construction at the SMOE
yard in Singapore. Thialf also lifted into place three modules with a
combined weight of 16,160 metric tons (17,813 tons) for the quarters
and utilities platform at BPs Clair Ridge project 75 km (46.6 mi) west
of Shetland. This will be bridge-linked next summer to the new production and drilling platform, with production due to start later in 2016.
In the Norwegian Sea, the Boa Sub C completed installation of the
three subsea templates for Statoils Aasta Hansteen project in 1,300
m (4,265 ft) of water, the deepest for any Norwegian field to date.
Aker Solutions built the templates in Sandessjoen to a new design,
in which the top structure is separated from the base structure
the lower weights allow use of a smaller installation vessel in deep,
rough waters. The six structures comprising the templates weigh
between 120 and 190 metric tons (132 and 209 tons), and are secured to the seabed by 22.5-m (74-ft) high suction anchors. Installation was due to follow of the 25 suction anchors mooring Aasta
Hansteens spar platform and associated risers, all built by Momek
in Mo i Rana, Norway.

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GULF OF MEXICO

More good news, bad news for Gulf E&P


Exploration activity in the Gulf of Mexico
continues to see new positive milestones, driven by past discoveries and recent field development; and more discouraging ones, owing
to the continued state of low oil prices.
The bad news first. On July 17, ConocoPhillips announced plans to reduce deepwater
exploration spending with most of the cuts
coming in Gulf of Mexico operations. We
have achieved some notable success in our
deepwater program, particularly in the Gulf
of Mexico Lower Tertiary play and offshore
Senegal, said Ryan Lance, chairman and
CEO. We are committed to delivering the
value we have created from these discoveries, while reducing the number of deepwater
exploratory prospects we drill in the future.
Since the start of the oil and gas price
downturn last year, we have moved decisively to position ConocoPhillips for lower, more
volatile prices by exercising capital flexibility and reducing operating costs across our
business, Lance said.
As part of this new plan, it was also announced that ConocoPhillips had provided a
notice of termination for the three-year ENSCO DS-9 drillship contract.
Under the terms of the contract, ConocoPhillips is obligated to pay Ensco termination fees monthly for two years equal to the
operating day rate of approximately $550,000.
These payments may be partially defrayed

should Ensco re-contract the rig within the


next two years and/or mitigate certain costs
during this time period while the rig is idle
and without a contract.
ConocoPhillips is also contractually obligated to reimburse certain costs that Ensco
incurs due to the termination of the contract
for ConocoPhillips convenience.
Built this year at Samsung Heavy Industries South Korean yard, the ultra-deepwater
DP-3 drillship was recently delivered and had
been scheduled to commence its initial drilling contract for ConocoPhillips in 4Q 2015.
On the positive side, on July 1, Royal
Dutch Shell announced that it had made the
final investment decision to proceed with
the Appomattox development in the deepwater Gulf. The decision authorizes the construction and installation of Shells eighth
and largest floating platform in the GoM.
Shell says that the Appomattox development initially will produce from the Appomattox and Vicksburg fields, with average peak
production estimated at 175,000 boe/d. The
platform and the Appomattox and Vicksburg
fields will be owned by Shell (79%) and Nexen
Petroleum Offshore U.S.A. Inc. (21%), a wholly owned subsidiary of CNOOC Ltd.
The Appomattox development host will
comprise a semisubmersible, four-column
production host platform, a subsea system
featuring six drill centers, 15 producing

Shells Appomattox deepwater development will include a semisubmersible, four-column production host platform, a subsea system featuring six drill centers, 15 producing wells, and five water
injection wells. (Courtesy Shell)

20 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

wells, and five water injection wells. Appomattox is 80 mi (129 km) offshore Louisiana,
in approximately 7,200 ft (2,195 m) of water.
The sanctioned project includes capital
for the development of 650 MMboe resources at Appomattox and Vicksburg, with startup estimated around the end of this decade.
The development of Shells recent, nearby
discoveries at the Gettysburg and Rydberg
prospects remains under review. These could
become tiebacks to Appomattox, bringing
the total estimated discovered resources in
the area to more than 800 MMboe.
Relatedly, Shell Pipeline Co. LP also made a
final investment decision on the Mattox Pipeline, a 90-mi, 24-in. pipeline that will transport
crude from the Appomattox host to an existing
offshore structure in the South Pass area, then
connect onshore through an existing pipeline.
More positive news came about a week later, when Stone Energy Corp. provided a drilling and production update on its deepwater
GoM operations. The company reported that
operations at the Cardona #6 development
well, located inMississippi Canyonblock 29,
have been proceeding ahead of schedule and
below budget, and drilling has been completed
through the targeted zones.The well encountered approximately 288 ft (87 m) of net pay
in two intervals, similar to theCardona#5 net
pay of 275 ft (83 m).Analysis of logging and
pressure data confirmed the existence of oil
in the pay zones. The well has been successfully cased and cemented across all productive
zones, the subsea tree has been installed and
completion operations have begun.
The well will be tied into Stones existing Cardona subsea infrastructure, which
flows into the Pompano platform. It is expected that gross production from Cardona#6 will reach about 5,000 boe/d from the
lower completion by late September.
Upon completion of the Cardona #6 well,
the ENSCO8503 deepwater drilling rig will be
released for approximately 60 days to receive
scheduled maintenance and to be outfitted
with mooring capabilities. The rig will then
be mobilized to Mississippi Canyon block
26 to finish the completion of the Amethyst
discovery, which will also be tied back to the
Pompano platform. First production here is
expected in 1Q 2016.
There is good news on the drilling front as
well. The US offshore rig count has continued
to trend upward in the first half of July. On
July 13, it was reported that the US offshore
rig count had risen to 31, up two rigs from the
week before. In late June, the US offshore rig
count by Baker Hughes Inc. had shown an increase of one rig over the prior week. But as of
mid-July, the total US offshore rig count was
still down 25 rigs, year-over-year.

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agreement to jointly market their combined services to pursue subsea-related projects in the Gulf of Mexico and other targeted regions.
Days after it announced its JIP with Chevron, OneSubsea confirmed
it had formed an alliance with Subsea 7 to jointly design, develop, and
deliver integrated subsea development solutions through the combination of subsurface expertise, subsea production systems, subsea processing systems, subsea umbilicals, risers, and flowlines systems, and
life-of-field services. The alliances aim is to collaborate with clients to
enhance project delivery, improve recovery, and optimize the cost and
efficiency of deepwater subsea developments for the life of the field.

Subsea contract news

Statoil and OneSubsea have created the worlds first subsea wet gas
compressor, which does not require any treatment of the well stream prior
to compression. (Photo courtesy Harald Pettersen, Statoil)

Gullfaks subsea compressor


nears testing phase
Statoil says the worlds first subsea wet gas compressor station is in
place on the seafloor near the Gullfaks C platform in the Norwegian
North Sea. In early May, heavy-lift vessel Oleg Strashnov installed the
compressor station and its protective structure, while Seven Viking
installed the compressor and cooling modules late last month.
Assuming testing of the complete compressor station goes as
planned, the compressor station should begin operating before yearend, Statoil said. The compressor will be hooked up between the L and
M subsea templates and Gullfaks C. More subsea wells could be tied
into the compressor through existing pipelines. The equipment will be
tied back to the Gullfaks C platform during late summer and the fall.
Subsea wet gas compression should allow Statoil to extract a further
22 MMboe from Gullfaks and extend plateau production by around two
years. The compressor is developed in cooperation with OneSubsea,
and large parts of the compressor station have been built by suppliers
and sub-suppliers in western Norway and in the Bergen region.

Two tiebacks for Stone Energys Pompano


The Cardona #6 development well, located in the Gulf of Mexicos
Mississippi Canyon block 29, will be tied back into Stone Energys
existing Cardona subsea infrastructure, which flows into the Pompano platform. Amethyst will also be tied back to the Pompano platform. Sanctioned in August 2014, first production from Amethyst is
expected in 1Q 2016.

JIPs, alliances continue


to spring up across sector
At the time of this writing, multiple joint industry projects (JIP)
and alliances were announced within days of each other in early July.
Kicking off what would become a string of announcements, on July
1 Endeavor Management released a proposal to support the industrys need for global best practice development in subsea decommissioning. The genesis of the JIP is the work completed for Petrobras
by Endeavor Management to research global best practices for subsea decommissioning. This study benchmarked Petrobras and five
additional operators.
Soon afterwards, OneSubsea entered into agreement with Chevron USA Inc. to form a JIP to develop subsea systems technology for
20,000-psi applications. Known as the 20Ksi Subsea System Development Program, the JIP will address the technical challenges presented by high-pressure/high-temperature reservoir environments
for development of 20,000-psi subsea systems.
The next day, Aqueos Corp. and Bibby Subsea ROV entered into an
22 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Technip has received a contract from Chevron North America


for the decommissioning of the brownfield development and installation of new subsea equipment supporting a floating production system. The project is located in Mississippi Canyon, Gulf of Mexico, in a
water depth of about 6,562 ft (2,000 m).
EMAS AMC has signed a six-year offshore engineering agreement with Saudi Aramco, under a consortium with Larsen &
Toubro. The two contractors will execute projects offshore Saudi
Arabia, providing project management, engineering, procurement,
fabrication, transportation, and installation of offshore facilities including platforms, pipelines, and submarine cables.
2H Offshore has won two separate contracts, one by Hess
Corp. and a second contract by Enbridge Energy Co., to verify the
design, fabrication, and installation phases of the steel catenary risers (SCR) for the Stampede field development in the central US Gulf
of Mexico. The Stampede field is operated by Hess. Enbridge plans
to build, own, and operate the oil export pipeline from the Stampede tension leg platform. The subsea development is located in the
GoMs Green Canyon blocks 468, 511, and 512 in water depths of
approximately 3,500 ft (1,066 m).
Bibby Offshore Singapore has completed offshore service
contracts in the Asia/Pacific region worth several million dollars in
the first half of 2015. The Bibby division performed ROV pipeline
inspection, remedial, and project management work for companies
including Moattama Gas Transportation offshore Myanmar, and
Singapore-based Seascape, a Mermaid Subsea Services company.
In April Bibby Offshore Singapore completed work for India-based
Larsen & Toubro that comprised ROV inspection work on the Yetagun D platform offshore Myanmar.
Wintershall Norge has awarded DNV GL a five-year frame
agreement to provide global inspection services for its field developments offshore Norway. DNV GL will perform inspection, test,
and surveillance activities on a worldwide basis for all Wintershalls
Norwegian projects. Its scope of services includes: review of the inspection and test plan, examination of materials, products, manufacturing processes, work procedures and/or services at Wintershalls
contractors premises. Additionally, DNV GL will examine contractors procedures, documents, quality performance, and compliance
with governing standards and specifications.
Sub-Atlantic has won a second contract with Italian oil and gas
subsea services provider, AALEA Offshore. The contract will see
Sub-Atlantic deliver one of its Tomahawk observation ROV systems.
It will be manufactured at Sub-Atlantics manufacturing base in Kirkbymoorside, Yorkshire, UK, and is due to be delivered in 3Q 2015.
Conductor Installation Ser vices Ltd. (CIS) completed a subsea piling operation for Subsea 7 in the UK North Sea. CIS used its
remotely-operated Subsea Piling System. The operation was executed as part of the Cladhan field development, located northeast of
the Shetland Islands, which will eventually see Cladhan connected
to the Tern Alpha oil production platform through a new subsea
tieback. In preparation for the tieback, CIS drove piles to secure a
subsea manifold to the seabed on Cladhan field.

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VESSELS, RIGS, & SURFACE SYSTEMS

Helm report pinpoints workboat


and OSV safety shortcomings
New findings show that 50% of crews working on offshore support vessels are willing to compromise safety rather than say no to
clients or senior management, while nearly 80% believe commercial
pressures could influence the safety of their working practices. The
findings come from a new report on workboat and OSV safety commissioned by operations and maintenance management software
specialist Helm Operations.
The Impact of Crew Engagement and Organizational Culture
on Maritime Safety in the Workboats and OSV Sectors is the first
maritime safety study specific to workboats and OSVs, and will be
finalized in time for World Maritime Day 2015, on Sept. 26.
The independent report, summarizing six months of research by
Dr. Kate Pike and Emma Broadhurst of Southampton Solent University, draws on original analysis of Port State Control detention
records, feedback from 50 offshore companies, incident case studies, and input from leaders in best practice.
This is a major contribution to knowledge in the industry, highlighting the link between the human element and safety performance in this distinct sector, says Ron deBruyne, CEO and founder
of Helm Operations. It tests often repeated regulatory assumptions,
establishes the realities of workboat and OSV safety, and provides
key recommendations aimed at improving maritime safety.
Despite the inherent risky nature of their work, many workouts
are not bound by SOLAS or the International Safety Management
Code. Both the Paris and the Tokyo memoranda of understanding
data show that 27% of workboat deficiencies relate to certificates and
documentation, the report says.
This report identifies shortcomings in current safety cultures,
and makes recommendations on how the workboat and OSV sectors can enhance and audit safe working practices, says deBruyne.
An online survey drawing on 50 key offshore companies saw 34%
of respondents saying their company needed to offer additional operational and technical training.

Robin Dupre Houston

tems. The vessel is also equipped with four additional below deck
Tier 3 generators, providing fully redundant power to the crane and
ROV systems.

Seven Arctic heavy construction


vessel shaping up for 2016
Construction of Subsea 7s state-of-the-art new heavy construction vessel, the Seven Arctic, is proceeding on schedule with the vessel targeted for delivery in 2016.
The vessel, which is in dry dock at Hyundai Heavy Industries in
South Korea, is being readied for the installation of key capabilities,
including a 600-ton vertical lay system (VLS) and a 900-ton crane.
Both the VLS and 900-ton crane are currently being assembled in
South Korea by Dutch heavy construction equipment manufacturer,
Huisman, ready for installation later in the year.
Chief among the vessels specifications is a unique knuckle boom
rope-luffing crane which can operate in a series of configurations,
with a capacity of up to 900 tons. When combined with the 600-ton
VLS, deck space of 2,600 sq m (27,986 sq ft), two work-class ROVs
and a 7,000-ton underdeck basket for the storage of flexible pipe
and umbilicals, the Seven Arctic will provide a step change in the
management of ever more complex deepwater subsea field development projects.

Vard secures contract for one diving support


and construction vessel for Kreuz Subsea
Vard Holdings Ltd. has secured a contract for the design and construction of one diving support and construction vessel for Kreuz
Subsea group. The vessel will be of VARD 3 17 design, with a total
length of 299 ft (91.2 m) and a beam of 701 ft (21.5 m), and has been
developed especially for diving support and subsea construction duties.
The DP-2 class vessel will have a 100-ton active heave compensated offshore crane, and is prepared for ROVs. The diving system
features a single bell system for a maximum of 12 divers, and can
operate in water depths of up to 984 ft (300 m) with a surface diving
spread suitable for air diving in up to 164 ft (50 m) depth. The diving accommodation is divided into three saturation living chambers.
The vessel will be built according to latest SPS regulations, and can
accommodate up to 105 persons.
Designed by Vard Design in lesund, Norway, and with hull construction to be carried out at Vard Tulcea in Romania, delivery is
scheduled from Vard Sviknes in Norway in 2Q 2017.

Statoil assigns Odfjell


Johan Sverdrup drilling program

The M/V Shelia Bordelon, a DP-2 ultra-light intervention vessel. (Image


courtesy Bordelon Marine)

Bordelon Marine takes delivery


of newbuild light-intervention vessel
Bordelon Marine has taken delivery of the M/V Shelia Bordelon,
a DP-2 ultra-light intervention vessel.
This highly specialized vessel features an NOV 50-ton active
heave compensating crane with 3,000 m (9,842 ft) of wire, a mezzanine deck with internal office and control rooms. The vessel can
support two work class ROVs.
The Shelia Bordelon offers 6,200 sq ft (576 sq m) of clear, usable
deck space, POB of 60, and two independent thru-hull USBL sys24 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Statoil has awarded two drilling contracts for the Johan Sverdrup
field development in the Norwegian North Sea with a combined
value of more than NOK 4.35 billion ($559 million).
Odfjell Drilling will provide the semisubmersible Deepsea Atlantic
and drilling services on a fixed drilling unit to be installed on the
Johan Sverdrup drilling platform.
The three-year charter of the Deepsea Atlantic starts in March
2016, with six extension options. Value of this contract is just over
NOK 2.5 billion ($321 million).
The rig will drill at least 13 pilot wells on the field prior to the
planned production start in late 2019.
Statoil values the four-year contract for the drilling services (also
with extension options) at NOK 1.85 billion ($237 million). Odfjell
Drilling will support this operation from its office in Stavanger.
Aibel, Nymo in Grimstad, and National Oilwell in Kristiansand
will collectively build the platforms drilling rig. In February, Aibel
contracted Odfjell for engineering support for construction of the
drilling platform.

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DRILLING & PRODUCTION

Dick Ghiselin Houston

Jackup designs evolve to operate in harsh conditions


Jackup rigs have been around for a long,
long time. In the evolution of offshore drilling, the only techniques that preceded
jackups were submersible rigs and drilling
tenders. The latter were flat barges or converted liberty-ships that served as a staging
area for all tubulars, the mud system, electrical power generators, and crew quarters.
These were connected to a small platform
containing the draw works, derrick, and
BOP stack. The connector, lovingly referred
to as the widow-maker, was a suspended
catwalk with one-end fixed at the tenders
bow and the other end swaying around as
the tender heaved, pitched, and yawed with
the prevailing sea and weather conditions.
Sometimes the weather was so bad that rig
workers elected to sleep curled up on the
platforms drill floor rather than brave the
task of leaping to the heaving end of the
widow-maker to descend to their hot food
and warm bunks.

The first jackups


Canadians argue that they were the true
pioneers of the North American oil and gas
industry with their discovery well near Chatham, Ontario, a full year before Col. Drake
successfully completed his well in Titusville,
Pennsylvania. Not only that, but they also
built and launched the first jackup rig to drill
the Canadian side of Lake Erie in the early
1950s. The Kenting 1 consisted of a land rig
erected amidships on a flat barge and was
suitable for the shallow, relatively calm waters of the lake. According to reports, the
Kenting 1 could drill in water depths up to
150 ft (46 m). The jackup concept placed
the rig and all its associated equipment on
the vessel. After drilling and completing the
well, the rig could jack down and sail away
leaving only the wellhead protruding out of
the lakes surface (hopefully with some kind
of beacon or sign warning pleasure-boaters
to stay away). Economic benefits were immediately obvious. For the first time, the
drilling unit was independent and mobile,
allowing multiple wells to be drilled by a
single self-contained rig.
Unfortunately, the Kenting 1 suffered a
bitter end, after rig workers failed in 20 attempts to actually jack it up out of the water. Its columnar legs sank into the soft lake
bottom. Accordingly, while it could drill as
a spud-barge using the legs like mooring
posts, it never successfully jacked itself up
out of the water, let alone established safe
air gap.
Next in line for mobility were the submersible barges and posted barges introduced in
the bayous and lakes of south Louisiana.
These popular units sat sedately on bottom
26 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Camerons new LeTourneau Jaguar Class self-elevating cantilever jackup rig, moves to the head of
the class as it joins the harsh-environment jackup fleet. (Photo courtesy Cameron)

until the well was completed; then they blew


ballast water and floated off to the next job
nudged by a shallow-draft tug boat. Some
were equipped with giant outboard motor
thrusters to give them self-propulsion, but
the cost outweighed the convenience.
Interestingly, the jackup concept was
introduced by Col. Leon de Long who developed several jackup platforms for Army
offshore radar installations. One might say
they worked perfectly since a bombing attack of Gulf Coast targets was never suffered during the entire war. Following the DDay Normandy invasion, de Long extended
the jackup idea to provide temporary port
facilities on beachheads to aid in supply of
ammunition and materials to the invasion
force, but these were never built.
With apologies to the ill-fated Kenting 1,
the first successful jackup rig was The Offshore Co.s Rig 51, a 10-leg monstrosity that
saw field service from 1954 through 1959.
Americas 41st president, George H. W.
Bush, was president of Zapata Offshore and
introduced the first triangular-leg jackup
design to the field. The Scorpion was completed in 1956 at LeTourneau Shipyards in
Vicksburg, Mississippi. Rated at 105 ft (32
m) of water, the rig was capable of drilling to
18,000 ft (5,486 m), which it did until it sank
in 1969 while under tow. With a few exceptions, the triangular-leg design captured the
bulk of construction contracts for decades.

Present day
Continuing in the three-leg tradition,
Cameron has just launched its Jaguar Class
self-elevating mobile offshore drilling unit.

Featuring the LeTourneau Storm-lok leg fixation system, the Jaguar is capable of operating in 400 ft (122 m) of harsh condition seas,
or 500 ft (152 m) in moderate seas. Drilling
depth is rated to 40,000 ft (12,192 m) with a
2.5 million lb maximum hook load.
The rig boasts several new features that
save time and money without compromising
safety. Specifically, the leg fixation system is
only needed during severe storm conditions.
This allows for half-day savings each time the
rig is moved. A unique feature is the ability to
lift the individual spud cans out of the water
for periodic inspection without dry-docking,
potentially saving weeks of downtime and
hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Other design features include a cantilever
with 1,542 MT (3,400 kip) maximum combined drilling load at its longitudinal reach
of 80 ft (24 m) and transverse skidding
within 25-ft (7.6 m) of center. The ability to
offer large scale well and workover services
is enabled by the rigs more than 6,800 MT
variable deck load at 70-knot winds (5,000
MT variable deck load under severe storm
conditions at 100-knot winds).
Boasting storage to well handling of two,
25,000-psi BOP stacks, the rig also features
11 active/reserve mud pits and two slugging
pits with combined capacity of 7,770 bbl.
Room has been provided for pit-volume expansion later if required. Mud system piping
allows for simultaneous use of fresh-, salt-,
or oil-based drilling fluid without cross-contamination. Finally, the rig is equipped with
automated pipe-handling equipment from
rack to downhole, including independent
stand-making.

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GEOSCIENCES

Gene Kliewer Houston

Geophysical company news


Petroleum Geo-Ser vices has entered
into a sale and leaseback agreement of PGS
Apollo, the only non-Ramform designed 3D
vessel in the PGS fleet. The sale and leaseback agreement is between PGS and Offshore Merchant Partners on a 10-year
bareboat charter, with an option for a fiveyear extension at a reduced rate. PGS has
the option to acquire the vessel after end of
year five or year eight.
FairfieldNodal has sold 4,000 Z100 nodes
to an unnamed geophysical company. FairfieldNodal has designed this new nodal system for 4C data acquisition in transition zones,
where it provides continuous recording for
up to 30 days at depths from 0 to 300 m (985
ft). The nodes can be used with any land and
marine acquisition systems for seamless data
integration from land to deeper waters.
TGS has a letter of intent to acquire Polarcus multi-client library, with the exception of Australia, for $27.5 million, subject
to due diligence and a final definitive agreement. Polarcus will share in revenues generated from the library after TGS reaches an
established return on its initial investment.
The multi-client library in northwest Europe
and West Africa consists of 22 3D seismic
surveys comprising a total area of 40,000 sq
km (15,444 sq mi) and one 2D survey comprising 5,000 linear km (3,107 mi). The data
covers locations within established hydrocarbon provinces of six countries along the
western Atlantic margin corridor.
PGS, Spectrum, and Schlumberger
have agreed to cooperate to acquire 80,000
to 100,000 km (49,710 to 62,137 mi) of longoffset 2D data in the major hydrocarbon
provinces offshore Mexico. The areas to be
covered include those on offer in Round 1
leasing such as the Perdido fold belt, Mexican ridges province, Campeche deep-sea
basin, and also will seamlessly connect with

Schlumberger has established Depth Domain Inversion Services for seismic structural and quantitative interpretation in complex environments. Seismic inversion in
the depth domain integrates the inversion with the imaging products to better estimate rock properties for reservoir characterization by correcting for depth space and
dip dependent illumination effects during seismic amplitude inversion directly in the
depth domain. Schlumberger said the service is particularly useful in complex areas
such as subsalt, and that it has proven successful in the Green Canyon area of the
US Gulf of Mexico. (Illustration courtesy Schlumberger)

coverage across the Yucatan platform tying


to Spectrums Big Wave program in the eastern area of the US Gulf of Mexico.

Offshore surveys,
plans, and processing
CGG completed in record time the fasttrack
results for a 1,748-sq km (675-sq mi) BroadSeis
3D marine acquisition and depth imaging project for a large international oil company. Nine
days after the last shot point, CGG delivered
pre-stack depth migration volumes using Kirchhoff and Reverse Time Migration. The fasttrack
BroadSeis volume was successfully processed

US BOEM, state geologists to share OCS information


The US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the Association of
American State Geologists (AASG) have agreed to foster interaction, cooperation,
and coordination on marine minerals and oil and gas resources on the outer continental shelf.
Under the memorandum of understanding, BOEMs Office of Strategic Resources
may provide information to the association on appropriate BOEM permitting,
research and planning activities for informal review and comment by the affected
states. The AASG, through individual state geological surveys, may provide information to BOEM on appropriate state projects for informal review and comment. The
purpose of these reviews is to foster mutually beneficial interaction, to increase opportunities for cooperative BOEM/state geological survey activities, and to minimize
conflict and misunderstanding.
On behalf of the Association of American State Geologists, we welcome the
enactment of this MOU ... to ensure the continuation of information sharing between
our nations state geological surveys and our federal colleagues, said AASG President Jonathan Arthur. This MOU will serve us well as we work on items of mutual
interest that affect the development and protection of our nations diverse coastal
resources.
28 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

through deghosting, 3D demultiple, tomography, salt model building, and PSDM.


Egypts state-owned EGAS plans to conduct the largest seismic oil and gas exploration project in the Mediterranean. EGAS
said it has signed a deal with Norwegian
seismic surveyor PGS to conduct 2D and
3D data in the western zone of Egypts territorial Mediterranean waters.
TGS plans a multi-client 3D survey offshore
eastern Canada to acquire 6,000 sq km (2,317
sq mi) of seismic data in partnership with
PGS. The survey will apply the PGS GeoStreamer technology in two areas; Eastern
Newfoundland Orphan basin and South Labrador. Data acquisition is to start this summer.
Pre-processing of the initial GeoStreamer signal will be performed by PGS following which
TGS will perform data processing with final
data available to clients in mid-2016.
TGS in partnership with PGS also has
two multi-client 2D surveys offshore eastern
Canada, with plans to acquire a total of about
30,000 km (18,641 mi) of seismic data. The
M/V Atlantic Explorer will use GeoStreamer
technology, will acquire approximately 18,000
km (11,185 mi) of seismic data in the southeast Grand Banks. The M/V Sanco Spirit, also
with PGS GeoStreamers, will acquire approximately 12,000 km (7,456 mi) of seismic in the
south Labrador, northeastern, and eastern
Newfoundland area. Pre-processing will be by
PGS followed by TGS data processing with final data available in 3Q 2016.

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O F F S H O R E A U T O M AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Topsides standardization initiative shows early signs of success


Rachael Mell

OTM Consulting
The importance of developing a standard
topsides interface, including a standard communication protocol, remains paramount for
both cost and risk reasons; 2015 might finally
be the year that gets us there. In June 2015,
the topsides standardization network MDIS
(Master Control Station and Distributed Control System Interface Standardization) successfully completed interoperability (IOP)
tests in Amsterdam that demonstrated the
standard working in practice. Although there
is still work to be done, the tests proved one
of the key benefits of the standard: switching
between different vendor systems should
and can take minutes not months.
MDIS was established in 2010 by a group
of operators, distributed control system (DSC)
vendors, and subsea vendors. The individual
parties realized the potential and benefit of

of data and allows the creation of standard,


defined common subsea working objects.
This approach was chosen from an initial
list of eight protocols from which four were
shortlisted and subjected to extensive testing
throughout 2012. Since then, MDIS has been
working extensively with the OPC Foundation
to understand the protocol and develop the
MDIS information model. The model currently includes four MDIS objects valve, choke,
analogue instrument, and digital instrument
which standardize the information that is
expected to flow between the MCS and the
DCS for all operations. Work is now well under
way toward completing the MDIS information
model and MDIS certification.
Thomas Burke, OPC Foundation president and executive director, said that the
value proposition for OPC UA was all about
connectivity and providing the complete infrastructure to support platform independent
interoperability and information modeling.

and work through the test cases.


One of the major successes during the IOP
test was that switching between vendor pairs
and establishing communication took a matter
of minutes, something that would currently
take months of development time on a project.
Additional successes and lessons learned
from the testing have led to minor changes to
the object models and several items that will
go into the MDIS recommended practice, a vital part of the MDIS standard. The success of
this initial interoperability test means that work
can now move forward with defining a recommended practice and additional object models.
As the information model and recommended practice becomes more defined, so development and testing activity will become more
intense; the recent IOP test was an important
first step in moving the work of MDIS from
paper-based to product-based. Planning is already under way for the next IOP test to take
place in early 2016.

The MDIS standard addresses project concerns


related to interface issues and the unforeseen
needs for additional testing.
working together to tackle the challenges associated with disparate communications interfaces. The mission established from the outset
was to optimize master control station (MCS)
to DCS communications of topsides systems,
by defining and establishing a standard for
the interface. As subsea developments have
become increasingly complex and costly, realizing this objective would provide significant
value to operators and the industry at large. At
a high level it would simplify implementation
of data communication links and increase data
quality but at a more project management level
system interface testing requirements would
be simplified, development times and risk of
interface failures would be minimized, and project changes could happen much faster.
With these benefits in mind, the MDIS Network members have been working closely to
develop an appropriate solution. As one of the
networks operator members commented: The
MDIS standard addresses project concerns
related to interface issues and the unforeseen
needs for additional testing. The new standard
should work towards minimizing this risk.
Thus far the network has defined two architectures, interfaced and integrated, that will
be supported by the standard. In addition, the
OPC Unified Architecture (UA) protocol was
selected, which marked an important step
forward. OPC UA is an interoperability framework for the secure and reliable exchange
30 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

He added that the important work that is being done by MDIS, in defining a standardized
information model for all of their objects, fits
well with the OPC UA information modeling
capabilities. It allows OPC UA clients and
servers to communicate integrated information seamlessly. The organizations working
on MDIS have recognized the importance of
secure reliable interoperability and platform
independence as a base requirement for their
information modeling. Im excited that they
have chosen OPC UA as the protocol of choice
to deliver the solution to their requirements.
The MDIS Validation Test workgroup has
defined extensive test cases that ensure the
correct implementation of the MDIS objects
within vendors products. Eventually a series
of tests will be defined that the vendor must
pass in order to achieve MDIS certification.
Perhaps most notable in the progress of the
topsides standard is the first MDIS interoperability (IOP) test that was conducted in June
2015. The purpose of the IOP test was to ensure
the object models were correctly defined and to
understand how the object definitions are being
interpreted by different vendors. The testing
involved six servers and six clients establishing communication and completing a series of
test cases designed to test the functionality of
the object models. The testing involved a dedicated test between each client and server pair.
All pairs were able to communicate successfully

Following the success of these IOP tests,


and with growing support from the businesses
that are providing resources and commitment,
MDIS members will be in a strong position to
mature the common standard going forward.
Nobuaki Konishi, vice president of Process
Automation Systems Business Center at DCS
vendor Yokogawa, says We are grateful for
the opportunity to work with operating companies and subsea vendors to develop the MDIS
specifications. By working together we have
developed an in-depth understanding of the
requirements and are committed to providing
MDIS interfaces that will provide value to the
operating companies. This type of commitment ensures MDIS can deliver against the
need for a standardized approach in the industry that provides simplified data communication links with increased data quality.
The MDIS standard offers significant promise for topsides communications; by using
common interfaces operators will be able to
evolve their systems and adapt to project and
program changes with greater efficiency and
effectiveness. In a time when cost control is
under tight scrutiny across the industry and
investment decisions are more difficult than
ever it is good to see that collaboration and
cooperation initiatives do work. The progress
that MDIS has made to date is notable and the
next set of IOP test results should be watched
and taken note of as well.

R E G U L AT O R Y P E R S P E C T I V E S

SEMS, safety audits loom large after recent government mandates


Charlie Williams

Center for Offshore Safety


Since the 2010 spill at the Macondo prospect in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and natural gas industry and government regulators
have made tremendous strides to enhance
the safety of offshore operations. For several years, all oil and natural gas operators
on the US outer continental shelf have been
required to implement and undergo audits
of their required safety programs, known
as Safety and Environmental Management
Systems (SEMS). The Bureau of Safety and
Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) recently made several updates to its SEMS regulations that will likewise impact every offshore
operator, including a requirement that SEMS
audits be provided by accredited auditors.
As the cornerstone of BSEEs hybrid
regulatory approach, the aim of SEMS is
to encourage the offshore oil and natural gas industry to continually advance its
safety culture by looking beyond baseline
compliance with regulations and toward
continuous improvement in safety and environmental performance management. By
using SEMS, organizations are better able
to influence human behavior, organizational
structure, leadership, standards, processes,
procedures and operating integrity.
On June 5, compliance with the auditing requirements of BSEEs SEMS II rule took effect,
mandating that all required audits of offshore
operators SEMS programs be conducted with
an independent, accredited, third-party audit
service provider (ASP) in the lead. The operator is responsible for providing SEMS audit
reports to BSEE, who then holds the operator
responsible for addressing any problems that
are identified. These third-party audits supplement and complement other BSEE inspection
and enforcement activities.
In June, BSEE approved the Center for Offshore Safety (COS) as the first and currently
the only body authorized to accredit audit
service providers for the purpose of conducting SEMS audits of offshore oil and natural gas
operators for BSEE. COS program has been in
operation for several years and has already accredited four ASPs as of July 1. Several others
are also under consideration. COS-accreditation
provides all operators, not just COS members,
assurance that ASPs are capable of providing assessments in conformance with COS program
requirements. BSEEs recognition of this COS
program means that all COS-accredited auditors
meet the new regulatory requirements.
The COS accreditation process involves
evaluation of an ASPs written procedures and
programs for planning, executing, and reporting SEMS audits, as well as for assuring the
32 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

competency and impartiality of their auditors.


ASPs and individual auditors must meet certain requirements for skills, knowledge, experience, competency, and impartiality. Such
requirements include but are not limited to
internationally recognized standards such as
ISO/IEC 17021 and ISO 19011, which cover
the guidelines an ASP must follow when audit
services are provided, as well as those provided by the auditor. COS then audits the ASPs
program and performs a witness assessment of the ASPs SEMS audit of an operator. A firm may only receive COS accreditation
after demonstrating that its auditing program
meets COS requirements.
A SEMS management system audit is an
evaluation of the implementation, maintenance, and performance of the SEMS program. It evaluates the effectiveness of the
overall system and its elements in delivering
expected safety and environmental performance. These audits are performance-based,
seek to identify system gaps, and are conducted at predetermined intervals. A system audit
report includes conclusions based on observations made by the auditor on the design and
implementation of the SEMS system, which
include the identified conformities and deficiencies. All conclusions in the report must be
supported by objective evidence made by the
auditor during the audit, which may include
review of records, policies, procedures, and
interviews with personnel involved in the management system. The audit report may also
identify strengths found within the auditee
management system. The audit results drive
changes to the audited companys SEMS and
continuous improvement.
The oil and natural gas industry created
the Center for Offshore Safety in 2010 in an
effort to achieve excellence in safety performance of its offshore operations. Its mission
is to promote the highest level of safety for
offshore drilling, completions, and operations
through effective leadership, communication,
teamwork, utilization of disciplined management systems, and independent third-party
auditing and certification. Third-party auditing, SEMS assistance, and ASP accreditation
have been an integral part from the beginning
of the COS work and mission.
By the end of the first SEMS audit cycle,
86% of regulated operators were able to successfully demonstrate through a formal audit
that the required SEMS program was established and operational. An estimated 95% or
more of the regulated operators used the COS
audit tools and protocols to conduct their audits. COS also requires its operator members
to complete a SEMS audit via a third-party
ASP accredited by COS. COS contractor members have also begun to conduct voluntary

SEMS audits. The Center feels this approach


will have significant benefit for both operators
and contractors.
Being a COS member means embracing
its guiding principles by working together to
share learnings about SEMS and safety; to
develop good practices based on data to improve performance; and to create a pervasive
culture of safety. Its members safety and environmental processes, equipment, training,
and technology undergo constant examination and improvement, and they share learnings and embrace industry standards and
COS good practices to drive continuous improvement. All eligible COS operator members successfully completed the first round
of BSEE SEMS audits.
Contractors, although not subject to the thirdparty audit requirements under the SEMS II
rule, may elect to voluntarily conduct SEMS
audits. SEMS auditing by contractors is another
clear indication of their commitment to safety
and effectiveness of their safety management.
The process makes it easier to align, plan, and
execute safety management as the contractors
and operators work together. It also allows contractors to be more effective, focused, and efficient in managing their SEMS program.
Operators and regulators gain the additional
assurance that the contractor meets all the
SEMS elements and requirements that an operator must meet and their programs are well
aligned. This voluntary SEMS auditing of contractors can assist in reducing the redundant
assessments by multiple operators on the contractors by providing a single, well planned, and
executed SEMS audit by an accredited ASP.
This will allow more time and focus on bridging
agreements improving communication and
relationships between operators and contractors and more time and resources on managing safety. At the time of this publication, two
contractors, Pacific Drilling and Schlumberger,
have successfully conducted SEMS audits
through accredited auditors.
By aligning their programs with the new
SEMS, operators and contractors alike can further the industry-wide goal of achieving greater
safety offshore. COS looks forward to being an
accreditation body and continuing to work with
BSEE and all companies involved in the offshore oil and natural gas industry as it pursues
more effective safety and environmental protection through SEMS and SEMS auditing.

The author

Charles (Charlie) R. Williams II was


named executive director for the Center
for Offshore Safety in March 2012.
Previously, he retired from Shell Oil as
Chief ScientistWell Engineering after
a 40-year career.

NORTH SEA

UK operators reviewing costs


at all levels to sustain future activity

ritains North Sea producers face a


struggle to remain in business. The
sectors operating costs are among
the worlds highest, with some of
the older, higher-maintenance fields
becoming a liability at the current oil price
despite falling rig and service rates. At the
same time, it is in the operators interest to
keep their facilities running as long as possible to avoid sky-high decommissioning bills.
Oil & Gas UKs Cost Efficiency conference
in London in May outlined how operators and
contractors on the shelf are managing the situation in different ways. Speakers included
John Catlow, cost efficiency project manager
at Total E&P UK, and Line Kaldestad, Statoil
Production UK logistics manager.
Total operates three production hubs in
the UK northern North Sea at the Alwyn
and Dunbar fields, and at the Elgin/Franklin complex in the central UK sector. Were
lucky we dont have a large scatter of installations to deal with, Catlow said, so our operations are reasonably efficient.
Were still active, spending about 2 billion [$3.2 billion] this year. We employ a lot
of people in the UK, over 1,000 at present,
and we have a couple of major projects in execution. Were nearing completion of the Laggan-Tormore [long-distance subsea-beach]
development and the associated Shetland gas
reception plant, and we recently launched the
associated Edradour and Glenlivet [tie-in]
project.
Total is in a busy drilling period in UK waters, Catlow added, with two platform rigs
in operation earlier in the year, later scaled
back to one, and six mobile rigs at one point.
These have been drilling a total of 10 development wells, two workovers and one exploratory well.
At the same time, the company is having to
take on the major challenge of heavily reducing its costs, following a directive from headquarters in Paris to all Total divisions worldwide to deliver cash savings where possible
to maintain profitability. If we can manage
an $8-billion cash improvement, Catlow said,
thats equivalent to $30/bbl.
On the surface, the scope for savings appears limited in the UK operation, due to the
difficulties of managing ageing infrastructure
at Alwyn/Dunbar and complex high-pressure/high-temperature activity at Elgin Frank34 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Jeremy Beckman

Editor, Europe

John Catlow, Total E&P UK, speaking at Oil &


Gas UKs conference in May.
(All photos courtesy Oil & Gas UK)

lin, where operations were shut in for a long


time following a leak in one of the wells.
Thats not something you take risks with,
Catlow stressed.
The solution that Total is adopting is known
as Change Culture.
In our case, in the UK, he explained, the
mantra for the past 10 years has been be safe
and produce. As long as youre producing,
the oil price is there to support you. Costs
will be what they will be. But that attitude
cant continue its not going to work on the
UK continental shelf any more, and probably
wont in quite a lot of other areas of our industry. Weve got to learn to be a little more competitive on costs our engineers tend to engineer things and then worry about the costs
later. And we have to deliver on our promises,
which means delivering projects on time and
also initiatives to save costs on time.

Road map
Total initiated this program in March 2014
when the oil price was over $100/bbl. When
the price took a dive, we had to add a layer
to the project we had already launched, Catlow said. Were reducing our capital investments, operating, and exploration costs, but
were also trying to ensure projects in execution start up as quickly as possible. And were
looking at the profitability of our assetsthat
is whats really important for the longer term.
The primary tool Total is using for this pro-

cess is road mapping: In the UK, management


has identified 77 initiatives for delivering cost
improvements, ranging from less than $1 million to $10 million. All our activities are under
review, Catlow explained. That includes well
construction, maintenance, field operations,
geoscience, procurement, the way we execute
projects, undertake our logistics spend, our
information systems and our structural costs.
At the time of this presentation in May,
the road mapping exercise had been in operation in the UK for six months. Its led to
lots of good ideas and enthusiasm, Catlow
said, now we need to get on with it and deliver. As an example, our industry has a tendency to over-engineering, disparagingly referred to as gold-plating. Our engineers will
always try to deliver the best solutions that
they can, but now they have to understand
that the best technology solution may not be
the one thats going to fly for their business.
Our drilling colleagues are very good at
complexifying their wells, and our geoscientists are very good at making extremely
complicated requests to our drillers, Catlow said. We then end up with expensive
wells so now were trying to strip out some
of the costs in our wells.
Total is proud of the technical standards it
has established in its upstream projects, he
continued, but sees scope for more flexibility.
It is not always necessary for engineers to apply the same standards for upstream projects
operating for 40 years to ones that are only
likely to run for five to 10 years, he suggested.
The company has also implemented methodologies such as Six Sigma, which is designed
to achieve improvements in a process via keywords, in this case: define, measure, analyze,
improve, control and lean offshore for its
upstream operations. Offering an example, Catlow explained that Total geoscientists had been
instructed to improve their planning related to
seismic acquisition processing, while also being told to accept that they cannot always have
all the data they would like. Its not an area
weve paid much attention to, as wells tend to
be where you spend the money, he said.
Another area under scrutiny is information services (IS). We have always gone for
the best software for our geoscientists, the
high-tech solution, he explained. Now we
are going to look for more simple IS solutions for other items such as telecoms, even

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NORTH SEA

simple things, like printers.


In addition, Total E&P UK is reviewing its
leverage with the supply chain, and talking
with its major suppliers about their sub-suppliers our own contract management is
perhaps an area weve not been very good
at, Catlow admitted. The company is considering in some cases sourcing cheaper goods
from China. Were also looking at stock optimization. Our drillers will always buy lots
of pipe then plans change, we end up not
drilling the well, and the wretched pipe sits in
the warehouse or yard for years and years.
Where possible, the company is trying to
collaborate more with other North Sea operators, offering time on its rigs for others
looking for single well slots, and potential
sharing of supply vessels. Its not easy when
you have drilling operations to support, with
[North Sea] rig costs at $3-400,000/d and
supply boats costing $120,000/d. But if you
have the option to go for an efficient rig or
an inefficient supply vessel, its a no-brainer
you go for the latter.
Were also looking at our annual offshore
[platform-related] turnarounds and shutdowns
weve discussed with other operators whether we can align our activities, execute our shutdowns more efficiently, he said. Central to all
this is communication the case for change is

Line Kaldestad, Statoil UK, also speaking in May.

being well made in the industry. We need to set


expectations as to what were trying to achieve.
Catlow concluded that the company had a
strong position on the UK continental shelf,
with three other production hubs, so were
not going out of business tomorrow. But we
have to adapt to ensure that all our assets are
profitable and continue to run that way in the
long term. The focus is on cost reduction in
the short term, but were also looking for
long-term cost efficiency.

Merger legacy

Statoils UK logistics head Line Kaldestad


previously performed a similar role for the

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company in Norway. Following Statoils 2007


merger with its main Norwegian competitor
Norsk Hydro, the company was operator of
26 producing assets offshore Norway with
10-12 drilling rigs operating at any time, she
explained. It also presided over an expanded logistics infrastructure built up since
the early 1980s, to an extent dictated by the
Norwegian governments desire to split the
majority of the countrys offshore resources
between two partially state-owned entities.
The two companies had four supply bases and three helicopter bases in the same
areas in Norway. It was not the best way
to optimize our resources, Kaldestad said.
Before the oil price plummeted [following
the merger], we had looked for all our assets
to increase production. So drilling/exploration activity was sky high, and the portfolio
of maintenance and increased recovery projects required a lot of support and flexibility
to achieve as many drilling meters as possible
per day. That drove increased costs for installations, and we had a tremendous amount of
storage vessels floating around as we lacked
sufficient storage capacity offshore.
But the situation was not sustainable. We
pressured the market, she said, which led
to increased rates, and our costs continued
to grow when the oil price fell. We then saw

NORTH SEA

that we had to change our position and focus more on safety, but we also wondered
whether there was anything we could do
tomake our operations more cost-effective, use our resources better, and get more
value for our money. Thereafter, Statoils
focus changed to getting planning right first
time, she added, and ensuring the correct
level of service for its activities.
On the Norwegian continental shelf, we
have a huge logistics operation, she continued, with seven supply bases and six helicopter terminals. The company decided to
optimize and re-organize its resources by
examining its main costs drivers, starting
with crew change capacity. Kaldestad cited
offshore personnel based in Kristiansand requesting to fly out to offshore facilities and
back the same day, or favoring crew changes between Tuesdays and Thursdays. During these days, that meant we had to have
additional [helicopter] capacity to get everyone offshore, she said, so Statoil decided instead to spread flights throughout the week,
insisting that staff accept longer layovers
offshore or on their return to shore.
In any case, as drilling and exploration
activity has dropped, the companys requirement for staff offshore has fallen steeply,
she pointed out. Many of our modification
projects have been canceled or postponed,
and several of our installationsnow operate with a lower persons on board capacity.
As drilling has been scaled back, the company has reorganized its helicopter bases,
transferring more resources from southern Norway father north, and entering an
agreement with BP to operate helicopters
jointly out of Sandnessjoen to trim costs.
We have also looked again at our contracts,
many of which we entered into at a time of
peak costs, so we dont have the best rates,
she explained. Another major cost Statoil
reviewed following the merger with Hydro
was its fleet of platform supply vessels the
company had 40-60 operating at any time
offshore Norway. With seven supply bases,
that didnt give us a lot of opportunities to
optimize, Kaldestad said. So in 2010, we
launched a project to look at our bases, especially in the southern Norwegian North
Sea, with a view to optimizing the structure
without changing requirements in field development plans. This led to Mongstad and
Stavanger becoming the companys main
supply bases, with Aagostnes serving as a
subsea mobilization base. Statoil also implemented a new regime to reduce the number
of calls for vessels offshore to a more acceptable level, she added, so that our teams get
what they need when they need it, but they
must get better at planning.
Offshore Norway, operators must be able
to provide emergency response resources

from their own fleets, including search and


rescue (S&R) helicopters and emergency
response vessels. Statoil has responded by
teaming up with other operators to provide
area-wide emergency response, Kaldestad
said. The company is also looking at restructuring its S&R capability more evenly, particularly in the southern sector, allocating
three aircraft to the main field centers and a
fourth to the Johan Sverdrup development.
Many of the facilities are close to the UK

North Sea median line, and Statoil is open to


sharing its resources with operators in UK
waters, she added.
When the company set up its operation in
Aberdeen to support its Mariner field development (and eventually Bressay in the same
area), we took some of these learnings with
us, Kaldestad said, to make sure that we
have a sound set-up and that we dont implement internal constraints on our operations
that drive us to inefficiencies.

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NORTH SEA

The 4,500-metric ton (4,082-ton)


process module for the Edvard Grieg
platform leaves the Aker Egersund
yard en route for the field in early July.
(Photos courtesy Lundin Norway)

Lundin joining major league


of Norway offshore producers

undin Norway is on a steeply upward


production curve, after converting its
first two major exploration successes
offshore Norway into new development hubs. With the Edvard Grieg
field in the central Norwegian North Sea
on track to produce first oil later this year,
development under way of the nearby giant
Johan Sverdrup field, and appraisal continuing of the significant Alta discovery in the
Barents Sea, the company has a very bright
future, according to Managing Director
Kristin Frvik.
In June, Norways parliament (Storting) authorized operator Statoils first-phase scheme
for Johan Sverdrup. Lundin, however, made
the initial breakthrough in the discovery of
the field, the largest found anywhere offshore
Norway in 30 years. Previously, the company
had discovered Edvard Grieg in the same
Utsira High region, and it has since proved
substantial additional resources in what was
considered to be a mature area.
Weve got very good people who are set
on acquiring as much information as possible from every exploration well that we drill,
and that goes for both coring and testing,
said Frvik. Heading the team has been
Hans Christen Rnnevik, who just retired as
exploration manager but will continue as a
consultant. We have a very high level both
of expertise and experience in our exploration team, with very deep knowledge of the
Norwegian continental shelf, Frvik continued. They are supported, she added, by
owners who have given us the freedom to
explore, who believe in our ideas, and are
willing to take risks.
38 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Nick Terdre

Contributing Editor

Parent company Lundin Petroleum is active in several countries, including offshore


Malaysia and Indonesia, but the Norwegian
operation accounted for almost 80% of its
187.5 MMboe of booked 2P reserves at the
end of 2014. That does not include its 22.6%
share of the 1.7-3 Bbbl of Johan Sverdrup
reserves, as re-determined recently by Norways Ministry of Petroleum and Energy.
According to the Norwegian Petroleum
Directorate, Lundin was the second most active explorer on the Norwegian continental
shelf during 2007-14, drilling 41 wildcats and
making commercial discoveries with 16; as
operator, the company was also responsible
for 50% of the countrys discovered resources in this period. This year we might very
well be the company with the most wildcat
and appraisal wells on the Norwegian continental shelf, Frvik added.
Lundin discovered Edvard Grieg, then
known as Luno, on the Utsira High in 2007,
via exploration well 16/1-8. From 2008-2010,
appraisal drilling led to a doubling of reserves on the field, with further discoveries
following nearby on Apollo (16/1-14) and
Luno South (16/1-12).
In 2010, Lundin discovered Johan Sverdrup
via exploration well 16/2-6 on the Avaldsnes
prospect, but prior to drilling, analysis suggested a discovery would likely extend over more
than one production license. Statoil drilled
an appraisal well a year later (16/2-8) on the

Aldous Major South prospect in the neighboring license, confirming this assumption, with
the reservoir appearing to cover large parts of
both licenses. An extensive program of 29 appraisal wells and side tracks followed, eventually ending in 2014.

Edvard Grieg

Lundins first operated development on the


NCS was Brynhild, a small subsea development in the North Sea tied back to Shells Pierce
FPSO in the UK sector, which came onstream
last December. Reserves are 23.1 MMboe and
initial production exceeded the forecast plateau
rate of 12,000 boe/d. However, Edvard Grieg,
with reserves of 187 MMboe and capex of NOK
25 billion ($3.05 billion), is of a higher order of
magnitude. Production, expected to plateau at
around 100,000 boe/d, will take place through
a fixed platform with wellhead, processing,
and accommodation facilities. Saipems crane
barge S7000 installed the 14,500-metric ton
(15,983-ton) jacket, built by Kvaerner Verdal
last year, while Heerema Marine Contractors
crane barge Thialf installed the 22,000-metric
ton (19,958-ton) topsides last month. This was
built mainly by Kvaerner Stord, with Aker
Egersund contributing the 4,500-metric ton
(4,960-ton)process module and Apply Leirvik
the 1,200-metric ton (1,322-ton) living quarters.
Lundin expects production to start some
time during the latter part of this year. Produced oil will be exported through a new 43km (27-mi) pipeline linking into the Grane field
export line, while Edvard Griegs rich gas will
head through a new 90-km (56-mi) line connecting to the Sage trunkline in the UK sector.
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NORTH SEA

The jackup Rowan Viking began drilling the 15 development wells


last October. We had to get the rig out of the way to allow the topsides
to be installed, Frvik said. It is now drilling an appraisal on the
southeastern part of Edvard Grieg. This well, 16/1-23, spudded in late
June, will hopefully optimize the placement of future development wells
in this part of the field and test for upside potential of up to 50 MMboe.
The search continues for additional reserves. We will hover the
area around Edvard Grieg so we can get the most out of our acreage
there, Frvik said. Were drilling an exploration well on Luno II
North. We now need to prove up materiality and hopefully we can get
development going there too at some stage. Reserves to tieback to
Edvard Grieg thats our motivation.
The Edvard Grieg complex will also handle final processing of oil
and gas from Det norske oljeselskaps Ivar Aasen development, 10
km (6.2 mi) to the north, in which Lundin has a 1.39% stake.

Johan Sverdrup

 

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40 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Under a pre-unitization agreement Statoil led development planning for Johan Sverdrup, but with the active participation of the other licensees Det norske, Maersk, Petoro, and Lundin. The first-phase
plan calls for installation of a field center comprising four bridgelinked installations drilling, riser, process, and utilities/quarters
platforms and 35 development wells.
The field extends more than 200 sq km (77 sq mi), with anticipated
long-term investment costs of NOK 170-220 billion ($20.7-26.8 billion).
At plateau it will deliver 550-650,000 boe/d and is expected to remain
in production for 50 years. The first-phase project will recover 1.4-2.4
Bboe at a cost of NOK 117 billion ($14.6 billion) and will produce 315380,000 boe/d at peak. According to the Ministry of Petroleum and
Energy, the breakeven price for the development is just $32/bbl.
Following authorization from Storting, Statoil swiftly issued engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contracts to Kvaerner for the drilling and riser platform jackets; the Kvaerner/KBR joint
venture for the utilities/quarters topsides; Aibel for the drilling platform topsides; and Samsung Heavy Industries for the process and
riser platform topsides. Allseas will install the drilling, process, and
utilities/quarters topsides using its newly-built single-lift vessel Pioneering Spirit. Odfjell has the contracts for both platform drilling and
mobile rig drilling, with Baker Hughes providing well services and
Fjords Processing supplying topsides process packages.
Following the wishes of the government, operations at the field
center will be powered from shore via a 200-km (124-mi) subsea
cable system. When the second phase of development comes onstream, probably in 2022, the power-from-shore system will be expanded to create a high-power hub supplying other development
projects on the Utsira High, including Statoils Gina Krog, Edvard
Grieg, and Ivar Aasen.
The beauty of Johan Sverdrup is that its such a long-term revenue stream, Frvik said. Were talking about a field with a 50year horizon. It gives us a fantastic foundation on which to continue
to build our business in Norway.

Barents Sea prospects


Lundin is a major license holder in the Loppa High area in the Barents Sea. In 2013, the company opened up a new play with its discovery well 7120/1-3 on the Gohta structure, followed in 2014 by Alta with
well 7220/11-1. The company assesses Altas potential resources in
the 125-400 MMboe range.
The semisubmersible Island Innovator is conducting a further drilling campaign on the Loppa High this year. It began with Alta appraisal
well 7220/11-2, spudded in March and side tracked in May. The well
confirmed the reservoir model and proved the presence of hydrocarbon columns and fluid contacts similar to those in the discovery well.
In June, the rig spudded Alta III appraisal 7220/11-3. After finishing

NORTH SEA

Heerema Marine Contractors crane barge Thialf installed the main deck of the Edvard Grieg platform
in early July.

this operation, the rig will move to the north


to drill an exploration well on the Neiden
prospect (7220/6), just east of Statoils Johan
Castberg oil and gas discovery. Well have a
better understanding of the Loppa High later
this year when weve been able to interpret all
the new data that weve gathered, Frvik
said. Lundin also plans a wildcat later this
year on the rnen prospect, much farther
east in quadrant 7130.
In addition, the company is also preparing bids for two current Norwegian licensing
rounds that include Barents Sea acreage the

Awards in Predefined Areas 2015, for mature


areas, and the 23rd frontier round, which for the
first time takes in acreage in the southeast Barents Sea near the frontier with Russia. There
has been widespread interest in the 23rd round
acreage, which led to multi-company seismic
acquisition campaigns last year. In partnership
with Statoil, Chevron, and Shell, Lundin is the
lead company for the processing and interpretation of data for one of the four areas covered.
The results will be available in time for the applications which are due by Dec. 2, Frvik
said. Meanwhile Lundin, Statoil, and other

operators with significant discoveries in the


Barents Sea have held talks on possible export
solutions in an area virtually devoid of offshore
infrastructure. This is one of the key issues to
be resolved ahead of development.
Lundins main non-operated asset in Norway is the Alvheim area in the North Sea
where it has a 15% stake. Marathon Oil (Norway), which Frvik once headed, developed
the Alvheim field in 2008, and Det norske is
the current operator. Production performance
has been above expectation, she claimed. Alvheim has been our backbone for quite some
time and its still going pretty well.
Norway remains an attractive venue for exploration, she added. Apart from one glitch a
couple of years back when there was a change
to the tax uplift, Norway offers a stable environment to investors. Exploration conditions
are generous and our capital expenditure
is reasonably well sheltered youre not as
exposed in a low-price environment as you
might be in a lot of other tax regimes.
Later this year, Lundins Norwegian business could end up almost trebling the groups
production to 75,000 boe/d, thanks to Edvard
Grieg. Production will take a further giant
step forward once Johan Sverdrup comes
onstream in 2019, with potential add-ons at
some point from the Barents Sea.

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NORTH SEA

Industry reassessing potential


of Irish Atlantic Margin

Catherine Caulfield
John Corr

Hannon Westwood

he Irish offshore Atlantic Margin is one of the final frontier


regions in northwest Europe and one that is largely underexplored. However, there are signs that this may change as
a result of improvements in Irelands fiscal regime, advancements made in understanding the geology, and technological
advances.
Recent successful exploration on the conjugate margins of the Atlantic - offshore Canada in the west, the west of Shetland region to the
north, and West Africa to the south has drawn attention to the prospectivity of the Irish Atlantic Margin. There is a sense of anticipation
as the Sept.16 deadline approaches for Irelands 2015 Atlantic Margin
Licensing Round, with all the basins opened for licensing.
The margin can be divided into the inward basins Porcupine, Slyne,
Erris, Donegal and the outward Rockall basin and associated perched
basins. The geological evolution of these basins has been relatively
poorly understood, although recent major studies by the governments
of the countries and provinces bordering the North Atlantic have made
significant strides toward developing a coherent regional picture.
The presence of Permian and Triassic salt and Tertiary basalts has,
in the past, resulted in reduced seismic quality and clouded understanding of the geology. The margin is also a particularly difficult region in
which to operate, with year-round harsh weather conditions and water
depths in the Rockall basin reaching 3,000 m (9,842 ft). Nevertheless,
working petroleum systems have been proven in the Porcupine, Rockall, Slyne, and Erris basins. Hannon Westwoods database suggests that
Porcupine and Rockall hold the largest estimated yet-to-find recoverable volumes of respectively 7.8 Bboe and 10 Bboe. The Slyne, Erris,
and Donegal basins have estimated yet-to-find prospective resources of
respectively 1.37 Bboe, 0.75 Bboe, and 0.28 Bboe.

Exploration history
The Irish Atlantic Margin covers an area nearly one and a half
times that of the UK equivalent, but in comparison to its neighbor,
offshore activity has remained low.
Since the first license was awarded on the Atlantic Margin in 1976,
around 60,000 sq km (23,166 sq mi) of acreage has been held under
license. The principal focus has been around the Northern Porcupine, Slyne, and Erris basins, while the Southern Porcupine and
deepwater, remote Rockall basins remain barely explored. In 2011,
the Irish government launched a license round designed to bring
most of the Atlantic Margin into play. Acreage on offer covered a
total area of 252,500 sq km (97,491 sq mi). Subsequent awards increased the licensed acreage by 8,000 sq km (3,089 sq mi) to 19,500
sq km (7,529 sq mi), and perhaps more importantly, brought seven
new players into the sector.
As with other regions offshore Ireland, the Atlantic Margin underwent a burst of activity in the six years between 1977 and 1982, with
26 wells drilled. Over the following 30 years, however, only 28 wells
were drilled on the Atlantic Margin, giving a total of 54 exploration
and appraisal wells. Although there have been several discoveries,
only Enterprise Oils Corrib from 1996 has reached commerciality under Shells management, and is due to come onstream later this year.
However, while commercial success has proven elusive, there are
positives going forward. Forty-three exploration wells have led to
42 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Acreage licensed offshore Ireland. (Map courtesy Hannon Westwood)

eight discoveries, a technical success rate of 19%. This compares favorably with other frontier basins around the world, even with mature
basins such as the UK and Norway where average success rates vary
between 25% and 45%. In the UK Atlantic Margin the technical success rate is 32%. When the Irish figure is compared with results from
the first 43 wells drilled on the UK Atlantic Margin, the volume of
resource discovered in the Irish sector is actually better, although the
UKs resource has been revised upward after BP reassessed volumes
in its Clair Ridge discovery west of Shetland following a concerted
appraisal campaign. However, there is the possibility that a similar
re-assessment of existing Irish discoveries could take place.
In the Irish sector, Triassic and Jurassic reservoirs were historically the primary objectives for the majority of wells drilled, accounting for 75% of the targets. But new research on regional link geology
is causing the industry to rethink its approach. New companies entering the region are bringing a wealth of experience from the West

NORTH SEA
Irish Atlantic Margin creaming curve

UK Atlantic Margin creaming curve

Comparison of Irish/UK Atlantic Margin well results. (All images courtesy Hannon Westwood)

African margin. The post-rift passive margin play has proven successful to the north in UK fields such as Foinaven and Schiehallion
West of Shetland, and has also worked to the south offshore Africa
in Ghanas Jubilee and Mahogany fields; its extension northward
into Ireland therefore seems logical.
The ultra-deepwater well 44/23-1 that ExxonMobil drilled in 2013
on the Dunquin North structure in the Porcupine basin is one example of companies employing new concepts and technology to
work up a prospect. Providence Resources and Sosina successfully
farmed out parts of the acreage containing Dunquin to major players
ExxonMobil, Eni, and Repsol to allow the well to go ahead. This level of pre-drill deal activity was unusual but, at the same time, encour-

aging for the Irish sector. Although the well did not encounter the
hoped-for hydrocarbons, it did demonstrate a working hydrocarbon
system and underlined the potential of the Atlantic Margin.

New data

In recent years, 2D seismic acquisition has picked up pace. The inward basins of the Atlantic Margin have excellent 2D seismic coverage,
much of it shot between 1995 and 2009. The seismic quality naturally varies depending on its vintage, but new reprocessing techniques
can provide clearer results. Last year, Harrier Navigation acquired a
4,872-km (3,027 mi) line multi-client 2D regional survey over the South
Porcupine basin on behalf of Seabird Exploration. The Petroleum Af-

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fairs Division of Ireland also commissioned a regional seismic survey


shot by Chinese contractor BGP during 2013-2014 with the objective
of providing 2D coverage over parts of the Rockall basin, where data
was previously sparse or non-existent. The government-subsidized prestack time migrated seismic survey totaled 16,800 km (10,439 mi).
Acquisition of 3D seismic in the Atlantic Margin began in earnest in 2000
(Fig. 3). Of the 43 exploration wells drilled in the region, only 10 have been
drilled on post-2000 3D seismic. Recently, two large surveys have been acquired in the Porcupine basin, the first shot by Polarcus on behalf of Kosmos on the eastern margin. The second was a 2014 Polarcus multi-client
survey with a footprint of more than 4,300 sq km (1,660 sq mi). It covered
Providence-operated acreage that included the Drombeg prospect and
unlicensed acreage available under the current licensing round. In 2014,
Dolphin Geophysical also acquired 3D seismic on behalf of Cairn Energy-subsidiary Capricorn Ireland, south of the Spanish Point Discovery.
In the future, exploration wells are more likely to be drilled based
on interpretation of superior quality 3D seismic than on older, poorer quality 3D or 2D data and, theoretically, the chance of finding a
commercial accumulation will be higher.

Irish Atlantic
Margin seismic
data coverage.

Fiscal changes

In advance of the 2015 Atlantic Margin Licensing Round, the Irish


government revised its fiscal regime for the petroleum industry in
an attempt to stabilize the Irish taxation system and encourage investment in offshore exploration. Irelands revamped fiscal regime
comprises of a combination of corporation tax (CT) and petroleum
production tax (PPT). New fiscal terms will apply to the 2015 round,
but will not be applied retrospectively to existing licenses.
Within the new terms, PPT is charged on a field-by-field basis with
the rate varying between 0 - 40% according to field profitability, although

a minimum rate of 5% will function as a royalty to the state. The CT rate


remains at 25%, however, PPT is now deductible against CT. Capital
allowances include accelerated depreciation and immediate write-off
for 100% exploration and development costs once the field commences production; a provision also allows for a deduction for expenditure
that companies may incur in withdrawing from or shutting down an
oil or gas field. Furthermore, investment incentives include the option

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for losses to be carried forward indefinitely, with further incentives for


research and development. There are no incentives for unconventional
oil and gas, and there are no direct incentives for exploration.
The maximum headline tax rate range increases to 28.75% - 55%,
when compared with a previous rate of 25% - 40%. While these headline
rates are higher than under the previous system (due to the deduction
of PPT against CT), this system is in fact more generous to smaller, potentially less commercially attractive fields. Under the previous system,
a profit resource rent tax of 10% equated to a headline tax of 35%, but
under the new system, a PPT of 10% equates to a headline tax of 32.5%.
Even with the potential of increased tax, Ireland has a lower comparable government take compared with peer group countries. It is
very favorable to oil companies when compared to the UK rate of
50-75% and a Norwegian rate of 78%.

Rockall breakeven model

Hannon Westwood currently recognizes 54 prospects in the Rockall


basin, which was first opened for licensing in 1997. Only three wells have
been drilled in the Irish sector on the eastern margin, one of which resulted in the Dooish discovery. Hannon Westwood has developed software
that can produce a breakeven model that determines the lowest possible
oil price at which a prospect can be developed economically.
The model takes the following factors into consideration: P50 resource estimate, water depth, tax regime, and development costs (both
capex and opex). Stand-alone development costs for the prospects have
been calculated using field analogues from the North Sea based on reserve size and reservoir target. Of the 54 unlicensed prospects, 42 were
included in the model after the application of a 30 MMboe cut-off. The
software analyzes each prospect as a single entity and does not recognize dual reservoir targets or the potential for cluster development.

In total, the model identified 32 prospects as breakeven or better at


the recent oil price of $60/bbl. The model shows that in the success
case, 7.5 Bboe out of an estimated 10 Bboe could be economically
extracted from the Rockall basin, despite the associated expense of
deepwater drilling, and high capex and opex associated with probable
stand-alone field developments (and the relatively low oil price).

Conclusion

Improved seismic acquisition and reprocessing techniques, along


with continued research are unlocking our understanding of the Irish
Atlantic Margin basins and their related prospectivity. Exploration and
development options are also benefiting from advances in technology
that are currently being applied in deepwater in the Gulf of Mexico and
shallower water in the Barents Sea. This technology is becoming more
efficient and less expensive, facilitating exploration in more challenging
environments and ultimately leading to greater oil recovery.
In addition, companies are applying new exploration and development
ideas in order to unlock the potential of the Atlantic Margin. Many of the
companies holding Irish acreage have had experience working in similar
operating conditions west of Shetland and have an understanding of how
to overcome such development challenges. Alternatively, they have had
success with analogous plays on the conjugate margin off the coast of
West Africa and are now chasing these plays off the Irish coast.
The Irish government has placed Ireland in a promising position
in advance of the 2015 Licensing Round by making available the subsidized regional seismic survey and introducing a favorable fiscal
regime for both the Irish people and oil companies. All elements are
in place to transform Ireland from one of the last frontiers to a hub
of exploration with a strong offshore industry and the potential to
supply the country with reliable sources of energy.

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GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

Mexico opens up offshore areas


for new seismic surveys
Reform measures spur renewed G&G activity
Robin Dupre

Sr. Technology Editor

exicos National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH) recently opened its waters to allow international seismic
companies to shoot and sell acquired data, a first in the
nation for more than 75 years, ahead of prospective new
bidding rounds. The event is the first in a series of petroleum auctions that opened the energy industry, which is expected
to bring in an estimated $62.5 billion by 2018 and increasing annual
output by 500,000 b/d.
The invitation to bid commenced in December 2014 followed by
the opening of the tender process in 1Q 2015. In late March, CNH
provided data room access to approved parties, which opened the
door to decades worth of seismic data for operators to assess before
Round 1 commenced.

46 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

We disclosed all the seismic information that has been kept confidential for decades, Juan Carlos Zepeda Molina, president of CNH,
stated at a Houston conference in March. Zepeda added that access
to all available seismic data was expected to be made public this
summer.
Prior to seismic companies bidding in the tender process, CNH
requested new seismic data due to changes in both processing and
acquisition technologies. Because the technologies are changing so
rapidly there is a considerable uplift in acquiring new seismic data.
It is believed that longer offsets in acquisition will deliver better images with newer processing algorithms providing improved images
of the subsurface.
Once CNH published the model production-sharing contract for
A MOU has been executed for a cooperation agreement between Spectrum, PGS, and Schlumberger in Mexico. The collaboration will acquire
49,710-62,137 mi (80,000 100,000 km) of modern, long-offset 2D data
encompassing all the major hydrocarbon provinces offshore Mexico.
(Courtesy Spectrum)

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the first phase of Mexicos Round One bid process, relating to 14


form areas in shallow waters, interested parties were given access to
perform hydrocarbon exploration and production operations in the
contract area on an exclusive basis.
Mexican regulators then offered permits after the application
of nine major companies were submitted for new seismic testing,
allowing seismic companies to sell the information for a specified
number of years to potential investors with the understanding that it
will eventually be made public.
Spectrum Geos President Richie Miller told Offshore there is no
time limit on the agreements, with the government granting the
companies 12 years of exclusive licensing rights for the project, with
an extension option, too.
Petroleum Geo-Services (PGS), the first company to commence
operations of a multi-client 2D seismic program in the Mexican Gulf
of Mexico (GoM), launched its project on May 16. The 2D vessels

Acquisition of the data should continue for about 15 months while


TGS processes it simultaneously to deliver fasttrack versions of
the records to customers in October 2015, Hobbs said.
This contract is certainly one of the bright spots for the seismic
industry, he added. There is a need for new data with appropriate technology as companies consider how they want to invest in
extremely prospective and under-explored basins.
This survey will provide the industry with unprecedented continuous coverage across the rift basin, Hobbs added, enhancing
regional context and understanding of depositional systems and prospective regions. The grid ties known as petroleum systems, as well
as vast under-explored areas of the basin, serve as a springboard for
new exploration.
Also in July, the first phase of IONs MexicoSPAN commenced,
encompassing more than 13,670 mi (22,000 km) of 2D seismic data
offshore Mexico. Combined with IONs YucatanSPAN, GulfSPAN

Were expecting a lot of activity, especially since so


many operators have registered to participate. Whether
its as big of a market as the US GoM, only time will tell.

Spectrum President Richie Miller


Atlantic Explorer and Sanco Spirit acquired multiple projects recently approved by the Mexican government. The first program is the
Mexican Well Tie MC2D, which is expected to provide clients with
an understanding of the hydrocarbon prospects in the area.
PGS said that fasttrack products were made available in June
2015.
PGS is proud to conduct its first commercial seismic acquisition
project in Mexico after approval of the Mexican Energy Reform, said
Gregg Parker, regional president NSA MultiClient in PGS. We have
worked diligently to position the company as a first mover in Mexico
and we are now very pleased to say that we have been successful in
our endeavor. PGS views Mexico as a viable investment market for
many years to come for the full suite of all of our solutions.
Additionally, in late June PGS announced an execution of an MOU
for a cooperation agreement with Spectrum and Schlumberger in
Mexico. The collaboration will acquire 49,710 to 62,137 mi (80,000
to 100,000 km) of modern, long-offset 2D data encompassing all the
major hydrocarbon provinces offshore Mexico. This included areas
currently on offer for Mexicos Round 1 in the Perdido Fold Belt,
Mexican Ridges Province, and Campeche Deep Sea basin, and also
provided coverage across the Yucatan platform tying to Spectrums
Big Wave program in the eastern areas of the US GoM. The previously announced PGS MultiClient Mexico Well Tie program will be
included in this collaboration.
TGS also commenced a large 2D project, titled Gigante, a 112,779mi (181,500-km) regional 2D seismic survey in the Mexican GoM
June 28, when the Osprey Explorer took its first shot, said Robert
Hobbs, CEO of TGS, in an interview with Offshore.
The Hawk Explorer acquired data in early July and TGS expects
to ramp up to a total of four vessels this year to work on the Gigante
project, covering a large portion of Mexicos offshore sector. The
data includes producing trends such as the Perdido fold belt and
Campeche Bay. Gigante is slated to also include gravity and magnetic data with a regional seismic structural interpretation.
48 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

and FloridaSPAN, MexicoSPAN will help deliver a complete, basinwide regional view of the GoM, Gerry Watson, manager, communications, ION Geophysical told Offshore.
MexicoSPAN supports both current and future offshore bidding
rounds, and is designed to provide regional coverage of both the
prolific production areas of the western Gulf, and the exploration
frontier margins of the eastern Gulf and northern Yucatan. Subsequent infill phases will commence after completion of Phase one
these infills will sufficiently enhance the 2D profile (to better identify prospective structures) before moving deeper into 3D workflows
using the large volume of 3D data soon to be available via the CNH.
Fasttrack products should be available in 3Q 2015, the company
stated.
Another area that has garnered a lot of interest is the Campeche/
Yucatan areas in Mexicos southern offshore region in the Gulf. Recently, Spectrum partnered with Schlumberger to jointly acquire
and process Spectrums offshore Mexico Campeche-Yucatan 2D
regional multi-client program. The agreement includes more than
27,340 mi (44,000 km) of regional 2D seismic data in the frontier Campeche/Yucatan area. The survey covers areas from the
Campeche Escarpment, including ties to the Round 1 block, the Yucatan shelf, and the deepwater.
The 2D regional program also provides a tie to Spectrums Big
Wave multi-client program in the northern and eastern areas in the
US section of the GoM. Work started in June with fasttrack products
slated for the summer, and final products earmarked for November.
We have two vessels working on the project with about four
months earmarked for completion and processing, Spectrums
President Richie Miller told Offshore. Were anticipating having the
data for availability for the people shortly after that, with a few of the
customers being bidders for Round 1.
He added: Were expecting a lot of activity, especially since so
many operators have registered to participate. Whether its as big of
a market as the US GoM, only time will tell.

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Conversions
(112 FPSOs)

Newbuilds
builds
(49 FPSOs)

53%

47%

Contractor
Owned
(85 FPSOs)

Operator
Owned
(76 FPSOs)

TOTAL FPSOs 161


(As of July 1, 2015)

COURTESY:

CONSTRUCTION TYPE: N - Newbuild C - Conversion

DDD
DD
DSME
FES
FPS
FSTP
GPS
GSI
HES
HHI
Ikdam
IVI
KMV
KOS
LMC
MAS
McNulty

COMPANY ABBREVIATIONS:
ABB Cnstrm
AENR
AESA
Aker BO
Aker FP
AMKC
APL
APS
AWE
BLT
Bumi Armada
CACT
CNOOC
Dalian

ABB/Astano/Coflexip/UiE
Agip Energy & Natural Resources
Astilleros Espanoles SA
Aker Borgestad Operations
Aker Floating Production
Aker Maritime.Kiewit Contractors
Advanced Production & Loading
Apex Process Sytems
Australia Worldwide Exploration
Berlian Laju Tanker
Bumi Armada Berhad
CNOOC, Chevron, Agip
China National Offshore Oil Corporation
Dalian New Shipyard

Internal Turret
External Turret
Spread Mooring
Riser Turret Mooring
Single Anchor Leg System
Catenary Anchor Leg Mooring
Single Anchor Leg Mooring
Jacket Soft Yoke
Tower Yoke
Dynamic Positioning
Submerged Turret Production

NORWAY

122

MDRI
MHI
MISC
MMHE
Newport News
NSSC
PGS
PNR
SBMO
Segen Cnstrm
Shanghai Hudong
Songa
Tsuneishi
UC
VOFT

Dubai Dry Docks


Dry Docks
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering
Flexible Engineering Solutions
Floating Production Systems
Keppel FELS - Technip Consortium
Global Process Systems
Gas Services International
Halliburton Energy Services
Hyundai Heavy Industries
Ikdam Production SA
Industrias Verolme Ishibras
Kaldness Mek Versted
Kiewit Offshore Services
London Marine Consultants
Maersk, AMEX, SBM
McNulty Offshore Construction

Worldwide Distribution of FPSO Vessels

POSTER

Marine Design & Research Institute of China


Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
Malaysia International Shipping Corp
Malaysia Marine & Heavy Engineering
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock
National Steel & Shipbuilding Company
Petroleum Geo-Services
Pioneer Natural Resources
SBM Offshore
Segen/Ishokawajima/Kure/Japao
Shanghai Hudong Shipyard
Songa Floating Production
Tsuneishi Shipbuilding Co
United Consortium
Vietnam Offshore Floating Terminal

Total Vessels: 161 NOTE: Only vessels that are producing are included in this map.

CANADA

UNITED KINGDOM

15
ITALY

1
EGYPT

US GOM

MEXICO

MAURITANIA

1
CHINA

1
LIBYA

INDIA
COTE D'IVOIRE

GABON

NIGERIA
BRAZIL

VIETNAM

EQUATORIAL GUINEA 4

GHANA

THAILAND

CONGO

INDONESIA
MALAYSIA

37

PHILIPPINES

13

ANGOLA

14

13

AUSTRALIA 11

NEW ZEALAND 2
COURTESY:

Graph 3: Ranking of Operators by Fleet Size

Graph 4: Ranking of Contractors by Fleet Size

CNOOC

ExxonMobil

3
3

SBMO

Statoil

Total Operator-Owned FPSOs 76


Representing 47% of all FPSOs

JV - SBMO/Partner

Company

BP
Shell

13

Bumi Armada

Chevron

14

MODEC

13

Total

Company

BW Offshore

13

Petrobras

Bluewater

Fred.Olsen

Maersk

MISC

ConocoPhillips

Petrofac

Shell/Exxon (50/50)

Petrofac

Vietsovpetro

Saipem

Woodside

Teekay Offshore

Others (1 FPSO Each)

Others (1 FPSO Each)

15

10

12

Total Contractor-Owned FPSOs 85


Representing 53% of all FPSOs

14

16

18

25

Number of Vessels Owned by Operator

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

(As of July 1, 2015)

Legend:

Graph 5 - Subsea Wells Capability for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)


Deepwater Facility Type

Number of Vessels Owned by Contractor

(As of July 1, 2015)

COURTESY:

10

Field Proven
Qualified
Conceptual

50

Indicates Installed Facility (Proven)


Indicates Sanctioned Facility (Qualified)
Not Sanctioned/Sanction Pending

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


Azurite

FPSO
A. Turret Moored

14

57

36
Global Producer III

Woollybutt
3

Kizomba C
28

100

84

Asgard A

37

71

Hai Yang Shi You 113

75

B. Spread Moored
Jamestown
2

Sendje Ceiba

Agbami

Dalia

Kizomba B

No Limit

C. Unconventional
(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,
Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Hummingbird

Piranema

Sevan

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Number of Well Slots or Wells

Graph 6 - Total Production Throughput (Mboe/Day) for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)

Deepwater Facility Type

200

50

10

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


FPSO
A. New Build

Azurite

13

160

203

Usan

San Jacinto
13

287

Schiehallion

169

317

Akpo

Erha
Kizomba A

220

197

B. Conversion
P-48

New Orleans
10

Yuum KaK Naab

P-54

120

30

200

400

C. Unconventional
Piranema
Goliat
Hummingbird

(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,


Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Voyageur

50

Sevan

100

150

Sevan

200

250

300

350

400

Mboe/day Throughput

Graph 7 - Water Depth Ranges for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)


4,526'

Deepwater Facility Type

1,000'

10,000'

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


FPSO
A. New Build

66'

3,937'
Hai Yang Shi You 113

Kizomba A
2,198'

50'

3,396'

Azurite
4,592' 4,797'
CLOV

Agbami
4,856'

7,053'

7,217'

8,530'

9,500'

BW Pioneer

Turitella

B. Conversion
Armada Perkasa
80'

Fluminense

394'

P-48

Xikomba

1,312'

Cidade de Angra Dos Reis

Cidade de Mangaratiba

>11,000'

5,250'

C. Unconventional
(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,
Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Sevan

0'

Hummingbird

1,000'
(304.8 m)
US MMS Definitions:
Shallow

Goliat

Piranema Spirit

Sevan Global SSP

2,000'

3,000'

4,000'

5,000'

6,000'

7,000'

8,000'

9,000'

10,000'

(609.6 m)

(914.4 m)

(1,219.1 m)

(1,523.9 m)

(1,828.7 m)

(2,133.5 m)

(2,438.3 m)

(2,743.1 m)

(3,047.9 m)

Deepwater

Ultra Deepwater

Water Depth
Note: Field proven data is not limited to a vessels current operational data it may include a vessels historical data, possibly using a previous name.

TM

INCLUDING GITAS OIL & GAS


PIPELINE CONFERENCE AND
PODS USER CONFERENCE

COURTESY:

26

SEPTEMBER 15-17, 2015


The Woodlands Waterway Marriott
Hotel & Convention Center
The Woodlands, Texas USA
www.pipelineweek.com

REGISTER BY AUGUST 18TH AND SAVE!

2
8
11
5
8
9
2
8
12
10
2
4
12
10
11
11
5
1
4
5
4
6
2
6
12
5
8
10
11
2
10
3
6
1
7
1
11
6
8
7
10
12
9
10
4
7
2
9
n/a
8
12
6
4
12
8
9
11
7
2H
10
1
12
10
8
5
8
9
10
4
8
8
7
10
5
6
11
10
8
6
3
1
6
12
1
11
7
11
3
7
8
12
09
1
10
6
12
8
12
12
2
4
12
12
12
3
5
11
8
4
11
11
3
9
10
7
12
2
2
10
3
4
7
1
11
3
3
7
12
11
11
2
1
1
6
7
2
4
7
10
6
8

L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

12

47
960
300
1,400
125
48
970
90
55
694
109
31
20
22
1,250

62
825
2,120
300
2,600
1,485
104

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

18
20

20

L
L
L
L

15

L
L
L
L
L
L
L

L
L
L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L

15

L
L
L

12

L
L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

L
L

L
L

15

15

50
1,221
2,150
2,140
250
2,200
1,370
2,120
1,350
1,300
2,100
1,386
1,400
114
170
92
48
1,360
1,200
2,500
1,180
1,780
120
91
800
740
60
1,080
711
1,400
344
91
113
24
400
1,200
85
20
110
22
25
330
120
128
88
1,350
1,180
1,016
37
100
1,100
95
340
1,015
492
728
80
100
72
1,320
120
100
305
400
350
380
150
380
78
140
330
160
780
840
850
905
790
1,040
1,225
1,080
1,400
1,260
1,400
1,600
1,200
600-1,200
100
60
520
95
410
84
142
1,600
100
2,000
200
101
290
49
58
720
375
120
140
800
475
400
55
825
74
94

L
L

85
90
120
700-850
89
135
90
100
180

Sime Sembcorp
KBR

MODEC
KBR

ABB
Fluor

Bluewater
SBMO
MARIC
SBMO

COOEC
NATCO
KBR/HES
Expro International
Kavin Engineering
Malaysia Shipyard
DPS
M7

SPCPL
Bumi Armada Berhad
SBMO
Aker Stord
Prosafe
Smedvig
SBMO
MODEC
PT Brown & Root

Keppel
Daewoo

Daewoo
HHI

Mitsubishi
IHI Marine
Hitachi Zosen

Hitachi

Jurong
Keppel/Vetco Aibel
Mitsubishi
IHI
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Hitachi
Keppel

Sime Sembcorp
McDermott

BW Offshore
Fluor

ABB
UiE Scotland

Dalian

COOEC/Dalian
NATCO
AMEC

DPS/MSE
Merpro

Ulstein Industrier

Dalian

Hitachi
Jiangnan
Dalian
Hudong
Samsung

Keppel
Jurong
Dalian
Keppel
Keppel
Hitachi
Shanghai Jiangan
Dalian
Hudong
Samsung
Aker Tulcea
Sembawang
MISC

SBMO
Astano

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

Technip
SBMO
ABB/Astano/Technip/UiE

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC
MODEC/ Schahin

Alliance
Various
Astano

Keppel
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Astano
Malaysia Marine
Keppel
Keppel
COSCO
CXG
Jurong
BrasFELS

Astano

Various
Brasa/EBSE
Various

KBR
Hudson/McDermott

Daewoo Shipbuilding
Hudson/McDermott

Daewoo Shipbuilding

Keppel
Jurong

Dalian

AMEC
MODEC/Alliance
Technip-Saipem JV
Aker Solutions
Dyna-mac/ Petreco

Odense Steel
MODEC/Samsung

Maersk
MODEC
Technip
Aker FP
DPI

Aker Yard Brevik


Sembawang

SBMO
Prosafe/GSI
Doris Engr.

SBMO
Prosafe
Izar

MODEC/Alliance Engr.
MODEC/Schlumberger
SBMO

MODEC
MODEC
SBMO

Mar Profundo Girassol

HHI
Bluewater
Maritime Tentech
Maritime Tentech/Mitsui
Dalian
Sevan Marine
HHI

KBR
KBR
CNOOC
Sevan Marine
KBR
APS/Aker

McDermott Indonesia
Kvaerner Govan
AMEC
MODEC/Samsung
Stolt Offshore JV
Aker Solutions
Dyna-mac/ Petreco
SMOE/Sembawang
Various
GSI
SMCO/MECI

SBMO
Prosafe
Exmar Offshore
Saipem
MODEC
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC/Delta
MODEC/Hup Seng Engr.
Various

Mar Profundo Girassol

HHI

Sevan Marine

Aker McNulty
McNulty
CNOOC Engr.
Sevan Marine
HHI
Aker McNulty
MHI

Pierce Production
Bohai Oil Corp./SBM

Shang Hai 708 Institute


CNOOC
Fluor
Sevan Marine (Kanfa)
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
MODEC/NATCO
SBMO
Fluor
AMEC

CNOOC/Nanhai West Oil Corp.


Shanghai
MDRI of China
Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Masa-Yards
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC
Maersk Contractors
SBMO
SBMO

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC/NATCO
CESL

MODEC
CESL

SBMO
AMEC/Fluor
Kvaerner Rosenberg
Granherne Engr.
Kvaerner-SBM Consortium
SBMO
DPS
IVI
AESA
HHI/Petromarine
IVI
Petromarine/Allan MacLure
Technip
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
UTC Engenharia

MODEC
Samsung
Prosafe
Tentech
Odense Steel
Samsung
SBMO

UTC Engenharia

CNOOC Engr.
Sembawang / SMOE
Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
MODEC
SBMO
Fluor/AMEC Alliance

Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Rosenberg
MODEC/Avery Laurence
Various
HHI
HHI

Saipem
PTSC
MODEC

Lamprell

Samsung
DSME/ Samsung
NSSC

Izar

HHI
Namura
Ast y Talleres del Noroeste
Mitsui
Dalian
Sevan Marine
HHI
Shanghai Hudong
Waigaogiao
Waigaogiao
Waigaogiao
Dalian Shipbuilding
Yantai Raffes
Kvaerner Masa

IHI
IHI

Various

12
5
24
163

5
6
12

3
1

4
3

3
13
6
3

4
2

Keppel

SOFEC

APL
SBMO
Seanor

4
10
36

SBMO
SBMO
SOFEC

13
5
15
10
16

SOFEC
SOFEC

3
8
16

2
5

9
8
5
280

7
4
8

15
SOFEC
SOFEC
SOFEC

SBMO
SOFEC/Framo Engr.

Jurong

APL

HHI
Samsung
Hudong
Waigaigiao
Shanghai Jiangan
Waigaigiao

Kvaerner Masa
Sumitomo HI
MMHE
IHI
IHI
DDD
DDD
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel

Samsung
Keppel FELS
Samsung
Samsung
Ishibras
HHI
HHI
Maritima/MODEC
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
Jurong
FSTP

SBMO

Sembawang
Jurong
Samsung
Keppel
Keppel
SLP Engr.
Samsung
Keppel
Ishibras
AESA
HHI
Ishibras
HHI
Jurong
Mau-Jurong Cnsort.
Mau-Jurong Cnsort.
Jurong
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel

4
6
71
9
1
25

SBMO
Prosafe
LMC/Rolls-Royce
Jurong
Jurong

Sumitomo

Jurong

Jurong

A&P Group

Ind. Verolme Ishibras


HHI
Ind. Verolme Ishibras
HHI
Jurong
Jurong/Mau-Jurong
FELS-Setal
Jurong

34
8

9
12
3

SOFEC
SOFEC/Framo Engr.
SBMO

17
3
20
7
40

Bluewater
Maritime Tentech
Maritime Tentech, M.E.S./Frame Engr.
APL

Cromarty Firth

20
14
33
43
8

STP/Framo
SBMO
APL
SBMO
Bluewater

3
11
12
3
18

10

20

7
4
12

20
2

26
84

NA
Bluewater
SOFEC
SBMO
SOFEC
SOFEC

2
19
10
35

18

16

SOFEC / Framo Eng

17

APL / Buoy System


SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO

11
10

17
6
4
5
13

SOFEC

APL
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO, SBMO
Prosafe
Kvaerner Rosenberg/SBMO
Lewis Offshore/ Bluewater
SBMO, SBMO
SBMO
APL
SOFEC
SBMO
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO
Bluewater

SBMO
Jurong

5
10

5
4
23
12
6
4
19
20
20
13
17
9
11
19
7

2
1

COSCO
KBR
J Ray McDermott

DSME
Dalian

DSME
Maersk

Astano/Golar-Nor
PGS

Ast y Tallered del Noroeste


Aker Maritime

ABB
GSI
Sevan Marine (Kanfa)
ABB
Toyo
MODEC

Maritime Tentech/Keppel
Prosafe
Sevan Marine
Prosafe
MODEC

Golar-Nor
Aker Kvaerner
Samsung
Keppel
Prosafe
Sevan Marine
Prosafe
MODEC
MODEC

SBMO
SBMO
KBR
Maersk Contractors
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
SBMO

Various
Various
Sembawang
Aker Maritime/ Keiwit
ABB
ABB
Various
Samsung

Various
GSI
Sevan Marine
Dynamac
Dyna-Mac

Dalian

APL

Keppel

Aker McNulty

FMC, Astano/Brown Brothers


TenTech

Jurong

NA
Prosafe
SOFEC

Samsung
Keppel

Keppel
Jurong
HanTong

SBMO
SBMO
Samsung
Samsung

SBMO/Alliance Engr.
Agra Shawmont Brown& Root
Wood Group Mustang
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
Alliance / ABB
HHI

SBMO
Aker Solutions
MODEC
MODEC
SBMO
KBR/Daewoo

MODEC
MODEC
SBMO
TNA AlliancePCL/KBR
Maresca

Wood Group Mustang


Kvaerner Oil & Gas
Prosafe
HHI
Sevan Marine

Kvaerner Oil & Gas


Prosafe
HHI
Sevan Marine

Oceaneering Int'l

Oceaneering Int'l

COOEC
COOEC
Wood Group Mustang

Dyna-Mac and BT Engr


Various
PCL/BARMAC

November 3-5, 2015

February 9-11, 2016

March 22-24, 2016

Moody Gardens Hotel


& Convention Center
Galveston, TX

Moody Gardens Hotel


& Convention Center
Galveston, TX

Henry B. Gonzalez
Convention Center
San Antonio, TX

IHI
Samsung
Samsung

Samsung
Samsung
Daewoo

NATCO/Dynamic/Serck Backer
Sembawang
Samsung
Dynamac
HHI
HHI
Keppel Verolme
Yantai Raffes
Qingdao Beihai
Qingdao Beihai
Various

www.deepwateroperations.com

www.topsidesevent.com

www.subseatiebackforum.com

November 3 - 5, 2015

Moody Gardens Hotel & Convention Center | Galveston, TX, USA


www.deepwateroperations.com

Keppel
Keppel

6
2

2
7
2
8
15
14
8
25
9
6
9

Jurong
MMHE
MMHE
IHI
Keppel
Sembawang
Samsung
Jurong
Jurong
Keppel
Samsung
COSCO
Samsung
Sembawang
Daewoo
Ulstein Verft AS
AESA
Samsung
Keppel (Tuas)

APL

Jurong
SBMO
SOFEC
SOFEC
SBMO
SOFEC

22
9

2
1

16
3
3

20
20
21
8
28
20
16
5
9

10

11

Bluewater/Lewis Offshore
Prosafe

24
7
11
42

APL
APL
APL

26

38

15

ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

245

43

20

322
321
334
332
337
305
325
101
236
245
322
332
101
290
331
325
94
268
411
248
337
337
300
242
259
219
277
107
310
252
215
262
272
323
267
65
233
268
337
285
285
207
274
243
359
290
261
343
258
370
274
171
271

56
58
51
58
54
61
48
21
40
43
56
58
21
51
57
57
22
42
60
39
55
55
60
42
41
38
51

29

ABS
DNV
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
RINA
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
BV
DNV
DNV
DNV
BV
DNV
CCS
CCS
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

58
42
31
46
51
63
65
42
43
55
63
60
54
44
42
59
51
58
52
46
54
43
25
55

14

LR
DNV
LR
LR
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV

14

8
4
23

10

ABS
ABS
LR
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
LR
DNV
ABS
ABS
BV
DNV
CCS
CCS
DNV
ABS

262
349
267
260
238
260
236
273
274
271
337
337
337
231
337
339
337
337
337
346
337
311
330
328
334
325
345
264
250
120
256
214
255
65
325
318
274
243
217
245
264
369
274
258
350
265
362
295
265
284
292
104
337
244
232
320
66
217
235
327
331

46
52
44
46
42
41
40
50
48
46
55
54
55
26
54
54
55
55
55
57
54
56
56
57
58
61
58
41
34
54
48
38
44
65
55
57
48
42
32
41
49
56
50
46
52
52
56
51
48
43
46
23
55
42
46
61
66
46
46
65
56

DS
DH
DH
SH
DH
DH
SH
DH
DH
SH
SH
DH
DH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DS
DH

23

DS

18
9
14

DH
SH
DH
SH

21
18

SH
DH

22

SH
SH
DH
DH

DH
DH
28
27
27
12
20
20
29
28
12
24
28
32
6
21
28
21
27
27
31
21
24
23
24
170
32
23
18
24
21
29
51
27
24
21
27
32
32
26
24
30
24
31
27
24
27
24
16
22

21
20
9
15

22

16
15
21
21
23
15
16
17
16
31

DH
DH
SH
DS
DH

DH

DH
SH
SH
DS
DH
DH
DH
D

16

DS
DH

17
14

DS
D

DH
SH
SH
DH
DH

SH

16
23
20

SH

100,000
360,700
263,933

SH

12
17

SH
SH
DH

DH
DS
DH
DS
DS

27
28
28
28
18
28
26
27
27
28
28
28

18
22
22
22
13
21
21
21
21
21
22
22

SH
SH

Where It All
Comes Together

40,000
93,476
134,000
273,000
375,000
340,660
239,781
145,242

15
25
18

21

18
15
19
15
19

21
28
9
27
21
23
32
27
24
24
32
27

360,000
103,000
53,071
150,000
150,000
286,480

SH
DH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DH
DH

DH
SH

SH

19
22
29
29
28
27
27
27
29
20

154,000
357,000
357,000
55,337
91,468
265,243
265,050
8,346
190,000
312,500
268,000
45,145
87,768
8,700
135,510
97,127
135,000
273,000
115,829
100,020
150,000
273,000
260,000
265,263
91,468
300,000
258,000
249,370
275,045
232,165
265,050
273,775
214,000
235,837
8,700
99,800
91,468
265,243
265,050
8,346
190,000
392,000
268,000
5,214
110,000
355,000
106,000
273,500
273,777
345,000
105,000
105,701
85,943
159,064

261,212
190,000
308,490
278,000
149,686
273,000
146,251
35,000
138,930
255,900
153,675
254,012
132,100
150,000
101,832
100,000
99,800
177,529
158,000
148,192
283,000
282,750
269,443
62,236
270,000
282,000
311,000
311,000
279,688
322,446
321,000
255,271
280,491
154,998
322,912
396,000
277,450
127,540
43,276
31,498
135,000
60,000
141,330
13,000
257,272
296,200
143,690
92,757
67,436
95,091
94,000
311,000
207,000
140,000
274,333
274,473
307,000
129,000
70,000
140,000
136,960
196,000
7,200
279,187
105,000
118,095
381,000
45,145

23
21

20

21
23
27
28
32

21

13
16
16
18
17
23

13
13
22
20
18
22
22
22

16
19
7
18

SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
DH

DH
DS
DH
DH
DH
DH
DH
SH
SH
DH
DH
DH
SH
DH/DS
SH
DS
DH
SH
SH
SH

1976
2008
2008
1969
2001
1996
1990
1999
1974
1984
1975
1997
1999
1996

2002

1994
2008

2009
2014
2009
2008
2012
2014
2011
2011
1998 2010
1988 2009
1995 2005
1994
1976 2005
2004
1983 2012
1985 2012

1977 2011
2005
2007
1986
1994
1975
1988
1975
1974
1996
1990

2012
2003
2007
2007
2010
2009
2009

1984
1975 2011
2014
1985 2012
2014
2009
1986
1973
1992
1976
2013
1973
1999
1983
1985

2008
2010
2006
--1991
1997
2012

1977 2011
1975 2008

1989
1974
1976
1976
1977
1999
1997
1993
1998
2003
2014
2007
1997
2002
2003
2008
2014
2007
1997
1975
1974
2005
2005
1985
1980
1991
1977
1999
1977
1992
1975

2011
2003
1999
2009
2008
2011
2001

2014
1990

1997
1985
2005

2006
2009
2014
2010
2011
2008
2003
2005
2006

1974 2001
1976 2003
2014
2002
1976 1989
1975 1996
2006
1981 2008
1997
1983 1997
1999
2009
2009 2011
1974 1997
1974
1978 1998
1959 1997
1975 1996
1975 2000
1975 2003
1973 2004
1980 2003
1984 2007
1979 2007
2003 2010
1991
2013
1983 2013
2010
2008 2010
1989
1997
2014
1998
1975
2006
1980
1996

2008
2001
2002
2002

2007
2011
2007
1980 2007
1981 2007
1990 2007
2001
1977 2007
2002
2005
1974 2004
1975 2001
1974 2002
2010
2008
2007
1976 1996
1999
1997 2004
1976 1997
1999
1980 2007
2006
2007 2012
2006
2006
1981 2007
1973 1999

40
250
240
10
157
225
70
30
80
40
30
60
27
55
80
200
40
110
100
70
55
30
75
60
80
12
70
170
24
20
30
40
40
7
80
100
37
35
70
100
100
150
80
150
100
120
100
35
120
100
160
35
40
45
65
35
80
30
250
100
45
200
12
70
20
100
60
60
60
100
100
80
100
155
70
12
72
190
190
56
25
123
25
120
250
100
70
35
20
123
50
120
100
100
100
40
15
80
100
80
80
65
100
63
225
76
180
30
40
100
50
190
100
150
150
150
180
180
180
180
180
180
140
160
100
1
140
90
63
80
20
25
90
157
96
95
15
45
105
200
105
38
160
110
85
30
11
50
32
20
20
200
50
180
30
100
100
200
80

125
150
36
35

53
60
18

11

360
35
180

35
180

60
20
30
9
20

25

60

75
14
150
80
35
6
3
100
5
60
53
30
340
113

N/A
177

55
80
200
50
100
83
57
88
66
81
13
70
187
25
20
40
49
45
64
80
119
37
35
70
100
130
80

280
124
174
87
350
177
118
230
12

100
174

74
150
60

30

60

10
75
12
73
10

100
50

85

65
166
3

100
37
90
65

100
85
160

100
10
10

60

18

N/A

16
70

20
40
14

20

140

50

70
210
76

140

110
100
180
96
240

140

150

150
113

150
50
37

150
138

35
32

116
19.5
316
400
45
80
150
7.2
75
20
106
37
90
92.5
90
45
39
190
110
3
15

30
25
400
150
10
85

64
68
35
133
30
317
108
58
225
13
83
23
118
66
75
75
115
100
88
187
88
13
75
190
190
56
25
128
29
120
317
125
72
49

160

150

100
80
2

137
113
100
100
50
15
94

60
85
115
6
5
80
80
530
30
60
7
6

16
14
15
85
210
4
212
6
35
177
13
330
7
47
3
127
7.5
245
60
83
40
29
125
150
600
145
30
45
160
670
10
150
5.4
36
50
260
25
35
38
500
120
60

80
81
66
113
76
313
81
190
30
41
101
50
190
100
153
152
153
194
215
180
181
215
181

110
35

38
82.5

100

300

50
10

30

45

130

75

350
75
8

50
30
86

92
130
60

56
85
75

72
65
170

43
4
90
110

72
205
40
3

60
22

19

150
60
79
85
300

250
95
160

25

20

130

260

80
60
141
150

180

160

160

80

95

95

15
0
100

0
70

270

85

230

250
63

40
80
24
20
0

40
80

125
147

40
80
0

70
126
100
60

12
50

50

230
125
125

11
55

32

50

300
320
50
20
55
189

110
60
60
135
147

40
60
50

60

300
205
37
32
245

360

360

0
0
0

0
0
2

10
7

4
4

1
1

0
1

3
1

11
8
4

66

FB

TS

SM

12

1
n/a

8
2
3

120
55
120
69
55
84
63
87
87
70
77
100
100

I, L
S, F
S,L

FT
FT
FB
FB
FB
FT
FB
FB
FB
FB
FT

TS
TS
TS
CB
TS
TS

FB

P
P
D
P
D
D
D
P
P
P
P
P
P

12
9
12

F
L,I

SM
IT, SM
IT
IT
ET
IT
ET
SM
SM
IT
IT
ET
IT

1
4

120
60
28

FB

TS
TS

SM
RTM
CALM SY
ET
SALM

P
P

12
10

100
96
130
47
110
63
72

S
F, I
F, I
F

FT
FB
FB

S
F

FB
FT

T
TS
TS
TS
TS
TS
BB

F
F,S

FB
FB

TS
TT
TB

6
15

2
11
5

F
F
F

SS
TB/TS
TS
TS
TS

TS

1
8
6
2

20
3

2
39

36
1

N/A

10

S
65
80

NUMBER OF ANCHOR LEGS

0
0
0

PERMANENT or DISCONNECTABLE

1
1
0

MOORING SYSTEM TYPE

1
0
0

SEE MOORING SYSTEM TYPE


TABLE FOR ABBREVIATION INFORMATION

0
0
1

OFFLOADING SYSTEM

2
2
3

TS-TANDEM STERN, TB-TANDEM BOW,


TC-TO CALM BUOY, SS-SIDE BY SIDE

4
3
6

FB-FLARE BOOM OR FLARE TOWER,


GF-GROUND FLARE, FF-FLOATING FLARE

1
1
1

TYPE OF FLARE

GAS DEPOSITION

n/a

QUARTERS CAPACITY (PEOPLE)

1
4
1
1

GAS INJECTION

5
8
2
6

N/A

12

96
60

ET
IT
JSY
JSY
T
SM
SM
SPT
DP
T
SM
T
IT
ET
SM
CALM SY
IT
SM

1
9

P
P

P
P
P
P
P
P
D

12
9

P
D
P
D
P
P
P
P
P

S, L

FB
FB

TS
TS

28
89

S, L,

FB

TS

70

100

FT

94
40
60

F
L, F
S, F

GF

SS

SM

FT

TS

IT, SM
IT
SM
IT
DP
SM
IT
IT
SM
ET
ET
ET
IT
SM
SM
IT
IT
ET, SM
ET
SM
IT
IT
JSY
SAL Yoke
SAL Yoke
IT

P
D
P
D
D

17

12
9
12
10
9

9
10

9
9
12
10
24

55

2
7

5
1

4
2

SM
SM
SM
SM
SM
SM
SM

14
11
1

8
5
1

2
1

8
1

52
104
28

F
F,S,I
F

FB
FB
FT

TC
TS
TB

12
10

100
66

S, L, I
S,L

FB
FB

TS
TS

3
3

S, L
S
F
S, L
I, S
L
I

GF
FB
FB
FB
FI
FB
FB
FB

TC
TS
TS

FB

TS

I
F
F

FB
FB
FB
FB

TS
TS
TS
TS

44
55
86
118

F
F
S, L, I

FB
FB
FB

TS
TB
TS

FT

TS
TS,TC
T
T
TS

15
2
18

12

11

4
12
9
25
24
7

9
20
3

5
2

2
1

108
59
120
100
140
96
90
40
63
120
75
55
130

7
4
2
10

15

12

5
11
7
14
19
12
12
3
23
16
4
3
3
7 (11)
8

2
3

2
4

1
2

1
1

1
1

5
6

1
5

1
0

9
4
2

1
1

1
2

8
8 (21)
7
15
4

1
3

1
34
2

5
1
23
75
10
80

3
3

80

70
120

4
2
2
2
12

1
2

10
5
2

S, L

100
58
40
100

L,I
L
F
F

90
1

1
2

2
2

80
60
240
53
84

5
4

80
90

10

I, L
S

80
100

FB

FB

TS
TS
TS
TS

FB
FB
FT
GF
GF

TS

I+L
I

FT
FB

TS
TS

I
I, L

FT
FT
FB
FB
GF

TS
TS
TS
TS
TS

FB
FB

TS
TS

FT
FB

TS
TS
TS

TS
TS

P
18
12
3
9
12
9
0

P
P

9
6

P
P
P
P

8
9
6
9
12
16
12
10
6
6
14
14
8

P
P
P
P
D
P
P
D
D
D
D
D

D
P
P

12
6
6
10

P
D
D
P
D
P

9
9
9
9
6
9
9
8
12

P
P
D
D
P
D
D
P
P
P
D
D

10
9
9
9
9
10

IT
IT
IT
IT
SALM
CALM
SM
IT

TS

SM

TC
ET

SM
STP
ET
IT
IT
ET
IT
SM
SM
IT
ET

85
120
36
35
100
160

FB
FB
FB

TS
TS

52

FB

GF

TS

SM
IT
CRY
ET
SM
IT
SM
SM
ET
ET
IT
IT
IT
IT
ET
STP
SM
SM
ET
IT
IT
IT
RTM
SM
SM
IT, SM
IT
RTM
STP
IT

16

265
340

190
102
56

12
175
100
72

110
80
21
46
91
210
106
109
22
50
21
130
300
129
43
168
137
197
30
13
75
33
26
28
243
54
186
36
100
183
220
90

33

8
14
7
12

WATER INJECTION

932
1,800
2,000
800
560
2,000
550
600
805
1,100
360
580
510
620
1,695
920
1,300
380
1,100
2,000
880
360
1,650
657
1,000
390
1,100
1,400
306
400
619
400
1,000
200
600
2,038
849
680
975
1,900
1,600
1,600
650
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
700
1,600
1,900
1,800
1,420
42
560
1,000
2,000
1,300
300
2,200
2,000
1,100
1,900
700
1,300
800
1,500
1,800
2,000
657
510
510
820
1,000
950
626
390
1,000
1,800
2,000
1,800
270
595
760
2,179
2,200
940
1,700
1,300
650
1,600
680
1,900
2,026
930
2,100
700
272
1,035
1,963
1,000
1,600
650
900
650
2,000
560
1,400
925
950
1,000
2,000
700
1,800
2,000
1,000
880
500
1,035
2,000
2,000
1,600

PRODUCTION

30
375
180
300
85
55
60
15

TOTAL RISERS

45
30
60

n/a

PRODUCED WAER (MBWPD)

60

44
280

MAX WATER PRODUCTION (MBPD)

40
285
287
16
178
236
75
36

GAS EXPORT & GAS LIFT (MMscfd)

44
212
282
35
125
65
32
38

GAS INJECTION (MMscfd)

MAX OIL PRODUCTION (MBOPD)

C
N
N
C
C
N
N
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
C
N
N
N
N
N
N
C
C
N
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
N
N
C
N
C
C
C
N
C
C
N
C
N
N
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
C
N
C
N
N
N
N
C
C

DH
18
16
16
21
24
24
19
17
14
20

25
26
23
26
24
25
20
28

28
32
31
22
13
21

155,612
337,859
337,000
127,000
81,213
131,666
76,200
105,000
102,123
156,483
58,557
90,819
107,160
112,323
255,502
177,808
259,999

LATEST INTEGRATION/UPGRADE YEAR

28
26
17
20
29
28
12
24
32
32
27
19
12
23
20
22
27
24

28
30

MMHE
SBMO
SBMO
SBMO
SBMO

60
58
32
43
56
58
21
51
58
57
66
43
21
44
42
44
55
38
41
52
58

11
22
7

40
13
5

Nymo
Qingdao Beihai
Qingdao Beihai
Sembawang
Ham Marine

5
25
30

22

Keppel FELS/Kabelschlepp Metool

Yantai Raffes

Batam
DPS
SBMO
SBMO
KBR
AMKC
ABB
ABB
SBMO
Aker Solutions

16
49
37

DSME
Keppel
Astano

19
18

344
316

Utc Engenharia, CEE, RJ

McDermott Int'l
Aker Maritime

27
30

17
13
15

2
17

45
56
36

ABS

BV
ABS
ABS
13
13
19
10
6
10
6
35
19
8
4
27
35
34
21
42
18
19
45
7

15

16
16
17
14
15

ORIGINAL HULL FABRICATION YEAR

350
285
207
245
322
332
101
290
305
325
66
233
101
254
247
276
346
214
245

20
32
21
23
24
21
21
23
23
18
21
21
23

DDH-DOUBLE HULL, SH-SINGLE HULL,


DS-DOUBLE SIDED

ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
LRS
ABS
DNV
ABS
DNV
DNV
ABS/BKI
DNV
ABS
DNV
BV

54
58
61
40
42
45
39
42
42
46
32
42
42
48

HULL CONSTRUCTION

269
319
310
260
252
226
165
248
241
308
211
235
247
336
350
278
312
211

MAX OPERATING DRAFT (M)

DNV
ABS
BV
DNV
DNV
LR
ABS
DNV
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
DNV

ABS
ABS
34
30

A&P Group

CLASSIFICATION

WATER INJECTION WELLS

GAS INJECTION WELLS

2
12
20
4
3
5

SBMO

Keppel

Jurong
DDD
Keppel

SBMO
MODEC
Samsung
Various
Kvaerner Rosenberg
SLP Engr.
United Const/Sembawang
SBMO
Keppel
IVI
AESA
Segen/HHI/Allan Maclure
Petrobras/SOFEC
Segen
Segen
KBR (PROJEMAR)
KBR (PROJEMAR)
Petrobras
QUIP Consortium
Maua

2
6
2

16

MSE

Keppel

Jurong
Jurong
DDD
Keppel
HHI
Sembawang
Astano
Mitsui
Dalian

MODEC/BT Engr.
Various

Prosafe
Aker Kvaerner
SLP Engr.
Kvaerner-SBM Consortium
SBMO
OSX Leasing B.V./ BWO Support
IVI
AESA
HHI/Petromarine
IVI
Petromarine/Allan MacLure
Technip
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
UTC Engenharia
SBMO

3
7

APL, Sembawang
Bluewater
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO

PRODUCTION WELLS

TOTAL WELLS

TURRET SUPPLIER/
SWIVEL MANUFACTURER
SBMO
SOFEC

Keppel

Samsung
Jurong
Sembawang
HHI
Keppel
Keppel (Tuas)
Izar

HHI

Vetco Aibel
Various

MODEC
CESL
SBMO Malaysia

5
20
22
11
22
7

Kvaerner Govan

Various

Maersk Contractors
SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

9
37
44
15
25
12
23
7

10
57
10
16

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SBMO
SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

REPAIR

CONVERSION / INTEGRATION

NEW BUILD HULL

TOPSIDES

GENERAL CONTRACTOR (EPCI)

HULL

TOPSIDES

RESERVES (MMBOE)

COUNTRY

FIELD or LOCATION

OPERATING WATER DEPTH (M)

FIELD OPERATOR (MAJORITY)

FPSO OPERATOR

FPSO OWNER

CURRENT LEASE PERIOD (YRS.)


15

Bumi Armada Engineering


KMV
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
SBMO
Maritime Tentech
Prosafe

GSI
DSME
HHI
GSI
Vetco Aibel
AMEC
MODEC/Applied Engr.
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Hug Seng
Dyna-mac
Dynamac
Dyna-mac
Various
Aker Stord
Various

UMBILICALS

30%

IT
ET
SM
RTM
SALS
CALM
SALM
JSY
TY
DP
STP

DPS
Schlumberger/Albert Garraudy
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
SBMO
Aker/ABB

Prosafe
DSME
Technip & HHI JV
Prosafe
Vetco Aibel
SBMO
MODEC
Bluewater
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada Navigation
Bumi Armada Berhad

MOORING

OTHER

70%

Every attempt has been made to identify and collect data on all FPSO vessels
operating around the world. No owner(s) or FPSO contractor(s) were intentionally
excluded from the survey. In some cases the owner or vessel has not been
included because information was not supplied in time. We have attempted to
make the survey as complete and accurate as possible. However, we make no
guarantee that it is all inclusive. The information was collected from company
brochures, websites, personal interviews,
phone interviews, and in major part by
owner-supplied data and World Energy
Reports. Neither Wood Group Mustang
Inc., nor Offshore Magazine guarantees or
assumes any responsibility or liability for any
reliance on the information presented.

MOORING SYSTEM TYPE:

Graph 2: OPERATOR vs
CONTRACTOR OWNED FPSOs

Prosafe
DSME
Technip
Kawasaki Dockyard
Keppel
Mitsubishi HI
MODEC
Bluewater

IMPORT / EXPORT RISERS

Graph 1: NEW BUILD vs


CONVERSION FPSOs

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

Prosafe/GSI
KBR
Technip
GSI
Vetco Aibel
Stork Protech
MODEC/NATCO
Bluewater/Aibel

TOPSIDES INFO

GAS LIFT

E-mail comments, corrections,


or additions to: posters@woodgroup.com
For additional copies E-mail: posters@pennwell.com.
Downloads available at www.offshore-mag.com.

Nigeria
82
Nigeria
770
Nigeria
620
Egypt
41
Norway
236
UK
119
Indonesia
216
UK
35
Australia
Oyo
Nigeria
n/a
Okoru Setu Field
Nigeria
D-1
India
D-1
India
Te Giac Trang
Vietnam
Aseng
Eq Guinea
sgard
Norway
2,000
Pointe Noire
Congo
75
Balder/Ringhorne
Norway
171
Dragon Block 9/16
Vietnam
Baobab
Cote d'Ivoire
123
Belanak West Natuna Block B
Indonesia
238
Berantai
Malaysia
Chinguetti Field
Mauritania
125
Ross, Parry, Blake
UK
138
Penglai 19-3 Block 11/05
China
103
Quinhuangdao 32-6
China
155
Bozhong 28-1
China
191
Bonga
Nigeria
1,000
Various
Mexico
Pagerungan Utara
Indonesia
Penera
Malaysia
Bressay
UK
Early production, various felds - incl. Sapinhoa, Lula
Brazil
Terang Sirasun Batur
Indonesia
119
Cascade, Chinook
US GOM
500
Cachalote
Brazil
Captain A, B, C
UK
350
Cendor
Malaysia
White Tiger
Vietnam
Baleia Azul
Brazil
Lula
Brazil
6,000
Sapinhoa, Santos Basin
Brazil
1,600
Bauna & Piracaba Fields
Brazil
Iracema South
Brazil
Jabuti Field
Brazil
Lula NE Field
Brazil
8,300
Espadarte Sul Field
Brazil
Urugua/Tambua Fields
Brazil
Sapinhoa
Brazil
2,100
Golfnho
Brazil
Block 17 - Acacia, Hortensia, Perpetua & Zinia
Angola
500
Yombo
Congo
500
Litorial Tabasco area
Mexico
Curlew, Kyle
UK
98
Cuu Long Basin (Black Lion), Block 15-1
Vietnam
390
Dalia Block 17
Angola
940
MA-D6
India
1,000
Carioca NE
Brazil
NA EWT
Niger Delta OPL 209
Nigeria
1,000
BC-10, Parque das Conchas - Abalone, Ostras, Nautilus, Argonauta
Brazil
Espoir
Cote d'Ivoire
Al Jurf Block C137
Libya
148
Aquila
Italy
20
Bijupira, Salema
Brazil
201
Jasmine
Thailand
196
Frade BC-4
Brazil
Gimboa
Angola
Girassol, Jasmim Block 17, Rosa (Future)
Angola
700
Kitan
Australia
Gryphon, Maclure, Tullich
UK
213
Dumbarton
UK
150
Caofeidian 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-5
China
81
Goliat, Barents Sea
Norway
Block 18: Paladio, Plutonio, Platino, Galio, Cromio, Cobalto
Angola
1,166
Pierce
UK
238
Bozhong 34/1
China
83
Panyu 4/2, 5/1
China
90
Bozhong 25-1
China
300
Penglai Block 19-3 (Phase 2)
China
500
Enping 24-2, Pearl River
China
Chestnut
UK
235
Jotun
Norway
200
Kakap KH
Indonesia
Kikeh
Malaysia
Block 15 - Hungo, Chocalho
Angola
1,000
Block 15 - Kissanje, Dikanza
Angola
1,000
Antan
Nigeria
Olowi
Gabon
Tang Long/Dong Do
Vietnam
Tano Basin
Ghana
300
Chim Sao
Vietnam
48
Vincent
Australia
73
Marlim Sul
Brazil
Mutineer, Exeter, WA-191-P
Australia
101
Mondo, Block 15
Angola
Montara, Skua, Swift, Swallow Fields
Australia
40
Langsa
Indonesia
16
Okono & Okpono Fields
Nigeria
270
Block 15-06
Angola
Wenchang 13-1, 13-2
China
3
Huizhou 19-3-1
China
Liuhua 11-1
China
Enfeld
Australia
145
Van Gogh
Australia
50
Norne
Norway
MacCulloch
UK
114
Laminaria, Corallina
Australia
209
Cossack, Wanaea, Lambert, Hermes
Australia
Tubaro Azul
Brazil
Albacora
Brazil
962
Marlim
Brazil
704
Marlim
Brazil
704
Barracuda & Caratinga
Brazil
600
Marlim
Brazil
704
Marlim
Brazil
704
Barracuda
Brazil
806
Caratinga
Brazil
153
Albacora Leste
Brazil
Marlim Leste
Brazil
Roncador Module 2
Brazil
2,000
Jubarte, Ph 2
Brazil
600
Espirito Santo
Brazil
Roncador
Brazil
Papa Terra Field, BLOCK BC-20
Brazil
Block 17 - Acacia, Hortensia, Perpetua & Zinia
Angola
Peregrino
Brazil
500
North Malay Basin
Malaysia
Foinaven, Foinaven East
UK
395
Banff and Kyle Fields
UK
Knarr Field
Norway
80
Varg
Norway
Etame
Gabon
Piranema
Brazil
76
Polvo
Brazil
50
Block 31: Pluto, Saturno, Venus, Marte
Angola
Pyrenees (Crosby, Revensworth, Stickle)
Australia
100
Maari
New Zealand
50
Galoc
Philippines
24
Blocks 01 & 02
Vietnam
140
Sanha-Bomboco
Angola
Saxi & Batuque, Block 15
Angola
EA (OML 79)
Nigeria
394
White Rose
Canada
440
Okwori, Okwori South
Nigeria
40
Ceiba
Eq Guinea
356
Zafro Southern Expansion Area
Eq Guinea
994
Skarv
Norway
385
Song Doc
Vietnam
Stybarrow
Australia
Tantawan
Thailand
Terra Nova
Canada
470
Mexico
Ukpokiti
Nigeria
48
Central Graben, Block 21/30, Guillemot Fields
UK
15
Tui
New Zealand
700
OML 138
Nigeria
500
Huntington
UK
Wenchang
China
83
Xijiang 23-1
China
40
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
Mexico
5
Zafro Block B
Eq Guinea
993

STORAGE CAPACITY (MBBLs)

Abo
Agbami OPL 216, 217
Akpo OPL 246, OML-130
Zaafarana Block BN 1
Alvheim
Teal, Teal South, Guillemot A, Cook
Anoa Block A
Ettrick Field, North Sea

RISER INFO

WATER INJECTION (MBWPD)

550
1,462
1,350
60
125
89
77
115
135
350
15
91

TOTAL THROUGHPUT (MBOED)

GAS PROCESSING (MMscfd)

ENI
NNPC
Total
Zaafarana Oil Co.
Marathon
Shell
Premier Oil
Nexen
Apache
ALLIED
Afren/Amni
ONGC
ONGC
Hoang Long Joint Operating Company
Noble Energy
Statoil/Saga
Murphy
ExxonMobil
Vietsovpetro
CNR
ConocoPhillips
Petrofac
Petronas
Talisman (Blake)
ConocoPhillips
CNOOC
CNOOC
Shell
PEMEX
Kangean Energy Indonesia
Petronas
Statoil
Petrobras
Kangean Energy Indonesia
Petrobras
Petrobras
Chevron
Petrofac
Vietsovpetro
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Total
Perenco
PEMEX
Shell
Cuu Long JV
Total
Reliance
Petrobras
ExxonMobil
Shell
CNRL
Total
ENI
Shell
Pearl Energy
Chevron
Sonangol
Total
PetroSA/PNR
Maersk
Maersk
Anadarko
ENI
BP
Shell
CNOOC
CNOOC
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips
CNOOC
Centrica
ExxonMobil
ConocoPhillips
Murphy Oil Sabah
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
Addax
CNRL
PetroVietnam/Petronas
Tullow Oil
Premier Oil
Woodside
Petrobras
Santos
ExxonMobil
PTTEP
Mitsui Oil
NPDC
ENI
CNOOC
CACT
CNOOC
Woodside
Apache
Statoil
ConocoPhillips
Woodside
Woodside
OGX
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Total
Statoil
Hess Malaysia
BP
CNR
BG Group
Talisman
Vaalco Energy
Petrobras
HRT
BP
BHP Billiton
OMV
Galoc Production Co.
PetroVietnam E&P
Chevron
ExxonMobil
Shell
Husky
Addax
Hess
ExxonMobil
BP
TSJOC
BHP Billiton
Chevron
Petro-Canada
PEMEX
Shebah E&P
Dana Petroleum
AWE
Total
E.ON Ruhrgas UK E&P
CNOOC
CNOOC
PEMEX
ExxonMobil/GEPetrol

CONSTRUCTION TYPE
(CONVERSION or NEWBUILD)

2003
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2008
Chevron
Star Deepwater JV
2009
Total
Total
1994
Zaafarana Oil Company
Aker
2008
Marathon
Marathon
1996
Shell/Exxon (50/50)
Shell
1990
Premier Oil
Premier Oil
2009
Bluewater
Bluewater
2014
Bumi Armada
2009
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2008
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2013
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2015
Bumi Armada
Dbumi Armada
2011
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2011
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
1999
Statoil
Statoil
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1999
Esso Norge
ExxonMobil
1994
Vietsovpetro
Vietsovpetro
2005
MODEC
MODEC
2004
ConocoPhillips
ConocoPhillips
2012
Petrofac
Petrofac
2006
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1999
Bluewater
Talisman
2002
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips/CNOOC
2001
CNOOC
CNOOC
2004
CNOOC
CNOOC
2005
Shell
Shell
2006
Bourbon Offshore
Bourbon Offshore
2011
BLT
BLT
2004
MISC
FPSO Ventures
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2010
SBMO
SBMO
1996
Chevron
Chevron
2014
MISC
MISC
1985
Vietsovpetro
Vietsovpetro
2012
SBMO
SBMO
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2014
SBMO
SBMO
2013
Teekay, Odebrecht
Teekay Petrojarl
2014
MODEC
MODEC
2009
MODEC
MODEC
2013
SBMO
SBMO
2007
MODEC
MODEC
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2013
MODEC
MODEC
2007
Saipem
Saipem
2014
Total
Total
1991
Perenco
Perenco
2012
Sea Production Ltd
Blue Marine
2002
Shell/Exxon (50/50)
Shell
2003
Cuu Long JV
MODEC
2006
Total
Total
2008
Aker FP
Aker BO
2011
DPI
DPI
2006
ExxonMobil
Esso
2009
SBMO
SBMO
2002
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2003
Total
Exmar
2012
ENI
Saipem
2003
Shell
MODEC
2004
Petrofac
Petrofac
2009
Chevron
SBMO
2009
Saipem
Saipem
2001
Total
Total
2003
Bluewater
Bluewater
1993
Maersk
Maersk
2001
Maersk
Maersk
2004
CNOOC
CNOOC
2015
Sevan
ENI Norge
2007
BP
BP
1999
Bluewater
Bluewater
2007
CNOOC
CNOOC
2003
CNOOC
CNOOC
2004
CNOOC
Chevron
2009
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips
2014
CNOOC
CNOOC
2008
Teekay Petrojarl
Wood Group
1999
Bluewater (JV)
ExxonMobil
1986
MODEC
ConocoPhillips
2007
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2004
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
2005
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
2006
Fred.Olsen
Fred.Olsen
2009
Fred.Olsen
Fred.Olsen
2014
PTSC/Vinson Holdings
PetroVietnam/Petronas
2010
Tullow Oil
MODEC
2011
Emas
Emas
2008
Woodside
Woodside
2004
SBMO
SBMO
2005
MODEC
MODEC
2008
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2013
PTTEP
PTTEP
2001
Blue Sky Langsa Ltd.
Blue Sky Langsa Ltd.
2004
NPDC
NPDC
2014
Sonasing
OPS
2002
CNOOC
CNOOC
1994
CNOOC
CNOOC
1996
MODEC
MODEC
2006
Woodside/Mitsui
Woodside
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1997
Statoil
Statoil
2001
North Sea Production
North Sea Production
1999
Woodside
Woodside
2011
JV - North West Shelf
Woodside
2012
OSX 1 Leasing B.V.
OSX Servios Operacionais LTDA
1998
Petrobras
Petrobras
1998
Petrobras
Petrobras
2002
Petrobras
Petrobras
2005
Petrobras
Petrobras
1999
Petrobras
Petrobras
1999
Petrobras
Petrobras
2004
Petrobras
Petrobras
2005
Petrobras
Petrobras
2006
Petrobras
Petrobras
2008
CDC
Petrobras
2007
Petrobras
Petrobras
2010
Petrobras
SBMO (First 3 years)
2014
Petrobras
Petrobras
2014
Petrobras
Petrobras
2013
BW Offshore
Petrobras
2011
Total
Total
2011
Statoil
BW Offshore
2013
Perisai Petroleum
Perisai Petroleum
1997
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
1997
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
2015
Teekay Offshore
Teekay
1999
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
2002 JV-BW Offshore/Fred Olsen
JV - BW Offshore/ Fred Olsen
2007
Teekay Petrojarl
Sevan Marine
2007
BW Offshore
HRT
2012
BP
BP
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2009
Maari JV
Maari JV
2008
Rubicon Offshore
Rubicon Offshore
2009
Vietnam OFT
PTSC
2005
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2008
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2003
Shell
Shell
2005
Husky
Husky
2005
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2002
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2003
ExxonMobil
SBMO
2012
BP
BP
2008
MODEC
MODEC
2007
MODEC
MODEC
1997
Chevron
Chevron
2002
Petro-Canada
Petro-Canada
2002
Toisa Horizon
Secunda Marine
1997
ConocoPhillips
Alliance Marine Services
2005
Dana Petroleum
Hess
2007
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
Total
Total
2013
Teekay Offshore
Voyageur LLC (Teekay Corp)
2008
CNOOC
CNOOC
2008
CNOOC
CNOOC
2007
PEMEX
PEMEX
1996
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil

PROCESS AND STORAGE CAPACITY

DEADWEIGHT (DWT) (Tonnes)

4
7
3
11
6
10
4
7
8
12
5

HULL INFORMATION
DIMENSIONS

DEPTH (M)

1455 West Loop South, Suite 400; Houston, TX 77027


Tel: 713-621-9720; Fax: 713-963-6296
www.offshore-mag.com

2015 Offshore

ABO
AGBAMI
AKPO
AL ZAAFARANA
ALVHEIM
ANASURIA
ANOA NATUNA
AOKA MIZU
ARMADA CLAIRE
ARMADA PERDANA
ARMADA PERKASA
ARMADA STERLING
ARMADA STERLING II
ARMADA TGT1 (PERWIRA)
ASENG
SGARD A
AZURITE FDPSO
BALDER
BA VI
BAOBAB IVOIRIEN MV 10
BELANAK
BERANTAI (EAST FORTUNE)
BERGE HELENE
BLEO HOLM
BOHAI MING ZHU
BOHAI SHI JI (BOHAI CENTURY)
BOHAI YOU YI HAO
BONGA
BOURBON OPALE
BROTOJOYO
BUNGA KERTAS
BW ATHENA
BW CIDADE DE SAO VICENTE
BW JOKO TOLE
BW PIONEER
CAPIXABA
CAPTAIN
CENDOR II (Onozo)
CHI LINH
CIDADE DE ANCHIETA (formerly Espadarte)
CIDADE DE ANGRA dos REIS (MV22)
CIDADE DE ILHABELA
CIDADE DE ITAJAI
CIDADE de MANGARATIBA (MV 24)
CIDADE de NITOROI (MV 18)
CIDADE DE PARATY
CIDADE de RIO de JANEIRO (MV14)
CIDADE de SANTOS (MV 20)
CIDADE DE SAO PAULO (MV23)
CIDADE de VITORIA
CLOV
CONKOUATI
CRYSTAL OCEAN
CURLEW
CUULONG MV9 (SU TU DEN)
DALIA
DHIRUBHAI-1 (AKER SMART 1)
DYNAMIC PRODUCER (PIPA-2)
ERHA
ESPIRITO SANTO (BC-10)
ESPOIR IVOIRIEN
FARWAH
FIRENZE FPSO
FLUMINENSE FPSO
FPF3 (JASMINE VENTURE)
FRADE
GIMBOA
GIRASSOL
GLAS DOWR
GLOBAL PRODUCER (GRYPHON A)
GLOBAL PRODUCER III
GLOBAL PRODUCER VIII (Hai Yang Shi You 112)
GOLIAT
GREATER PLUTONIO
HAEWENE BRIM
HAI YANG SHI YOU 102 (CHANG QING HAO)
HAI YANG SHI YOU 111
HAI YANG SHI YOU 113
HAI YANG SHI YOU 117
HAI YANG SHI YOU 118
HUMMINGBIRD SPIRIT (former Sevan Hummingbird)
JOTUN A
KAKAP NATUNA
KIKEH
KIZOMBA "A"
KIZOMBA "B"
KNOCK ADOON
KNOCK ALLAN
LAM SON
KWAME NKRUMAH MV21 (JUBILEE FIELD)
LEWEK EMAS (CHIM SAO)
MAERSK NGUJIMA-YIN
MARLIM SUL
MODEC VENTURE 11
MONDO
MONTARA VENTURE
MV 8 LANGSA VENTURE
MYSTRAS
N'GOMA (formely Xikomba)
NAN HAI ENDEAVOR (FEN JIN HAO)
NAN HAI FA XIAN
NAN HAI SHENG LI
NGANHURRA
NINGALOO VISION
NORNE
NORTH SEA PRODUCER
NORTHERN ENDEAVOUR
OKHA
OSX-1
P-31
P-32 (Formerly VLCC Cairu)
P-33
P-34
P-35 (Formerly VLCC Jose Bonifacio)
P-37 (Formerly Friendship)
P-43
P-48
P-50
P-53
P-54
P-57
P-58
P-62 (Formerly MT Suva)
P-63
PAZFLOR
PEREGRINO
PERISAI KAMELIA (formerly Lewek Arunthai)
PETROJARL FOINAVEN
PETROJARL BANFF (Ramform)
PETROJARL KNARR
PETROJARL VARG
PETROLEO NAUTIPA
PIRANEMA SPIRIT (formerly Sevan Piranema)
POLVO
PSVM FPSO
PYRENEES VENTURE
RAROA
RUBICON INTREPID
RUBY II
SANHA LPG FPSO
SAXI-BATUQUE (KIZOMBA C)
SEA EAGLE (EA FPSO)
SEA ROSE (WHITE ROSE)
SENDJE BERGE
SENDJE CEIBA
SERPENTINA
SKARV FPSO
SONG DOC MV19
STYBARROW VENTURE MV16
TANTAWAN EXPLORER
TERRA NOVA
TOISA PISCES
TRINITY SPIRIT
TRITON
UMUROA
USAN
VOYAGEUR SPIRIT
WENCHANG II (HAI YANG SHI YOU 116)
XIJIANG (HAI YANG SHI YOU 115)
YUUM K'AK' NAAB
ZAFIRO PRODUCER

WELLS
FABRICATION YARDS

WIDTH (M)

AUGUST 2015

MAIN CONTRACTORS
DETAIL ENGINEERING

LENGTH (M)

POSTER LAYOUT: Chris Jones of Xenon Group | www.xenongroupdesign.com

FIRST OIL YEAR

VESSEL NAME

O r g a n i z e d b y Ve s s e l N a m e : O p e r a t i n g Ve s s e l s O n l y
Prepared by: Chris Barton and Heather Hambling of Wood Group Mustang, E. Kurt Albaugh of Repsol E&P USA,
Bob Mahlstedt of RamMark Services and David Davis of Offshore Magazine.

FIRST OIL MONTH

2015 WORLDWIDE SURVEY OF FLOATING PRODUCTION,


STORAGE AND OFFLOADING (FPSO) UNITS

LEASED (L) FPSO (CONTRACTOR OWNED)

To k y o H o u s t o n S i n g a p o r e

F-FLARED, S-SALES, L-LIFT

www.modec.com

165
120

233
1
120
84

10

120

60
60

72

135
195
110
120
30

12
150
530
145
OPT
OPT
150

50

150

150
100
OPT
135
150

10
25
14
4
16

430

42
50

125
OPT
135
150

25

250
118
100
42

25
185

45

100
300
110
90

13

150

200

10
20
135
195

300
165
89
95
60

40
450
135
48

50
40

35

100

2,000
1,600
725
260
120
800
1,000
1,080
250
1,600
2,000
850
120
450
745
362
2,431
920
630
920
2,000
1,900
875
360
53
1,000
550
24
1,700
2,200
773
2,000
270
700
1,000
2,200
1,900

17
12

15

15
4
18
25
6
18

2
4
10

1
4

8
100
1

70
60

77
70
63
75
140

1
4
1
2

10
3
4
9
22
9

9
13
5
7
2

4
18
7
10
1
9
8
8

2
4
1
2

15
4
5

4
2

5
4

60
36
80
90
100
116
80
100
100
100
100

GF
FB

TS

F
LS

FB
FT

TS
TS

FB
FB

TS

L,I
S

FB
FB
FB

SS
TS
TS

F, I
F, I
I
S

FS
FS
FB
FB

T
T
TS
TS

4
100
88
70
55

F
S
F

GF
FB
EF/GF

SS
TS
TS

FB

60
180
57

I, L
F,L
S

FB
FB

TB
CB
TS
TC

120
110
150

S, I

FB

CB

FB,FF

TB

DISCOVER THE
DIFFERENCE

February 9-11, 2016 Moody Gardens Hotel & Convention Center


Galveston, Texas USA www.topsidesevent.com

www.doris-engineering.com

IT
ET
ET
ET
ET
JSY
IT
SM
SM
ET
SM
SM
ET
ET
DP
SM
SM
IT
SM
SM
IT
SM
IT
SM

16

P
P

10
10

P
P
P
D
P
D
P

10
8
9
6
12
9
10

P
P
P
P
P
P
D
P
P
P
P
P
D
P
D
P
D
P

9
9
9
12
9
12
12
9
15
12
8
6

8
12
9
16
12
9
14
13
12

Ex p e r ie n ce ... T he ri gh t so l uti o n, t he ri ght re su lt s


www.sofec.com

P r o f i t f r o m o u r e x p e r i e n c e.
FPSO/FSOs FLNGs TLPs Semisubmersibles Operations Mooring Systems Marine Terminals

Notching up the latest generation FPSO

Leader in bringing value


to challenging project
environments

K13109 2015 KBR. All Rights Reserved

www.kbr.com
www.sbmoffshore.com

Conversions
(112 FPSOs)

Newbuilds
builds
(49 FPSOs)

53%

47%

Contractor
Owned
(85 FPSOs)

Operator
Owned
(76 FPSOs)

TOTAL FPSOs 161


(As of July 1, 2015)

COURTESY:

CONSTRUCTION TYPE: N - Newbuild C - Conversion

DDD
DD
DSME
FES
FPS
FSTP
GPS
GSI
HES
HHI
Ikdam
IVI
KMV
KOS
LMC
MAS
McNulty

COMPANY ABBREVIATIONS:
ABB Cnstrm
AENR
AESA
Aker BO
Aker FP
AMKC
APL
APS
AWE
BLT
Bumi Armada
CACT
CNOOC
Dalian

ABB/Astano/Coflexip/UiE
Agip Energy & Natural Resources
Astilleros Espanoles SA
Aker Borgestad Operations
Aker Floating Production
Aker Maritime.Kiewit Contractors
Advanced Production & Loading
Apex Process Sytems
Australia Worldwide Exploration
Berlian Laju Tanker
Bumi Armada Berhad
CNOOC, Chevron, Agip
China National Offshore Oil Corporation
Dalian New Shipyard

Internal Turret
External Turret
Spread Mooring
Riser Turret Mooring
Single Anchor Leg System
Catenary Anchor Leg Mooring
Single Anchor Leg Mooring
Jacket Soft Yoke
Tower Yoke
Dynamic Positioning
Submerged Turret Production

NORWAY

122

MDRI
MHI
MISC
MMHE
Newport News
NSSC
PGS
PNR
SBMO
Segen Cnstrm
Shanghai Hudong
Songa
Tsuneishi
UC
VOFT

Dubai Dry Docks


Dry Docks
Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering
Flexible Engineering Solutions
Floating Production Systems
Keppel FELS - Technip Consortium
Global Process Systems
Gas Services International
Halliburton Energy Services
Hyundai Heavy Industries
Ikdam Production SA
Industrias Verolme Ishibras
Kaldness Mek Versted
Kiewit Offshore Services
London Marine Consultants
Maersk, AMEX, SBM
McNulty Offshore Construction

Worldwide Distribution of FPSO Vessels

POSTER

Marine Design & Research Institute of China


Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
Malaysia International Shipping Corp
Malaysia Marine & Heavy Engineering
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock
National Steel & Shipbuilding Company
Petroleum Geo-Services
Pioneer Natural Resources
SBM Offshore
Segen/Ishokawajima/Kure/Japao
Shanghai Hudong Shipyard
Songa Floating Production
Tsuneishi Shipbuilding Co
United Consortium
Vietnam Offshore Floating Terminal

Total Vessels: 161 NOTE: Only vessels that are producing are included in this map.

CANADA

UNITED KINGDOM

15
ITALY

1
EGYPT

US GOM

MEXICO

MAURITANIA

1
CHINA

1
LIBYA

INDIA
COTE D'IVOIRE

GABON

NIGERIA
BRAZIL

VIETNAM

EQUATORIAL GUINEA 4

GHANA

THAILAND

CONGO

INDONESIA
MALAYSIA

37

PHILIPPINES

13

ANGOLA

14

13

AUSTRALIA 11

NEW ZEALAND 2
COURTESY:

Graph 3: Ranking of Operators by Fleet Size

Graph 4: Ranking of Contractors by Fleet Size

CNOOC

ExxonMobil

3
3

SBMO

Statoil

Total Operator-Owned FPSOs 76


Representing 47% of all FPSOs

JV - SBMO/Partner

Company

BP
Shell

13

Bumi Armada

Chevron

14

MODEC

13

Total

Company

BW Offshore

13

Petrobras

Bluewater

Fred.Olsen

Maersk

MISC

ConocoPhillips

Petrofac

Shell/Exxon (50/50)

Petrofac

Vietsovpetro

Saipem

Woodside

Teekay Offshore

Others (1 FPSO Each)

Others (1 FPSO Each)

15

10

12

Total Contractor-Owned FPSOs 85


Representing 53% of all FPSOs

14

16

18

25

Number of Vessels Owned by Operator

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

(As of July 1, 2015)

Legend:

Graph 5 - Subsea Wells Capability for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)


Deepwater Facility Type

Number of Vessels Owned by Contractor

(As of July 1, 2015)

COURTESY:

10

Field Proven
Qualified
Conceptual

50

Indicates Installed Facility (Proven)


Indicates Sanctioned Facility (Qualified)
Not Sanctioned/Sanction Pending

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


Azurite

FPSO
A. Turret Moored

14

57

36
Global Producer III

Woollybutt
3

Kizomba C
28

100

84

Asgard A

37

71

Hai Yang Shi You 113

75

B. Spread Moored
Jamestown
2

Sendje Ceiba

Agbami

Dalia

Kizomba B

No Limit

C. Unconventional
(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,
Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Hummingbird

Piranema

Sevan

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Number of Well Slots or Wells

Graph 6 - Total Production Throughput (Mboe/Day) for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)

Deepwater Facility Type

200

50

10

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


FPSO
A. New Build

Azurite

13

160

203

Usan

San Jacinto
13

287

Schiehallion

169

317

Akpo

Erha
Kizomba A

220

197

B. Conversion
P-48

New Orleans
10

Yuum KaK Naab

P-54

120

30

200

400

C. Unconventional
Piranema
Goliat
Hummingbird

(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,


Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Voyageur

50

Sevan

100

150

Sevan

200

250

300

350

400

Mboe/day Throughput

Graph 7 - Water Depth Ranges for FPSOs (As of July, 2015)


4,526'

Deepwater Facility Type

1,000'

10,000'

FDPSO (SBM, Prosafe, OPE SSP)


FPSO
A. New Build

66'

3,937'
Hai Yang Shi You 113

Kizomba A
2,198'

50'

3,396'

Azurite
4,592' 4,797'
CLOV

Agbami
4,856'

7,053'

7,217'

8,530'

9,500'

BW Pioneer

Turitella

B. Conversion
Armada Perkasa
80'

Fluminense

394'

P-48

Xikomba

1,312'

Cidade de Angra Dos Reis

Cidade de Mangaratiba

>11,000'

5,250'

C. Unconventional
(Sevan SSP, Petrobras MonoBR,
Global SSP SSP320 & SSP PLUS)

Sevan

0'

Hummingbird

1,000'
(304.8 m)
US MMS Definitions:
Shallow

Goliat

Piranema Spirit

Sevan Global SSP

2,000'

3,000'

4,000'

5,000'

6,000'

7,000'

8,000'

9,000'

10,000'

(609.6 m)

(914.4 m)

(1,219.1 m)

(1,523.9 m)

(1,828.7 m)

(2,133.5 m)

(2,438.3 m)

(2,743.1 m)

(3,047.9 m)

Deepwater

Ultra Deepwater

Water Depth
Note: Field proven data is not limited to a vessels current operational data it may include a vessels historical data, possibly using a previous name.

TM

INCLUDING GITAS OIL & GAS


PIPELINE CONFERENCE AND
PODS USER CONFERENCE

COURTESY:

26

SEPTEMBER 15-17, 2015


The Woodlands Waterway Marriott
Hotel & Convention Center
The Woodlands, Texas USA
www.pipelineweek.com

REGISTER BY AUGUST 18TH AND SAVE!

2
8
11
5
8
9
2
8
12
10
2
4
12
10
11
11
5
1
4
5
4
6
2
6
12
5
8
10
11
2
10
3
6
1
7
1
11
6
8
7
10
12
9
10
4
7
2
9
n/a
8
12
6
4
12
8
9
11
7
2H
10
1
12
10
8
5
8
9
10
4
8
8
7
10
5
6
11
10
8
6
3
1
6
12
1
11
7
11
3
7
8
12
09
1
10
6
12
8
12
12
2
4
12
12
12
3
5
11
8
4
11
11
3
9
10
7
12
2
2
10
3
4
7
1
11
3
3
7
12
11
11
2
1
1
6
7
2
4
7
10
6
8

L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

12

47
960
300
1,400
125
48
970
90
55
694
109
31
20
22
1,250

62
825
2,120
300
2,600
1,485
104

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

18
20

20

L
L
L
L

15

L
L
L
L
L
L
L

L
L
L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L

15

L
L
L

12

L
L
L

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

L
L

L
L

15

15

50
1,221
2,150
2,140
250
2,200
1,370
2,120
1,350
1,300
2,100
1,386
1,400
114
170
92
48
1,360
1,200
2,500
1,180
1,780
120
91
800
740
60
1,080
711
1,400
344
91
113
24
400
1,200
85
20
110
22
25
330
120
128
88
1,350
1,180
1,016
37
100
1,100
95
340
1,015
492
728
80
100
72
1,320
120
100
305
400
350
380
150
380
78
140
330
160
780
840
850
905
790
1,040
1,225
1,080
1,400
1,260
1,400
1,600
1,200
600-1,200
100
60
520
95
410
84
142
1,600
100
2,000
200
101
290
49
58
720
375
120
140
800
475
400
55
825
74
94

L
L

85
90
120
700-850
89
135
90
100
180

Sime Sembcorp
KBR

MODEC
KBR

ABB
Fluor

Bluewater
SBMO
MARIC
SBMO

COOEC
NATCO
KBR/HES
Expro International
Kavin Engineering
Malaysia Shipyard
DPS
M7

SPCPL
Bumi Armada Berhad
SBMO
Aker Stord
Prosafe
Smedvig
SBMO
MODEC
PT Brown & Root

Keppel
Daewoo

Daewoo
HHI

Mitsubishi
IHI Marine
Hitachi Zosen

Hitachi

Jurong
Keppel/Vetco Aibel
Mitsubishi
IHI
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Hitachi
Keppel

Sime Sembcorp
McDermott

BW Offshore
Fluor

ABB
UiE Scotland

Dalian

COOEC/Dalian
NATCO
AMEC

DPS/MSE
Merpro

Ulstein Industrier

Dalian

Hitachi
Jiangnan
Dalian
Hudong
Samsung

Keppel
Jurong
Dalian
Keppel
Keppel
Hitachi
Shanghai Jiangan
Dalian
Hudong
Samsung
Aker Tulcea
Sembawang
MISC

SBMO
Astano

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

Technip
SBMO
ABB/Astano/Technip/UiE

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC

MODEC
MODEC
MODEC/ Schahin

Alliance
Various
Astano

Keppel
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Astano
Malaysia Marine
Keppel
Keppel
COSCO
CXG
Jurong
BrasFELS

Astano

Various
Brasa/EBSE
Various

KBR
Hudson/McDermott

Daewoo Shipbuilding
Hudson/McDermott

Daewoo Shipbuilding

Keppel
Jurong

Dalian

AMEC
MODEC/Alliance
Technip-Saipem JV
Aker Solutions
Dyna-mac/ Petreco

Odense Steel
MODEC/Samsung

Maersk
MODEC
Technip
Aker FP
DPI

Aker Yard Brevik


Sembawang

SBMO
Prosafe/GSI
Doris Engr.

SBMO
Prosafe
Izar

MODEC/Alliance Engr.
MODEC/Schlumberger
SBMO

MODEC
MODEC
SBMO

Mar Profundo Girassol

HHI
Bluewater
Maritime Tentech
Maritime Tentech/Mitsui
Dalian
Sevan Marine
HHI

KBR
KBR
CNOOC
Sevan Marine
KBR
APS/Aker

McDermott Indonesia
Kvaerner Govan
AMEC
MODEC/Samsung
Stolt Offshore JV
Aker Solutions
Dyna-mac/ Petreco
SMOE/Sembawang
Various
GSI
SMCO/MECI

SBMO
Prosafe
Exmar Offshore
Saipem
MODEC
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC/Delta
MODEC/Hup Seng Engr.
Various

Mar Profundo Girassol

HHI

Sevan Marine

Aker McNulty
McNulty
CNOOC Engr.
Sevan Marine
HHI
Aker McNulty
MHI

Pierce Production
Bohai Oil Corp./SBM

Shang Hai 708 Institute


CNOOC
Fluor
Sevan Marine (Kanfa)
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
MODEC/NATCO
SBMO
Fluor
AMEC

CNOOC/Nanhai West Oil Corp.


Shanghai
MDRI of China
Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Masa-Yards
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC
Maersk Contractors
SBMO
SBMO

SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

MODEC/NATCO
CESL

MODEC
CESL

SBMO
AMEC/Fluor
Kvaerner Rosenberg
Granherne Engr.
Kvaerner-SBM Consortium
SBMO
DPS
IVI
AESA
HHI/Petromarine
IVI
Petromarine/Allan MacLure
Technip
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
UTC Engenharia

MODEC
Samsung
Prosafe
Tentech
Odense Steel
Samsung
SBMO

UTC Engenharia

CNOOC Engr.
Sembawang / SMOE
Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
MODEC
SBMO
Fluor/AMEC Alliance

Sevan Marine
Kvaerner Rosenberg
MODEC/Avery Laurence
Various
HHI
HHI

Saipem
PTSC
MODEC

Lamprell

Samsung
DSME/ Samsung
NSSC

Izar

HHI
Namura
Ast y Talleres del Noroeste
Mitsui
Dalian
Sevan Marine
HHI
Shanghai Hudong
Waigaogiao
Waigaogiao
Waigaogiao
Dalian Shipbuilding
Yantai Raffes
Kvaerner Masa

IHI
IHI

Various

12
5
24
163

5
6
12

3
1

4
3

3
13
6
3

4
2

Keppel

SOFEC

APL
SBMO
Seanor

4
10
36

SBMO
SBMO
SOFEC

13
5
15
10
16

SOFEC
SOFEC

3
8
16

2
5

9
8
5
280

7
4
8

15
SOFEC
SOFEC
SOFEC

SBMO
SOFEC/Framo Engr.

Jurong

APL

HHI
Samsung
Hudong
Waigaigiao
Shanghai Jiangan
Waigaigiao

Kvaerner Masa
Sumitomo HI
MMHE
IHI
IHI
DDD
DDD
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel
Keppel
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel

Samsung
Keppel FELS
Samsung
Samsung
Ishibras
HHI
HHI
Maritima/MODEC
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
Jurong
FSTP

SBMO

Sembawang
Jurong
Samsung
Keppel
Keppel
SLP Engr.
Samsung
Keppel
Ishibras
AESA
HHI
Ishibras
HHI
Jurong
Mau-Jurong Cnsort.
Mau-Jurong Cnsort.
Jurong
Keppel
Jurong
Keppel

4
6
71
9
1
25

SBMO
Prosafe
LMC/Rolls-Royce
Jurong
Jurong

Sumitomo

Jurong

Jurong

A&P Group

Ind. Verolme Ishibras


HHI
Ind. Verolme Ishibras
HHI
Jurong
Jurong/Mau-Jurong
FELS-Setal
Jurong

34
8

9
12
3

SOFEC
SOFEC/Framo Engr.
SBMO

17
3
20
7
40

Bluewater
Maritime Tentech
Maritime Tentech, M.E.S./Frame Engr.
APL

Cromarty Firth

20
14
33
43
8

STP/Framo
SBMO
APL
SBMO
Bluewater

3
11
12
3
18

10

20

7
4
12

20
2

26
84

NA
Bluewater
SOFEC
SBMO
SOFEC
SOFEC

2
19
10
35

18

16

SOFEC / Framo Eng

17

APL / Buoy System


SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO

11
10

17
6
4
5
13

SOFEC

APL
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO, SBMO
Prosafe
Kvaerner Rosenberg/SBMO
Lewis Offshore/ Bluewater
SBMO, SBMO
SBMO
APL
SOFEC
SBMO
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO
Bluewater

SBMO
Jurong

5
10

5
4
23
12
6
4
19
20
20
13
17
9
11
19
7

2
1

COSCO
KBR
J Ray McDermott

DSME
Dalian

DSME
Maersk

Astano/Golar-Nor
PGS

Ast y Tallered del Noroeste


Aker Maritime

ABB
GSI
Sevan Marine (Kanfa)
ABB
Toyo
MODEC

Maritime Tentech/Keppel
Prosafe
Sevan Marine
Prosafe
MODEC

Golar-Nor
Aker Kvaerner
Samsung
Keppel
Prosafe
Sevan Marine
Prosafe
MODEC
MODEC

SBMO
SBMO
KBR
Maersk Contractors
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
SBMO

Various
Various
Sembawang
Aker Maritime/ Keiwit
ABB
ABB
Various
Samsung

Various
GSI
Sevan Marine
Dynamac
Dyna-Mac

Dalian

APL

Keppel

Aker McNulty

FMC, Astano/Brown Brothers


TenTech

Jurong

NA
Prosafe
SOFEC

Samsung
Keppel

Keppel
Jurong
HanTong

SBMO
SBMO
Samsung
Samsung

SBMO/Alliance Engr.
Agra Shawmont Brown& Root
Wood Group Mustang
Kvaerner Oil & Gas
Alliance / ABB
HHI

SBMO
Aker Solutions
MODEC
MODEC
SBMO
KBR/Daewoo

MODEC
MODEC
SBMO
TNA AlliancePCL/KBR
Maresca

Wood Group Mustang


Kvaerner Oil & Gas
Prosafe
HHI
Sevan Marine

Kvaerner Oil & Gas


Prosafe
HHI
Sevan Marine

Oceaneering Int'l

Oceaneering Int'l

COOEC
COOEC
Wood Group Mustang

Dyna-Mac and BT Engr


Various
PCL/BARMAC

November 3-5, 2015

February 9-11, 2016

March 22-24, 2016

Moody Gardens Hotel


& Convention Center
Galveston, TX

Moody Gardens Hotel


& Convention Center
Galveston, TX

Henry B. Gonzalez
Convention Center
San Antonio, TX

IHI
Samsung
Samsung

Samsung
Samsung
Daewoo

NATCO/Dynamic/Serck Backer
Sembawang
Samsung
Dynamac
HHI
HHI
Keppel Verolme
Yantai Raffes
Qingdao Beihai
Qingdao Beihai
Various

www.deepwateroperations.com

www.topsidesevent.com

www.subseatiebackforum.com

November 3 - 5, 2015

Moody Gardens Hotel & Convention Center | Galveston, TX, USA


www.deepwateroperations.com

Keppel
Keppel

6
2

2
7
2
8
15
14
8
25
9
6
9

Jurong
MMHE
MMHE
IHI
Keppel
Sembawang
Samsung
Jurong
Jurong
Keppel
Samsung
COSCO
Samsung
Sembawang
Daewoo
Ulstein Verft AS
AESA
Samsung
Keppel (Tuas)

APL

Jurong
SBMO
SOFEC
SOFEC
SBMO
SOFEC

22
9

2
1

16
3
3

20
20
21
8
28
20
16
5
9

10

11

Bluewater/Lewis Offshore
Prosafe

24
7
11
42

APL
APL
APL

26

38

15

ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

245

43

20

322
321
334
332
337
305
325
101
236
245
322
332
101
290
331
325
94
268
411
248
337
337
300
242
259
219
277
107
310
252
215
262
272
323
267
65
233
268
337
285
285
207
274
243
359
290
261
343
258
370
274
171
271

56
58
51
58
54
61
48
21
40
43
56
58
21
51
57
57
22
42
60
39
55
55
60
42
41
38
51

29

ABS
DNV
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
RINA
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
BV
DNV
DNV
DNV
BV
DNV
CCS
CCS
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

58
42
31
46
51
63
65
42
43
55
63
60
54
44
42
59
51
58
52
46
54
43
25
55

14

LR
DNV
LR
LR
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS

DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV

14

8
4
23

10

ABS
ABS
LR
DNV
DNV
DNV
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
LR
DNV
ABS
ABS
BV
DNV
CCS
CCS
DNV
ABS

262
349
267
260
238
260
236
273
274
271
337
337
337
231
337
339
337
337
337
346
337
311
330
328
334
325
345
264
250
120
256
214
255
65
325
318
274
243
217
245
264
369
274
258
350
265
362
295
265
284
292
104
337
244
232
320
66
217
235
327
331

46
52
44
46
42
41
40
50
48
46
55
54
55
26
54
54
55
55
55
57
54
56
56
57
58
61
58
41
34
54
48
38
44
65
55
57
48
42
32
41
49
56
50
46
52
52
56
51
48
43
46
23
55
42
46
61
66
46
46
65
56

DS
DH
DH
SH
DH
DH
SH
DH
DH
SH
SH
DH
DH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DS
DH

23

DS

18
9
14

DH
SH
DH
SH

21
18

SH
DH

22

SH
SH
DH
DH

DH
DH
28
27
27
12
20
20
29
28
12
24
28
32
6
21
28
21
27
27
31
21
24
23
24
170
32
23
18
24
21
29
51
27
24
21
27
32
32
26
24
30
24
31
27
24
27
24
16
22

21
20
9
15

22

16
15
21
21
23
15
16
17
16
31

DH
DH
SH
DS
DH

DH

DH
SH
SH
DS
DH
DH
DH
D

16

DS
DH

17
14

DS
D

DH
SH
SH
DH
DH

SH

16
23
20

SH

100,000
360,700
263,933

SH

12
17

SH
SH
DH

DH
DS
DH
DS
DS

27
28
28
28
18
28
26
27
27
28
28
28

18
22
22
22
13
21
21
21
21
21
22
22

SH
SH

Where It All
Comes Together

40,000
93,476
134,000
273,000
375,000
340,660
239,781
145,242

15
25
18

21

18
15
19
15
19

21
28
9
27
21
23
32
27
24
24
32
27

360,000
103,000
53,071
150,000
150,000
286,480

SH
DH
DH
SH
DH
SH
DH
DH

DH
SH

SH

19
22
29
29
28
27
27
27
29
20

154,000
357,000
357,000
55,337
91,468
265,243
265,050
8,346
190,000
312,500
268,000
45,145
87,768
8,700
135,510
97,127
135,000
273,000
115,829
100,020
150,000
273,000
260,000
265,263
91,468
300,000
258,000
249,370
275,045
232,165
265,050
273,775
214,000
235,837
8,700
99,800
91,468
265,243
265,050
8,346
190,000
392,000
268,000
5,214
110,000
355,000
106,000
273,500
273,777
345,000
105,000
105,701
85,943
159,064

261,212
190,000
308,490
278,000
149,686
273,000
146,251
35,000
138,930
255,900
153,675
254,012
132,100
150,000
101,832
100,000
99,800
177,529
158,000
148,192
283,000
282,750
269,443
62,236
270,000
282,000
311,000
311,000
279,688
322,446
321,000
255,271
280,491
154,998
322,912
396,000
277,450
127,540
43,276
31,498
135,000
60,000
141,330
13,000
257,272
296,200
143,690
92,757
67,436
95,091
94,000
311,000
207,000
140,000
274,333
274,473
307,000
129,000
70,000
140,000
136,960
196,000
7,200
279,187
105,000
118,095
381,000
45,145

23
21

20

21
23
27
28
32

21

13
16
16
18
17
23

13
13
22
20
18
22
22
22

16
19
7
18

SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
SH
DH

DH
DS
DH
DH
DH
DH
DH
SH
SH
DH
DH
DH
SH
DH/DS
SH
DS
DH
SH
SH
SH

1976
2008
2008
1969
2001
1996
1990
1999
1974
1984
1975
1997
1999
1996

2002

1994
2008

2009
2014
2009
2008
2012
2014
2011
2011
1998 2010
1988 2009
1995 2005
1994
1976 2005
2004
1983 2012
1985 2012

1977 2011
2005
2007
1986
1994
1975
1988
1975
1974
1996
1990

2012
2003
2007
2007
2010
2009
2009

1984
1975 2011
2014
1985 2012
2014
2009
1986
1973
1992
1976
2013
1973
1999
1983
1985

2008
2010
2006
--1991
1997
2012

1977 2011
1975 2008

1989
1974
1976
1976
1977
1999
1997
1993
1998
2003
2014
2007
1997
2002
2003
2008
2014
2007
1997
1975
1974
2005
2005
1985
1980
1991
1977
1999
1977
1992
1975

2011
2003
1999
2009
2008
2011
2001

2014
1990

1997
1985
2005

2006
2009
2014
2010
2011
2008
2003
2005
2006

1974 2001
1976 2003
2014
2002
1976 1989
1975 1996
2006
1981 2008
1997
1983 1997
1999
2009
2009 2011
1974 1997
1974
1978 1998
1959 1997
1975 1996
1975 2000
1975 2003
1973 2004
1980 2003
1984 2007
1979 2007
2003 2010
1991
2013
1983 2013
2010
2008 2010
1989
1997
2014
1998
1975
2006
1980
1996

2008
2001
2002
2002

2007
2011
2007
1980 2007
1981 2007
1990 2007
2001
1977 2007
2002
2005
1974 2004
1975 2001
1974 2002
2010
2008
2007
1976 1996
1999
1997 2004
1976 1997
1999
1980 2007
2006
2007 2012
2006
2006
1981 2007
1973 1999

40
250
240
10
157
225
70
30
80
40
30
60
27
55
80
200
40
110
100
70
55
30
75
60
80
12
70
170
24
20
30
40
40
7
80
100
37
35
70
100
100
150
80
150
100
120
100
35
120
100
160
35
40
45
65
35
80
30
250
100
45
200
12
70
20
100
60
60
60
100
100
80
100
155
70
12
72
190
190
56
25
123
25
120
250
100
70
35
20
123
50
120
100
100
100
40
15
80
100
80
80
65
100
63
225
76
180
30
40
100
50
190
100
150
150
150
180
180
180
180
180
180
140
160
100
1
140
90
63
80
20
25
90
157
96
95
15
45
105
200
105
38
160
110
85
30
11
50
32
20
20
200
50
180
30
100
100
200
80

125
150
36
35

53
60
18

11

360
35
180

35
180

60
20
30
9
20

25

60

75
14
150
80
35
6
3
100
5
60
53
30
340
113

N/A
177

55
80
200
50
100
83
57
88
66
81
13
70
187
25
20
40
49
45
64
80
119
37
35
70
100
130
80

280
124
174
87
350
177
118
230
12

100
174

74
150
60

30

60

10
75
12
73
10

100
50

85

65
166
3

100
37
90
65

100
85
160

100
10
10

60

18

N/A

16
70

20
40
14

20

140

50

70
210
76

140

110
100
180
96
240

140

150

150
113

150
50
37

150
138

35
32

116
19.5
316
400
45
80
150
7.2
75
20
106
37
90
92.5
90
45
39
190
110
3
15

30
25
400
150
10
85

64
68
35
133
30
317
108
58
225
13
83
23
118
66
75
75
115
100
88
187
88
13
75
190
190
56
25
128
29
120
317
125
72
49

160

150

100
80
2

137
113
100
100
50
15
94

60
85
115
6
5
80
80
530
30
60
7
6

16
14
15
85
210
4
212
6
35
177
13
330
7
47
3
127
7.5
245
60
83
40
29
125
150
600
145
30
45
160
670
10
150
5.4
36
50
260
25
35
38
500
120
60

80
81
66
113
76
313
81
190
30
41
101
50
190
100
153
152
153
194
215
180
181
215
181

110
35

38
82.5

100

300

50
10

30

45

130

75

350
75
8

50
30
86

92
130
60

56
85
75

72
65
170

43
4
90
110

72
205
40
3

60
22

19

150
60
79
85
300

250
95
160

25

20

130

260

80
60
141
150

180

160

160

80

95

95

15
0
100

0
70

270

85

230

250
63

40
80
24
20
0

40
80

125
147

40
80
0

70
126
100
60

12
50

50

230
125
125

11
55

32

50

300
320
50
20
55
189

110
60
60
135
147

40
60
50

60

300
205
37
32
245

360

360

0
0
0

0
0
2

10
7

4
4

1
1

0
1

3
1

11
8
4

66

FB

TS

SM

12

1
n/a

8
2
3

120
55
120
69
55
84
63
87
87
70
77
100
100

I, L
S, F
S,L

FT
FT
FB
FB
FB
FT
FB
FB
FB
FB
FT

TS
TS
TS
CB
TS
TS

FB

P
P
D
P
D
D
D
P
P
P
P
P
P

12
9
12

F
L,I

SM
IT, SM
IT
IT
ET
IT
ET
SM
SM
IT
IT
ET
IT

1
4

120
60
28

FB

TS
TS

SM
RTM
CALM SY
ET
SALM

P
P

12
10

100
96
130
47
110
63
72

S
F, I
F, I
F

FT
FB
FB

S
F

FB
FT

T
TS
TS
TS
TS
TS
BB

F
F,S

FB
FB

TS
TT
TB

6
15

2
11
5

F
F
F

SS
TB/TS
TS
TS
TS

TS

1
8
6
2

20
3

2
39

36
1

N/A

10

S
65
80

NUMBER OF ANCHOR LEGS

0
0
0

PERMANENT or DISCONNECTABLE

1
1
0

MOORING SYSTEM TYPE

1
0
0

SEE MOORING SYSTEM TYPE


TABLE FOR ABBREVIATION INFORMATION

0
0
1

OFFLOADING SYSTEM

2
2
3

TS-TANDEM STERN, TB-TANDEM BOW,


TC-TO CALM BUOY, SS-SIDE BY SIDE

4
3
6

FB-FLARE BOOM OR FLARE TOWER,


GF-GROUND FLARE, FF-FLOATING FLARE

1
1
1

TYPE OF FLARE

GAS DEPOSITION

n/a

QUARTERS CAPACITY (PEOPLE)

1
4
1
1

GAS INJECTION

5
8
2
6

N/A

12

96
60

ET
IT
JSY
JSY
T
SM
SM
SPT
DP
T
SM
T
IT
ET
SM
CALM SY
IT
SM

1
9

P
P

P
P
P
P
P
P
D

12
9

P
D
P
D
P
P
P
P
P

S, L

FB
FB

TS
TS

28
89

S, L,

FB

TS

70

100

FT

94
40
60

F
L, F
S, F

GF

SS

SM

FT

TS

IT, SM
IT
SM
IT
DP
SM
IT
IT
SM
ET
ET
ET
IT
SM
SM
IT
IT
ET, SM
ET
SM
IT
IT
JSY
SAL Yoke
SAL Yoke
IT

P
D
P
D
D

17

12
9
12
10
9

9
10

9
9
12
10
24

55

2
7

5
1

4
2

SM
SM
SM
SM
SM
SM
SM

14
11
1

8
5
1

2
1

8
1

52
104
28

F
F,S,I
F

FB
FB
FT

TC
TS
TB

12
10

100
66

S, L, I
S,L

FB
FB

TS
TS

3
3

S, L
S
F
S, L
I, S
L
I

GF
FB
FB
FB
FI
FB
FB
FB

TC
TS
TS

FB

TS

I
F
F

FB
FB
FB
FB

TS
TS
TS
TS

44
55
86
118

F
F
S, L, I

FB
FB
FB

TS
TB
TS

FT

TS
TS,TC
T
T
TS

15
2
18

12

11

4
12
9
25
24
7

9
20
3

5
2

2
1

108
59
120
100
140
96
90
40
63
120
75
55
130

7
4
2
10

15

12

5
11
7
14
19
12
12
3
23
16
4
3
3
7 (11)
8

2
3

2
4

1
2

1
1

1
1

5
6

1
5

1
0

9
4
2

1
1

1
2

8
8 (21)
7
15
4

1
3

1
34
2

5
1
23
75
10
80

3
3

80

70
120

4
2
2
2
12

1
2

10
5
2

S, L

100
58
40
100

L,I
L
F
F

90
1

1
2

2
2

80
60
240
53
84

5
4

80
90

10

I, L
S

80
100

FB

FB

TS
TS
TS
TS

FB
FB
FT
GF
GF

TS

I+L
I

FT
FB

TS
TS

I
I, L

FT
FT
FB
FB
GF

TS
TS
TS
TS
TS

FB
FB

TS
TS

FT
FB

TS
TS
TS

TS
TS

P
18
12
3
9
12
9
0

P
P

9
6

P
P
P
P

8
9
6
9
12
16
12
10
6
6
14
14
8

P
P
P
P
D
P
P
D
D
D
D
D

D
P
P

12
6
6
10

P
D
D
P
D
P

9
9
9
9
6
9
9
8
12

P
P
D
D
P
D
D
P
P
P
D
D

10
9
9
9
9
10

IT
IT
IT
IT
SALM
CALM
SM
IT

TS

SM

TC
ET

SM
STP
ET
IT
IT
ET
IT
SM
SM
IT
ET

85
120
36
35
100
160

FB
FB
FB

TS
TS

52

FB

GF

TS

SM
IT
CRY
ET
SM
IT
SM
SM
ET
ET
IT
IT
IT
IT
ET
STP
SM
SM
ET
IT
IT
IT
RTM
SM
SM
IT, SM
IT
RTM
STP
IT

16

265
340

190
102
56

12
175
100
72

110
80
21
46
91
210
106
109
22
50
21
130
300
129
43
168
137
197
30
13
75
33
26
28
243
54
186
36
100
183
220
90

33

8
14
7
12

WATER INJECTION

932
1,800
2,000
800
560
2,000
550
600
805
1,100
360
580
510
620
1,695
920
1,300
380
1,100
2,000
880
360
1,650
657
1,000
390
1,100
1,400
306
400
619
400
1,000
200
600
2,038
849
680
975
1,900
1,600
1,600
650
1,600
1,600
1,600
1,600
700
1,600
1,900
1,800
1,420
42
560
1,000
2,000
1,300
300
2,200
2,000
1,100
1,900
700
1,300
800
1,500
1,800
2,000
657
510
510
820
1,000
950
626
390
1,000
1,800
2,000
1,800
270
595
760
2,179
2,200
940
1,700
1,300
650
1,600
680
1,900
2,026
930
2,100
700
272
1,035
1,963
1,000
1,600
650
900
650
2,000
560
1,400
925
950
1,000
2,000
700
1,800
2,000
1,000
880
500
1,035
2,000
2,000
1,600

PRODUCTION

30
375
180
300
85
55
60
15

TOTAL RISERS

45
30
60

n/a

PRODUCED WAER (MBWPD)

60

44
280

MAX WATER PRODUCTION (MBPD)

40
285
287
16
178
236
75
36

GAS EXPORT & GAS LIFT (MMscfd)

44
212
282
35
125
65
32
38

GAS INJECTION (MMscfd)

MAX OIL PRODUCTION (MBOPD)

C
N
N
C
C
N
N
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
C
N
N
N
N
N
N
C
C
N
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
N
C
C
C
C
N
N
C
N
C
C
C
N
C
C
N
C
N
N
C
C
C
N
C
N
C
N
C
C
N
C
N
N
N
N
C
C

DH
18
16
16
21
24
24
19
17
14
20

25
26
23
26
24
25
20
28

28
32
31
22
13
21

155,612
337,859
337,000
127,000
81,213
131,666
76,200
105,000
102,123
156,483
58,557
90,819
107,160
112,323
255,502
177,808
259,999

LATEST INTEGRATION/UPGRADE YEAR

28
26
17
20
29
28
12
24
32
32
27
19
12
23
20
22
27
24

28
30

MMHE
SBMO
SBMO
SBMO
SBMO

60
58
32
43
56
58
21
51
58
57
66
43
21
44
42
44
55
38
41
52
58

11
22
7

40
13
5

Nymo
Qingdao Beihai
Qingdao Beihai
Sembawang
Ham Marine

5
25
30

22

Keppel FELS/Kabelschlepp Metool

Yantai Raffes

Batam
DPS
SBMO
SBMO
KBR
AMKC
ABB
ABB
SBMO
Aker Solutions

16
49
37

DSME
Keppel
Astano

19
18

344
316

Utc Engenharia, CEE, RJ

McDermott Int'l
Aker Maritime

27
30

17
13
15

2
17

45
56
36

ABS

BV
ABS
ABS
13
13
19
10
6
10
6
35
19
8
4
27
35
34
21
42
18
19
45
7

15

16
16
17
14
15

ORIGINAL HULL FABRICATION YEAR

350
285
207
245
322
332
101
290
305
325
66
233
101
254
247
276
346
214
245

20
32
21
23
24
21
21
23
23
18
21
21
23

DDH-DOUBLE HULL, SH-SINGLE HULL,


DS-DOUBLE SIDED

ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
ABS
LRS
ABS
DNV
ABS
DNV
DNV
ABS/BKI
DNV
ABS
DNV
BV

54
58
61
40
42
45
39
42
42
46
32
42
42
48

HULL CONSTRUCTION

269
319
310
260
252
226
165
248
241
308
211
235
247
336
350
278
312
211

MAX OPERATING DRAFT (M)

DNV
ABS
BV
DNV
DNV
LR
ABS
DNV
LR
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
ABS
DNV
DNV

ABS
ABS
34
30

A&P Group

CLASSIFICATION

WATER INJECTION WELLS

GAS INJECTION WELLS

2
12
20
4
3
5

SBMO

Keppel

Jurong
DDD
Keppel

SBMO
MODEC
Samsung
Various
Kvaerner Rosenberg
SLP Engr.
United Const/Sembawang
SBMO
Keppel
IVI
AESA
Segen/HHI/Allan Maclure
Petrobras/SOFEC
Segen
Segen
KBR (PROJEMAR)
KBR (PROJEMAR)
Petrobras
QUIP Consortium
Maua

2
6
2

16

MSE

Keppel

Jurong
Jurong
DDD
Keppel
HHI
Sembawang
Astano
Mitsui
Dalian

MODEC/BT Engr.
Various

Prosafe
Aker Kvaerner
SLP Engr.
Kvaerner-SBM Consortium
SBMO
OSX Leasing B.V./ BWO Support
IVI
AESA
HHI/Petromarine
IVI
Petromarine/Allan MacLure
Technip
KBR/HES
KBR/HES
UTC Engenharia
SBMO

3
7

APL, Sembawang
Bluewater
SBMO
SOFEC
SBMO

PRODUCTION WELLS

TOTAL WELLS

TURRET SUPPLIER/
SWIVEL MANUFACTURER
SBMO
SOFEC

Keppel

Samsung
Jurong
Sembawang
HHI
Keppel
Keppel (Tuas)
Izar

HHI

Vetco Aibel
Various

MODEC
CESL
SBMO Malaysia

5
20
22
11
22
7

Kvaerner Govan

Various

Maersk Contractors
SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

9
37
44
15
25
12
23
7

10
57
10
16

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APL
SBMO
SOFEC
Bluewater

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DPS
SBMO
ABB

SBMO
Intelligent/Engr./Keppel

Smedvig

AMEC
Maresca
Berlian Laju Tanker
INTEC

SBMO
SBMO
MODEC
SBMO

REPAIR

CONVERSION / INTEGRATION

NEW BUILD HULL

TOPSIDES

GENERAL CONTRACTOR (EPCI)

HULL

TOPSIDES

RESERVES (MMBOE)

COUNTRY

FIELD or LOCATION

OPERATING WATER DEPTH (M)

FIELD OPERATOR (MAJORITY)

FPSO OPERATOR

FPSO OWNER

CURRENT LEASE PERIOD (YRS.)


15

Bumi Armada Engineering


KMV
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
SBMO
Maritime Tentech
Prosafe

GSI
DSME
HHI
GSI
Vetco Aibel
AMEC
MODEC/Applied Engr.
Sembawang
Keppel
Keppel
Hug Seng
Dyna-mac
Dynamac
Dyna-mac
Various
Aker Stord
Various

UMBILICALS

30%

IT
ET
SM
RTM
SALS
CALM
SALM
JSY
TY
DP
STP

DPS
Schlumberger/Albert Garraudy
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
Bumi Armada Engineering
SBMO
Aker/ABB

Prosafe
DSME
Technip & HHI JV
Prosafe
Vetco Aibel
SBMO
MODEC
Bluewater
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada Navigation
Bumi Armada Berhad

MOORING

OTHER

70%

Every attempt has been made to identify and collect data on all FPSO vessels
operating around the world. No owner(s) or FPSO contractor(s) were intentionally
excluded from the survey. In some cases the owner or vessel has not been
included because information was not supplied in time. We have attempted to
make the survey as complete and accurate as possible. However, we make no
guarantee that it is all inclusive. The information was collected from company
brochures, websites, personal interviews,
phone interviews, and in major part by
owner-supplied data and World Energy
Reports. Neither Wood Group Mustang
Inc., nor Offshore Magazine guarantees or
assumes any responsibility or liability for any
reliance on the information presented.

MOORING SYSTEM TYPE:

Graph 2: OPERATOR vs
CONTRACTOR OWNED FPSOs

Prosafe
DSME
Technip
Kawasaki Dockyard
Keppel
Mitsubishi HI
MODEC
Bluewater

IMPORT / EXPORT RISERS

Graph 1: NEW BUILD vs


CONVERSION FPSOs

L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L

Prosafe/GSI
KBR
Technip
GSI
Vetco Aibel
Stork Protech
MODEC/NATCO
Bluewater/Aibel

TOPSIDES INFO

GAS LIFT

E-mail comments, corrections,


or additions to: posters@woodgroup.com
For additional copies E-mail: posters@pennwell.com.
Downloads available at www.offshore-mag.com.

Nigeria
82
Nigeria
770
Nigeria
620
Egypt
41
Norway
236
UK
119
Indonesia
216
UK
35
Australia
Oyo
Nigeria
n/a
Okoru Setu Field
Nigeria
D-1
India
D-1
India
Te Giac Trang
Vietnam
Aseng
Eq Guinea
sgard
Norway
2,000
Pointe Noire
Congo
75
Balder/Ringhorne
Norway
171
Dragon Block 9/16
Vietnam
Baobab
Cote d'Ivoire
123
Belanak West Natuna Block B
Indonesia
238
Berantai
Malaysia
Chinguetti Field
Mauritania
125
Ross, Parry, Blake
UK
138
Penglai 19-3 Block 11/05
China
103
Quinhuangdao 32-6
China
155
Bozhong 28-1
China
191
Bonga
Nigeria
1,000
Various
Mexico
Pagerungan Utara
Indonesia
Penera
Malaysia
Bressay
UK
Early production, various felds - incl. Sapinhoa, Lula
Brazil
Terang Sirasun Batur
Indonesia
119
Cascade, Chinook
US GOM
500
Cachalote
Brazil
Captain A, B, C
UK
350
Cendor
Malaysia
White Tiger
Vietnam
Baleia Azul
Brazil
Lula
Brazil
6,000
Sapinhoa, Santos Basin
Brazil
1,600
Bauna & Piracaba Fields
Brazil
Iracema South
Brazil
Jabuti Field
Brazil
Lula NE Field
Brazil
8,300
Espadarte Sul Field
Brazil
Urugua/Tambua Fields
Brazil
Sapinhoa
Brazil
2,100
Golfnho
Brazil
Block 17 - Acacia, Hortensia, Perpetua & Zinia
Angola
500
Yombo
Congo
500
Litorial Tabasco area
Mexico
Curlew, Kyle
UK
98
Cuu Long Basin (Black Lion), Block 15-1
Vietnam
390
Dalia Block 17
Angola
940
MA-D6
India
1,000
Carioca NE
Brazil
NA EWT
Niger Delta OPL 209
Nigeria
1,000
BC-10, Parque das Conchas - Abalone, Ostras, Nautilus, Argonauta
Brazil
Espoir
Cote d'Ivoire
Al Jurf Block C137
Libya
148
Aquila
Italy
20
Bijupira, Salema
Brazil
201
Jasmine
Thailand
196
Frade BC-4
Brazil
Gimboa
Angola
Girassol, Jasmim Block 17, Rosa (Future)
Angola
700
Kitan
Australia
Gryphon, Maclure, Tullich
UK
213
Dumbarton
UK
150
Caofeidian 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-5
China
81
Goliat, Barents Sea
Norway
Block 18: Paladio, Plutonio, Platino, Galio, Cromio, Cobalto
Angola
1,166
Pierce
UK
238
Bozhong 34/1
China
83
Panyu 4/2, 5/1
China
90
Bozhong 25-1
China
300
Penglai Block 19-3 (Phase 2)
China
500
Enping 24-2, Pearl River
China
Chestnut
UK
235
Jotun
Norway
200
Kakap KH
Indonesia
Kikeh
Malaysia
Block 15 - Hungo, Chocalho
Angola
1,000
Block 15 - Kissanje, Dikanza
Angola
1,000
Antan
Nigeria
Olowi
Gabon
Tang Long/Dong Do
Vietnam
Tano Basin
Ghana
300
Chim Sao
Vietnam
48
Vincent
Australia
73
Marlim Sul
Brazil
Mutineer, Exeter, WA-191-P
Australia
101
Mondo, Block 15
Angola
Montara, Skua, Swift, Swallow Fields
Australia
40
Langsa
Indonesia
16
Okono & Okpono Fields
Nigeria
270
Block 15-06
Angola
Wenchang 13-1, 13-2
China
3
Huizhou 19-3-1
China
Liuhua 11-1
China
Enfeld
Australia
145
Van Gogh
Australia
50
Norne
Norway
MacCulloch
UK
114
Laminaria, Corallina
Australia
209
Cossack, Wanaea, Lambert, Hermes
Australia
Tubaro Azul
Brazil
Albacora
Brazil
962
Marlim
Brazil
704
Marlim
Brazil
704
Barracuda & Caratinga
Brazil
600
Marlim
Brazil
704
Marlim
Brazil
704
Barracuda
Brazil
806
Caratinga
Brazil
153
Albacora Leste
Brazil
Marlim Leste
Brazil
Roncador Module 2
Brazil
2,000
Jubarte, Ph 2
Brazil
600
Espirito Santo
Brazil
Roncador
Brazil
Papa Terra Field, BLOCK BC-20
Brazil
Block 17 - Acacia, Hortensia, Perpetua & Zinia
Angola
Peregrino
Brazil
500
North Malay Basin
Malaysia
Foinaven, Foinaven East
UK
395
Banff and Kyle Fields
UK
Knarr Field
Norway
80
Varg
Norway
Etame
Gabon
Piranema
Brazil
76
Polvo
Brazil
50
Block 31: Pluto, Saturno, Venus, Marte
Angola
Pyrenees (Crosby, Revensworth, Stickle)
Australia
100
Maari
New Zealand
50
Galoc
Philippines
24
Blocks 01 & 02
Vietnam
140
Sanha-Bomboco
Angola
Saxi & Batuque, Block 15
Angola
EA (OML 79)
Nigeria
394
White Rose
Canada
440
Okwori, Okwori South
Nigeria
40
Ceiba
Eq Guinea
356
Zafro Southern Expansion Area
Eq Guinea
994
Skarv
Norway
385
Song Doc
Vietnam
Stybarrow
Australia
Tantawan
Thailand
Terra Nova
Canada
470
Mexico
Ukpokiti
Nigeria
48
Central Graben, Block 21/30, Guillemot Fields
UK
15
Tui
New Zealand
700
OML 138
Nigeria
500
Huntington
UK
Wenchang
China
83
Xijiang 23-1
China
40
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
Mexico
5
Zafro Block B
Eq Guinea
993

STORAGE CAPACITY (MBBLs)

Abo
Agbami OPL 216, 217
Akpo OPL 246, OML-130
Zaafarana Block BN 1
Alvheim
Teal, Teal South, Guillemot A, Cook
Anoa Block A
Ettrick Field, North Sea

RISER INFO

WATER INJECTION (MBWPD)

550
1,462
1,350
60
125
89
77
115
135
350
15
91

TOTAL THROUGHPUT (MBOED)

GAS PROCESSING (MMscfd)

ENI
NNPC
Total
Zaafarana Oil Co.
Marathon
Shell
Premier Oil
Nexen
Apache
ALLIED
Afren/Amni
ONGC
ONGC
Hoang Long Joint Operating Company
Noble Energy
Statoil/Saga
Murphy
ExxonMobil
Vietsovpetro
CNR
ConocoPhillips
Petrofac
Petronas
Talisman (Blake)
ConocoPhillips
CNOOC
CNOOC
Shell
PEMEX
Kangean Energy Indonesia
Petronas
Statoil
Petrobras
Kangean Energy Indonesia
Petrobras
Petrobras
Chevron
Petrofac
Vietsovpetro
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Total
Perenco
PEMEX
Shell
Cuu Long JV
Total
Reliance
Petrobras
ExxonMobil
Shell
CNRL
Total
ENI
Shell
Pearl Energy
Chevron
Sonangol
Total
PetroSA/PNR
Maersk
Maersk
Anadarko
ENI
BP
Shell
CNOOC
CNOOC
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips
CNOOC
Centrica
ExxonMobil
ConocoPhillips
Murphy Oil Sabah
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
Addax
CNRL
PetroVietnam/Petronas
Tullow Oil
Premier Oil
Woodside
Petrobras
Santos
ExxonMobil
PTTEP
Mitsui Oil
NPDC
ENI
CNOOC
CACT
CNOOC
Woodside
Apache
Statoil
ConocoPhillips
Woodside
Woodside
OGX
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Petrobras
Total
Statoil
Hess Malaysia
BP
CNR
BG Group
Talisman
Vaalco Energy
Petrobras
HRT
BP
BHP Billiton
OMV
Galoc Production Co.
PetroVietnam E&P
Chevron
ExxonMobil
Shell
Husky
Addax
Hess
ExxonMobil
BP
TSJOC
BHP Billiton
Chevron
Petro-Canada
PEMEX
Shebah E&P
Dana Petroleum
AWE
Total
E.ON Ruhrgas UK E&P
CNOOC
CNOOC
PEMEX
ExxonMobil/GEPetrol

CONSTRUCTION TYPE
(CONVERSION or NEWBUILD)

2003
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2008
Chevron
Star Deepwater JV
2009
Total
Total
1994
Zaafarana Oil Company
Aker
2008
Marathon
Marathon
1996
Shell/Exxon (50/50)
Shell
1990
Premier Oil
Premier Oil
2009
Bluewater
Bluewater
2014
Bumi Armada
2009
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2008
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2013
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2015
Bumi Armada
Dbumi Armada
2011
Bumi Armada
Bumi Armada
2011
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
1999
Statoil
Statoil
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1999
Esso Norge
ExxonMobil
1994
Vietsovpetro
Vietsovpetro
2005
MODEC
MODEC
2004
ConocoPhillips
ConocoPhillips
2012
Petrofac
Petrofac
2006
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1999
Bluewater
Talisman
2002
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips/CNOOC
2001
CNOOC
CNOOC
2004
CNOOC
CNOOC
2005
Shell
Shell
2006
Bourbon Offshore
Bourbon Offshore
2011
BLT
BLT
2004
MISC
FPSO Ventures
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2010
SBMO
SBMO
1996
Chevron
Chevron
2014
MISC
MISC
1985
Vietsovpetro
Vietsovpetro
2012
SBMO
SBMO
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2014
SBMO
SBMO
2013
Teekay, Odebrecht
Teekay Petrojarl
2014
MODEC
MODEC
2009
MODEC
MODEC
2013
SBMO
SBMO
2007
MODEC
MODEC
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2013
MODEC
MODEC
2007
Saipem
Saipem
2014
Total
Total
1991
Perenco
Perenco
2012
Sea Production Ltd
Blue Marine
2002
Shell/Exxon (50/50)
Shell
2003
Cuu Long JV
MODEC
2006
Total
Total
2008
Aker FP
Aker BO
2011
DPI
DPI
2006
ExxonMobil
Esso
2009
SBMO
SBMO
2002
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2003
Total
Exmar
2012
ENI
Saipem
2003
Shell
MODEC
2004
Petrofac
Petrofac
2009
Chevron
SBMO
2009
Saipem
Saipem
2001
Total
Total
2003
Bluewater
Bluewater
1993
Maersk
Maersk
2001
Maersk
Maersk
2004
CNOOC
CNOOC
2015
Sevan
ENI Norge
2007
BP
BP
1999
Bluewater
Bluewater
2007
CNOOC
CNOOC
2003
CNOOC
CNOOC
2004
CNOOC
Chevron
2009
CNOOC
ConocoPhillips
2014
CNOOC
CNOOC
2008
Teekay Petrojarl
Wood Group
1999
Bluewater (JV)
ExxonMobil
1986
MODEC
ConocoPhillips
2007
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2004
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
2005
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil
2006
Fred.Olsen
Fred.Olsen
2009
Fred.Olsen
Fred.Olsen
2014
PTSC/Vinson Holdings
PetroVietnam/Petronas
2010
Tullow Oil
MODEC
2011
Emas
Emas
2008
Woodside
Woodside
2004
SBMO
SBMO
2005
MODEC
MODEC
2008
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2013
PTTEP
PTTEP
2001
Blue Sky Langsa Ltd.
Blue Sky Langsa Ltd.
2004
NPDC
NPDC
2014
Sonasing
OPS
2002
CNOOC
CNOOC
1994
CNOOC
CNOOC
1996
MODEC
MODEC
2006
Woodside/Mitsui
Woodside
2009
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
1997
Statoil
Statoil
2001
North Sea Production
North Sea Production
1999
Woodside
Woodside
2011
JV - North West Shelf
Woodside
2012
OSX 1 Leasing B.V.
OSX Servios Operacionais LTDA
1998
Petrobras
Petrobras
1998
Petrobras
Petrobras
2002
Petrobras
Petrobras
2005
Petrobras
Petrobras
1999
Petrobras
Petrobras
1999
Petrobras
Petrobras
2004
Petrobras
Petrobras
2005
Petrobras
Petrobras
2006
Petrobras
Petrobras
2008
CDC
Petrobras
2007
Petrobras
Petrobras
2010
Petrobras
SBMO (First 3 years)
2014
Petrobras
Petrobras
2014
Petrobras
Petrobras
2013
BW Offshore
Petrobras
2011
Total
Total
2011
Statoil
BW Offshore
2013
Perisai Petroleum
Perisai Petroleum
1997
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
1997
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
2015
Teekay Offshore
Teekay
1999
Teekay Petrojarl
Teekay Petrojarl
2002 JV-BW Offshore/Fred Olsen
JV - BW Offshore/ Fred Olsen
2007
Teekay Petrojarl
Sevan Marine
2007
BW Offshore
HRT
2012
BP
BP
2010
MODEC
MODEC
2009
Maari JV
Maari JV
2008
Rubicon Offshore
Rubicon Offshore
2009
Vietnam OFT
PTSC
2005
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2008
JV - SBMO/ Partner
SBMO+JV Partner
2003
Shell
Shell
2005
Husky
Husky
2005
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2002
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2003
ExxonMobil
SBMO
2012
BP
BP
2008
MODEC
MODEC
2007
MODEC
MODEC
1997
Chevron
Chevron
2002
Petro-Canada
Petro-Canada
2002
Toisa Horizon
Secunda Marine
1997
ConocoPhillips
Alliance Marine Services
2005
Dana Petroleum
Hess
2007
BW Offshore
BW Offshore
2012
Total
Total
2013
Teekay Offshore
Voyageur LLC (Teekay Corp)
2008
CNOOC
CNOOC
2008
CNOOC
CNOOC
2007
PEMEX
PEMEX
1996
ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil

PROCESS AND STORAGE CAPACITY

DEADWEIGHT (DWT) (Tonnes)

4
7
3
11
6
10
4
7
8
12
5

HULL INFORMATION
DIMENSIONS

DEPTH (M)

1455 West Loop South, Suite 400; Houston, TX 77027


Tel: 713-621-9720; Fax: 713-963-6296
www.offshore-mag.com

2015 Offshore

ABO
AGBAMI
AKPO
AL ZAAFARANA
ALVHEIM
ANASURIA
ANOA NATUNA
AOKA MIZU
ARMADA CLAIRE
ARMADA PERDANA
ARMADA PERKASA
ARMADA STERLING
ARMADA STERLING II
ARMADA TGT1 (PERWIRA)
ASENG
SGARD A
AZURITE FDPSO
BALDER
BA VI
BAOBAB IVOIRIEN MV 10
BELANAK
BERANTAI (EAST FORTUNE)
BERGE HELENE
BLEO HOLM
BOHAI MING ZHU
BOHAI SHI JI (BOHAI CENTURY)
BOHAI YOU YI HAO
BONGA
BOURBON OPALE
BROTOJOYO
BUNGA KERTAS
BW ATHENA
BW CIDADE DE SAO VICENTE
BW JOKO TOLE
BW PIONEER
CAPIXABA
CAPTAIN
CENDOR II (Onozo)
CHI LINH
CIDADE DE ANCHIETA (formerly Espadarte)
CIDADE DE ANGRA dos REIS (MV22)
CIDADE DE ILHABELA
CIDADE DE ITAJAI
CIDADE de MANGARATIBA (MV 24)
CIDADE de NITOROI (MV 18)
CIDADE DE PARATY
CIDADE de RIO de JANEIRO (MV14)
CIDADE de SANTOS (MV 20)
CIDADE DE SAO PAULO (MV23)
CIDADE de VITORIA
CLOV
CONKOUATI
CRYSTAL OCEAN
CURLEW
CUULONG MV9 (SU TU DEN)
DALIA
DHIRUBHAI-1 (AKER SMART 1)
DYNAMIC PRODUCER (PIPA-2)
ERHA
ESPIRITO SANTO (BC-10)
ESPOIR IVOIRIEN
FARWAH
FIRENZE FPSO
FLUMINENSE FPSO
FPF3 (JASMINE VENTURE)
FRADE
GIMBOA
GIRASSOL
GLAS DOWR
GLOBAL PRODUCER (GRYPHON A)
GLOBAL PRODUCER III
GLOBAL PRODUCER VIII (Hai Yang Shi You 112)
GOLIAT
GREATER PLUTONIO
HAEWENE BRIM
HAI YANG SHI YOU 102 (CHANG QING HAO)
HAI YANG SHI YOU 111
HAI YANG SHI YOU 113
HAI YANG SHI YOU 117
HAI YANG SHI YOU 118
HUMMINGBIRD SPIRIT (former Sevan Hummingbird)
JOTUN A
KAKAP NATUNA
KIKEH
KIZOMBA "A"
KIZOMBA "B"
KNOCK ADOON
KNOCK ALLAN
LAM SON
KWAME NKRUMAH MV21 (JUBILEE FIELD)
LEWEK EMAS (CHIM SAO)
MAERSK NGUJIMA-YIN
MARLIM SUL
MODEC VENTURE 11
MONDO
MONTARA VENTURE
MV 8 LANGSA VENTURE
MYSTRAS
N'GOMA (formely Xikomba)
NAN HAI ENDEAVOR (FEN JIN HAO)
NAN HAI FA XIAN
NAN HAI SHENG LI
NGANHURRA
NINGALOO VISION
NORNE
NORTH SEA PRODUCER
NORTHERN ENDEAVOUR
OKHA
OSX-1
P-31
P-32 (Formerly VLCC Cairu)
P-33
P-34
P-35 (Formerly VLCC Jose Bonifacio)
P-37 (Formerly Friendship)
P-43
P-48
P-50
P-53
P-54
P-57
P-58
P-62 (Formerly MT Suva)
P-63
PAZFLOR
PEREGRINO
PERISAI KAMELIA (formerly Lewek Arunthai)
PETROJARL FOINAVEN
PETROJARL BANFF (Ramform)
PETROJARL KNARR
PETROJARL VARG
PETROLEO NAUTIPA
PIRANEMA SPIRIT (formerly Sevan Piranema)
POLVO
PSVM FPSO
PYRENEES VENTURE
RAROA
RUBICON INTREPID
RUBY II
SANHA LPG FPSO
SAXI-BATUQUE (KIZOMBA C)
SEA EAGLE (EA FPSO)
SEA ROSE (WHITE ROSE)
SENDJE BERGE
SENDJE CEIBA
SERPENTINA
SKARV FPSO
SONG DOC MV19
STYBARROW VENTURE MV16
TANTAWAN EXPLORER
TERRA NOVA
TOISA PISCES
TRINITY SPIRIT
TRITON
UMUROA
USAN
VOYAGEUR SPIRIT
WENCHANG II (HAI YANG SHI YOU 116)
XIJIANG (HAI YANG SHI YOU 115)
YUUM K'AK' NAAB
ZAFIRO PRODUCER

WELLS
FABRICATION YARDS

WIDTH (M)

AUGUST 2015

MAIN CONTRACTORS
DETAIL ENGINEERING

LENGTH (M)

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FIRST OIL YEAR

VESSEL NAME

O r g a n i z e d b y Ve s s e l N a m e : O p e r a t i n g Ve s s e l s O n l y
Prepared by: Chris Barton and Heather Hambling of Wood Group Mustang, E. Kurt Albaugh of Repsol E&P USA,
Bob Mahlstedt of RamMark Services and David Davis of Offshore Magazine.

FIRST OIL MONTH

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120

233
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120
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10

120

60
60

72

135
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110
120
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12
150
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100
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135
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10
25
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4
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185

45

100
300
110
90

13

150

200

10
20
135
195

300
165
89
95
60

40
450
135
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50
40

35

100

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1,600
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260
120
800
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250
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120
450
745
362
2,431
920
630
920
2,000
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360
53
1,000
550
24
1,700
2,200
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2,000
270
700
1,000
2,200
1,900

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18

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100
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TB
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120
110
150

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FB

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FB,FF

TB

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SM
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12

GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

Baker Hughes, Shell release jointly


developed reservoir modeling software
Sarah Parker Musarra

Editor

ccuracy and precision are critical


components of the success of any
industry. In the offshore industry,
however, accuracy and precision can
make or break a multi-billion dollar
investment. Not just that, but engineers, geologists, and many others are charged to be
as accurate as possible with hundreds of meters of water and earth separating them from
the hydrocarbons they are trying to examine.
To this end, Baker Hughes recently introduced its JewelSuite 6 modeling software.
The new version is based upon the JewelEarth 6 platform and offers users a first version of a suite of fully-integrated applications,
including Subsurface Modeling, Reservoir
Stimulation, GeoMechanics, and more.
JewelSuite 6 is the first result of its collaboration with Shell under a software license and joint development agreement that
reaches back to 2013.
The applications offer automated workflows and built-in smart rules with the end
goal of accuracy and increased operational
efficiency. As such, these applications can
be used independently or, as an example, as
part of integrated multi-domain workflows.

JewelSuite 6 shows fracture clusters in carbonate reservoir. (All images courtesy Baker Hughes)

Once the geological structures from seismic data have been interpreted, JewelSuite
6 steps in to handle things from there. The
Subsurface Modeling application allows the
users to build a 3D structural understanding
of the subsurface. At that point, the user can
even build a 3D mesh or grid that represents
the entire volume. That mesh can continue to
be filled with properties. Based on the well
data and logging data loaded by the user,
as well as information derived from seismic

JewelSuite 6 is Baker
Hughes and Shells
first collaborative
release following the
two companies 2013
agreement.

50 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

data, information can then be extrapolated to


populate the entire grid with properties.
Our patented gridding technology is an
important differentiator. Other products in
the market have certain limitations on how
their grid is created, Baker Hughes Vice
President of Reservoir Technology, Martin
Brudy said. Our gridding and meshing
algorithm can handle complex geological
structures quickly and accurately, unlike the
products from our competitors.
From that, the user can continue by
defining reservoir fluid flow simulations,
which depicts how the field would produce
if certain wells are created. Brudy called the
softwares workflows comprehensive, and
noted that the models were scalable.
Of the GeoMechanics application, also
built upon JewelEarth, Brudy said that it offers everything. From 1D well-based analysis, users can interpret data and derive pore
pressure profiles and stress profiles. The application then allows this to be extrapolated
through that 3D grid and mesh. In this way,
a static understanding of the geomechanical stresses and pressures can be created.
As part of an advanced integrated geomechanical workflow, users can then continue
to create 3D reservoir-centric models, perform 3D fault stability analysis, and then run
4D full-field finite-element geomechanical
simulations. The geomechanic functionality ties in with reservoir simulators, so the

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GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

user can understand the changes in the rock


mechanical situation as fluids are produced
from the reservoir. JewelSuite 6 gives users
access to multiple simulator engines (such
as Computer Modelling Groups IMEX and
GEM, and Schlumbergers Eclipse) from
one common interface.
Brudy said that the Lego brick-like concept, wherein the platform acts as a foundation for each application to build upon,
results in lossless data and knowledge transfer and is a key differentiator between JewelSuite 6 and its competitors.
For example, Brudy explained, if someone carried out a work flow in one of these
applications and is satisfied with the results,
this person can drag-and-drop this result or
object it could be a well or interpreted log
into another application that is built on the
same platform and it will appear there.
We are doing all of this, Brudy said,
because I believe that in todays world, we
are facing such complex problems in the development of oil fields, that we cant rely on
traditional analytical, empirical methods.
We have to go one step further and use
sophisticated techniques to better understand and predict the behavior of the fields
that we are developing.
In addition, the platform can be sold to clients with a software development kit (SDK)
to allow a customers development team
to build standalone applications, or to customize a JewelSuite application by creating
add-ins for augmented functionality. Brudy
explained that this, too, is another key differentiator, as other platforms only allow users
to build on existing applications.
With the platform that we are bringing
out with JewelEarth 6, he said, clients are
able to build their own applications on the
JewelEarth platform to use internally or distribute and sell. They can also build add-ins
or additional modules to use on top of our existing JewelSuite applications. These add-ins
and applications, built with the JewelEarth 6
SDK, would be automatically integrated with
the JewelSuite family of products. Should
customers go this more customized route,
they are able to purchase additional licenses
to roll out their new technology within their
respective organizations as needed.
Brudy places the origination of the JewelSuite software in 2005. Baker Hughes
subsidiary in the Netherlands acquired 40%
of JewelSuite developer JOA Oil & Gas BV
in 2009, procuring the remaining 60% in October 2010. In 2012, Baker Hughes debuted
JewelSuite 2012 at that years Offshore Technology Conference in May. The agreement
with Shell to jointly develop the JewelSuite 6
software came soon after, in September 2013.
I think the project very nicely combines
strengths of both companies. Shell cer52 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

DFN in Mid-Cretaceous faulted reservoir, modeled by JewelSuite 6.

In Emerson Process Managements new Roxar RMS 2013.1 release, the company remains focused on the geophysical domain with enhancements to the original software and model-driven
interpretation. (Image courtesy Emerson Process Management)

Emerson introduces Roxar RMS update


Also released in mid-June, Emerson Process Management launched Roxar RMS
2013.1, an update to its RMS 2013 reservoir modeling software. The product capitalizes on its model-driven interpretation tools, aiming to improve those functions and
velocity modeling. The Stavanger, Norway-based company says that the systems
structural modeling tools more effectively quantify uncertainties in the data and
improve volumetric sensitivities. Additionally, RMS 2013.1 also sees fault uncertainty
tools integrated with structural modeling and 3D gridding, enabling users to build
fault uncertainty models in full and investigate a wide variety of scenarios corresponding to the uncertainty in the input data.
The company said that its flagship software has improved model-driven interpretation, and a redesigned SEG-Y import dialogue box. It can also read seismic data
directly from OpenWorks and OpenSpirit sources without the need to export to SEGY files.

tainly brings in a tremendous amount of the


modeling experience, and the experience
with the workflows that our customers expect for such a tool: building the structural
model, the property model, and creating a
full-field reservoir flow simulation, Brudy
said. Baker Hughes brings in a lot of the
software development expertise, and the
basic software architectural concepts, which
Shell also has.
He continued by noting that both compa-

nies offered each other deep technical expertise in their respective areas of specialization.

Collaboration with Shell


Software collaborations can be routine for
the industry, pointed out Bettina Bachmann,
vice president for Subsurface and Wells Software in Shells Projects and Technology group.
In fact, Shells collaboration with Baker Hughes
to develop JewelSuite 6 is one of many it is involved in, including an alliance with Computer

GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

Modelling Group and Petrobras, which is working on, she said the next-generation simulator.
However, she told Offshore, the Baker Hughes
and Shell alliance that produced JewelSuite 6 is
probably the biggest joint software development
effort the international operator has undertaken.
Its a bit bigger, a bit more comprehensive
than what we would normally do, but we firmly
believe that this is a good thing for us, she said.
In any collaboration, a shared vision is key.
In this case, she said that the companies shared
the goal of making a more modern, extendable
platform capable of integrating across the lifecycle.
The wheels were set in motion toward what
would eventually become the joint software
agreement with Baker Hughes when, three
years ago, Shell evaluated the portfolio it built
around static and dynamic modeling. Conclusions were drawn that while the portfolio was
a strong one, it was also very fragmented.
The first decision we made was, we wanted
something more integrated, and we wanted to
be in an environment where we can leverage
the novel algorithms coming out of our R&D
department faster and more easily, Bachmann
explained.
Additionally, the fragmented and congested
portfolio was costly to maintain, so Shell decided to find and adopt a simpler approach to

allow for greater efficiency.


The first idea is of course always, Okay, lets
just sit down and start from scratch, Bachmann
said. Now, it is a big area. It is complicated; it
is not easy to do that, and when you look at the
standard timeline, such as in this case, you were
talking about eight to 10 years plus [to develop
the product]. We decided we didnt have that.
Bachmann said that Shell was aware and
intrigued by the JewelSuite product, and after
talking with Baker Hughes, the operator realized that the relatively new, yet stable and robust product could form the basis for where we
wanted to go.
Prior to the agreement, the two companies
assembled an evaluation team with equal representation of both Shell and Baker Hughes.
Bachmann said that pilot projects were assembled to ensure that the objectives were
attainable. Other, less tangible factors were
tested as well.
We tested two things there: One was the
technology alignment and whether the potential was there to actually achieve what we were
looking for, and the second thing we tested
was the compatibility of the teams. How do the
two company cultures come together?
This was tested before we signed in 2013,
and that gave us the confidence that we could
build an alliance that had a chance to suc-

ceed, she said. Many of these alliances in the


industry dont last, and it was clear for us from
the beginning that we were going to embark
on a multi-year journey.
With the 2013 agreement, Baker Hughes
JewelSuite became the platform for which both
companies would combine their domain expertise to build upon. Bachmann said that, as an
operator, Shell brought knowledge on what the
end-user actually needs and looks for to the table.
Following the agreement, Brudy said that
a development team was assembled by Baker
Hughes as part of the contract. In its first stage,
about software developers and domain experts
gathered in Delft. Beginning in early 2014, the
team worked together to develop JewelSuite 6.
Bachmann said that Shell counts JewelSuite
6 as a success and sees greater things for the
two companies future works. This first year
was focused on maturing and expanding the
project, she explained, while future versions
will continue to address the platforms comprehensiveness and robustness.
What an operator will see is the extendibility of the applications; to bring in other
things; and then indeed they will see the first
steps towards what we want to achieve at the
end, which is full integration across the static
and dynamic modeling and, in particular, also
into geomechanics, Bachmann said.

GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

Depth domain inversion bridges the divide


between seismic imaging, rock properties
Amplitude inversion technique improves subsalt imaging
Laurence Letki
Jun Tang
Charles Inyang
Xiang Du
Robin Fletcher
Jalal Khazanehdari

Schlumberger

he quest for new sources of hydrocarbons has pushed the exploration and
production industry into more geologically complex offshore environments that impose greater challenges
on accurate geophysical reservoir characterization. While seismic acquisition and imaging techniques have made great technical
strides, a disconnect remains between the
seismic images obtained and the properties
of the rock formation.
Conventional methods of amplitude inversion assume that amplitudes in a seismic
image are correctly located and can be inverted to elastic parameters, from which an
accurate representation of rock properties
can be derived. However, complex geologiesincluding structurally complex, subsalt, and heterogeneous formationsand
limitations in surface seismic acquisition
geometries often lead to insufficient illumi-

RTM images showing the inline and crossline (left), the inline and crossline through the corresponding PSF extracted at the highlighted location (middle), and associated Kx Kz and Ky Kz spectra
showing the dip dependent illumination effects captured by the PSF (right). The estimated local
geological dip is represented by the black arrow. (All images courtesy Schlumberger)

nation of subsurface targets. Conventional


amplitude inversion techniques cannot
compensate for the resulting amplitude and
phase variations of the migrated image. As
a result, imprints of various non-geological
effects and complex overburdens will carry
over into the seismic inversion results, leading to less reliable estimation of acoustic and
elastic parameters.

Further complicating amplitude inversion


in complex geologic environments is that
while depth imaging is normally required
to obtain a reliable image of the subsurface,
current amplitude inversion techniques are
typically implemented in the time domain.
This difference in approach between the
imaging and inversion steps often compromises the fidelity of the attributes derived
from seismic inversion.
As a result, current inversion techniques
only provide information on subsurface
structure, but no accurate estimates of rock
properties such as lithology and porosity.
The operator has to make drilling decisions
with a high degree of uncertainty regarding
prospectivity and volume estimation of the
reservoir, and ultimately, the true economic
potential of the well.

Depth domain inversion

Representative RTM images with source illumination compensation (left) compared to equivalent
reflectivity images output from the depth domain inversion (right). Black rectangles in the top and
middle sections outline high-and low-amplitude areas in the RTM image that have more balanced
amplitudes in the reflectivity image. A comparison of the areas highlighted in the black ovals in the
bottom panels demonstrates how structural interpretation can be significantly improved after depth
domain inversion.

54 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Schlumberger has recently developed a


depth domain inversion technique aimed at
improving the consistency between structural imaging and rock property estimation.
The technique performs amplitude inversion
directly in the depth domain, with a workflow that uses point spread functions (PSF)
to capture and correct for space-, depth-, and
dip-dependent illumination effects resulting

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GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

The amplitude extracted around the target


horizon on the RTM image shows a strong imprint of the illumination effects (left), while the
amplitude extracted around the target horizon
on the reflectivity image (right) shows a better
consistency of the amplitudes with the structure
of the horizon.

from the acquisition geometry and complex


geology. The PSFs represent the spatially
and depth-variant 3D wavelet embedded
in a migrated image, which replaces the
1D wavelet used in conventional amplitude
inversion techniques. The output of this
new technique is a reflectivity image and
associated acoustic impedance volume corrected for illumination effects, which results
in more consistent and reliable imaging
products and rock property attributes from
depth migrated datasets.

Tackling challenges
Several areas of the Gulf of Mexico present severe imaging challenges related to the
presence of thick salt sheets with complex
morphology. Modeling studies suggest that
adequate subsalt imaging in these areas requires both full-azimuth (FAZ) coverage and
long source-receiver offsets. Schlumberger
acquired and processed more than 30,000
sq km (11,583 sq mi) of long-offset (up to 14
km, or 8 mi) FAZ data equivalent to nearly
1,300 outer continental shelf blocks as
part of a multi-client survey program in the

Green Canyon area of the deepwater GoM.


The data was acquired using the
Schlumberger Dual Coil Shooting mulitvessel full-azimuth acquisition design, in which
two recording vessels are deployed with
their own sources and with two separate
source vessels, all sailing in large interlinked
circles. In addition to providing 360 subsurface illumination, this configuration yields a
trace density that is roughly 2.5 times that of
current wide-azimuth survey designs, which
improves signal-to-noise ratio for improved
imaging of weak subsalt reflections. It enables the interpretation of subsalt horizons
on a reverse time migration (RTM) image.
A part of the dataset from the K2 area of
the multi-client survey was studied in further detail. The geological complexity of
the salt overburden in this study area led to
highly variable levels of illumination, which
subsequently negatively impacted the amplitudes and phase of the migrated image. Further analysis of amplitudes extracted along
certain horizons showed a correlation with
variations in illumination, with areas that are
well illuminated with a wide range of offsets

and azimuths corresponding to higher amplitudes. Conversely, areas illuminated with


a narrower range of offsets and azimuths
corresponded to low amplitude areas along
the key horizon.
Conventional amplitude inversion techniques are not equipped to compensate for
these variations in amplitude or phase. The
imprint of non-geological effects such as illumination in the results of seismic inversion
severely limited quantitative interpretation.
As a result, any attributes derived from amplitudes in the seismic image volume would
fail to accurately represent the properties of
the corresponding lithology.

Applying the workflow


The new depth domain inversion workflow was applied to the test dataset, with the
objective of creating more reliable seismic
inversion attributes that were also more
consistent with the depth imaging products.
The key input to the workflow was a grid
of PSFs, which represent the spatially and
depth variant 3D wavelet embedded in the
migrated image and captures the dip depen-

Top: Example RTM image with source illumination compensation (left) compared to reflectivity
image output from the depth domain inversion
(right). The lower panels show acoustic impedance volumes from the time domain inversion
(left) and depth domain inversion (right), annotated with an interpretation of a key horizon.
A comparison of the areas highlighted in the
black ovals in the top panels demonstrates how
structural interpretation can be significantly
improved after depth domain inversion. The
same area is highlighted in the bottom panels to
highlight how quantitative interpretation is also
improved after depth domain inversion. (Using
data property of and provided courtesy of IHS
Energy Log Services, Inc.)

56 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS

dent illumination effects due to acquisition geometry and complex


geology. In other terms, the migrated image obtained from the FAZ
acquisition can be interpreted as the true reflectivity convolved
with a blurring operator represented by the PSFs.
The information captured by the PSFs can be correlated with the
amplitude and phase variations observed along the target horizon.
The first image presents representative inline and crossline displays through the RTM volume. The PSF corresponding to an area
with lower amplitudes has been extracted and analyzed. The KxKz
and KyKz spectra of this PSF illustrate strong dip dependence, with
the geological dip estimated from the RTM image (shown overlaid
on the spectra of the corresponding PSF) lying at the edge of the
illuminated dip range. This example observation confirms the effects of variable illumination on the RTM image.

Results

Representative RTM images using source illumination compensation when compared with reflectivity image output from the
depth domain inversion shows that the inversion has improved the
continuity of major events, delivered an overall sharper image, and
revealed details of minor events previously unseen.
The amplitudes extracted along the key horizon from the reflectivity image also appear more balanced. An amplitude analysis confirms that the amplitudes are less impacted by variable
illumination, and more consistent with the subsurface structure.
This leads to an increased confidence that these amplitudes can
be used to derive more reliable acoustic properties. It should be
noted that in areas of very low illumination, the amplitudes on the
reflectivity image remain low, as the signal-to-noise ratio is insufficient for adequate illumination compensation. Another limitation
of the inversion results appears around high acoustic impedance
contrasts, such as the salt boundaries in this case study. The PSF
discontinuity across such a high contrast boundary is very high
and a simple interpolation of the PSFs is not appropriate. In this
situation, a more sophisticated interpolation scheme, a denser PSF
grid, or a combination of both is required.
The workflow also produced an acoustic impedance volume corrected for the imprint of the acquisition geometry and complex
overburden, enabling an improved structural and quantitative interpretation compared to the time domain inversion.

Conclusions

The depth domain inversion workflow illustrated in this article


used point spread functions to capture dip-dependent effects related to acquisition geometry and complex geology. The amplitude
inversion was performed in the depth domain and the output was a
reflectivity image and acoustic impedance volume corrected for illumination effects. This provided better event continuity, a sharper
image, and more reliable amplitude information leading to higher fidelity acoustic impedance results. This enables an improved
structural and quantitative interpretation compared to the time domain inversion.
This workflow can also be extended to include more sophisticated physics in the generation of the PSFs, such as incorporating
ghost effects or attenuation effects. Including such aspects within
the inversion provides a mechanism to produce an even higher fidelity inversion result.

ENHANCING TECHNOLOGY THROUGH

ENGINEERING DESIGN &


PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

offshore@nylacast.com
www.nylacast.com/offshore

Stand 4A160

DRILLING & COMPLETION

MWD/LWD advances should help


boost a depressed market

Dick Ghiselin

Contributing Editor

New improvements include multi-tool combinability

ne sector that seems to be retaining


its strength in the face of depressed
prices is the measurement-whiledrilling and the logging-while-drilling (MWD/LWD) market. The drilling business is somewhat propped up by the
requirement to drill on new leases or lose
them. However, the requirement to drill
or die is likely only a temporary respite as
many operators prove their undrilled leases,
but do not invest in new ones. A notable
exception is deepwater offshore, where millions have been invested in very promising
prospects. It is hard to see how an operator
could turn his back on a prospect that he
had already invested multimillions of dollars
to secure. Development time for deepwater
offshore fields can take a decade or more.
For its part, the service industry knows that
it must invest in new technology whose principle objectives are cost-reduction, dry hole
reduction, and/or improvement of field recovery factors. And they have achieved some notable successes in delivering on these results.

As extended-reach drilling (ERD) gains in


popularity, the ability to control toolface and
MWD strings has taken a prominent position.
Drillers of ERD wells must be able to send
commands to drilling tools and obtain confirmation that they have been properly received
and acted upon. With some ERD wells extending more than 7.5 mi (12 km) from the surface
location, the ability to reliably steer becomes
the most critical capability to ensure the well is
landed precisely in the target formation.
The gap between MWD and LWD tool
systems has recently been narrowed with development of a telemetry/geosteering device
that allows operators to choose the measurements it needs to manage the cost/price gap
between minimum acceptable steering performance and maximum desired savings. By
equipping the tool with two gamma ray detectorsone measuring total azimuthal gamma
ray and the other measuring natural gamma
spectroscopya rich data set that can facilitate steering while yielding mineralogy and
360 gamma images has evolved.

Defining MWD and LWD

The rest of the story

MWD is defined as measurements whose


principle objective is improving drilling efficiency.
Considerable progress has been made in
this area, with major developments in measurements that extend bit life. Any time an
operator can drill a section in a single bit trip
is money in the bank. Accordingly, the ability
to measure and transmit in real-time downhole weight-on-bit, downhole torque, four-axis
vibration, direction and inclination and annular pressure, can enable maximum drilling efficiency. So important is eliminating excessive
bit trips that the ability transcends increased
penetration rate as the chief money-saver.
Recently, a major improvement in MWD
electronics design has extended downhole
instrument temperature ratings by as much
as 20%. The initial application of this technology was made on rotary-steerable and
telemetry systems, upping their ratings to
200C (392F). This improvement has significant benefit in extending the range of
high-pressure/high-temperature drilling to
access deep, hot reservoirs.
58 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

LWD is defined as measurements whose


principle objective is finding and evaluating
commercial reserves, enabling them to be
produced cost-effectively, and/or extending
their productive life.
Fundamental among these is geosteering.
The ability to use real-time measurements to
identify target reservoirs and land the borehole
precisely in them is well worth its cost, particularly when you consider the alternative. The
latest development in this area is an electromagnetic measurement that defines a sphere
around the borehole 200 ft (61 m) in diameter.
Not only does this measurement provide plenty
of time to make and execute a steering decision
to hit a sweet spot, but it can also spot geohazards so they can be avoided. In a recent job
offshore Brazil, the tool enabled the borehole
to steer through three unconnected reservoirs,
stringing them like beads on a necklace so all
could be exploited with a single well.
Advances in other LWD services include
look-ahead seismic-while-drilling tools that
can detect geo-pressured zones before drilling into them, in plenty of time to adjust mud

weight or set a protective liner. These also provide a more precise time-to-depth correlation
for conventional surface seismic surveys.
Another valuable advance that has been
around for several years includes a multifunction formation evaluation LWD collar
that can produce a compensated azimuthal
formation density/neutron log along with
elemental capture spectroscopy and sigma
without a chemical radioactive source.
Formation pressure-while-drilling tools
are offered by several service suppliers.
One supplier has introduced a commercial
formation fluid sample-taker while drilling.
Perhaps one of the most valuable MWD/
LWD advances is multi-tool combinability.
This allows a full petrophysical analysis to be
made using data from a single descent into the
well, with the added advantage of real-time
telemetry. Multi-tool combinations can also
benefit from the replacement of downhole batteries with mud turbine power generators. By
taking formation measurements almost immediately after the formation is drilled, the effects
of mud filtrate contamination are minimized.
Using combination strings to geosteer enables
operators to drill close to formation tops to access attic oil, that was previously overlooked.
At the same time, they can avoid drilling to
close to oil/water contacts where water coning can result. The combination allows them
to design completions that produce maximum
hydrocarbons from each reservoir.
Over the years since the introduction of LWD
measurements, its log quality has rivalled that
of wireline logs, long recognized as the standard excellence in formation evaluation. The
tensile strength of drill pipe, and the ability to
maintain mud circulation and desired bottomhole equivalent circulating density, has greatly
reduced fishing incidents. In this months issue, Offshore publishes its annual MWD/LWD
report and capability tables. Often viewed as an
expensive alternative only to be used when all
else has failed, MWD/LWD technology has
enabled formations to be drilled and evaluated
safely, and thoroughly. Significant cost savings
are routinely realized by users of the technology, who value the timely acquisition of relevant
well information while maintaining well control
and circulation.

Multiply your returns.

Increase your ROI through better wells, optimized production, and improved
recovery rates.
As the completions leader, we are relentless. And we deliver results. We can help you:
Eliminate post-frac milling in unconventionals with interventionless solutions
Maximize reservoir drainage with advanced surveillance and control
Increase recovery from frontier plays with the industrys first integrated
ultradeepwater system
Call us or visit BakerHughes.com/CompletionsLeader to multiply your returns
with innovative completion solutions.
+44 2070 483646 or +1 713-268-6218
2015 Baker Hughes Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. 43115 07/2015

To download the full survey free of charge, please visit our website: www.offshore-mag.com

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2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Directional

APS Technology (Rental Division) Brian Stroehlein 7 Laser Lane Wallingford, CT 06492 (860) 613-4450 bstroehlein@aps-tech.com
APS SureShot

3 1/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/4,
6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2+

25*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


(3 1/2) 27,
175
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6,
(8) 3,
(9 1/2) 2

(3 1/2) 150,
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 35,
(8) 20,
(9 1/2) 10

(6 1/2 - 6 3/4) 114,


(8) 61,
(9 1/2) 32

(9 1/2) 220

(3 1/8, 3 1/2) 70 - 250


(4 3/4) 150 - 350
(6 1/4, 6 3/4) 150- 750
(8) 300 - 1,100
(9 1/2+) 650 - 1,200

APS SureShot with Gamma

3 1/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/4,
6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2+

29*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


(3 1/2) 29,
175
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6,
(8) 3,
(9 1/2) 2

(3 1/2) 165,
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 40,
(8) 20,
(9 1/2) 10

(6 1/2 - 6 3/4) 114,


(8) 61,
(9 1/2) 32

(9 1/2) 225

(3 1/8, 3 1/2) 70 - 250


(4 3/4) 150 - 350
(6 1/4, 6 3/4) 150- 750
(8) 300 - 1,100
(9 1/2+) 650 - 1,200

APS SureShot Gamma + WPR 3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8


Propagation Resistivity

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

APS SureSteer 475-rss Rotary 4 3/4 (blades and


Steerable System (RSS)
stabilizers for 6 and 6
3/4 holes)

32.4

21, 15.
Programmable build rates of 0.5
to 12.0. Also, vertical and tangent
angle hold modes.

150

20

200 psi @ 350


gal/min

150 - 350 gal/min

APS SureSteer 675-rsm Rotary


6 3/4
Steerable Motor (RSM)
(blades and stabilizers
for 8 3/8, 8 1/2 and 8
3/4 holes)

17*

15, 12.
Programmable build rates of 0.5
to 8.0. Also, vertical and tangent
angle hold modes.

150

20

250 psi @ 600


gal/min

300 - 600 gal/min

Baker Hughes

Configurationdependent

Dana Morrison - 2929 Allen Parkway, Suite 2100, Houston, TX 77019, (713) 439-8254, dana.morrison@bakerhughes.com / AskDrillingServices@bakerhughes.com

AutoTrak Curve rotary steerable

6 3/4

37.8

30/15

BHA Dependent

150

20

N/A

N/A

Application Specific

N/A

300 - 750

AutoTrak 3.0 rotary steerable

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

13.3 (4 3/4)
15.4 (6 3/4)
18.9 (8 1/4)
20.0 (9 1/2)

30/10 (4 3/4)
20/13 (6 3/4)
9/6.5 (8 1/4)
13/6.5 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150
175
(option)

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
0 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AutoTrak X-treme rotary


steerable & mud motor

4 3/4
6 3/4
9 1/2

35.0 (4 3/4)
35.5 (6 3/4)
43.9 (9 1/2)

25/10 (4 3/4)
16/7 (6 3/4)
8/3.8 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150
175
(option
6 3/4 &
9 1/2)

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
0 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AutoTrak eXpress rotary


steerable

4 3/4
6 3/4
9 1/2

56.8 (4 3/4)
58.2 (6 3/4)
70 (6 3/4 high DLS)
64.6 (9 1/2)

30/10 (4 3/4)
23/8 (6 3/4)
23/12 (6 3/4 high DLS option)
13/6.5 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AutoTrak V vertical drilling


rotary steerable

4 3/4
6 3/4
9 1/2

23.1 (4 3/4)
19.7 (6 3/4)
22.3 (9 1/2)

30/10 (4 3/4)
23/8 (6 3/4)
13/6.5 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150
175
(option
6 3/4 &
9 1/2)

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

UltraSlim directional &


gamma ray

3 1/8

26.4

50 (sliding)
BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

N/A

N/A

N/A

79 - 180

CoilTrak directional &


gamma ray

2 3/8
3

49.5 (includes motor)

50 (2 3/8 sliding only)


45 (3 sliding only)

150

14.5

Application
Specific

N/A

N/A

N/A

0 - 80 (2 3/8)
0 - 210 (3)

CoilTrak RSM rib-steered motor

19.6

10 (sliding only)

150

14.5

Application
Specific

N/A

N/A

N/A

40 - 120

GyroTrak gyroscopic MWD

6 3/4 (OnTrak)
8 1/4 (OnTrak)
9 1/2 (OnTrak)
3 1/8 (NaviTrak)
4 3/4 (NaviTrak)
6 3/4 (NaviTrak)

16.0 (OnTrak)
29.0 (NaviTrak)

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

See OnTrak & NaviTrak

NaviTrak directional &


gamma ray

3 1/8
4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

BHA Dependent

50/16 (3 1/8)
25/7 (4 3/4)
12.5/6.5 (6 3/4)
10.5/4.5 (8 1/4)
7/3.5 (9 1/2)
70/21 (3 1/8 flex)
82/21 (4 3/4 flex)
23/9.5 (6 3/4 flex)

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

75 - 175 (3 1/8)
105 - 350 (4 3/4)
210 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,350 (8 1/4)
450 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

OnTrak integrated formation


evaluation

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

31.3 (4 3/4)
27.7 (6 3/4)
30.7 (8 1/4)
30.2 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

150
175
(optional
4 3/4, 6
3/4 & 9
1/2)

25 (4 3/4 6
3/4 8 1/4 9
1/2)
30
(optional 4
3/4 and 6
3/4)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AziTrak azimuthal resistivity

4 3/4
6 3/4

44.6 (4 3/4)
32.8 (6 3/4)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)

150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)

E-MTrak directional &


gamma ray

4 3/4
6 1/2

18.5

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 660 (6 1/2)

TruTrak non-rotating steering

4 3/4
6 3/4
8
9 1/2

28.3 (4 3/4)
31.0 (6 3/4)
36.1 (8)
36.1 (9 1/2); excluding MWD

5 (4 3/4)
3 (6 3/4)
2 (8)
2 (9 1/2)

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 317 (4 3/4)


264 - 660 (6 3/4)
395 - 900 (8)
528 - 1,162 (9 1/2)

TeleTrak LCM-tolerant MWD

4 3/4
6 1/2
6 3/4

44.5 (4 3/4)
39.8 (6 1/2, 6 3/4)

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

120 - 350 (4 3/4)


240 - 750 (6 1/2, 6 3/4)

SureTrak steerable drilling liner

4 3/4 (7 liner)
6 3/4 (9 5/8 liner)

BHA Dependent

3 (rotating only)

BHA Dependent

150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)

60 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

BHA Dependent

DrilTech LLC

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2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Brad Vincent - 248 Rousseau Road, Youngsville, LA 70592, (337) 837-1219, brad.vincent@driltech.net

Positive Pulse MWD Probe


Based

GE Oil & Gas

1 7/8 tool OD, 3.5-8

18-25

60/30

As applicable to standard NMDC

150 175

20 (137
mpa)

50 (NMDC
dependent)

100 (NMDC dependent) 150 (NMDC dependent)

N/A

(3 1/2) 50-130, (4 3/4)


130-300, (6 3/4) 235-600,
(8) 400-800

Chau Nguyen - 4424 W. Sam Houston Parkway N. 10th Floor, Houston, TX 77041, (713) 458 3629, chau.nguyen@ge.com

Pilot

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 1/2,


8, 9 1/2

Shortest probe length 17.8

(4 3/4) 30/15
(6 3/4) 21/10
(8) 14/8
(9 1/2) 7/4

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81, (6 3/4) 6.71x2.81, (8)


7.93x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.42x2.81

150

20

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 8

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 47

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 153

(9 1/2) 450

130-1,060

Tensor

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 1/2,


8, 9 1/2

Shortest probe length 25.2

(3 1/2) 100/50
(4 3/4) 30/15
(6 3/4) 21/10
(8) 14/8
(9 1/2) 7/4

(3 1/2) 2.96x2.25, (4 3/4) 4.75x2.81, (6 3/4)


6.71x4.00, (8) 7.93x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.42x4.00

175

20

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 39

(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 127

(9 1/2) 373

75-1,200

Directional Electro-Trac
EM MWD

4 3/4, 6 1/2, 6
3/4, 7 3/4

25.5 (adjusted to Monel


length)

collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

25

100

100

100

50-1,200

Gyrodata

Mark Miller 23000 Northwest Lake Drive Houston, TX 77095 (281) 213-6300 markm@gyrodata.com

Gyrodata Positive Pulse MWD

3 1/2, 4 3/4 , 5 1/4,


6 1/2, 6 3/4,
8 1/4, 9 1/2

23

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

25

400 (2.25ID)
350 (2.69 ID) 300
(2.813ID)

N/A
425 (2.69ID)
400 (2.813ID)
375 (3.25ID)
340 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
525 (2.813ID)
425 (3.25ID)
400 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600(3.75ID)

3 1/2= 86-170
4 3/4 = 106-358
5 1/4 = 106-358
6 1/2 = 179-475
6 3/4 =179 -701
8 1/4 = 419-800
9 1/2 = 419-1,232

Gyrodata Positive Pulse


Retrievable MWD

3 1/2 , 4 3/4, 5 1/4


6 1/2, 6 3/4, 8 1/4,
9 1/2

18

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

400 (2.25ID)
350 (2.69 ID) 300
(2.813ID)

N/A
425 (2.69ID)
400 (2.813ID)
375 (3.25ID)
340 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
525 (2.813ID)
425 (3.25ID)
400 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600 (3.75ID)

3 1/2= 80-170
4 3/4 = 100-400
5 1/4 = 100-400
6 1/2 = 120-475
6 3/4 =120-701
8 1/4 = 400-800
9 1/2 = 400-1,300

GWD90

3 3/4, 4 3/4, 5 1/4


6 1/2, 6 3/4, 8 1/4,
9 1/2

48

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

500 (2.25ID)
400 (2.688 ID)
350 (2.8125ID)

N/A
475 (2.69ID) 45
(2.813 ID)
400 (3.25 ID)

N/A
N/A
550 (2 813ID)
450 (3.25ID) 425
(3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600 (3.75ID)

3 3/4= 80-150
4 3/4 = 106-358
5 1/4 =106-358
6 1/2 =179-450
6 3/4 =179-701
8 1/4 =419-800
9 1/2 = 419-1,232

Directional EM MWD

3 3/4, 4 3/4, 6 1/2,


6 3/4, 7 3/4

25.5 (adjusted to Monel


length)

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

25

100

100

100

50-1,200

N/A

N/A

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling Billy Hendricks - P.O. Box 60070, Houston, Texas 77205, (281) 871-5396, billy.hendricks@halliburton.com
Electromagnetic Telemetry
System

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 1/2

(3 1/2) 33.9, (4 3/4) 33.5, (6


1/2) 35.6 (t)

35/14

(3 1/2 flex) 2.9x1.5, (4 3/4 flex) 4.06x2.25, (6


1/2 flex) 4.63x2.81

150

15

Negative Pulse Telemetry


System

6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

9.2

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8, 9 1/2) 14/8

(6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8) 7.76x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.35x3

150

18 std., 25
opt.

(3 1/2) 171, (4 3/4) 139, (4 3/4) 400, (6 1/2) 150


(6 1/2) 40

Positive Pulse Telemetry


System

3 3/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/2, 6 3/4, 7 1/4,
8, 9 1/2

(3 3/8, 3 1/2) 21, (4 3/4 - 9


1/2) 26

(3 3/8 - 4 3/4) 30/14, (6 1/2 - 7


1/4) 21/10, (7 3/4 - 9 1/2) 14/8

(3 3/8) 3.21x1.5, (3 1/2) 3.35x1.5, (4 3/4)


4.66x2.25, (6 1/2 - 9 1/2) Equivalent to a
standard NMDC

Quasar Pulse

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 26.9, (6 3/4) 25.2

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

(4 3/4) TBD, (6 3/4) TBD

200

25

MWD Gyro

6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

25.8

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8) 14/8, (9


1/2) 14/8

Equivalent to standard NMDC

150

20

150

20

40

80

150

(6 3/4, 8) 17, (9 1/2) 4

150 std. 20, 22.5, (3 3/8, 3 1/2) 120


175
25, 30
at 150 gal/min
opt.
TBD

(4 3/4) 140

(6 3/4, 8) 31, (9 1/2) 7 (6 3/4, 8) 182, (9 1/2) 36

(x)

170

380

(3 3/8, 3 1/2) 90-200, (4 3/4)


150-350, (6 1/2 -9 1/2) 225650, (7 1/4 - 9 1/2) 400-1,500

(4 3/4) 36 at 350 gpm

(6 3/4) 74 at 500 gpm

N/A

(4 3/4) 150-350, (6 3/4)


225-650

(6 3/4, 8) 17, (9 1/2) 4

(6 3/4, 8) 31, (9 1/2) 7 (6 3/4, 8) 182, (9 1/2) 36

225-1,500

MWD Services LLC. Clyde Cormier - P O Box 750, or 219 Griffin Rd, Youngsville, LA 70592, (337) 856-5965, ccormier@mwdsi.com
MWD Shuttle

1 7/8 tool OD, 3


1/8 - 9 1/2

22.7 w/single battery, 29.1 w/


dual battery

60/30

As applicable to standard NMDC

75-1,000

Ryan Directional Services Steve Krase - 19510 Oil Center Blvd., Houston, TX 77073, (281) 443-1414, steve.krase@nabors.com
Ryan EM

4 3/4
6.5
6 3/4

34

(4 3/4) 75 / 20 (6 3/4)
28/11

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81 (6 3/4) 6.71x3.25

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

47

153

450

(4 3/4) 100-350 (6 3/4)


150-800

Ryan Pulse MWD

3 1/8
4 3/4
6.5
6 3/4
8
9.5

20-30

(3 1/8) 100/ 50
(4 3/4) 40 / 15
(6 3/4) 28/11
(8) 15/9
(9.5) 8/ 5

(3 1/8) 2.96x2.25 (4 3/4) 4.75x2.81 (6 3/4)


6.71x3.25 (8) 7.93x4.00 (9.5) 9.42x4.00

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

47

153

450

(3 1/8) 50-175 (4 3/4)


100-350 (6 3/4) 150-800 (8)
400-925 (9 1/2) 400-1,200

Navigate AccuPulse

4 3/4, 6 1/2, 8

(4 3/4) 10, ( 6 1/2 & 8) 10 As applicable to standard NMDC

As applicable to standard NMDC

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

N/A

60

125

N/A

225-1,000

Navigate AccuWave (EMMWD)

4 3/4, 6 1/2 & 8

(4 3/4) 10, (6 1/2 & 8) 10

As applicable to standard NMDC

As applicable to standard NMDC

175C

20

N/A

60

125

N/A

225-1,000

DynaForce Flex
Shale Drilling Motor

Depends on the Power


sections to be used.
Bit box to fix bend: 3.5ft

As per motor specification for


bend setting

175

30

Dependent on
specific model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

200 - 800

PowerDrive X6
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8
1/4, 9, 11

(4 3/4) 13.65, (6 3/4 )


13.47, (8 1/4 , 9 ) 14.07,
(11 ) 15.22

(4 3/4 , 6 3/4) 8, (8 1/4 ) 6, (9


) 5, (11 ) 3

(475) 11.5; (675) 14.7; (900) 15.0; (1100) 18.0

150
20 std, It varies with the
std., 175 30 opt. (4 Mud Design and
opt.
3/4),
Tool Sizes
35 opt.
(6 3/4, 8
1/4)

It varies with the Mud


Design and Tool Sizes

It varies with the Mud


Design and Tool Sizes

It varies with the Mud


Design and Tool Sizes

100-2,000

PowerDrive Orbit
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4 , 6 3/4, 9

(4 3/4) 13.50, (6 3/4 ) 13.53,


( 9 ) 14.00

(4 3/4 , 6 3/4) 8, (9 ) 5

(475) 11.5; (675) 14.7; (900) 15.0

150
20 std,
std., 175 30 opt. (4
opt.
3/4),
35 opt.
(6 3/4, 8
1/4)

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

100-2,000

PowerDrive ICE ultraHT


Rotary Steerable Tool

6 3/4

(6 3/4) 34.26

( 6 3/4) 16

(675) 14.7

275 - 800

PowerDrive Archer
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 14.98, (6 3/4) 16.64

Capability (/100 ft) : (4 3/4,


6 3/4) 18
Pass Through (/100 ft): (6
3/4) , >15 Based on fatigue
management

Power Drive Xceed


Rotary Steerable Tool

6 3/4, 9

(6 3/4) 25, (9) 28

Capability (/100 ft) : (6 3/4)


8, (9) 6.5
Pass Through (/100 ft): (6 3/4)
15/8, (9) 12/6.5

Schlumberger

(675) 31.0; (900) 35.9

200

30

N/A

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

N/A

150

20

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

220-650

150

20

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

290-1,800

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 61

PowerV
Vertical drilling
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8
1/4, 9, 11

(4 3/4) 13.65, (6 3/4) 13.47,


(8 1/4, 9) 14.07, (11) 15.22

PowerDrive vorteX Xceed

6 3/4, 9

PowerDrive vorteX

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
era
Ma
tur
x.
e(
op
C
.p
)
res
s,
kp
si
Pre
s
10 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Eq
uiv
ale
nt
be
nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
ng
, ro 100
tat ft
ion
)

ft
Le
ng
th,

To
ol
OD
, in
.

Se
rvi
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)

sti
ffn
es
s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Capability (/100 ft) : (4 3/4, (475) 11.5; (675) 14.7; (900) 15.0; (1,100) 18.0 150
20 std,
6 3/4, 8 1/4) 8, (9) 5, (11) 4
std., 175 30 opt. (4
Pass Through (/100 ft): (4 3/4)
opt.
3/4),
30/15, (6 3/4, 8.25, 9) 20/10,
35 opt.
(11) 15/8
(6 3/4, 8
1/4)

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

100-2,000

Depends on the Power


Section to be used

Capability (/100 ft) : (6 3/4)


8, (9) 6.5
Pass Through (/100 ft): (6 3/4)
15/8, (9) 12/6.5

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

290-1,800

4 3/4 , 6 3/4, 8
1/4, 9, 11

Depends on the Power


Section to be used

Capability (/100 ft) : (4 3/4 , 6


3/4) 8, (8 1/4, 9) 6, (11) 3
Pass Through (/100 ft): (4 3/4)
30/15, (6 3/4 , 8 1/4, 9) 20/10,
(11) 15/8

Depends Mud
Design and Tool
Sizes

Depends Mud Design


and Tool Sizes

Depends Mud Design Depends Mud Design and


and Tool Sizes
Tool Sizes

130 - 2,000

PowerPak ERT high


performance positive
displacement motors

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 5/8

17.3 (4 3/4), 16.3 (6 3/4),


30.2 (8), 30 (9 5/8)

As per motor specification for


bend setting

175

30

Dependent on
specific model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

125-325 (4 3/4), 300-650 (6


3/4), 300-900 (8), 600-1,200
(9 5/8)

PowerPak HR higher torque


positive displacement motors

4 3/4, 6 3/4,7, 8, 9
5/8, 11 1/4

Dependent on specific model

As per motor specification for


bend setting

175

30

Dependent on
specific model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

Dependent on specific
model

125-325 (4 3/4), 300-600


(6 3/4 and 7), 300-900 (8),
600-1,200 (9 5/8), 800-1,800
(11 1/4)

ImPulse

4.75

32

30/15

4.75x2.25x38.5

150
20 std.,
std., 175 27.5 opt.
opt.

N/A

125 (varies with


Modulator gap)

N/A

N/A

130-400

ShortPulse

4.75

27.3

30/15

4.75x2.25x34.8
-OR- 4.59x2.25x30.3

150
std., 175
opt.

N/A

125 (varies with


Modulator gap)

N/A

N/A

130-400

DigiScope

4.75

29.9

30/15

30.7 (9.4) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

150 std. 25 std., 30 75 (varies with


opt.
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

N/A

N/A

150-400

TeleScope

6 3/4, 8 1/4, 9, 9 1/2

24.7

(6 3/4) 16/8
(8 1/4) 12/7
(9, 9 1/2) 10/6

(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x31.5
(8 1/4) 8x2.81x26.2
(9 1/4) 9.25x3x28
(9 1/2) 9.5x3.5x26.2

150 25 std., 30
std., 175
opt.
opt.

(6 3/4) 56
(6 3/4) 151
(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 595 (varies
(8 1/4) 32 (varies with (8 1/4, 9 1/2) 84 (varies
with modulator gap)
modulator gap)
with modulator gap)

TeleScope ICE

4 3/4

31.9

30/15

31.9 (9.7) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

75 (varies with
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

TeleScope ICE

6 3/4

31.4

15/8

32.5 (9.9) of 6.75 OD x 2.81 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

N/A

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


300 (varies with Mud
weight and Modulator weight and Modulator gap)
gap)

SlimPulse

1 3/4 tool OD
3 1/8 to 9 1/2 collars

Collar based probe


normally 30

(4 3/4 and smaller) 145/40


(6 3/4) 28/10
(8 1/4) 20/8
(9 1/2) 19/7

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81x33
(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x32

150
std., 175
opt.

22

(4 3/4) 68
(6 3/4) 16

(6 3/4) 100
(8 1/4) 18

(6 3/4) 324
(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 58

(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 411

Multiple configurations:
35-1,200

GyroPulse

6 3/4,8 1/4, 9, 9 1/2

(6 3/4) 16/8
(8 1/4) 12/7
(9, 9 1/2) 10/6

(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x31.5
(8 1/4) 8x2.81x26.2
(9 1/4) 9.25x3x28
(9 1/2) 9.5x3.5x26.2

(8 1/4) 8.25x3.5x26.2 (9) 9x3.5x28 (9 1/2)


9.5x3.5x26.2

150

25

N/A

N/A

26

(6 3/4) 250-800
(8 1/4) 300-1,200
(8 1/4) opt. 800-1,400
(9 1/2) 400-2,000
(9 1/2) opt. 400-1,600

149
Core, V

25
Core, V

20

35

55

N/A

1,800

175
Heat

30 Heat

149
Core, V

25
Core, V

20

35

55

N/A

1,500

Weatherford

150

20

150 std., 20 std,


175 opt. 30 opt. (4
(4 3/4.
3/4),
6 3/4, 8 35 opt.
1/4)
(6 3/4, 8
1/4)

20

N/A

N/A

(6 3/4) 250-800
(8 1/4) 300-1,200
(8 1/4) opt. 800-1,400
(9 1/2) 400-2,000
(9 1/2) opt. 400-1,600
150-400

275-800

Jeff Percival - 15710 John F. Kennedy Blvd., Houston, TX 77032, (Jeff.Percival@weatherford.com)

Revolution 950 rotary steerable OD: 9.50 ID: 2.75


system (Core, Heat, V)

24.89

Revolution 825 rotary steerable OD: 8.25 ID: 2.75


system (Core, Heat, V)

17.8

7.5

175
Heat

30 Heat

Revolution 675 rotary steerable OD: 6.75 ID: 2.0


system (16)

20.18

16

149
standard
175
optional

25

20

35

55

N/A

750

Revolution 675 rotary steerable OD: 6.75 ID: 2.0


system (Core, Heat, V)

14.8

10

149
Core, V

25
Core, V

20

35

55

N/A

750

175
Heat

30 Heat

149
Core, V

25
Core, V

20

35

55

N/A

350

Revolution 475 rotary


steerable system (Core,
Heat, V)

OD: 4.75
ID: 1.25

12.9

10

175
Heat

30 Heat

Revolution 475 rotary


steerable system (SRT)

OD: 4.75
ID: 1.25

63.94

3 rotating to 12 sliding

165
operating

30

150-360

Revolution 650 rotary


steerable system (SRT)

OD: 6.50
ID: 2.00

64.5

3 rotating to 12 sliding

165
operating

30

200-500

Revolution 675 rotary


steerable system (SRT)

OD: 6.75
ID: 2.00

64.99

3 rotating to 12 sliding

165
operating

30

200-600

Revolution 825 rotary


steerable system (SRT)

OD: 8.25
ID: 2.75

65.42

3 rotating to 12 sliding

165
operating

30

EMpulse (Electromagnetic
MWD)

All sizes

(3 1/16) 28.4, (4 3/4) 33.1,


(6 3/4) 34.8, (8) 35.4,
(9 1/2) 36.4

(3 1/6) 116/38, (4 3/4) 25/16,


(6 1/4) 20/14, (6 3/4) 18/13, (8)
15/10, (9 1/2) 14/7.5

(3-1/16) 3.06x2.16, (3-3/8) 3.38x2.16, (4-3/4)


4.53x2.25, (6-3/4) 6.59x2.81, (8) 7.78x2.81,
(9-1/2) 9.69x3

150

15

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8, 8-1/4, (4-3/4) 19.5, (6-3/4) 19.7,


9-1/2
(8-1/4) 20.0, (9-1/2) 20.0

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8, (8,


8-1/4) 14/7, (9-1/2) 12/6

(4-3/4) 4.75x3.22, (6-3/4) 6.75x4.20, (8-1/4)


8.25x5.17, (9-1/2) 9.50x5.16

HEL (Hostile Environment


Logging)

300-900
(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3
1/2) 50

150 std. (4.75, 6.75, (4 3/4) 12, (6


180 8) 20 std., 3/4, 8) 2, (8 1/4,
opt.
30 opt.
9-1/2) 1
(8.25, 9.5)
20 std., 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 64, (6 3/4, 8) 9,


(8 1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6 3/4, 8) 26, (8 1/4,


9 1/2) 2

(4 3/4) 64, (6 3/4, 8) 9

(6 3/4, 8) 26

EMpulse HEL (Electromagnetic


Hostile Environment Logging)

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4-3/4) 19.5, (6-3/4) 19.7

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8

(4-3/4) 4.75x3.22, (6-3/4) 6.75x4.20

150 std.

(4.75,
6.75) 20
std.

(4 3/4) 12, (6
3/4, 8) 2

HyperPulse MWD (Positive


Pulse MWD)

All sizes

31

(3 1/6) 116/38, (4 3/4) 25/16,


(6 1/4) 20/14, (6 3/4) 18/13, (8)
15/10, (9 1/2) 14/7.5

(4-3/4) 4.75x2.69, (6-1/4) 6.25x3.25, (6-3/4)


6.75x3.25

150

15

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3
1/2) 50

62 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) (4 3/4) 20; (6 1/4) 25, (6


100; (4 3/4) 8; (6 1/4) 9
3/4, 8) 7; (9.5) 4

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) (4 3/4) 20; (6 1/4) 25, (6


100; (4 3/4) 8; (6 1/4) 9
3/4, 8) 7; (9.5) 4

(6 3/4, 8) 20; (9.5) 13

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) 160; (4


3/4, 6 1/4) 350; (6 3/4) 800; (8,
9 1/2) 1,200

(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 33

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4, 8)


80-700; (8 1/4, 9 1/2) 80-1,600

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4,


8) 80-700
(6 3/4, 8) 20; (9.5) 13

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) 160; (4


3/4, 6 1/4) 350; (6 3/4) 800; (8,
9 1/2) 1,200

TrendLine

6-1/2, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

Dependent on drill collar


length - 26 minimum

(6-3/4) 8/16, (8-1/4) 7/14,


(9-1/2) 6/12

150

20

100

29*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


(3 1/2) 29,
175
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6,
(8) 3,
(9 1/2) 2

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

24, 12 (4 3/4) 14,10 (6 3/4)


10, 8 (8)

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Pre
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45 sure
0 g dr
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mi , p
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Pre
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25 sure
0 g dr
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Eq
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Ma
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.

Se
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sti
ffn
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s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

140

200

(6-1/2, 6 3/4) 80-700; (8 1/4, 9


1/2) 80-1,600

(3 1/2) 165,
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 40,
(8) 20,
(9 1/2) 10

(6 1/2 - 6 3/4) 114,


(8) 61,
(9 1/2) 32

(9 1/2) 225

(3 1/8, 3 1/2) 70 - 250


(4 3/4) 150 - 350
(6 1/4, 6 3/4) 150- 750
(8) 300 - 1,100
(9 1/2+) 650 - 1,200

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

Drilling Mechanics

APS Technology (Rental Division)


APS SureShot with Gamma +
VMM + PWD

3 1/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/4,
6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2+

APS SureShot Gamma + VMM 3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8


+ PWD + WPR Propagation
Resistivity
Drilling Dynamics Monitor
(DDM)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

150

20

Vibration Memory Sub (VMS)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

5.5

150

20

Magnetorheological Active
Vibration Damper (AVD)
6.75

6.75

32

10

150

20

Magnetorheological Active
Vibration Damper (AVD)
9.5

9.5

32

10

150

20

LithoTrak acoustic caliper

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4

16.1 (4 3/4)
17.6 (6 3/4)
18.2 (8 1/4)

150

20
25 (4 3/4
option)
30 (6 3/4
& 8 1/4
option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

See OnTrak

AutoTrak eXpress
AutoTrak V

4 3/4
6 3/4
9 1/2

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

150
20
175
25
(optional (option)
AutoTrak
30
V 6 3/4 (option)
&9
1/2)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AziTrak azimuthal resistivity


OnTrak integrated formation
evaluation

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4 (OnTrak only)
9 1/2 (OnTrak only)

31.3 (4 3/4 OnTrak)


27.7 (6 3/4 OnTrak)
30.7 (8 1/4 OnTrak)
30.2 (9 1/2 OnTrak)
44.6 (4 3/4 AziTrak)
32.8 (6 3/4 AziTrak)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)
10/7 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150
175
(optional
OnTrak 6
3/4 & 9
1/2)

20 (4 3/4 6
3/4 8 1/4 9
1/2)
25
(optional 4
3/4 6 3/4 8
1/4)
30
(optional)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

E-MTrak
NaviTrak
TeleTrak

3 1/8 (NaviTrak only)


4 3/4
6 1/2 (E-MTrak only)
6 3/4 (no E-MTrak)
8 1/4 (NaviTrak only)
9 1/2 (NaviTrak only)

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

As per directional tool


specification

CoPilot drilling mechanics

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

8.9 (4 3/4)
7.0 (6 3/4)
8.1 (8 1/4)
7.5 (9 1/2)

150

20
25
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 800 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,600 (8 1/4)

CoilTrak DP drilling
performance
UltraSlim DP drilling
performance

2 3/8
3 (CoilTrak)
3 1/8

49.5 (includes motor)

50 (2 3/8)
45 (3)
*sliding only

150

14.5

Application
Specific

N/A

N/A

N/A

0 - 80 (2 3/8)
0 - 210 (3)

Baker Hughes
4.82 x 1.870 (4 3/4)
6.87 x 2.000 (6 3/4)
8.25 x 2.813 (8 1/4)

GE Oil & Gas


Sentinel, Shock and Vibration

3-1/2 - 9 1/2

Part of
E-Link & Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

150

20

As per Geolink
MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

Guardian, Pressure During


Drilling

4 3/4 - 9 1/2

Additional 4 ft sub to Geolink


or E-Link MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

150

20

As per Geolink
MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

As per Geolink MWD

6 3/4, 8

(6 3/4) 6, (8) 7.7

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8) 14/8

(6 3/4) 6.45x2.81, (8) 7.81x2.81

150

18

(6 3/4) 3, (8) 4

(6 3/4) 10, (8) 12

(6 3/4) 57, (8) 73

(4 3/4) 36 at 350 gpm

(6 3/4) 74 at 500 gpm

N/A

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
AcoustiCaliper
Drillstring Dynamics

Quasar Pulse - Drillstring


Dynamics
Pressure While Drilling

Quasar Pulse - Pressure


While Drilling
Vibration Severity

Annular Mud Temperature

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2 Part of some dual gamma ray


tools, see below
4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 26.9, (6 3/4) 25.2

150

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2 (4 3/4) 10.8, (6 3/4, 8) 4.51, (4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,
(9 1/2) 4.45
9 1/2) 14/8
4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 26.9, (6 3/4) 25.2

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

(4 3/4) TBD, (6 3/4) TBD

200

25

(4 3/4) 4.66x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8)


7.76x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.35x3

175

18 - 25

(4 3/4) TBD, (6 3/4) TBD

200

25

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2 Part of pressure-while-drilling


tool (see above) as well as
some other tools
8

Drilling Downhole Optimization 4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2


Collar (DrillDOC)

TBD

(4 3/4) 150-350, (6 3/4)


225-650

(4 3/4) 70, (6 3/4, 8) 2, (4 3/4) 190, (6 3/4, 8) 7, (6 3/4, 8) 42, (9 1/2) 14


(9 1/2) 1
(9 1/2) 2
TBD

(4 3/4) 36 at 350 gpm

(6 3/4) 74 at 500 gpm

13

N/A

(4 3/4) 150-350, (6 3/4)


225-650

175

25.3 (part of EWR-M5 tool)

14/8

7.65 x 2.81

150

25

(4 3/4) 8.1, (6 3/4, 8) 7.3,


(9 1/2) 7.2

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


9 1/2) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.86x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.63x2.81,


(8) 7.79x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.22x3.00

175

(4 3/4) 30,
(6 3/4, 8, 9
1/2) 25

32

30/15

4.75x2.25x38.5

(4 3/4) 52 ,(6 3/4) 4, (8, (4 3/4) 142, (6 3/4) 11,


9 1/2) 2
(8, 9 1/2) 4

75
(6 3/4) 59, (8, 9 1/2) 22

Schlumberger
ImPulse
*Downhole shocks
*Downhole flow/washout
*APWD (with VisionPWD sub)

4.75

150
20 std.,
std., 175 27.5 opt.
opt.

20

125 (varies with


Modulator gap)

N/A

N/A

130-400

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 63

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
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,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
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Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
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op
. te
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To
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, in
.

Se
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ce
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)

sti
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s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

ShortPulse
*Downhole shocks
*Downhole flow/washout
*APWD (with VisionPWD sub)

4.75

27.3

30/15

4.75x2.25x34.8
-OR- 4.59x2.25x30.3

150
std., 175
opt.

20

20

125 (varies with


Modulator gap)

N/A

N/A

130-400

VisionPWD *APWD *IPWD

4.75

13.6

30/15

4.75x2.25x38.5

150
std., 175
opt.

25

29

N/A

N/A

0-400

DigiScope
*Internal & Annular Pressure
While Drilling (built in)
*3 axis Shocks & Vibrations
*Downhole flow/washout

4.75

29.9

30/15

30.7 (9.4) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

150 std. 25 std., 30 75 (varies with


opt.
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

N/A

N/A

150-400

TeleScope ICE
*Internal & Annular Pressure
While Drilling (built in)
*3 axis Shocks & Vibrations
*Downhole flow/washout

4 3/4

31.9

30/15

31.9 (9.7) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

75 (varies with
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

N/A

150-400

TeleScope ICE
*Internal & Annular Pressure
While Drilling (built in)
*3 axis Shocks & Vibrations
*Downhole flow/washout

6 3/4

31.4

15/8

32.5 (9.9) of 6.75 OD x 2.81 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

N/A

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


300 (varies with Mud
weight and Modulator weight and Modulator gap)
gap)

TeleScope
*APWD
*3 axis vibrations (MVC)
*Downhole WOB
*Downhole TORQ
*Downhole flow/washout

6 3/4, 8 1/4, 9, 9 1/2

24.7

(6 3/4) 16/8
(8 1/4) 12/7
(9, 9 1/2) 10/6

(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x31.5
(8 1/4) 8x2.81x26.2
(9 1/4) 9.25x3x28
(9 1/2) 9.5x3.5x26.2

N/A

(6 3/4) 56
(6 3/4) 151
(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 595 (varies
(8 1/4) 32 (varies with (8 1/4, 9 1/2) 84 (varies
with modulator gap)
modulator gap)
with modulator gap)

(6 3/4) 250-800
(8 1/4) 300-1,200
(8 1/4) opt. 800-1,400
(9 1/2) 400-2,000
(9 1/2) opt. 400-1,600

SlimPulse
*Shocks
*Stick Slip

1 3/4 tool OD
3 1/8 to 9 1/2 collars

Collar based probe


normally 30

(4 3/4 and smaller) 145/40


(6 3/4) 28/10
(8 1/4) 20/8
(9 1/2) 19/7

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81x33
(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x32

(4 3/4) 68, (6
3/4) 16

(6 3/4) 100, (8 3/4) 18

(6 3/4) 324, (8 3/4,


9 3/4) 58

(8 3/4, 9 3/4) 411

Multiple configurations:
35-1,200

EcoScope
6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8
*APWD dynamic and static 1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
*Multi-axis shock & vibration
Options
(MVC)
*Ultrasonic caliper (UCAL)
*Density caliper (DCAL)

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

NeoScope
*APWD dynamic and static
*Multi-axis shock & vibration
(MVC)
*Ultrasonic caliper (UCAL)

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

proVISION Plus (Magnetic


Resonance while Drilling)
*3 axis motion detection
*Shocks
*Stick Slip
*Downhole flow/washout

6 3/4 with Slick, 7


3/4, 8 1/4, or 9 5/8
Stabilizer Options

37.3

16/8

6.5x2.81x36.5

proVISION Plus (Magnetic


Resonance while Drilling)
*3 axis motion detection
*Shocks
*Stick Slip
*Downhole flow/washout

8 1/4 slick, 10 1/4, 10


3/8, 12 1/8 Stabalizer
Options

38.47

14/7

150 25 std., 30
std., 175
opt.
opt.

150
std., 175
opt.

22

275-800

150

20 std, 22
opt.

2.7

17.4

56

N/A

300-800

150

20 std, 22
opt.

6.35

20.6

146

300-1,200

Weatherford
BAP (Borehole/Annular
Pressure)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4, Added to HEL length - (4-3/4)


9-1/2
2.71, (6-3/4) 2.67, (8-1/4,
9-1/2) 2.67

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8,


(8-1/4) 14/7, (9-1/2) 12/6

(4-3/4) 4.75x3.22, (6-3/4) 6.75x4.24, (8-1/4)


8x4.28, (9-1/2) 9.5x5.16

150 std. (4.75,


180
6.75) 20
opt.
std., 30
opt.
(8.25, 9.5)
20 std., 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 12, (6
3/4) 2, (8 1/4,
9-1/2) 1

(4 3/4) 64, (6 3/4) 9, (8


1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6 3/4) 26, (8 1/4,


9 1/2) 2

(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 33

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 80-1,600

TVM (True Vibration Monitor)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

No additional Length

N/A, Electronic Boards

N/A, Electronic Boards

150 std.
N/A,
180 Electronic
opt.
Boards

N/A, Electronic
Boards

N/A, Electronic Boards

N/A, Electronic Boards

N/A, Electronic Boards

N/A, Electronic Boards

RAT (Rapid Annular


Temperature)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

No additional Length

N/A, External Sensor

N/A, External Sensor

150 std. (4-3/4,


180 6-3/4,) 20
opt.
std., 30
opt.
(8.25, 9.5)
20 std., 25
opt.

N/A, External
Sensor

N/A, External Sensor

N/A, External Sensor

N/A, External Sensor

N/A, External Sensor

EMpulse MWD Annulus


Pressure

All Sizes

31

(3 1/6) 116/38, (4 3/4) 25/16, (4 3/4) 4.53 x 2.25, (6 1/4) 6.09 x 2.25), (6 3/4)
(6 1/4) 20/14, (6 3/4) 18/13, (8)
6.59 x 2.81, (8) 7.78 x 2.81
15/10, (9 1/2) 14/7.5

150

15

N/A, Additional
Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) 160; (4


3/4, 6 1/4) 350; (6 3/4) 800; (8,
9 1/2) 1,200

MWD TVMS (Total Vibration


Monitoring Sonde)

All sizes

31

(3 1/6) 116/38, (4 3/4) 25/16,


(6 1/4) 20/14, (6 3/4) 18/13, (8)
15/10, (9 1/2) 14/7.5

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.69, (6 1/4) 6.25x3.25, (6 3/4)


6.75x3.25

150

15

N/A, Additional
Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) 160; (4


3/4, 6 1/4) 350; (6 3/4) 800; (8,
9 1/2) 1,200

APS SureShot

3 1/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/4,
6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2+

25*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


(3 1/2) 27,
175
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6,
(8) 3,
(9 1/2) 2

(3 1/2) 150,
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 35,
(8) 20,
(9 1/2) 10

(6 1/2 - 6 3/4) 114,


(8) 61,
(9 1/2) 32

(9 1/2) 220

(3 1/8, 3 1/2) 70 - 250


(4 3/4) 150 - 350
(6 1/4, 6 3/4) 150- 750
(8) 300 - 1,100
(9 1/2+) 650 - 1,200

APS SureShot with Gamma

3 1/8, 3 1/2, 4 3/4,


6 1/4,
6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2+

29*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


(3 1/2) 29,
175
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 6,
(8) 3,
(9 1/2) 2

(3 1/2) 165,
(4 3/4 - 6 3/4) 40,
(8) 20,
(9 1/2) 10

(6 1/2 - 6 3/4) 114,


(8) 61,
(9 1/2) 32

(9 1/2) 225

(3 1/8, 3 1/2) 70 - 250


(4 3/4) 150 - 350
(6 1/4, 6 3/4) 150- 750
(8) 300 - 1,100
(9 1/2+) 650 - 1,200

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

Gamma Ray

APS Technology (Rental Division)

APS SureShot Gamma + WPR 3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8


Propagation Resistivity

APS SureShot Gamma +


PWD + WPR Propagation
Resistivity

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

64 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
era
Ma
tur
x.
e(
op
C
.p
)
res
s,
kp
si
Pre
s
10 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Eq
uiv
ale
nt
be
nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
ng
, ro 100
tat ft
ion
)

ft
Le
ng
th,

To
ol
OD
, in
.

Se
rvi
ce
lin
e(s
)

sti
ffn
es
s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

APS SureLog-AGZ (Azimuthal


Gamma)
4.75

4.75

7.3

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

500 max.

APS SureLog-AGZ (Azimuthal


Gamma)
6.75

6.75

7.3

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

1,000 max.

AutoTrak Curve high build rate


rotary steerable

6 3/4

37.8

30/15 (6 3/4)

BHA Dependent

150

20

N/A

N/A

Application Specific

N/A

300 - 750

AutoTrak 3.0 G near-bit


gamma ray

4 3/4

12.3
34.0 (X-treme)

30/10 (3.0)
25/10 (X-treme)

BHA Dependent

150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

N/A

N/A

0 - 350

AutoTrak eXpress rotary


steerable

4 3/4
6 3/4
9 1/2

56.8 (4 3/4)
58.2 (6 3/4)
70 (6 3/4 high DLS option)
64.6 (9 1/2)

30/10 (4 3/4)
23/8 (6 3/4)
23/12 (6 3/4 high DLS option)
13/6.5 (9 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AutoTrak V gamma ray

4 3/4

22.1
33.0 (X-treme)

BHA Dependent

150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

N/A

N/A

0 - 350?

CoilTrak directional &


gamma ray
UltraSlim directional &
gamma ray

2 3/8 (CoilTrak only)


3 1/8

49.5 (includes motor)

50 (2 3/8)
45 (3)
*sliding only

150

14.5

2 3/8 (CoilTrak
only)
3 1/8

N/A

N/A

N/A

0 - 80 (2 3/8)
0 - 210 (3)

OnTrak integrated formation


evaluation

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

31.3 (4 3/4)
27.7 (6 3/4)
30.7 (8 1/4)
30.2 (9 1/2)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)
10/7 (9 1/2)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AziTrak reservoir navigation

4 3/4
6 3/4

44.6 (4 3/4)
32.8 (6 3/4)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)

E-MTrak directional &


gamma ray

4 3/4
6 1/2

39.6

21/7 (4 3/4 slick)


12.5/6.5 (6 1/2 slick)
8/32 (4 3/4 flex)
48/25 (6 1/2 flex)

NaviTrak directional &


gamma ray

3 1/8
4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

29

50/16 (3 1/8)
25/7 (4 3/4)
12.5/6.5 (6 3/4)
10.5/4.5 (8 1/4)
7/3.5 (9 1/2)
70/21 (3 1/8 flex)
82/21 (4 3/4 flex)
23/9.5 (6 3/4 flex)

ZoneTrak G near-bit gamma ray

9 1/2

5.35 (Bit sub)


4.79
(RSS sub)

TruTrak non-rotating steerable

4 3/4
6 3/4
8
9 1/2

28.3 (4 3/4)
31.0 (6 3/4)
36.1 (8)
36.1 (9 1/2)
*excludes MWD

Baker Hughes

CBG Corp.

150 20 (4 3/4 6
175 3/4 8 1/4 9
(optional
1/2)
6 3/4 &
25
9 1/2) (optional 4
3/4 6 3/4 8
1/4)
30
(optional)
150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

N/A

N/A

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 660 (6 1/2)

BHA Dependent

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

75 - 175 (3 1/8)
100 - 320 (4 3/4)
200 - 800 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,350 (8 1/4)
450 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

150

25

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 1,600

150

20

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 317 (4 3/4)


264 - 660 (6 3/4)
395 - 900 (8)
528 - 1,162 (9 1/2)

N/A

(3 1/2) 50-130, (4 3/4)


130-275, (6 3/4) 235-600,
(8) 400-800

5 (4 3/4)
3 (6 3/4)
2 (8)
2 (9 1/2)

Mike Pochkowski 4616 West Howard Ln, Suite 900, Austin, Texas 78728, (512) 491-7541, mpochkowski@cbgcorp.com

NGT-T

1.36

1.13

175

18

MGT-T

1.36

1.13

175

18

NGT-TX

1.36

0.97

175

18

NGT-CSX

1.05

1.05

175

18

NGT-CN

1.36

1.13

175

18

NGT-075

0.75

1.15

175

18

DGA - Focused Gamma

1.30

1.13

175

18

NGT-Custom

Custom

Custom

175

18

1 7/8 tool OD, 3.5-8

23-28

60/30

As applicable to standard NMDC

150 175

20 (137
mpa)

50 (NMDC
dependent)

Pilot Gamma

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 1/2,


8, 9 1/2

Shortest probe length with


MWD 20.84

As Per Pilot MWD

As Per Pilot MWD

150

20

As Per Pilot MWD

As Per Pilot MWD

As Per Pilot MWD

As Per Pilot MWD

As Per Pilot MWD

Scinturion Gamma

3 1/2, 4 3/4, 6 1/2,


8, 9 1/2

Shortest probe length with


MWD 30.4

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

175

20

As per Tensor
MWD

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

Gamma Ray Electro-Trac EM


MWD with Gamma

4 3/4
6 1/2
6 3/4
7 3/4

26.9

collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

25

100

100

100

50-1,200

Gyrodata Positive Pulse MWD


with gamma

3 1/2
4 3/4
5 1/4
6 1/2
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

23

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

25

400 (2.25ID)
350 (2.69 ID)
300 (2.813ID)

N/A
425 (2.69ID)
400 (2.813ID)
375 (3.25ID)
340 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
525 (2.813ID)
425 (3.25ID)
400(3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600(3.75ID)

3 1/2= 86-170
4 3/4 = 106-358
5 1/4 = 106-358
6 1/2 = 179-475
6 3/4 =179 -701
8 1/4 = 419-8,00
9 1/2 = 419-1,232

Gyrodata Positive Pulse


Retrievable MWD with gamma

3 1/2
4 3/4
5 1/4
6 1/2
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

18

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

400 (2.25ID)
350 (2.69 ID)
300 (2.813ID)

N/A
425 (2.69ID)
400 (2.813ID)
375 (3.25ID)
340 (3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
525 (2.813ID)
425 (3.25ID)
400(3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600(3.75ID)

3 1/2= 80-170
4 3/4 = 100-400
5 1/4 = 100-400
6 1/2 = 120-475
6 3/4 =120-701
8 1/4 = 400-800
9 1/2 = 400-1,300

DrilTech LLC
Positive Pulse MWD and
Gamma Ray Probe Based

100 (NMDC dependent) 150 (NMDC dependent)

GE Oil & Gas

Gyrodata

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 65

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
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Pre
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in at

Pre
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45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
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Pre
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25 sure
0 g dr
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C
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Pre
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Eq
uiv
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ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
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.

Se
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2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

GWD90 W/ Gamma

4 3/4
5 1/4
6 1/2
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

54

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

500 (2.25ID)
400 (2.688 ID)
350 (2.8125ID)

N/A
475 (2.69ID)
45 (2.813 ID)
400 (3.25 ID)

N/A
N/A
550(2 813ID)
450 (3.25ID)
425(3.75ID)

N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
600 (3.75ID)

3 3/4= 80-150
4 3/4 = 106-358
5 1/4 =106-358
6 1/2 =179-450
6 3/4 =179-701
8 1/4 =419-800
9 1/2 = 419-1,232

EM MWD with Gamma

3 3/4
4 3/4
6 1/2
6 3/4
7 3/4

26.9

Collar limited

Collar-defined

150

20

25

100

100

100

50-1,200

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(4 3/4) 7.5, (6 3/4, 8) 4.5,


(9 1/2) 4.4

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


9 1/2) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.66x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8)


7.76x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.35x2.81

150

18 std. 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 68, (6 3/4, 8) 2,


(9 1/2) 1

(4 3/4) 184, (6 3/4, 8)


7, (9 1/2) 3

(6 3/4, 8) 43, (9 1/2) 16

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 26.9, (6 3/4) 25.2

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

(4 3/4) TBD, (6 3/4) TBD

200

25

(4 3/4) 36 at 350 gpm

(6 3/4) 74 at 500 gpm

N/A

Depends on hang-off collar

Depends on hang-off collar

Depends on hang-off
collar ID

Depends on hang-off
collar ID

(3 3/8, 3 1/2) 90-200, (4


3/4) 150-350, (6 1/2 - 9
1/2) 225-650, (7 1/4 - 9
1/2) 400-1,500

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
Dual Gamma Ray (DGR)

Quasar Pulse - Gamma Ray


Gamma Ray Probe

Depends on hang-off Depends on hang-off collar


collar OD

TBD

150 std. 20 std. 30 Depends on hang175


opt.
off collar ID
opt.

Azimuthal Gamma Ray (AGR)

6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(6 3/4) 23.6, (8) 25.3, (9 1/2)


25.4 (part of EWR-M5 tool)

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8, 9 1/2) 14/8

(6 3/4) 6.60 x 2.81, (8) 7.65 x 2.81, (9 1/2)


9.23 x 3.00

150

25

N/A

Geo-Pilot Gamma Ray (ABG)

6 3/4, 9 5/8

(6 3/4) 20, (9 5/8) 22 (part


of GeoPilot RST)

(6 3/4) 21/10, (9 5/8) 14/8

Depends on rotary steerable tool mode

Gamma Ray/At-Bit Inclination


(GABI)

4.75

Part of Mud Motor

30/14

Depends on mud motor

150

20

60/30

As applicable to standard NMDC

150

20

40

80

150

150 20 std. 30
std., 175
opt.
opt.

(4 3/4) 150-350, (6 3/4)


225-650

(6 3/4) 12, (8, 9 1/2) 5 (6 3/4) 35, (8, 9 1/2) 13 (6 3/4) 200, (8, 9 1/2) 75

(6 3/4) 38, (9 5/8) 6

(6 3/4) 105(9 5/8) 17

(9 5/8) 96

Depends on mud Depends on mud motor


motor

100-265

MWD Services Inc.


MWD Shuttle

Sub dia: 3 1/8 - 9 1/2, 29.1 w/single battery, 35.5 w/


tool dia: 1 7/8
dual battery

75-1,000

Ryan Directional Services


Ryan EM MWD Gamma Ray

4 3/4
6.5
6 3/4

34

(4 3/4)
75 / 20
(6 3/4) 28/11

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81 (6 3/4) 6.71x3.25

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

47

153

450

(4 3/4) 100-350 (6 3/4)


150-800

Ryan Pulse MWD w/Gamma

3 1/8
4 3/4
6.5
6 3/4
8
9.5

20-30

(3 1/8) 100/ 50
(4 3/4)
40 / 15
(6 3/4) 28/11
(8)
15/9
(9.5)
8/ 5

(3 1/8) 2.96x2.25 (4 3/4) 4.75x2.81 (6 3/4)


6.71x3.25 (8) 7.93x4.00 (9.5) 9.42x4.00

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

47

153

450

(3 1/8) 50-175
(4 3/4) 100-350
(6 3/4) 150-800
(8) 400-925
(9 1/2) 400-1,200

Navigate AccuPulse w/Gamma

4 3/4, 6 1/2 & 8

(4 3/4) 10, (6 1/2 & 8) 10

As applicable to standard NMDC

As applicable to standard NMDC

175C

20

N/A

60

125

N/A

225-1,000

Navigate AccuWave (EMMWD)


w/Gamma

4 3/4, 6 1/2 & 8

(4 3/4) 10, (6 1/2 & 8) 10

As applicable to standard NMDC

As applicable to standard NMDC

175C

20

N/A

60

125

N/A

225-1,000

PowerDrive X6
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8
1/4, 9, 11

(4 3/4) 13.65, (6 3/4 )


13.47, (8 1/4 , 9 ) 14.07,
(11 ) 15.22

Capability (/100 ft) : (4 3/4 , 6


3/4) 8, (8 1/4 ) 6, (9 ) 5, (11 ) 3
Pass Through (/100 ft): (4 3/4
) 30/15, (6 3/4 , 8.25 , 9 ) 20/10,
(11 ) 15/8

It varies with the Mud


Design
(600 - 750 psi required
across bit)

100-2,000

PowerDrive Archer
Rotary Steerable Tool

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 14.98, (6 3/4) 16.64

Capability (/100 ft) : (4 3/4,


6 3/4) 18
Pass Through (/100 ft): (6
3/4) , >15 Based on fatigue
management

ShortPulse

4.75

27.3

30/15

ImPulse

4.75

32

DigiScope

4.75

TeleScope ICE

Schlumberger
150
20 std,
std., 175 30 opt. (4
opt.
3/4),
35 opt.
(6 3/4, 8
1/4)

It varies with the


Mud Design
(600 - 750
psi required
across bit)

It varies with the Mud It varies with the Mud


Design
Design
(600 - 750 psi required (600 - 750 psi required
across bit)
across bit)

150

20

N/A

N/A

30
(600 - 750 psi required
across bit)

N/A

220-650

4.75x2.25x34.8
-OR4.59x2.25x30.3

150
std., 175
opt.

20

20

515 - medium flow


(varies with modulator
gap)

N/A

N/A

130-360

30/15

4.75x2.25x38.5

150
20 std.,
std., 175 27.5 opt.
opt.

20

515 - medium flow


(varies with modulator
gap)

N/A

N/A

130-360 (20 kpsi tool)


130-310 (25 kpsi tool)

29.9

30/15

30.7 (9.4) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

150 std. 25 std., 30 75 (varies with


opt.
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

N/A

N/A

150-400

4 3/4

31.9

30/15

31.9 (9.7) of 4.75 OD x 2.25 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

75 (varies with
Mud weight and
Modulator gap)

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

N/A

150-400

TeleScope ICE

6 3/4

31.4

15/8

32.5 (9.9) of 6.75 OD x 2.81 ID API collar

200 std.

30 std.

N/A

115 (varies with Mud


weight and Modulator
gap)

200 (varies with Mud


300 (varies with Mud
weight and Modulator weight and Modulator gap)
gap)

TeleScope

6 3/4, 8 1/4, 9, 9 1/2

24.7

(6 3/4) 16/8
(8 1/4) 12/7
(9, 9 1/2) 10/6

(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x31.5
(8 1/4) 8x2.81x26.2
(9 1/4) 9.25x3x28
(9 1/2) 9.5x3.5x26.2

N/A

(6 3/4) 56
(6 3/4) 151
(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 595 (varies
(8 1/4) 32 (varies with (8 1/4, 9 1/2) 84 (varies
with modulator gap)
modulator gap)
with modulator gap)

(6 3/4) 250-800
(8 1/4) 300-1,200
(8 1/4) opt. 800-1,400
(9 1/2) 400-2,000
(9 1/2) opt. 400-1,600

SlimPulse

1 3/4 tool OD
3 1/8 to 9 1/2 collars

Collar based probe


normally 30

(4 3/4 and smaller) 145/40


(6 3/4) 28/10
(8 1/4) 20/8
(9 1/2) 19/7

(4 3/4) 4.75x2.81x33
(6 3/4) 6.75x2.81x32

150
std., 175
opt.

22

(6 3/4) 100, (8 3/4) 18

(6 3/4) 324, (8 3/4,


9 3/4) 58

Multiple configurations:
35-1200

geoVISION675

6 3/4

10.12

16/8

6.5x2.81x10

150

18

0.9

5.5

18

N/A

0-800

geoVISION825

8 1/4

12.72

13/7

8x2.81x13.5

150

15

0.15

0.95

21.8

0-1,200

arcVISION312

3.125

23.5

100/30

3x1.75x33

150

20

112

N/A

N/A

N/A

0-160

arcVISION475

4.75

21

30/15

4.75x2.81x22

150

25

30

N/A

N/A

0-400

arcVISION675

6 3/4

18

16/8

6.5x2.81x19

20

N/A

0-800

66 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

150 25 std., 30
std., 175
opt.
opt.

150 std. 20 std.,


175 25 and 30
opt.
opt.

(4 3/4) 68, (6
3/4) 16

(8 3/4, 9 3/4) 411

275-800

arcVISION825

8 1/4

18

14/7

8.25x2.81x19.8

150 std.
175
opt.

25 std.,
30 opt.

0.12

1.5

2.5

17.8

150

25

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
era
Ma
tur
x.
e(
op
C
.p
)
res
s,
kp
si
Pre
s
10 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Eq
uiv
ale
nt
be
nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
ng
, ro 100
tat ft
ion
)

ft
Le
ng
th,

To
ol
OD
, in
.

Se
rvi
ce
lin
e(s
)

sti
ffn
es
s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

0-1,950

arcVISION900

18

12/4

9x3x20.7

0.12

1.5

2.5

17.8

0-1,950

EcoScope

6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8


1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

NeoScope

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

MicroScope

4 3/4 with
5 3/8 slick sleeve

18

30/15

4.75x2.25x18

150

20

9.8

61

198

N/A

0-500

PeriScope

4 3/4, 6 3/4

18.3 (6 3/4), 23.5 (4 3/4)

(4 3/4) 30/15, (6 1/2) 16/8

4.75x2.25x27 (4 3/4), 6.5x2.81x19.3 (6 3/4)

150

25

(4 3/4) 10,
(6 3/4) 0.7

(4 3/4) 65,
(6 3/4) 4

(6 3/4) 14

N/A

0-400 (4 3/4), 0-800 (6 3/4)

All Sizes

31

150

15

N/A, Additional
Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

N/A, Additional Sonde

(3 1/16, 3 3/8, 3 1/2) 160; (4


3/4, 6 1/4) 350; (6 3/4) 800; (8,
9 1/2) 1,200

(4-3/4) 64, (6-3/4) 9,


(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6 3/4) 26, (8 1/4,


9 1/2) 2

(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 33

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 80-1,600

(4-3/4) 19
(6-3/4) 8

(4-3/4) 19
(6-3/4) 2

(6-3/4) 2

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700

(4 3/4, (4 3/4) 10
6 3/4) (6 3/4) 10
150

(4 3/4) 12, (6
3/4) 2

(4 3/4) 64, (6 3/4) 9

(6 3/4) 26

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700

Weatherford
MWD UGR (Universal
Gamma Ray)
HAGR (High-temperature
Azimuthal GR)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4, (4-3/4) 22.47, (6-3/4) 22.63,


9-1/2
(8-1/4) 22.96, (9-1/2) 22.93

(3 1/6) 116/38, (4 3/4) 25/16, (4 3/4) 4.53 x 2.25, (6 1/4) 6.09 x 2.25), (6 3/4)
(6 1/4) 20/14, (6 3/4) 18/13, (8)
6.59 x 2.81, (8) 7.78 x 2.81
15/10, (9 1/2) 14/7.5
(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8,
(8-1/4) 14/7, (9-1/2) 12/6

(4-3/4) 4.75x3.22, (6-3/4) 6.75x4.24, (8-1/4)


8x4.28, (9-1/2) 9.5x5.16

150 std.
180
opt.

(4-3/4) 4.75x3.125 (6-3/4) 6.75x4.44

150
Std.
165
opt.

(4-3/4,
(4-3/4) 12,
6-3/4,
(6-3/4) 2, (8-1/4,
8-1/4,
9-1/2) 1
9-1/2) 20
std. 30
opt.

SpectralWave (Spectral
Azimuthal GR)

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4-3/4) 12.83,
(6 3/4) 13.08

(4 3/4) 30/15, (6 3/4) 16/8

20

At-Bit Measurement System

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4 3/4) 2.83 ft., (6 3/4)


3.01 ft.

(4 3/4) 30/15
(6 3/4) 16/8

APS SureShot Gamma +


WPR 3.5

3 1/2

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

APS SureShot Gamma +


WPR 3.75

3 3/4

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

APS SureShot Gamma +


WPR 4.75

4 3/4

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

APS SureShot Gamma +


WPR 6.75

6 3/4

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

APS SureShot Gamma +


WPR 8.0

59 (2 pcs.)*

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and 20 and 25


175

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

(3 1/2) 150 max. (3 3/4) 200


max. (4 3/4) 350 max. (6 3/4)
700 max. (8) 1,200 max.

UltraSlim MPR resistivity

2 3/8
3 1/8

9.6 (2 3/8)
17.0 (3 1/8)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

N/A

N/A

System dependent

OnTrak integrated formation


evaluation

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

31.3 (4 3/4)
27.7 (6 3/4)
30.7 (8 1/4)
30.2 (9 1/2)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)
10/7 (9 1/2)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)
300 - 1,295 (8 1/4)
300 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

AziTrak reservoir navigation

4 3/4
6 3/4

44.6 (4 3/4)
32.8 (6 3/4)

33/12 (4 3/4)
25/15 (6 3/4)
10/7 (9 1/2)

N/A

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)

StarTrak high-resolution
imaging

4 3/4
6 3/4

9.8 (4 3/4)
8.3 (6 3/4)

ZoneTrak boundary detection

6 3/4
9 1/2

6.3 (6 3/4)
5.7 (9 1/2)

GRT 4.75

4.75

11.34

GRT 6.50

6.50

11.54

4 3/4, 6.91, 8 1/4

(4 3/4, 6.91)
14.5
(8 1/4) 15.17

(4 3/4) 25/12
(6.91)
17/8
(8 1/4)
14/7

Resistivity

APS Technology (Rental Division)

Baker Hughes
150

20

150 20 (4 3/4 6
175 3/4 8 1/4 9
(optional
1/2)
6 3/4 &
25
9 1/2) (optional 4
3/4 6 3/4 8
1/4)
30
(optional)
150

20
25
(option)
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

5.25 x 3.13 (4 3/4)


7.25 x 4.60 (6 3/4)

150

25

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)

7.25 x 3.64 (6 3/4)


9.63 x 3.70 (9 1/2)

150

25
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

20 sliding / 15 rotate

160

20

330

15 sliding / 10 rotate

160

20

870

175

20

CBG Corp.

GE Oil & Gas


Centerfire Propagation
Resistivity Tool

(4 3/4) 5.0x2.81, (6 3/4) 6.58x2.81, (8 1/4)


8.25x2.81

As per Tensor
MWD

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

As per Tensor MWD

(4 3/4) 90, (6 3/4, 8) 7,


(9 1/2) 2

(4 3/4) 250, (6 3/4, 8)


19, (9 1/2) 7

(6 3/4) 114, (8) 115,


(9 1/2) 40

40

(4 3/4)
100-350
(6.91)
300-750
(8 1/4)
450-1,200

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
EWR-PHASE 4

EWR-PHASE 4D
SuperSlim EWR-PHASE 4

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2 (4 3/4) 12.5, (6 3/4) 12.1, (8, (4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,
9 1/2) 12.2
9 1/2) 14/8
9.5
3.125

12.2
11.3

14/8
30/14

(4 3/4) 4.66x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8)


7.76x2.81, (9 1/2) 9.35x3

150 std. 18 or 25
175
opt.

9.35x3

150

18

2.63x1.25

150

16

213 at 150 gal/min

SuperSlim EWR-PHASE 4

3.625

12.9

30/14

TBD

150

20

TBD

EWR-M5

6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(6 3/4) 23.6, (8) 25.3, (9


1/2) 25.4

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8, 9 1/2) 14/8

(6.75) 6.60 x 2.81, (8) 7.65 x 2.81, (9 1/2)


9.23 x 3.00

150

25

(6 3/4) 12, (8, 9 1/2) 5 (6 3/4) 35, (8, 9 1/2) 13 (6 3/4) 200, (8, 9 1/2) 75

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 67

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
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Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
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Ma
tur
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C
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Eq
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nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
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, in
.

Se
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)

sti
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2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Azimuthal Focused Resistivity


(AFR)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

(4 3/4) 10.0, (6 3/4) 10.8,


(8) 8.5

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10,


(8) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.74x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.56x2.81, (8) TBD

150

(4 3/4)
24.5, (6
3/4) 22, (8)
24.5

(4 3/4) 78, ( 6 3/4)


6, (8) 2

(4 3/4) 214, (6 3/4)


17, (8) 5

(6 3/4) 101, (8) 25

Azimuthal Deep Resistivity


(ADR)

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 25.5, (6 3/4) 24.3

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

(4 3/4) 4.76x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.71x2.81

150

25

(4 3/4) 152, (6 3/4) 14

(4 3/4) 419, (6 3/4) 38

(6 3/4) 229

ImPulse

4.75

32

30/15

4.75x2.25x38.5

N/A

125

N/A

N/A

0-400

geoVISION675

6.75

10.12

16/8

6.5x2.81x10

150

18

0.9

5.5

18

N/A

0-800

geoVISION825

8 1/4

12.72

13/7

8x2.81x13.5

150

15

0.15

0.95

21.8

0-1,200

arcVISION312

3.125

23.5

100/30

3x1.75x33

150

20

112

N/A

N/A

N/A

0-160

arcVISION475

4.75

21

30/15

4.75x2.81x22

150

25

30

N/A

N/A

0-400

arcVISION675

6.75

18

16/8

6.5x2.81x19

20

N/A

0-800

arcVISION825

8.25

18

14/7

8.25x2.81x19.8

150 std.
175
opt.

25 std,
30 opt.

0.12

1.5

2.5

17.8

0-1,950

Schlumberger
150
20 std.,
std., 175 27.5 opt.
opt.

150 std. 20 std.,


175 25 and 30
opt.
opt.

arcVISION900

18

12/4

9x3x20.7

150

25

0.12

1.5

2.5

17.8

0-1,950

PeriScope

4 3/4, 6 3/4

18.3 (6 3/4), 23.5 (4 3/4)

30/15 (4 3/4) , 16/8 (6 3/4)

4.75x2.25x27 (4 3/4), 6.5x2.81x19.3 (6 3/4)

150

25

(4 3/4) 10,
(6 3/4) 0.7

(4 3/4) 65,
(6 3/4) 4

(6 3/4) 14

N/A

0-400 (4 3/4), 0-800 (6 3/4)

EcoScope

6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8


1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

NeoScope

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

MicroScope

4 3/4 with
5 3/8
slick sleeve

18

30/15

4.75x2.25x18

150

20

9.8

61

198

N/A

0-500

PeriScope

4 3/4, 6 3/4

18.3 (6 3/4), 23.5 (4 3/4)

(4 3/4) 30/15, (6 1/2) 16/8

4.75x2.25x27 (4 3/4), 6.5x2.81x19.3 (6 3/4)

150

25

(4 3/4) 10,
(6 3/4) 0.7

(4 3/4) 65,
(6 3/4) 4

(6 3/4) 14

N/A

0-400 (4 3/4), 0-800 (6 3/4)

Multi-Frequency Resistivity
(MFR)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

(4 3/4) 28.0, (6-3/4) 28.1,


(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 28.3

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8,


(8-1/4) 14/7, (9-1/2) 12/6

(4-3/4) 4.75x2.29; (6-3/4) 6.75x3.06; (8-1/4)


8.25x5.28, (9-1/2) 9.5x6.08

150

(4.75,
6.75) 20
std. 30
opt.
(8.25, 9.5)
20 std, 25
opt.

(4-3/4) 19
(6-3/4) 2
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(4-3/4) 105
(6-3/4) 11
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6-3/4) 32
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 6

(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 45

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 80-1,600

(GuideWave Azimuthal
Resistivity Tool)

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4-3/4) 34.7, (6-3/4) 35.3

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8

(4-3/4) 4.75x2.54, (6-3/4) 6.75x3.40

150

20 Std.,
30 opt.

(4-3/4) 19,
(6-3/4) 2

(4-3/4) 105, (6-3/4) 11

(6-3/4) 32

n/a

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700

SureLog FWS (Full Wave


Sonic) 4.75

4 3/4

18

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

350 max.

SureLog FWS (Full Wave


Sonic) 6.75

6 3/4

18

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

700 max.

SureLog FWS (Full Wave


Sonic) 8.0

18

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

1,000 max.

SureLog iPCD (Integrated


Porosity, Caliper & Density)
4.75

4 3/4

17.5

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

350 max.

SureLog iPCD (Integrated


Porosity, Caliper & Density)
6.75

6 3/4

19

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

650 max.

SureLog (Integrated Porosity,


Caliper & Density) iPCD 8

19

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

1,500 max.

LithoTrak neutron porosity


& density

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4

16.1 (4 3/4)
17.6 (6 3/4)
18.2 (8 1/4)

4.82 x 1.870 (4 3/4)


6.87 x 2.000 (6 3/4)
8.25 x 2.813 (8 1/4)

150

20
25 (4 3/4
option)
30 (6 3/4
& 8 1/4
option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 320 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,300 (8 1/4)

SoundTrak acoustic porosity

6 3/4
8 1/4
9 1/2

32.8

7.1 x 5.5 (6 3/4)


8.4 x 6.3 (8 1/4)
9.7 x 7.6 (9 1/2)

150

25
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,300 (8 1/4)
0 - 1,560 (9 1/2)

MagTrak magnetic resonance


porosity

4 3/4
6 3/4

27.7 (4 3/4)
29.9 (6 3/4)

150

25

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 406 (4 3/4)


264 - 660 (6 3/4)

Bi-modal AcousTic (BAT)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(4 3/4) 28, (6 3/4, 8,


9 1/2) 21

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


(4 3/4) 4.65x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.43x2.81, (8)
150, 175 (All) 25, (6
9 1/2) 14/8
7.65x2.81, (8 HP/HF) 7.53x2.81, (9 1/2) 8.98x3
3/4, 8, 9
1/2) 30 opt.

(4 3/4) 161, (6 3/4, 8) (4 3/4) 458, (6 3/4, 8)


11, (6 3/4 HP) 12, (8 HP/ 33, (6 3/4 HP) 35, (8
HF, 9 1/2) 4
HP/HF, 9 1/2) 13

(6 3/4, 8) 198, (6 3/4 HP)


208, (8 HP/HF, 9 1/2) 76

Quadrupole Acoustic (QBAT)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(4 3/4) 28, (6 3/4, 8,


9 1/2) 21

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


(4 3/4) 4.65x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.43x2.81, (8)
150,175 (All) 25, (6
9 1/2) 14/8
7.65x2.81, (8 HP/HF) 7.53x2.81, (9 1/2) 8.98x3
3/4, 8, 9
1/2) 30 opt.

(4 3/4) 161, (6 3/4, 8) (4 3/4) 458, (6 3/4, 8)


11, (6 3/4 HP) 12, (8 HP/ 33, (6 3/4 HP) 35, (8
HF, 9 1/2) 4
HP/HF, 9 1/2) 13

(6 3/4, 8) 198, (6 3/4 HP)


208, (8 HP/HF, 9 1/2) 76

Azimuthal/Crossed-Dipole
Acoustic (XBAT)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(4 3/4) 28, (6 3/4, 8,


9 1/2) 21

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


(4 3/4) 4.65x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.43x2.81, (8)
9 1/2) 14/8
7.65x2.81, (8 HP/HF) 7.53x2.81, (9 1/2) 8.98x3

(4 3/4) 161, (6 3/4, 8) (4 3/4) 458, (6 3/4, 8)


11, (6 3/4 HP) 12, (8 HP/ 33, (6 3/4 HP) 35, (8
HF, 9 1/2) 4
HP/HF, 9 1/2) 13

(6 3/4, 8) 198, (6 3/4 HP)


208, (8 HP/HF, 9 1/2) 76

Compensated Neutron
Porosity (CNP)

6 3/4, 8

7.65

Weatherford

Porosity

APS Technology (Rental Division)

Baker Hughes

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling

(6 3/4) 21/10, (8) 14/8

68 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

(6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8) 7.76x2.81

150

(All) 25, (6
3/4, 8, 9
1/2) 30 opt.

150

18

12

72

Compensated Thermal
Neutron (CTN)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

(4 3/4) 11.1, (6 3/4) 11.8,


(8) 17.5

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10,


(8) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.72x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.62x2.81, (8)


8.04x2.81

150, 175 (4 3/4) 20,


25 (6 3/4,
8) 25, 30

Magnetic Resonance Imaging


Logging While Drilling
(MRIL-WD)

6.75

39

21/10

6.35 x 2.81

150

20

14.5

(4 3/4) 25/12.2 (6.91) 17.8

(4 3/4) 5.0x2.81, (6 3/4) 6.58x2.81

175C

20K PSI
(137 mpa)

(4 3/4) 72, (6 3/4)


4, (8) 3

(4 3/4) 193, (6 3/4)


12, (8) 11

20

58

47

153

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
era
Ma
tur
x.
e(
op
C
.p
)
res
s,
kp
si
Pre
s
10 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Eq
uiv
ale
nt
be
nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
ng
, ro 100
tat ft
ion
)

ft
Le
ng
th,

To
ol
OD
, in
.

Se
rvi
ce
lin
e(s
)

sti
ffn
es
s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

(8) 63

Ryan Directional Services


Ryan Propagation Resistivity

4 3/4

6 3/4

450

(4 3/4) 100-350 (6.91)


300-750

Schlumberger
( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 7,500

SonicScope475

4.75

30

30/15

33.7

150 std.
175
opt.

25

0-400

SonicScope675

6.75

32

16/8

29.4

150 std.

30

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 42,500

0-800

SonicScope825

8.25

32

14/7

38

150 std.

30

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 130,500

0-1,200

sonicVISION675

6.75

23.8

16/8

35

150 std.
175
opt.

25 std.
30 opt.

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 256,000

0-800

sonicVISION825

8.25

22.6

14/6

32

150 std.
175
opt.

25 std.
30 opt.

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 750,000

0-1,200

sonicVISION900

22.6

12/4

37

150

25

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 750,000

0-1,400

adnVISION475

4 3/4 with Slick, 5


7/8, or 6 1/4 Stabilizer
options

23.6

30/15

4.75x2.25x24.7

150
std., 175
opt.

20

adnVISION675

6 3/4 with Slick, 8


3/8, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

20.5

16/8

6.5x2.25x27.4

150 std. 20 std., 30


175
opt.
opt.

adnVISION825

8 1/4 with Slick or


10 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

22.3

14/7

8.25x2.81x26.1

150

adnVISION825s

8 1/4 with 12
stabilizer

31

12/4

8.0x2.81x21.0

proVISION Plus (Magnetic


Resonance while Drilling)
*3 axis motion detection
*Shocks
*Stick Slip
*Downhole flow/washout

6 3/4 with Slick, 7


3/4, 8 1/4, or 9 5/8
Stabilizer Options

37.3

16/8

6.5x2.81x36.5

proVISION Plus (Magnetic


Resonance while Drilling)
*3 axis motion detection
*Shocks
*Stick Slip
*Downhole flow/washout

8 1/4 slick, 10 1/4, 10


3/8, 12 1/8 Stabalizer
Options

38.47

14/7

EcoScope

6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8


1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

25.2

16/8

NeoScope

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

AZD (Azimuthal Density


Sensor)

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4

TNP (Thermal Neutron


Porosity)

35

220

N/A

N/A

0-400

10

N/A

0-800

20 std., 30
opt.

41

0-1,600

150

20

22

90

0-1,000

150

20

25

81

N/A

300-800

150

20 std, 22
opt.

6.35

20.6

146

300-1,200

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

(4-3/4) 23.2, (6-3/4) 26.8,


(8-1/4) 27.25 (includes TNP)

(4-3/4) 30/15 (6-3/4) 16/8,


(8-1/4) 14/7

(4-3/4) 4.75x 3.18 (6-3/4) 6.75x4.39 (8-1/4)


8.25x4.28

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4
& 6-3/4)
20 std.,
30 opt.,
(8-1/4) 20
std., 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 16,
(6 3/4) 2,
(8 1/4) 2

(4 3/4) 87,
(6 3/4) 10,
(8 1/4) 2

(6 3/4) 27,
(8 1/4) 11

(8 1/4) 43

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4) 80-1,600

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4

(4-3/4) 23.2, (6-3/4) 26.8,


(8-1/4) 27.25 (includes AZD)

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4) 16/8,


(8-1/4) 14/7

(4-3/4) 4.75x 3.18 (6-3/4) 6.75x4.39 (8-1/4)


8.25x4.28

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4
& 6-3/4)
20 std.,
30 opt.,
(8-1/4) 20
std., 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 16
(6 3/4) 2
(8 1/4) 2

(4 3/4) 87
(6 3/4) 10
(8 1/4) 2

(6 3/4) 27
(8 1/4) 11

(8 1/4) 43

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4) 80-1,600

ShockWave Sonic Tool

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

(4-3/4) 29.7, (6-3/4) 26.0,


(8-1/4) 26.5, (9-1/2) 26.75

(4-3/4) 20/12, (6-3/4) 11/5,


(8-1/4) 10/4, ( 9-1/2) 8/4

(4-3/4) 4.75 x 4.12, (6-3/4) 6.75 x 3.06, (8-1/4)


8.25 X6.89, (9-1/2) 9.5x8.8

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4 &
(4-3/4) 19,
6-3/4) 20
(6-3/4) 2
std., 30 (8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2
opt., (8-1/4
& 9-1/2)
20 std., 25
opt.

(4-3/4) 105
(6-3/4) 11
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6-3/4) 32
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 6

(8-1/4 , 9-1/2) 45

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4, 9 1/2) 80-1,600

CrossWave Azimuthal Sonic

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4,


9-1/2

(4-3/4) 29.7, (6-3/4) 26.0,


(8-1/4) 26.5, (9-1/2) 26.75

(4-3/4) 20/12, (6-3/4) 11/5,


(8-1/4) 10/4, ( 9-1/2) 8/4

(4-3/4) 4.75 x 4.12, (6-3/4) 6.75 x 3.06, (8-1/4)


8.25 x 6.89, (9-1/2) 9.5 x 8.8

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4 &
(4-3/4) 19,
6-3/4) 20
(6-3/4) 2,
std., 30 (8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2
opt., (8-1/4
& 9-1/2)
20 std., 25
opt.

(4-3/4) 105,
(6-3/4) 11,
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 2

(6-3/4) 32,
(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 6

(8-1/4 , 9-1/2) 45

(4-3/4) 80-350; (6-3/4) 80-700;


(8-1/4, 9-1/2) 80-1,600

HeatWave TNP

4-3/4

14.86

30/15

4.75 x 3.04

150
Std.
180
Opt.

20 std.,
30 opt

(4-3/4) 19

(4-3/4) 19

SureLog iPCD (Integrated


Porosity, Caliper & Density)
4.75

4 3/4

17.5

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

350 max.

SureLog iPCD (Integrated


Porosity, Caliper & Density)
6.75

6 3/4

19

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

650 max.

SureLog (Integrated Porosity,


Caliper & Density) iPCD 8

19

Collar-limited

Collar-defined

150 and
175

20

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

Configurationdependent

Configuration-dependent

1,500 max.

Weatherford

80-350

Density

APS Technology (Rental Division)

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 69

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l/m
in
Flo
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Pre
ss
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Pre
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45 sure
0 g dr
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mi , p
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Pre
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25 sure
0 g dr
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C
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Pre
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Eq
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Ma
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.

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s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Baker Hughes
LithoTrak density

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4

16.1 (4 3/4)
17.6 (6 3/4)
18.2 (8 1/4)

4.82 x 1.870 (4 3/4)


6.87 x 2.000 (6 3/4)
8.25 x 2.813 (8 1/4)

150

20
25 (4 3/4
option)
30 (6 3/4
& 8 1/4
option)

Azimuthal Lithodensity (ALD)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

(4 3/4) 14.3, (6 3/4) 12.4,


(8) 13.6

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10,


(8) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.6x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8)


7.76x2.81

Stabilized Lithodensity (SLD)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

(4 3/4) 14.3, (6 3/4) 12.4,


(8) 13.6

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10,


(8) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.6x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.54x2.81, (8)


7.76x2.81

140

(4 3/4)
20, (6 3/4,
8) 18

adnVISION475

4 3/4 with Slick, 5


7/8, or 6 1/4 Stabilizer
options

23.6

30/15

4.75x2.25x24.7

150
std., 175
opt.

20

adnVISION675

6 3/4 with Slick, 8


3/8, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

20.5

16/8

6.5x2.25x27.4

150 std. 20 std., 30


175
opt.
opt.

adnVISION825

8 1/4 with Slick or


10 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

22.3

14/7

8.25x2.81x26.1

150

adnVISION825s

8 1/4 with 12
stabilizer

31

12/4

8x2.81x21

150

EcoScope

6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8


1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

NeoScope

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4

(4-3/4) 23.2, (6-3/4) 26.8,


(8-1/4) 27.25 (includes TNP)

(4-3/4) 30/15 (6-3/4) 16/8,


(8-1/4) 14/7

(4-3/4) 4.75x 3.18 (6-3/4) 6.75x4.39 (8-1/4)


8.25x 4.28

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 320 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,290 (8 1/4)

(4 3/4) 86, (6 3/4, 8) 7

(4 3/4) 237, (6 3/4)


19, (8) 21

(6 3/4) 117, (8) 128

(4 3/4) 86, (6 3/4, 8) 7

(4 3/4) 237, (6 3/4)


19, (8) 21

(6 3/4) 117, (8) 128

35

220

N/A

N/A

0-400

10

N/A

0-800

20 std, 30
opt.

41

0-1,600

20

22

90

0-1,000

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
150, 175 (4 3/4) 20,
25, (6 3/4,
8) 18, 25

Schlumberger

Weatherford
AZD (Azimuthal Density
Sensor)

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4
& 6-3/4)
20 std.,
30 opt.,
(8-1/4) 20
std., 25
opt.

(4 3/4) 16,
(6 3/4) 2,
(8 1/4) 2

(4 3/4) 87,
(6 3/4) 10,
(8 1/4) 2

(6 3/4) 27,
(8 1/4) 11

(8 1/2) 43

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4) 80-700;


(8 1/4) 80-1,600

150

30

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,295 (8 1/4)

Formation Pressure Testing

Baker Hughes
TesTrak formation pressure
testing

4 3/4
6 3/4
8 1/4

23.0 (4 3/4)
24.3 (6 3/4)
24.4 (8 1/4)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 1/2

(4 3/4) 24, (6 3/4) 28.4, (8,


9 1/2) 26.7

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


9 1/2) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.76 x 2.25, (6 3/4) 6.4x2.81, (8) 7.9 x


2.81, (9 1/2) 9.18 x 3

150

StethoScope 675

6 3/4 w/ 8 1/4 stab


6 3/4 w/ 9 1/4 stab
(Optional)

31

16/8

31

150 std.
165
opt.

20 std.
25 opt.
30 opt.

MW x Q2/C, MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 58,620

0-800

StethoScope 825

8 1/4 w/ 12.0 stab


8 1/4 w/ 10 3/8 stab
8 1/4 w/ 10 1/8 stab
(Optional)

31.5

13/7

35

150

20 std.
25 opt.
30 opt.

MW x Q2/C, MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 79,439

0-1,600

StethoScope 475

4 3/4 w/ 5 3/4 stab


4 3/4 w/ 5 1/2 stab
(Optional)

26

30/15

43.5

150

20 std.
25 opt.
30 opt.

MW x Q2/C, MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 6000

0-400

4-3/4, 6-3/4, 8-1/4

(4.75) 26.2, (6.75) 24.3,


(8.25) 24.6

(4.75) 30/15, (6.75) 16/8,


(8.25) 14/7

(4.75) 4.75x3.28, (6.75) 6.75x4.24, (8.25)


8.25x5.17

150
Std.
165
Opt.

(4-3/4
& 6-3/4)
20 std.,
30 opt.,
(8-1/4) 20
std., 25
opt.

seismicVISION675

6.75

14

16/8

13.8

150

25
30 opt

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 217,000

0-800

seismicVISION825

8.25

13.84

14/7

14.4

150

25
30 opt

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 769,000

0-2,000

seismicVISION900

13.84

12/4

14.8

150

23

( MW x Q2/C ), MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 769,000

0-2,000

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
GeoTap

4 3/4, 25 (4 3/4) 20, (6 3/4) (4 3/4) 120, (6 3/4) 39, (6 3/4) 75, (8, 9 1/2) 60
(6 3/4,
19, (8, 9 1/2) 15
(8, 9 1/2) 31
8, 9 1/2)
25, 30

(8, 9 1/2) 350

Schlumberger

Weatherford
PressureWave Formation
Tester

(6 3/4) 2

(6 3/4) 10

(6 3/4) 27

(4.75) 80-350, (6.75) 80-700,


(8.25) 80-1,600

Seismic

Schlumberger

70 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

ga
l/m
in
Flo
wr
an
ge
,

Pre
ss
1,2 ure
00 dro
ga p, p
l/m si
in at

Pre
s
45 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Pre
s
25 sure
0 g dr
al/ op,
mi ps
n
ia
t

Ma
x.
op
. te
mp
era
Ma
tur
x.
e(
op
C
.p
)
res
s,
kp
si
Pre
s
10 sure
0 g dr
al/ op
mi , p
n si a
t

Eq
uiv
ale
nt
be
nd
ing

Ma
x.
(sl DLS
idi ,
ng
, ro 100
tat ft
ion
)

Le
ng
th,

ft

To
ol
OD
, in
.

Se
rvi
ce
lin
e(s
)

sti
ffn
es
s

2015 MWD/LWD Services Directory

Well Placement Technology

Baker Hughes
AziTrak reservoir navigation

4 3/4
6 3/4

44.6 (4 3/4)
32.8 (6 3/4)

150

20
25 (4 3/4
option)
30 (6 3/4
option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

125 - 350 (4 3/4)


200 - 900 (6 3/4)

ZoneTrak G near-bit gamma ray

9 1/2

5.35 (Bit sub)


4.79
(RSS sub)

150

20
25
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 1,600

ZoneTrak boundary detection

6 3/4
9 1/2

6.3 (6 3/4)
5.7 (9 1/2)

150

25
30
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

0 - 900 (6 3/4)
0 - 1,600 (9 1/2)

DeepTrak deep resistivity

6.75

6.9 (transmitter)
22.4 (receiver)

150

20
25
(option)

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

0 - 900

StarTrak high-resolution
imaging

4 3/4
6 3/4

9.8 (4 3/4)
8.3 (6 3/4)

5.25 x 3.13 (4 3/4)


7.25 x 4.60 (6 3/4)

150

25

Application
Specific

Application Specific

Application Specific

N/A

0 - 350 (4 3/4)
0 - 900 (6 3/4)

SeismicTrak borehole seismic

6 3/4
9 1/2

10.7 (6 3/4)
11.4 (9 1/2)

7.0 x XX (6 3/4)
9.5 x XX (9 1/2)

150

25

N/A

N/A

Application Specific

Application Specific

265 - 900 (6 3/4)


530 - 1,270 (9 1/2)

7.25 x 3.64 (6 3/4)


9.63 x 3.70 (9 1/2)

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
Azimuthal Deep Resistivity
(ADR)

4 3/4, 6 3/4

(4 3/4) 25.5, (6 3/4) 24.3

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10

(4 3/4) 4.76x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.71x2.81

150

25

(4 3/4) 152, (6 3/4) 14

(4 3/4) 419, (6 3/4) 38

(6 3/4) 229

Azimuthal Focused Resistivity


(AFR)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8

(4 3/4) 10.0, (6 3/4) 10.8,


(8) 8.5

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10,


(8) 14/8

(4 3/4) 4.74x2.25, (6 3/4) 6.56x2.81, (8) TBD

150

(4 3/4)
24.5, (6
3/4) 22, (8)
24.5

(4 3/4) 78, (6 3/4)


6, (8) 2

(4 3/4) 214, (6 3/4)


17, (8) 5

(6 3/4) 101, (8) 25

At-Bit Inclination (ABI)

4 3/4, 6 3/4, 8, 9 5/8

Part of Mud Motor

(4 3/4) 30/14, (6 3/4) 21/10, (8,


9 5/8) 14/8

Depends on mud motor

150

18

PeriScopeHD

4 3/4, 6 3/4

23.5 (4 3/4), 18.3 (6 3/4)

30/15 (4 3/4) , 16/8 (6 3/4)

4.75x2.25x27 (4 3/4), 6.5x2.81x19.3 (6 3/4)

150

25

(4 3/4) 10,
(6 3/4) 0.7

(4 3/4) 65,
(6 3/4) 4

(6 3/4) 14

N/A

0-400 (4 3/4), 0-800 (6 3/4)


0-400 (4 3/4), 0-800 (6 3/4)

Depends on mud Depends on mud motor Depends on mud motor Depends on mud motor
motor

Depends on mud motor

Schlumberger

PeriScope

4 3/4, 6 3/4

23.5 (4 3/4), 18.3 (6 3/4)

30/15 (4 3/4) , 16/8 (6 3/4)

4.75x2.25x27 (4 3/4), 6.5x2.81x19.3 (6 3/4)

150

25

(4 3/4) 10,
(6 3/4) 0.7

(4 3/4) 65,
(6 3/4) 4

(6 3/4) 14

N/A

geoVISION675

6.75

10.12

16/8

6.5x2.81x10

150

18

0.9

5.5

18

N/A

0-800

geoVISION825

8 1/4

12.72

13/7

8x2.81x13.5

150

15

0.15

0.95

21.8

0-1,200

arcVISION312

3.125

23.5

100/30

3x1.75x33

150

20

112

N/A

N/A

N/A

0-160

adnVISION475

4 3/4 with Slick, 5


7/8, or 6 1/4 Stabilizer
options

23.6

30/15

4.75x2.25x24.7

150
std., 175
opt.

20

35

220

N/A

N/A

0-400

adnVISION675

6 3/4 with Slick, 8


3/8, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

20.5

16/8

6.5x2.25x27.4

150 std. 20 std., 30


175
opt.
opt.

10

N/A

0-800

adnVISION825

8 1/4 with Slick or


10 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

22.3

14/7

8.25x2.81x26.1

41

0-1,600

150

20 std, 30
opt.

150

20

adnVISION825s

8 1/4 with 12
stabilizer

31

12/4

8x2.81x21

22

90

0-1,000

EcoScope

6 3/4 with 7 7/8, 8


1/4, or 9 3/8 Stabilizer
Options

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

NeoScope

6 3/4 with 8 1/4


stabilizer

25.2

16/8

6.5x2.81x24.5

150 std. 20 std., 25


175
opt.
opt.

10

32

N/A

250-800

MicroScope

4 3/4 with 5 3/8 slick


sleeve

18

30/15

4.75x2.25x18

150

20

9.8

61

198

N/A

0-500

MicroScopeHD

4 3/4 with 5 3/4,


5 7/8, 6, 6 3/8 OD
sleeve

18

30/15

4.75x2.25x18

150

20

9.8

61

198

N/A

0-500

GuideWave Azimuthal
Resistivity Tool

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4-3/4) 34.7, (6-3/4) 35.3

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4), 16/8

(4-3/4) 4.75x2.54, (6-3/4) 6.75x3.40

150

20 std.,
30 opt.

n/a

At-Bit Measurement System

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4 3/4) 2.83 ft., (6 3/4)


3.01 ft.

(4 3/4) 30/15, (6 3/4) 16/8

Weatherford

(4 3/4, (4 3/4) 10
6 3/4) (6 3/4) 10
150

(4-3/4) 19,
(6-3/4) 2

(4-3/4) 105, (6-3/4) 11

(6-3/4) 32

(4 3/4) 12, (6
3/4) 2

(4 3/4) 64, (6 3/4) 9

(6 3/4) 26

(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4,


8) 80-700
(4 3/4) 80-350; (6 3/4)

Formation Fluid Identification and Sampling

CBG Corp.
FIT-A

12.69

175

15

6 3/4

34.7 + 11.8 per sample collar

21/10

6.89x2.81 (with one sample collar)

150

20

TBD

TBD

TBD

4-3/4, 6-3/4

(4-3/4) 12.77, (6-3/4) 12.85

(4-3/4) 30/15, (6-3/4) 16/8

(4-3/4) 4.75x2.29, (6-3/4) 6.75x3.06

150
Std.
165
Opt.

20 std.,
30 opt.

(4-3/4) 19,
(6-3/4) 2

(4-3/4) 19, (6-3/4) 2

(6-3/4) 2

Halliburton/Sperry Drilling
GeoTap IDS

TBD

Microimager

Weatherford
SineWave Microimager

(4 3/4) 80-350, (6-3/4) 80-700

Reservoir Mapping While Drilling

Schlumberger
GeoSphere 675 (6 3/4
Transmitter and Receiver)

6.75

12.83 (Transmitter), 13.16


(Receiver)

16/8

6.5x2.81x12.83 (UD1T6), 6.5x2.81x13.16


(UD3R6)

150

25

GeoSphere 825 (8 Transmitter


and Receiver)

8.25

13.42 (Transmitter), 13.58


(Receiver)

14/7

8x2.81x13.42 (UD1T8), 8x2.81x13.58 (UD3R8)

150

25

MW x Q2/C, MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm


C = 124,000

N/A

MW x Q2/C, MW = mud weight in ppg, Q = Flowrate in gpm, C = 500,000

0-800

0-1,200

www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 71

DRILLING & COMPLETION

Downhole deployment valve improves


efficiency in underbalanced operations
Justin Cunningham

Weatherford

orth Sea drilling conditions are notoriously challenging,


especially with regards to safety, complexity, and cost factors. The offshore areas of interest are fraught with issues
typically associated with remote, deepwater applications.
Deepwater prospects and high-pressure/high-temperature
wells, specifically, are prone to serious health, safety, and environmental risks, including potential damage to the formation itself. Adding more equipment and bringing on more personnel is one way to
manage these challenges, but that just incurs more expense to an
already costly endeavor. A new generation of sophisticated drilling
methods, procedures, and specially designed equipment has been
introduced to the region to help contain costs and mitigate risks inherent in precarious environments like the North Sea.
Weatherford recently took on an offshore jackup rig in the North
Sea that required the deployment of a long completion string, comprised of 12 swellable packers in a multi-zone completion with 13
individual oil zones. The goal was to safely and efficiently deploy and
trip the drillstring without killing the well or requiring installation
of a snubbing unit while minimizing nonproductive time (NPT) and
not adding equipment or personnel.
This was an ideal opportunity to use the Weatherford proprietary
downhole deployment valve (DDV) system, developed to address such
situations. The DDV system allows safe installation of drillstrings and
completion assemblies during underbalanced operations and increases
well productivity by avoiding formation damage. With the DDV system,
the formation is actually protected from cyclical fatigue and damage
caused by commonly used techniques, such as surging or swabbing
the well. Furthermore, it enables faster tripping into the well.
A tandem DDV approach (comprised of both upper and lower DDV
units) was decided upon for an extra measure of security. This solution
enabled service team members to isolate the slightly underbalanced
well in a conventional, completely controlled manner, and also to provide a safer, less expensive, and more efficient method of tripping drill
pipe. Although used previously in numerous locations, this particular
application represented the first deployment of a tandem DDV system
in the North Sea. Moreover, the added use of downhole pressure gauges on this project helped mitigate pressure-related hazards.

DDV technology

The DDV design is essentially a deep-set flapper valve with a fullopen internal diameter specification to match the casing. Its seal
mechanism contains reservoir fluids in the casing, which prevents
potentially hazardous pressure at the surface. Run as an integral
part of the intermediate casing string, the DDV is typically set at
a depth below the mudline, but placement is flexible and can be as
deep as the well plan requires.
Again depending on job requirements, the DDV system can be configured either as permanent or retrievable. For permanent placement,
the flapper valve is run in on the casing string and then cemented in
place. If the retrievable option is preferred, the flapper valve is run in
72 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

The downhole deployment valve is typically set at a depth below the


mudline, but placement is flexible and can be as deep as the well plan
requires. (Photos courtesy Weatherford)

as part of the liner tieback string connected to the liner. This allows
the valve and tieback string to be easily retrieved when drilling ends.
Hydraulic pressure applied from the surface controls the opening and
closing of the valve flapper via two control lines within one encapsulation, which takes up less real estate and improves wellhead penetration.
A separate lock-open tool can be used, if needed, to disable the DDV and
provide full-open access should the control line become compromised.

Project details

The project team sought to accurately monitor downhole wellbore


pressure by mounting pressure and temperature gauges both above
and below the lower DDV. They ran in the lower completion string
on drill pipe, using the DDV as a lubricator to accommodate a long,
complex assembly. With the DDV in the open position, the assembly
was tripped into the bottom of the well and then spaced out to secure
it at the desired depth.
The following well completion steps were taken in preparation
for any planned simulation operations that were part of the drilling
program. A 4-in. x 7-in. liner hanger and packer were set in the
7-in. liner, with the shoe at 17,619 ft (5,370 m) MD, and tested to
4,000 psi (276 bar). The 7-in. tieback casing and two DDVs were
then retrieved from the well, and the 4-in. upper completion was
completed with a tieback seal. A 958-in. packer was run in the hole,

DRILLING & COMPLETION

to allow complex, intricate bottomhole assemblies.


The result was a trouble-free drilling and completion operation process with very little NPT. It was, therefore, considered an operational
and economic success that provided safe, kill-free tripping, and important well information throughout the entire process. Furthermore,
the DDV implementation established a secure barrier, which helped
to isolate the well formation pressure below the flapper valve.
Overall, deployment of the DDV system saved the operator rig
time, enhanced safety, and reduced drilling costs and risk exposure
with faster tripping and elimination of the need for snubbing units
or extra personnel.
The DDV flapper shown in its three positions (closed, partially open, and
fully open), gives field technicians complete control from the surface via
hydraulic pressure-operated control line.

spaced out, tied into the lower completion, landed, and set. Finally,
the combined upper and lower completion string was tested to 6,000
psi (414 bar) as a safety measure to protect valuable rig assets and
personnel during drilling and well operations.

Results summary
This was the first-ever deployment of a tandem DDV system in
the North Sea with downhole pressure gauges in an underbalanced
well. It provided several benefits to a complex completion installation, such as eliminating surface pressure during a significant portion of the tripping time, and reducing fluid losses or kicks when
drilling in a reservoir with narrow pore pressure/fracture gradient
windows. In the closed position, it also provided a lengthy lubricator

RC 639040

Future applications
Laboratory testing can only go so far in analyzing well conditions.
That makes the availability of historical data an important asset, especially as it pertains to using DDVs in future underbalanced and
pressurized mud-cap drilling operations. History from prior applications will clearly demonstrate how to enable faster tripping, higher
efficiencies, etc., which will, in turn, drive cost reductions.
To support the selection of best tools and practices, Weatherford
has compiled an extensive database of DDV installation details from
this and similar projects conducted around the world. A proprietary
performance tracking system was used in this effort to gather valuable data that can be leveraged in the future by other E&P company
drilling teams. A reliable source of historical information will enable
high-quality decision making, because it documents proven DDV
models to optimize any drilling scenario in the North Sea, or anywhere else, regardless of complexity.

MIDIS
ENERGY
SERVICES
LIMITED



 
   

& Subsea Projects

 

Atamuno A. Atamuno
+2348023157903
+2347067442856
atamuno@midisenergyservices.com
Milicent Haynes
+18435688830
mhaynes@midisenergyservices.com

www.midisenergyservices.com

E N G I N E E R I N G , C O N S T R U C T I O N , & I N S TA L L AT I O N

Giant Mariner jacket designed


for longevity, stability in severe storms
Jeremy Beckman

Editor, Europe

his summer Saipem is due to launch and install the jacket


for the Mariner field platform east of the Shetland Isles. The
$7-billion project is the largest current greenfield development in the UK North Sea, and Statoils first as operator in
the UK sector.
The 22,400-ton jacket and the 54,000-ton
topsides, to be installed next spring, will form
the production, drilling, and quarters platform,
with produced oil stored on a floating storage
unit alongside for offloading to a shuttle tanker. Statoil aims to start production in early 2017
and to keep the field in production for 30 years.
Shortly before receiving formal UK government approval for the project in early 2013,
Statoil awarded engineering, procurement, and
construction contracts to Dragados to build the
jacket in southwest Spain and to Daewoo in South
Korea for the topsides. SNC-Lavalins division in the
UK, which had earlier performed front-end engineering and design for the jacket, also performed detailed design of the structure, working in close cooperation with Dragados.
David Maclaren, head of StructuresOffshore at SNC-Lavalin, outlined the main engineering issues for the jacket at Bentleys Year in
Infrastructure conference in London late last year. The engineering
team adopted Bentleys SACS and STAAD.Pro software for 19 interrelated analyses of structural strength requirements in different
scenarios and for detailed design of secondary steel components.
The topsides designer Aker Solutions used the same software, and
both parties shared their models and analyses throughout the construction process with the jacket and topsides fabricators, another
engineering center in India, and third-party verification specialists in
London and Norway.
Texaco originally discovered Mariner in the 1980s. Recoverable
reserves are estimated at 250 MMbbl, but the combination of heavy
oil and complex reservoirs ruled out development until technologies finally emerged to make production economic. Statoils solution
involves importing lighter crude mixed with water into a diluent and
installing electric submersible pumps into the wells in order to drive
the oil out. The jacket will feature 60 conductors which could eventually accommodate 80 production wells and more than 60 water
re-injectors.
Aside from the conductors, the jacket will be connected to three
risers and 16 caissons, with 13 j-tubes to connect future risers and umbilicals. Its a really massive structure, Maclaren said, connected to
the seabed by 24 piles, all 8-in. diameter, penetrating 400 m [1,312 ft]
below the seabed and connected via traditional grouted connections.
To design this kind of structure we need to perform a huge number
of different analyses, all of which interrelate to each other, and the complexity of that means we have to repeat the analysis after each one is completed. We then have to go back and recycle some of our other analyses
and use Bentleys suite of SACS programs to perform further analysis.
74 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

The priority is to cover all eventualities once the jacket is in place,


including whether it can survive a 100-year storm in the area without
progressive collapse, Maclaren said. In this case, that means 27-m
[89-ft] peak-trough waves equivalent to seven stories high passing
through the structure. Thats what we have to simulate in our design,
ensuring that the forces are not excessive and that the braces are all
adequate for purpose.
The jacket is engineered to survive 40 years without further recourse to repairs for fatigue damage. This entails analysis of each individual element, effectively to
ensure survival for 400 years in some cases,
Maclaren explained, equivalent to a factor
of 10 in fatigue life. We also have to look
at the 10,000-year storm scenario to ensure
the structure doesnt collapse.

Load-out stresses

For load-out of the completed jacket from


Dragados yard in Puerto Real, SNC-Lavalins team built a SACS model of the structure in a horizontal position. This took into
account potential stresses along the load-out
grillage; the load-out beams on the bottom; and
the forces acting on the jacket during its subsequent voyage on a transportation barge, pulled by
tugs and ballasted to a certain level within
Image of the Mariner
the water. In this case, the route takes in
jacket generated using
the Bay of Biscay off northern Spain and
Bentley software. (Image
the English Channel, before continuing up
courtesy SNC-Lavalin)
the North Sea. Its quite a long tow, Maclaren said, so we have to design for that worst-case scenario.
Once at the site, we then have to launch from the barge into the water [using SACS launch model]. This is one of the most nerve-wracking moments for an engineer, because we want to ensure that when
we launch the jacket it floats and doesnt get too close to the seabed,
which is relatively close in this case. The jacket is 135 m (443 ft) tall,
while the water depth at the location is 110 m (361 ft).
The jacket will be upended from a heavy-lift vessel. We analyze the
different stages of the upending sequence with slings added to the
model between the hook point and the jacket lift pointensuring only
the axial load is carried.
According to Maclaren, both the third-party verification company
and an independent competent persons report confirmed that the design achieved a high level of utilization in the jacket, allowing SNC-Lavalin to minimize wastage of materials and reduce project cost. The
installation risk was also mitigated by using SACS to design the installations systems and the structural launch analysis. The redundancy analysis allowed our engineers to ensure accelerated impact scenarios
would not cause the overall structure to fail; and the safety of the design
was demonstrated by conducting simulated blast analysis and non-linear analysis such as bolt impact.
The long-term integrity of the structure is provided by ensuring the
detailed fatigue and fracture mechanisms assessment and providing
adequate corrosion protection to ensure integrity for the 40-year life of
the platform.

E N G I N E E R I N G , C O N S T R U C T I O N , & I N S TA L L AT I O N

Detailed crane analysis


critical to platform life
extension, decommissioning
An offshore lattice
boom pedestal crane.
(All photos courtesy
Sparrows)

Regular inspections
needed to combat fatigue,
damage, and corrosion
Stuart Smith
Brendan Forbes

Sparrows Group

nderstanding structural fatigue in offshore cranes and their


overall condition is necessary to safeguard the integrity of
deck operations and to comply with safety requirements. It
may also prove to be critical as many of these cranes and
their components are yet to enter the toughest stage of their
life cycle.
During the decommissioning of platforms, the demands placed on
offshore cranes can be greatest at the very end of their working lives.
In the past, it was common practice to change out a cranes structural components on a five-year cycle to ensure their integrity. This
typically involved removing and lowering the boom, an operation
which would take up a great deal of deck space and hamper or even
halt work altogether on the platform over the two- to three-week maintenance period. The industry now places more importance on understanding the condition of offshore cranes and how they are deteriorating, rather than changing the components on a fixed-term basis.
To comply with the UK continental shelfs Key Performance 4
(KP4) requirements on managing aging offshore installations, operators must demonstrate they are monitoring their assets effectively.
Fatigue analysis is a tool that supports them in this work.
The occurrence of fatigue varies widely between different makes
of cranes. Some are extremely robust and rarely experience any failures, even with high frequency of use, due to their low stress range.
With other models where the structure is working harder, or where
there are susceptible connection details, signs of structural fatigue
can appear much earlier.
Many of the first-generation cranes were originally designed as onshore crawler cranes and then adapted for work offshore, used for
sea loading and dynamic work. It is not uncommon to find early signs
of fatigue on some lighter models of the older first- and second-gen76 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

eration offshore cranes, as these were designed to earlier editions of


offshore crane codes with less stringent strength requirements than
those that operate today.
On the other hand, there are some robustly designed cranes of this
era which exhibit good fatigue resistance. In the second generation of
cranes that were designed specifically for offshore use, models from
Liebherr and Stothert and Pitts have proven to be extremely sturdy
and in many cases have shown little in the way of fatigue.
In around 95% of cases, the boom is the section of the structure
most vulnerable to fatigue, with its mid-sections particularly sensitive to premature aging. The exception can be the A-frame, which
can also have a shorter than predicted lifespan.
It is not possible to prevent fatigue, but understanding its causes

Boom fatigue crack that initiated from the weld between lattice and chord,
then propagated to the chord.

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Fatigue crack visible


on the offshore crane
boom foot section.

enables operators to guard


against its effects. Invariably,
welds on the structure are
where issues begin. Undetectable flaws occurring during the welding process mean
that every weld has a potential defect that could present
a weakness in the future. Full
penetration welds tend to perform better than the more common fillet
welds on the booms mid-sections. However, when considering the head
and foot boom sections there comes a point where tapering causes the
geometry of the lattice chord connection to reduce vastly due to concentrated stress.
In some instances platework stiffeners have been added to strengthen the structure. This can have a positive impact although it also introduces high stress concentration factors that create further fatigue
sensitive positions and can lead to an earlier failure of the joint.
The only way to fully understand the condition of the crane is to
conduct a study examining loads and cycles. Typically, the average
lifted load offshore does not stray significantly from 3.2 metric tons
(3.5 tons), with a variance of 0.75 metric tons (0.82 tons).
Although the weight of the load does play a part in the analysis,
it is more pertinent to study the stress range. Calculating the difference between the existing residual strain on the structure, the added
stress during an actual lift and the spare lifting capacity provides an
accurate picture of the fatigue experienced.
Because of the relatively low average load, the number of lift cycles has a greater impact on the fatigue life of the structure than
the lifted load itself. This also means there are many large capacity cranes operating at a fraction of their design limits. Lower stress
ranges provide longer fatigue lives and occasional lifts at maximum
capacity will not significantly affect their fatigue life.
Cranes that operate predominately toward the outer regions of their
radius range are more prone to greater stress ranges and therefore
reduced fatigue life compared to those operating at closer ranges. All
of this can be plotted on an S/N curve with fatigue strength and the
number of cycles along each axis, with the Miners Rule then applied
to calculate the damage through variable stress ranges.
A critical part of analyzing fatigue is determining an accurate life
cycle. In the majority of cases gaining reliable information to determine the cranes life cycle can be a challenge. Many of todays cranes
have a recording load indicator system with a full history of each
lift, detailing the weight and the position of the crane when this took
place. However, numerous older cranes will not have this information, or if they do, it will only be available for a small proportion of
the cranes life.
It is still possible to establish realistic life cycles for any offshore
platform crane even without a recording load indicator system.
Knowing the type of work, when drilling programs have taken place,
and even the deck layout all make it possible to establish the likely
lifting frequency, average weights involved, and where loads were
being moved to and from.
Second-generation cranes were designed to perform 500,000 lifting cycles, while the more recent fourth-generation cranes are expected to carry out half that number. In most cases the cranes will
not have been used as often as initially expected, with the nature of
operations meaning that they tend to be exerted more in bursts of
activity followed by quieter periods. During the cranes first year in
service it will be used heavily to assist in the building of the platform

E N G I N E E R I N G , C O N S T R U C T I O N , & I N S TA L L AT I O N

The fatigue crack along the boom foot pin clevis weld root.

before taking on a steadier flow of work that will


increase around drilling programs and again at
decommissioning.
Sparrows Group has a 40-year track record of
working on the UK continental shelf before all
lifts were recorded. The companys knowledge
of operating requirements and shipping methods has allowed it to develop an approach to establish realistic life cycles.
Of course, fatigue is only one aspect of a
cranes condition monitoring. The effects of damage and corrosion also play a major part in determining its condition, hence the need for regular inspection.
However, accurate fatigue analysis will only highlight the
vulnerable areas on the crane. Once these have been established it
is important to perform inspections of these areas focusing on the
sections prone to fatigue and then increase the inspection rate if
fatigue signs are present.
Inspection of crane structures is mainly performed visually or via
magnetic particle inspection. Other forms of study such as eddycurrent and ultrasonic testing tend only to be viable on small targeted areas of the crane.
So, what happens if fatigue failure occurs? The next step is to
take the analysis further and establish a criticality assessment.
This involves a stress analysis of the crane that takes into account
the potential fatigue failures to determine how this could affect the
structure. It may be that if a single weld failure occurs, an alternative
load path could be available through the unit and increased use will

not cause yielding or further damage. Alternatively, complete structural failure may be the predicted result.
This type of information is especially important
to offshore asset owners when making decisions
on continued use of aging cranes, particularly
when considering life extensions for a facility or
decommissioning. During a life extension program, the predicted life of the platform will be
compared to the crane analysis and condition
reports to establish the options for and risks of
continued use.
During a decommissioning program, the crane
often has to perform vastly increased operating
cycles with heavier loads when it may already have
exceeded its designed operating life. It is not unusual
for asset owners to replace or change-out cranes before
embarking on such projects in order to lessen the risk of reliability
issues or structural failures. Equally, this analysis can provide assurance that continued use during this highly active period of the
cranes life can be conducted without concern, with the crane safe to
operate over the assets full working life.

The authors

Stuart Smith is global design services manager for Sparrows Group. He has been
employed in the firms engineering department for the duration of his 22-year career
specializing in the design and analysis of lifting equipment.
Brendan Forbes is global head of engineering at Sparrows Group based in Aberdeen,
UK. He holds a BSc in Engineering and Management from Edinburghs Heriot-Watt
University and holds professional accreditation with the Institution of Mechanical
Engineers and Society of Operations Engineers.

E N G I N E E R I N G , C O N S T R U C T I O N , & I N S TA L L AT I O N

More UK operators submitting plans


for platform, subsea removal programs
Nick Terdre

Contributing Editor

ecommissioning activity is accelerating on the UK continental shelf. According to industry association Oil &
Gas UK, the number of fields expected
to cease production during 2014-19 is
now close to 80, up 6% on last years estimate,
as rising operating costs and lower oil prices
shorten fields economic lifespans. The total
estimated decommissioning bill to 2040 has
also increased by around 11% to 46 billion
($71.4 billion).
Bill Cattanach, head of supply chain at Britains new Oil and Gas Authority, reports that
23 decommissioning applications have been
received so far this year and transformational change is needed to bring costs down,
he said at a recent conference. But that may
not come soon enough to help the dozen or
so projects currently under way.
Fairfield Energys Dunlin field in the UK
northern North Sea is the latest to move into
decommissioning production was due to
cease in June. Abandonment planning has
been under way for several years: the licensees, supported by a technical study from Xodus, have decided the best option is to leave in
situ Dunlin A platforms concrete gravity base
(CGB). The four-legged concrete substructure, installed in 1977, weighs around 320,000
metric tons (352,739 tons) and supports a
20,000-metric ton (22,046-ton) topsides. The
base was not designed to be refloated.
There are also subsea facilities to be decommissioned on the Osprey and Merlin fields both
tied back to the Dunlin complex. Dunlin A,
which exported oil to the Sullom Voe terminal
on Shetland via TAQAs Cormorant A platform,
will remain in operation for a while as a pumping station for oil from the EnQuest-operated
Thistle field. It used to perform the same function for Canadian Naturals Murchison field
until the latter too ceased production last year.
Fairfield estimates the overall decommissioning cost for Dunlin at roughly $600 million.
Canadian Natural received approval for
its Murchison decommissioning program
last year. Aker Solutions is providing various services, including engineering-down of
the 24,584-metric ton (27,100-ton) topsides.
80 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Computer image
showing how the Brent
Delta topsides will be transported
on Allseas Pioneering Spirit.
(Picture courtesy Allseas)

Shell recently received approval to remove


the 24,200-metric ton (26,676-ton) Brent Delta
topsides, again in the UK northern North Sea.
The operation is due to be performed next
year by Allseas single-lift vessel Pioneering
Spirit, which will at some point also remove
the Brent Alpha and Bravo topsides and the
Alpha jacket. Brent Alpha and Bravo ceased
production last November, leaving Brent
Charlie as the fields only producing platform. Archer has started well abandonment
on Bravo. Shell intends to seek derogation
from the full removal requirement for the
Bravo, Charlie, and Delta CGBs in the further decommissioning program it is preparing.
BP received approval for its decommissioning program for the Miller platform in the
UK central North Sea in 2013. The footings of
the 18,584-metric ton (20,485-ton) jacket are
to be left in place. The company is currently
engaging the market to identify a competitive removal project for the 28,732-metric
ton (31,671-ton) topsides, for which it plans to
let a contract next year.
Maersk is awaiting approval for its plan
to decommission the subsea facilities on the
Leadon field in the UK central North Sea. Harkand has been contracted to provide project
management and engineering services for
the abandonment of the 18 wells, as well as
removing spoolpieces, jumpers, and concrete
mattresses. This is the first decommissioning
project on the UKCS involving pipeline bundles, and could set a precedent for other fields
with this equipment. Maersk proposes leaving
the bundle sections in place after retrieving

the towheads and manifolds.


Centrica has embarked on the coordinated decommissioning of Stamford and Rose,
two single well subsea developments in the
UK southern gas basin. Last month the jackup Paragon B391 was P&Aing the Stamford
well and was then due to transfer to Rose.
The export pipelines will be left in place after the exposed ends have been cut off, and
concrete mattresses and grout bags will be
retrieved. Subsea 7 will perform removal
operations under its frame agreement with
Centrica. WS Atkins has also provided preFEED studies under a five-year agreement.
Recently, the contractor Norsea was working on the onshore disposal of subsea manifolds and associated pipework from Enterprises Renee and Rubie fields. In mid- year
Bibby Offshore started a second stint of
subsea removal operations on the fields with
its diving support vessel Bibby Sapphire and
subsea construction vessel Olympic Ares.
The semisubmersible WilHunter is working on well abandonment at present on Hess
Fife fields in the central UK sector, and is
also due to plug the Ivanhoe/Rob Roy wells,
although its contract expires in November.
Perenco and Tullow Oil have also filed decommissioning programs for their Thames
area fields in the southern sector which
ceased production last year. Talisman is preparing to decommission the Beatrice field in
the Moray Firth after reassuming operatorship from Ithaca Energy, while Ithaca has responsibility for decommissioning the Jacky
satellite, which it developed with a wellhead
platform tied back to Beatrice.

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P R O D U C T I O N O P E R AT I O N S

Concept, design key


to developing marginal fields
Consultancy group examines non-linear process
Conor Crowley

Atkins Oil and Gas

ast years Wood Review of oil and gas


production in the UK continental shelf
(UKCS) highlighted the challenges of
a mature basin, with marginal fields
which may never be developed without
concerted engineering and collaborative effort. For many of these fields, no economic
development plan exists, and the time is ticking to allow these to ever be developed with
infrastructure decommissioning looming.
Management of the project delivery phases is well understood, with focus on fixed
scope, management of change, and schedule risk. How to best tackle the conceptual
phases of project development is not as well
defined.
Marginal field development in many ways
focuses the engineering challenge into the
early phase of the project. A project cannot
progress until at least one economic solution
is found. In a mature basin like the UKCS,
the design will often be heavily influenced
by access to infrastructure, either to host,
control, process or export the hydrocarbon,
meaning that the design will also need to
overcome additional constraints over and
above greenfield development.

Concept development
The conceptual development process is
inherently difficult to proceduralize, as in
general there are not large amounts of time,
money, or details available to answer every
potential design question and there is little
engineering basis. Decisions have to be taken which precede the detailed engineering
that would justify them.
Atkins oil and gas division has reviewed
the conceptual work it has carried out, including 10 years worth of concept development studies, and has outlined a framework
to capture its approach.
While the process tends to be non-linear,
it generally follows six main activities:
82 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

Atkins oil and gas concept development framework. (Image courtesy Atkins Oil and Gas)

1. Define the problem


With potentially competing goals and often significant uncertainty over the fundamental inputs and outcomes, it is not trivial
to define the problem that is to be resolved
at the start.
When working with client teams, it is
important to understand what their understanding of what project success looks like,
as a combination of technical, safety, environmental, and economic/commercial factors. This may also involve getting a feel for
a maximum supportable capex.
2. Generate options
The options generation phase is an inherently creative process, with a team of engineers taking the project objectives and finding a concept or concepts that may work.
This is like generating a new Lego model.
With a wide knowledge of all the potential
bricks in the concept box, candidate option or options are pieced together into viable concepts.
3. Model options
A model is defined here as a set of ideas,
numbers, and simplified representations that

describe the present, and/or future state of


a development. It encompasses the process,
and also the structures, vessels, pipelines,
people, systems, and facilities required to
support those processes.
In modeling options, the basic idea of
each concept is tested to determine its likely
outcomes in terms of product and requirements. The model needs to be as simple as
possible, but no simpler, reflecting the particular constraints of the situation, and the
uncertainties inherent in the inputs. It needs
to be robust enough that the model can adequately describe the impact of any changes
on the concept.
This model is generally owned by one
engineering discipline, but informed by
other relevant disciplines. A process engineer may define what the process scheme
will look like, but will need to understand
the effect of pipeline design on operability,
along with the impact of the weight on the
structure and how that is supported through
using fixed or floating designs. Equipment
will need to be controlled, powered, and supplied with whatever utilities are appropriate.
The concept needs be safe enough, and be
able to handle major accident hazards.

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4. Evaluate technically
Not every discipline can be represented
in the modeling process, and the simplified
representation cannot capture all potential
pitfalls. As a result, the design concept is
presented to the wider engineering team,
and often to the client and partners, to test
the robustness of the concept. The goal is
to uncover any fundamental issues with the
concept that would make it infeasible.
The key is to be able to make decisions
about the design that take account of the
uncertainties inherent in the concept development. This conceptual evaluation ability is
not universal among engineers.

the study, in response to developing reservoir modeling, economic evaluation, and


commercial negotiation.

Design agility
The process also follows three models,
detailed as follows:
Behaviors and engineering approach. The
conceptual phase of a project is ultimately
about describing the future state of the facilities once the project is complete, rather than
developing the deliverables allowing tender
and procurement of facilities.
It requires not only that engineers apply
their domain knowledge in option genera-

it is natural to look for upside in production rates, the size of the reservoir, scope
for later tiebacks, all of which drive up the
size and cost of any facility. When combined
with the additional drilling and subsea development costs, things can get rapidly out of
hand. Similarly, the push to maximize initial
production rate and reservoir net present
value to meet growing capex fuels the fire.
Concept development should always include
multiple field development economic alternatives. Staged developments using smaller, lower cost facilities to get first oil and
cash flowing as soon as possible represent a
sound risk reduction measure, not least be-

Utilizing space on an existing installation to process new


fluids will change the loading on a jacket structure, but will
also change the potential life of the structure.
5. Evaluate cost, timeline
Engineering is often about the art of the
possible, and the most elegant concept may
fall down when it comes to how long it takes
to implement, or how much it costs. This is
likely to require high-level cost modeling,
and also an understanding of the time and
resources required to complete the project. Where this involves brownfield modifications, scheduling work relative to other
competing schedules and accommodating
the time required for tie-ins and other modifications adds layers of complexity.
6. Rank options
With the project goals outlined, and the
costs, benefits and issues associated with
of the option or options worked up in subsequent phases, the concept phase is best
closed with a ranking exercise. This may be
fully quantitative, using an economic model
to evaluate the options. More commonly,
some tests may screen out options (e.g. maximum capex, minimum or maximum schedule, etc.); the remaining options are ranked
relative to each other, by a combination of
qualitative and quantitative measures. This
then informs the recommendation on which
concept or concepts are taken forward to
the next phase (pre-front-end engineering
and design or FEED).
The framework is itself a simplified model
of the processes taking place during conceptual studies, with arrows in multiple directions to suggest the fact that depending on
the project, the steps may well be repeated,
run in parallel, or in some situations, be
omitted entirely. Studies seldom run in isolation, and it is very common for fundamental parameters of the study to change during
84 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

tion, but also to be comfortable in divergent,


emergent, and convergent thinking. Making
decisions without detailed analysis can be
challenging. Depending on the drivers for
the project, this will often be led by generalist disciplines such as process and subsea.
While generalist disciplines tend to have
wide cross-disciplinary knowledge, this is
augmented by specific discipline input in areas such as structures and marine, power,
mechanical, instrumentation, cost, and planning. The full picture will generally be better
with wider discipline and specialist input as
appropriate.
A complex environment. By definition, marginal fields require optimization of their economic performance to ever leave the metaphorical drawing board, and in many cases,
this may require pushing the limits of conventional approaches.
Utilizing space on an existing installation
to process new fluids will change the loading on a jacket structure, but will also change
the potential life of the structure. Many of the
structures and vessels in use in the North Sea
are now heading for operation 30-50 years
beyond their initial life. The Forties field, for
example, is now looking to 2030 and beyond,
with the original structures in use since 1975.
One must also be mindful of the fact that the
offshore oil and gas production industry is a
high hazard industry. Those in the field are
dealing with flammable hydrocarbon, often at
high pressures, and the fluids being processed
change day-to-day and year-to-year.
Economies of scale. Conventional wisdom
suggests bigger is always better. However,
during concept design, it is critical to test
this view, particularly with marginal fields.
In trying to justify large capital investment,

cause they often lead to strategies naturally


suited to life extension, and less exposed to
oil price fluctuations.
Perhaps the most recent example of this
type of agile thinking is Premier Oils Sea
Lion project. The effect of the falling oil
price was quickly matched with an alternative solution more suited to the changing
economic climate, and quickly adopted as it
had already been considered as an option at
the conceptual stage.

Case studies
The following case studies provide examples of how the above-described process has
been successfully applied.
Weight versus cost. Much of design is
compromise, and the challenge offshore is
to provide the minimum facilities that will
meet the export specifications, especially
in areas without pipeline export facilities.
Each additional process adds weight and
area that require to be supported by either
structures or floating facilities, a challenging cross-disciplinary conceptual problem.
In developing a concept for an independent
oil company west of Shetland, Atkins had to
find a way to reduce the overall capital cost
for a facility exporting via tanker. By careful
iteration between process and structural, a
minimum weight concept with a simplified
process supported on an articulated tower,
using a subsea tank for storage and export
emerged. This concept unlocked the funding for the client and its investors to allow
development wells to be drilled in the area.
These turned out to have higher reserves
than originally thought, allowing for more
complex topsides to be justifiable, and unlocked the field for production.

P R O D U C T I O N O P E R AT I O N S

Overcoming long distances. A recent highpressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) subsea


tieback in the UKCS faced the competing requirements of needing to minimize heat loss
from the hydrate-prone gas condensate to ensure long cool-down times, while also needing to lose excess heat at the pipeline inlet in
order to limit the levels of thermally-induced
strain in the pipeline and limit the product arrival temperature at the processing facility.
Flow assurance, computational fluid dynamics, pipeline limit state design, and localized finite element analysis techniques were
combined to develop an early understanding
of the nature and scope of the problems to be
resolved. Selected, targeted assessments were
used to screen potential design concepts, and
a successful design emerged. The project was
sanctioned, and is now in commissioning.
Life extension. Unlike most other process
industries, there is no real steady-state product stream over the production life, and design
tends to focus on the early years of production.
In some cases, facilities required later in field
life have been properly examined to see if they
can be operated or even commissioned.
Meeting the Wood Review challenge of extending infrastructure life revolves around
being able to have a detailed understanding

of processing plant capacity and capability,


and finding economic ways to incorporate
new hydrocarbon streams into existing facilities. This has been ongoing in the UKCS
for a number of years now, and in supporting these conceptual developments, Atkins
developed its MeasCap process evaluation
tools. Key in this is the ability to quickly
evaluate and re-evaluate the performance of
a process against a range of operating cases,
with those who have invested in these studies developing a better understanding of the
ultimate performance of their plants against
a changing demand profile.
Feasible solutions. Feasible solutions do
not always exist. A recent study Atkins was
involved in looked at a large variety of potential options for an HP/HT development.
The approach requested by the client was to
review all potential solutions, without demonstrating a viable base case first. As the
reservoir modeling progressed, evaluation
of the reserves meant that the economics of
the field were not viable, but by casting such
a wide net for potential options and trying
to develop many concepts in parallel without
testing that there was a good base-case, a
large engineering effort was carried out to
limited benefit.

Conclusions

In the current climate, there is limited


budget to build many potential options. It is
arguably therefore a good time to examine
how concepts are best developed, and use
the pause in investment frenzy that a downturn brings to calmly and systematically examine our development portfolios in order
to maximize the returns when investment
decisions are ultimately taken.

Acknowledgments

This article is based on a paper presented at the Deep


Offshore Technology International Conference & Exhibition held in Aberdeen, Scotland, Oct. 14-16, 2014.

The author

Conor Crowley graduated with a


degree in Chemical Engineering
from the Cork Institute of Technology. He is a process and safety
engineer working with Atkins Oil
and Gas in Aberdeen.He has been
involved in conceptual process
engineering with Atkins over the
past 15 years, and has worked
most recently on bringing process safety further into
conceptual design. He is a Fellow of the Institution of
Chemical Engineers in the UK.

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SUBSEA

Unconventional methods offer


wax remediation options

Filippo Librino

Genesis

New technologies may provide flow assurance alternatives

n recent years, wax control and remediation have become serious issues in deepwater fields, especially if long tiebacks are
involved. Wax reduces the flowline cross sectional area, restricting, and in some case completely impeding, the flow of produced
hydrocarbons. This article discusses unconventional wax remediation methods that have been developed to address the situations
in which traditional methods are not usable or not effective, along
with new techniques to determine the locations of the wax deposits
along a flowline and the thickness of the deposits.
Wax consists of long, linear n-paraffin chain normal alkane compounds that are naturally dissolved in crude oil. Wax crystals start
to form as the oil cools down and reach the wax appearance temperature (WAT).
Crystals may aggregate in particles that are either transported
along with the fluid or, under the appropriate environmental conditions, deposited on pipeline walls, progressively restricting the oil
flow and reducing volume produced. WAT changes with the chemical composition of the oil considered.
For prevention, wax is typically controlled by injecting wax inhibitors in the produced fluid, adding insulation layers to the flowlines
and running cleaning pigs on a regular basis. However, even with
the proper preventive measures in place, flowline wax flow-restricting deposits and even blockages are not uncommon.

Traditional methods
Wax is typically removed using methods including coiled tubing
intervention; progressive pigging; and flowline flushing with hot oil,
hot water, and various solvents.
The most significant shortcomings of the traditional wax remediation methods are the following:
Progressive pigging and flowline flushing: Not viable in case of complete flowline blockage
Progressive pigging: Applicable only to piggable flowlines; potential risk of a full blockage resulting from a stuck pig; considerable flowline downtime
Solvents: Risks to people and the environment; ineffective at low
temperatures encountered in proximity of the seabed (particular-

CoilTAC equipment operating on a support vessel. (Photo courtesy Superior Energy Services Co.)

86 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

ly in deepwater); decreased efficiency results in the requirement


of large treatment volumes of solvent and long treatment times
Flushing with hot oil or hot water: Limited reach due to the water/
oil cooling; temperature restriction on flexible pipe flowlines
that limits effectiveness
Coiled tubing intervention: Limited reach; may be logistically
complex if flowline access on the production facility is difficult.

Unconventional methods
The type of blockage applicability for four unconventional wax
remediation methods is shown below. A brief description of each
method is provided further down.

Method Applicability
Partial Wax Blockages

Full Wax Blockages

CoilTAC

FlexiCoil

SureTherm

Pressure-Pipe

CoilTAC
Originally developed by Superior Energy Services Co., CoilTAC
significantly extends the reach of coiled tubing. Its equipment consists of a conventional coil tubing unit, control console, various
tanks, manifolds, and pumps that are installed on a production facility or a support vessel.
Once access is gained to the obstructed flowline above the sea surface, a device called Thruster, which is equipped with sealing cups,

The CoilTAC thruster doubles as a cleaning tool. (Image courtesy Superior


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is attached to the end of the coiled tubing and the coiled tubing is
started through the flowline. The annulus between the coiled tubing
and the flowline is then pressurized to propel the Thruster forward.
As a result, the coiled tubing is pulled rather than pushed through
the flowline without the risk of helical buckling, causing a significant
reach increase. The fluid displaced by the Thruster as it moves forward is sent to the surface through the coiled tubing. The speed at
which the Thruster moves through the flowline is controlled by holding back the coiled tubing with the injector.
The Thruster doubles as a cleaning tool. When the propelling
fluid pressure exceeds a preset value, internal crossover ports open
and allow the fluid to move from the annulus to washing nozzles
located at the front of the tool.
If the distance between the blockage and the production facility
is greater than the reach of CoilTAC, after cleaning an initial section from the production facility, it will be necessary to cut the line
subsea and recover a line-free end to the surface to get coiled tubing
access for cleaning a second section.
CoilTAC has been successfully used on a number of wax cleaning
jobs in the Gulf of Mexico. The maximum distance for a cleaned
blockage has been 20,000 ft (6,096 m).

Flexi-Coil
Flexi-coil was developed by Paradigm Flow Services in 2013.
Conceptually, Flexi-Coil is similar to CoilTAC: Coiled tubing is
pulled through a flowline using a thruster installed at the end of
the coiled tubing by pressurizing the annulus between the flowline
and the coiled tubing. An important difference with CoilTAC is that
Flexi-Coil uses an almost-neutrally buoyant composite coiled tubing
instead of steel coiled tubing. As a result, according to Paradigm,
Flexi-Coil is able to negotiate tighter curves in flowlines and risers
and achieve longer distances. Paradigm also believes that the chances of composite pipe damaging the flowlines by friction loads applied
to the flowline curves are lower than with steel coiled tubing.
Most of the components of the Flexi-Coil surface are smaller than
those used with conventional coiled tubing. This makes it easier to
install the equipment in the often-limited space offered on production facilities or support vessels.

SureTherm
In the Campos basin, Petrobras pioneered the use of an exothermic chemical reaction between ammonium chloride and sodium
nitrite in an acidic pH to generate heat to melt wax (and hydrate)
deposits.
In doing so, the Brazilian national oil company successfully removed a number of blockages using the chemical process that is
known as the Nitrogen Generating System (SGN, from the Portu-

Graph depicting SureTherm temperature versus time. SureTherm has


been successfully tested off West Africa. (Image courtesy Halliburton)

88 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

A typical set-up of SureTherm equipment. (Image courtesy Halliburton)

guese expression Sistema Gerador de Nitrognio).


The biggest drawback of the technology was that only those areas
in close proximity to the chemical injection point could be treated,
because the exothermic reaction would terminate before the chemicals could reach more distant areas.
To address this issue, Halliburton developed SureTherm, which
controls the onset of the exothermic chemical reaction and generates heat after a calculated delay time. By delaying the exothermic
reaction, sufficient time is available for pumping the chemicals into a
flowline to a specified location where the generated heat can be used
to treat the wax deposits.
The maximum temperatures achievable and the target temperatures
employed are dependent upon and controlled by two factors, namely
the pipeline pressure and the concentration of the reactants used.
Depending upon the specific requirements, the SureTherm service can be applied alone or together with solvents. This latter method ensures that the solvents are applied at elevated temperatures,
resulting in efficient removal of paraffin from restricted flowlines.
The method can be used online (with production) or offline (flowline shutdown). The increased pressure generated by the produced
nitrogen shall be safely released.
To date, SureTherm has been successfully used once in a field
trial for one of Halliburtons clients in West Africa. The SureTherm
treatment generated sufficient heat to remove the paraffin deposits
in the pipeline; the time-delay mechanism worked as expected; and
the reaction took place in the paraffin deposition area.

Pipe-Pulse
Paradigm Flow Services launched Pipe-Pulse in 2011. Pipe-Pulse
is targeted at treating fully blocked flowlines. It is based on sending
high frequency, low amplitude pressure pulses into the flowline. The
length and pressure of a pulse is controlled using the Pipe-Pulse unit
and determined by proprietary algorithms developed by Paradigm.
Pipe-Pulse is a non-intrusive technology and does not require support vessels, ROVs, or entering the flowline with coiled tubing. The
Pipe-Pulse equipment is installed on the production platform and
typically tied to the flowline at the pig launcher.
The pulses work in two different ways: by breaking the bond between the plug and the pipe or by fissuring the plug itself, creating
a path for fluid to flow. With the latter, once communication is restored between the two ends of the plug, the pipeline can be flushed
with solvent to complete the wax cleaning operations.
The Pipe-Pulse consists of a conventional triplex pump that generates and pressurizes the flowline, usually between 1,000 psi and
2,000 psi (69 bar and 138 bar); a pulse unit capable of generating
pressure of various amplitudes and frequency; a hydraulic power
unit connected with the pulse unit; and various hoses and valves.
The technology appears particularly attractive for blockages that

SUBSEA

Launched in 2013, Discovery Subsea CT Scanner provides an image of


the contents of a flowline. (Photo courtesy Tracerco)

are located far away from the production platform or other suitable
access point, or when significant heat cannot be applied to a temperature restricted flexible pipe flowline.
Potential issues with the technology are the risk of mechanically
damaging the flowline, possibly requiring the use of a fatigue analysis. Additionally, high gas content in the flowline, typically defined in
excess of 5% of the volume of the flowline, can dampen the pulses.
According to Paradigm, the technology has been used so far in
about a dozen projects with a rate of success of 70%.

Determining wax location, deposition


Five techniques by varying companies for determining locations
of full or partial blockages are presented here. Tools and methods
like these listed below aid in gathering information that can be helpful in determining the best method for wax remediation. In addition,
some of these techniques can also be used to diagnose the effectiveness of the remedial treatment after the work is completed.
Halliburton. Pressure Pulse is a non-intrusive surveying method
for partial blockages only. Each survey takes a few minutes, and a
number of surveys are usually performed on a flowline cleaning job.
However, the analysis of the result of a Pressure Pulse survey takes
24-48 hours from the time the survey was performed.
To begin performing the survey, a valve to a flowline, through
which fluid is flowing, is rapidly closed. That valve closure creates
a pulse (similar to the water hammer effect) that travels through the
pipe at the speed of sound. The response from the pulse as it travels
along the pipeline is measured with fast sampling pressure transducers and a data logger. The analysis of the response from the pulse is
performed; the results of the analysis are presented in a graph showing the estimated thickness of the deposits in millimeters along the
flowline. The pressure transducers are usually located close to the
actuated valve.
The line volume should be filled with one liquid. Pressure Pulse
is not suitable for gas lines. The line should not have more than
around 2-3% line volume gas. Flexible sections and interfering pipework such as tees, etc., should be kept to a minimum.
Pressure Pulse can be used on a flowline in production.
Tracerco. The Discovery Subsea CT Scanner was launched in 2013.
The device provides an accurate image of the contents of a flowline
and of the pipe wall itself. It is installable by ROV after adequate room
is made available around the flowline using jetting or airlift. There is
no need to remove any flowline coating or stop pipeline operations.
Discovery works in a similar fashion to a CT scanner in a hospital
using a radioactive source revolving around the pipe and an array
of detectors. The device takes a set of pictures called projections at
different angles and recombines them to create a detailed computer
generated tomographic image. This gives a 360 image of the pipeline and its contents. The scanned image is available in real-time.
Discovery can distinguish between hydrate and wax build-up and
will also give data on weaknesses and wall thinning of flowlines. In
pipe-in-pipe applications, it can also detect water ingress between
pipes, allowing both the inner and outer pipeline in a pipe-in-pipe

system to be inspected from the outside.


One potential issue in detecting wax is that wax and oil have very
similar densities (density is what differentiates targets in a radiographic
image). Tracerco claims that the Discovery equipment is very sensitive
and can detect even the smallest differences in density. In addition, any
quantity, even minimal, of gas in the production fluid will further differentiate the density of the production fluid from the density of wax.
Schlumberger. The companys non-intrusive hoop strain pressure
sensors system can be used to determine the location and length of a
full wax blockage in a pipeline. The system can measure the pipeline
diameter at multiple positions while the line is pressurized and depressurized. Detection or absence of a diameter change at each location will determine the location of the plug, as no diameter change at a
location means flowline completely plugged at that location.
The system consists of multiple measuring stations, each made
up of ROV installable clamps and fasteners, hoop strain gauge, battery, memory to record the strain gauge readings.
The measurement stations can be removed and recovered to the
surface for full data download and analysis. They can be subsequently deployed at other locations to identify the location of the blockage
with higher accuracy. The system cannot be used to estimate the
thickness of the wax deposits on the wall of a flowline.
Paradigm Flow Services. Find-Block is a non-intrusive method,
based on a pipe pulse technology, to locate full obstructions in a
pipeline. It has been used in the North Sea.
Circor Energy. Acoustek is based on transmitting acoustic waves down
a gas or condensate pipeline and analyzing the pattern of the reflected
waves to locate full or partial blockages. For wax, its use is limited to condensate pipelines in which sometimes wax deposition occurs.

PIPELINES & FLOWLINES

Operators planning more than 6,500 miles


of offshore pipelines through 2019
Bruce Beaubouef

Managing Editor

perators and developers are studying, planning, and building just over 6,577 mi (10,582 km) of oil and gas pipelines to
bring these supplies from offshore felds to onshore markets.
The total refects a decrease from last years offshore pipeline
construction survey, which showed a total of 7,057 mi (11,355
km). This years total represents a 6.8% decrease over last year.
The decrease is largely driven by the removal of the long-planned
(and long-delayed) White Stream project from the survey, and the
cancellation of the South Stream project in the Black Sea. The White
Stream project, frst presented by Ukrainian offcials in 2005, had called
for 635 mi (1,021 km) of 20, 24 and 42-in. pipe to move natural gas from
Georgia to Ukraine and Romania via the Black Sea. The lack of progress on this project for many years led to its removal from the survey.
The cancellation of the South Stream pipeline project also decreased the survey numbers. The project was dropped by Russias
Gazprom last December following numerous obstacles placed on the
project by Bulgaria and the EU; the Crimean crisis; and the imposition of western sanctions on Russia. South Stream had called for four
578-mi (930-km) pipelines to move natural gas from Russia to Europe
via the Black Sea.
That same December, offcials from Gazprom and Turkeys Botas
Petroleum Pipeline Corp. signed amemorandum ofunderstanding
toconstruct anoffshore gas pipeline across the Black Sea to Turkey.
The Turkish Stream system, which calls for four 565-mi offshore
pipelines, will now replace theSouth Stream pipelineproject. Thus
the shift from South Stream to Turkish Stream also led to another
(albeit small) decrease in the survey numbers.
In January, Gazprom held talks with the Turkish Ministry ofEnergy and Natural Resources on the proposedpipeline. Gazprom will
submit anotice requesting execution offront-end engineering and design operations for the new Turkish offshore section. It will besolely
responsible for construction ofthe offshore section, while the Turkish
gas transportation facilities will bebuilt jointly. Current plans call for
the frst string of Turkish stream to come online in December 2016.
Even with all these changing project plans in the Black Sea, Europe remains the leader with offshore pipelines under consideration, with some 3,549 mi being built and planned.
Development of the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) continues to
make slow but steady progress. In March, developers launched two
prequalifcation contracts for construction of the 65-mi (105-km) offshore pipeline section under the Adriatic Sea. The frst prequalifcation comprises engineering, procurement, construction, and installation (EPCI) for the offshore section of the 36-in. pipeline between
the coastlines of Albania andsouthern Italy. The EPCI scope of work
includes associated landfall civil works at the landfalls in both Albania
and Italy, as well as survey, seabed, and pre-commissioning activities.
The second prequalifcation process is for supply of offshore line
pipes and coating. Following the selection stage,TAPis expected to
issue the related invitations to tender for offshore construction this
summer.
90 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

The proposed Turkish Stream system calls for four 565-mi offshore pipelines to move Russian natural gas across the Black Sea to Turkish and
Greek markets. (Courtesy Gazprom)

In the Norwegian Sea, pipelay has commenced on the Polarled gas


pipeline, the frst pipeline to extend Norways gas infrastructure into
the Arctic Circle. The Allseas pipelay vessel Solitairebegan pipelay
activities in March, and is working toward a late August completion.
The 298-mi, 36-in. pipeline will transport gas from theAasta Hansteen
feld in the Norwegian Sea to the terminal at Nyhamna in western
Norway. Laying will extend to water depths of up to 1,265 m (4,150 ft),
a record for a pipeline of this diameter, Statoil claims.
The Middle East comes in second in the survey with 1,405 mi being
built and planned. In the Persian Gulf, Pars Oil and Gas Co. (POGC) has
started subsea pipelay for phases 20 and 21 of the South Pars gas feld in
the Persian Gulf. The 65-mi (105-km) long pipelines will deliver sour gas
to the onshore refning facilities in Assaluyeh in southern Iran. To date,
some 25 mi (40 km) of Phase 21s pipes have been laid. Once pipelay has
fnished, POGC will install the new platforms for the two phases.
The South Pacifc comes in third in this years survey with 853 mi of
pipe being planned and built. Most notable here is the 552-mi (889-km),
42-in. gas export pipeline that will form part of the Ichthys LNG project
offshore Australia. Pipelay has been under way for months on this project, with the Saipem vessel Castorone undertaking the 446 mi of pipelay
called for in the deepwater portion of this project. Saipems SEMAC-1
has completed the 102-mi (164-km) shallow-water portion.Deepwater
pipelay is scheduled for completion late this year.
South America comes in fourth in the survey with some 515 mi of
pipelines planned for construction offshore Brazil. Saipem has won a
number of EPCI contracts for this work, but, according to reports, the
ongoing Petrobras scandal has resulted in late payments to Saipem
and other contractors, and the delay of these projects seems likely.
The US comes in ffth in the survey with almost 165 mi of pipe planned
for construction over the next few years. Perhaps the most notable
of these is Shells recently-announced Mattox pipeline. It calls for
a 90-mi, 24-in. pipeline to transport crude oil from the Appomattox
platform to an existing offshore structure in the South Pass area. No
completion date has been announced.

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2015 Global offshore pipeline construction survey


Length
(miles)

Pipe
dia. in
inches

Enbridge

16

Enbridge

Company

Location of project

Type of service

Max.
water
depth (ft)

18

Green Canyon block 468


(Stampede lateral)

Gathering, crude

3,500

Planned

36

20

Green Canyon block 860 to


Heidelberg development

Gathering, crude

5,300

Planned

Saipem (C)

2016

22.6

Dual 10

Coelacanth platform to existing


pipeline, Ewing Bank block 834

Gathering, crude and gas

1,200

Working

Ceona (C)

1Q 2016

90

24

Appomattox platform to existing


pipeline system, South Pass
area (Mattox pipeline)

Export, crude

7,200

Planned

Dual 18

Lakach field, Mexican GoM

Gathering, gas

3,937

Await start

12.75

Project status

Contractor and/or
Engineering Firm

In-service
target

UNITED STATES

Walter Oil & Gas Corp.


Shell

Total Miles

2018

NA

164.6

MEXICO
PEMEX

90

Total Miles

90

Saipem (E&C)

4Q 2017

EUROPE
Apache North Sea

14.4

Aviat field, UK central North Sea

Gathering, gas

2,690

Await start

EMAS (C )

2015

BP (Shah Deniz 2)

310

Shah Deniz field, Caspian Sea

Transmission, gas

1,800

Planned

Wood Group Kenny (E)

2018

Chevron North Sea

143

Rosebank field to Shetlands


Islands regional gas export
system

Export, gas

3,609

IGI Poseidon SA

135

42

Ionian Sea

Transmission, gas

Under Study

Lukoil

78

22

Vladimir Filanovsky field,


Caspian Sea, to shore

Trunkline, oil

Working

Saipem (C )

2015

83

28

Vladimir Filanovsky field,


Caspian Sea, to shore

Transmission, gas

Working

Saipem (C )

2015

North Caspian
Operating Co.

40

Dual 28

D Island, Caspian Sea, to Karabatan plant, Kazakhstan

Export, gas

Await start

Saipem (C )

4Q 2016

Trans Adriatic
Pipeline AG

65

36

Greece to Albania and Italy via


Adriatic Sea

Transmission, gas

2,657

Planned

2019

Turkish Stream
(Gazprom/Botas)

566

Russia to Turkey via Black Sea

Transmission, gas

7,381

Under Study

4Q 2016

566

Russia to Turkey via Black Sea

Transmission, gas

7,381

Under Study

566

Russia to Turkey via Black Sea

Transmission, gas

7,381

Under Study

Russia to Turkey via Black Sea

Transmission, gas

7,381

Under Study

Statoil (Polarled)

566
298

36

Aasta Hansteen field, Norwegian


Sea,

Transmission, gas

4,150

Working

Allseas (C)

2015

Statoil

17

20

Gina Krog platform to Sleipner


A platform

Export, gas

Planned

Ramboll Oil & Gas (E)

2017

Statoil

102

Karmy Island to Krst


processing plant

Export, gas

Under Study

Zakum field, offshore U.A.E.

Crude oil

Planned

Technip (EPIC)

2016

Dual gas pipelines to shore


(South Pars phases 20 and 21)

Transmission, gas

Working

Iranian Offshore
Engineering and
Construction Co.

4Q 2015

Under study
Supreme Offshore
Construction & Technical
Services (EPC)

2Q 2016

Total Miles

3,549.4

MIDDLE EAST
Abu Dhabi Marine
Operating Co.

56

National Iranian Oil Co.

124

National Iranian Gas


Exports Co.

162

Iran to Oman via Persian Gulf

Transmission, gas

ONGC

106

Mumbai High North field,


Arabian Sea

Gathering, crude and gas

South Asia Gas Enterprise Pvt. Ltd. (SAGE)

807

24 to 27

Oman MECS to Gujarat, India,


via Arabian Sea

Transmission, gas

11,100

Under study

Zakum Development Co.

150

6 to 42

Offshore Abu Dhabi, UAE

Gathering, crude

80

Planned

Total Miles

Dual 32

1,405

92 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

2017
Technip/National
Petroleum Construction
Co. (EPCI)

2017

PIPELINES & FLOWLINES


2015 Global offshore pipeline construction survey
Length
(miles)

Pipe
dia. in
inches

Chevron

140

44

Cooper Energy/Santos
Ltd. (VIC/RL3 joint
venture)

40

Eni Muara Bakau BV

121

4 to 24

Muara Bakau PSC working area,


Makassar Strait, Indonesia

INPEX

552

42

Offshore processing facility to


Darwin

Total Miles

853

232

20, 22,
24

236

Company

Location of project

Type of service

Max.
water
depth (ft)

Wheatstone processing platform


to LNG plant, Ashburton North,
Western Australia

Transmission, gas

229

Working

Sole gas field to Orbost Gas


Plant, Victoria, Australia

Transmission, gas

410

Under Study

1411

Planned

Technip (EPIC)

2017

Transmission, gas

902

Working

Saipem (C )

2016

Franco and Marica areas to


petrochemical plant in Itaborai

Export, oil and gas

7,544

Planned

24

Gathering manifold, Lula field,


to onshore processing plant,
Macae district

Export, gas

7,218

Planned

Saipem (EPCI)

2016

33.6

18

Guara FPSO to subsea gathering


manifold, Lula field

Export, gas

7,218

Planned

Saipem (EPCI)

2016

13.7

18

Lula Northeast FPSO to subsea


gathering manifold, Lula field

Export, gas

6,890

Planned

Saipem (EPCI)

2016

Project status

Contractor and/or
Engineering Firm

In-service
target

Allseas (C)

2016

SOUTH PACIFIC

SOUTH AMERICA
Petrobras

Total Miles

GRAND TOTAL

2016-2017

515.3
6,577.3

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Call For Nominations


of Offshore Pioneers
For the 2016 Hall of Fame
Help us honor those
who made our industry
what it is today.

The Offshore Energy Center


is currently calling for nominations of Industry
Pioneers and Pioneering Technologies for induction
into the Hall of Fame. For 2016, the committee would
like to place an emphasis on receiving nominations for
the individuals who formed some of the foundations
for the offshore industry's technology and/or were
corporate leaders, preferably before 1995 including
overseas developments.

Industry Pioneers Award


recognizes important achievements of individuals
who are recognized leaders in the offshore energy
industry.

The Offshore Pioneers


are inducted into the
Offshore Energy Centers
Hall of Fame at the
annual Ocean Star Gala.

Technology Pioneers Award


recognizes important technologies by individuals,
companies, organizations or institutions.
Nominations Close
November 20, 2015
To receive a nominating package, please contact the
Offshore Energy Center at 281.679.8040,
email dknigge@oceanstaroec.com or log on to
www.oceanstaroec.com and download the forms.
Bill Barkhouse - Chairman, Hall of Fame Committee

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OCTOBER 13-15, 2015 | HOUSTON, TEXAS, USA

2015 ADVISORY BOARD


Dr. Francisco Garca Hernndez PEMEX

Mr. David Morgan OneSubsea

Ms. Stphanie Abrand Saipem s.a.

Dr. Andrew Newport SBM Offshore

Mr. Christopher M. Barton Wood Group Mustang, Inc.

Dr. H. Lee Norris III Schlumberger

Mr. Simon Davies Statoil

Dr. Patrick OBrien ITF

Mr. Loc des Dserts Doris Engineering

Mr. Jim Osborn Worley Parsons Group

Mr. Richard DSouza KBR/Granherne

Mr. David Paganie Offshore

Dr. Ian Frazer Crondall Energy

Mr. Francesco Paone ENI

Mr. Frederic Garnaud TOTAL

Mr. Philippe Perreau GEP AFTP

Dr. Christian Geertsen ITP InTerPipe

Mr. Artie Ruderman Ruderman Business Services


Corporation

Mr. Jan van der Graaf Heerema Marine Contractors

Dr. T. Sriskandarajah Subsea 7

Mr. Kieran Kavanagh Wood Group Kenny

Mr. David Walters 2H Offshore

Angel Gonzalez Lastra Repsol E&P USA

Mr. Bill Westcott INTECSEA, Inc.

Dr. Ming-Yao Lee Chevron

Mr. James Wiseman Noble Energy

Mr. Alain Marion Technip

Dr. Flora Yiu Anadarko Petroleum Corporation

Mr. Mike McEvilly Hess Corporation

Dr. Jane Zhang Shell International E&P

DeepOffshoreTechnology.com

OPENING PLENARY SESSION


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2015
8:30 AM 10:30 AM

WELCOME & INTRODUCTION


MR. DAVID PAGANIE, CHIEF EDITOR, OFFSHORE MAGAZINE, PENNWELL CORPORATION
David Paganie is Chief Editor of Offshore magazine and International Conferences Director of PennWells Offshore Group. He oversees the
Offshore international conferences and all Offshore magazine print and digital editorial content. Prior to joining PennWell in 2005, Paganie
served as Editor of Offshore Field Development International at ODS-Petrodata (IHS-Petrodata), and as an Analyst at Baker Energy
(Wood Group). He has more than 17 years of experience in the upstream offshore oil and gas industry. Paganie holds a Bachelor of Business
Administration degree with a specialty in fnance from Ohio University.

ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRMAN WELCOME


DR. FRANCISCO GARCA-HERNNDEZ, MANAGER TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT, DEPLOYMENT RESOURCES MANAGEMENT, PEMEX E&P
Dr. Francisco Garca-Hernndez holds a Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering from the Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico
(UNAM) and a Masters Degree and PhD in Petroleum Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines.
In 1974 Dr. Garca began his professional career in the Production Division of the Mexican Petroleum Institute (IMP) and subsequently has held
various positions at Petrleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) such as Well Productivity Manager, Leader of the Cantarell Strategic Project, and Production
Project Manager of the South Region. In 2011 he was appointed Technical Resources Development & Implementation Manager.
Additionally, he has collaborated with the Graduate School of Engineering and the School of Earth Sciences at the Instituto Politcnico Nacional (IPN) and
with UNAMs School of Engineering. He is currently member of the Mexican Engineering Academy, the Mexican Association of Petroleum Engineers and the
Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), where he serves on the Board of the SPE Mexico Section.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS
DR. PEDRO SILVA-LPEZ, CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER, PEMEX, INVITED

INTERNATIONAL OPERATOR PERSPECTIVES


MR. TOM MORONEY, VICE PRESIDENT WELLS & FACILITIES ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES IRD, SHELL PROJECTS & TECHNOLOGY
Tom is currently Vice President for Wells & Facilities Engineering Technologies in Shells Innovation, Research, & Development unit within
the RDS Projects and Technology organization. In this capacity he is accountable for all research and development activities across several
global technology platforms: Deepwater, Wells, Arctic, Water Sustainability, Process Separation & IOR/EOR Facilities, and Shell Technology
Norway. Prior to assuming his current role in December 2014, he was Deepwater Technology Deployment & Geosciences Expertise Manager for
Shell Upstream America. Previous to the appointments in technology, he was the Deepwater Wells Surveillance Manager and Well & Reservoir Management
Strategic Lead with responsibilities for Shells production engineering discipline covering assets in the GOM & South America. Tom began his career in
1985 with Shell in California as a reservoir engineer. Over the course of the next 30 years, he has worked in a variety of technical roles and has held a
number of management positions in all of Shells major U.S. locations - covering both onshore and offshore operations. He holds a BS with Distinction in
Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University (1985) and a MBA from UCLA Andersen (1999).

MR. MICK KRALY, GENERAL MANAGER OF FACILITIES ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, CHEVRON ENERGY TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
Mick received his Bachelors degree in Petroleum Engineering from University of Wyoming in 1983. He joined Texaco
in 2000 as a project manager based in Caracas, Venezuela, and has held project management positions within his
Chevron career in Venezuela, Russia, Kazakhstan and Nigeria. Prior to joining Chevron, Mick worked for ARCO in various
positions in Alaska, Yemen, Indonesia and Venezuela. Mick was appointed to the position of General Manager, Facilities
Engineering in October 2013. Mick resides in Houston, Texas with his wife Peggy and their twin daughters, Kesha & Masha.

MR. JASON NYE, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT US OFFSHORE, STATOIL


Jason joined Statoil in 2003 and has served as Vice President of Finance and Control in both the International
and North American business units. He was appointed to his current position as Senior Vice President of US
Offshore in 2011. Prior to joining Statoil, Jason worked for over ten years in offshore operations with Unocal
in the US and Asia. He also served as an energy consultant for McKinsey and as Head of Strategy for BG Group.
Jason holds a B.S. degree in geology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, an M.S. in geophysics from Stanford
University and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin.

OCTOBER 13-15, 2015 | HOUSTON, TEXAS, USA

CONFERENCE-AT-A-GLANCE
TRACK 2

TRACK 1
Floating Production Facilities & Mooring, Deepwater Projects - Lessons
Learned, Asset Integrity, Emerging Technology & Development Trends,
Offshore Safety & Environment, Deepwater Project Economics
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Subsea Technology Advancements, Riser Design


& Deployment, Pipeline Construction & Installation,
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OPENING PLENARY

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BUSINESS BRIEFS

People
Akastor ASA has appointed Kristian
Rkke as CEO. He succeeds Frank O. Reite,
who will take the position of CFO at Aker ASA.
Lundin Petroleum has appointed Alex
Schneiter as president and CEO, effective
Oct. 1, 2015. Schneiter will succeed Ashley
Heppenstall, who has recently advised the
board of his decision to step-down as president and CEO. He will remain on the board of
directors. Nick Walker, who recently joined
the company as senior vice president development and operations, will succeed Schneiter
as COO.
Hans Christen Rnnevik, exploration
manager at Lundin Norway AS, has retired
from his executive duties
but through a consultancy
arrangement will be fully
involved in all explorationrelated activities in
Norway.
Greenes Energy Group
CEO Robert Vilyus has
elected to retire from the
Mathews
company and the board
of directors in September
2015. Frank Mathews
has assumed the role of
president and COO and
will be added to the board.
4Subsea has appointed
Peter Jenkins as CEO.
He succeeds Henning
Jenkins
Christensen.
AnTech Ltd. has appointed Jan Ward as
chair of the companys
board of directors.
Jay Swent has retired
as executive vice president and CFO of Ensco
plc after more than 11
years of service.
Ward
Amec Foster Wheeler
has appointed George Hernandez as president, Upstream Business Development.
Rodney J. Eichler has retired as executive
vice president and executive advisor to the
CEO of Apache Corp.
BMT Group has appointed Sir John Hood
as chairman. Effective
Oct. 1, 2015, he succeeds
Dr. Neil Cross.
Bibby HydroMap has
appointed Mick Slater as
operations director.
Hood
Layne Christensen Co.
has appointed J. Michael
Anderson as CFO.
Car y Bounds has joined VAALCO Energy
as COO.
Prosafe Management AS has named Stig

H. Christiansen as CFO.
Xodus Group has
promoted Andrew Sewell
to global subsurface lead
to drive forward its global
subsurface capabilities.
Nido Petroleum Ltd.
has named Dr. Michael
Fischer as managing
director.
Sewell
Paul Betteridge has
joined TCO as managing director of the UK
division.
2H Offshore, an Acteon
company, has appointed
Prahlad Enuganti as
technical manager in its
Aberdeen office.
Enuganti
Jim Kinser has joined
Suretank as sales manager
for North America. The
company also has appointed Peter Weiss as
regional director for Asia/
Pacific. He will be responsible for the companys
manufacturing facilities in
China and Thailand.
Kinser
Unique Group has promoted Mike Jessop to global head of diving.
The company has recruited Andy Doggett to
serve as head of the new survey equipment
division, and Steve McMillan to serve as
global HSE & projects director.
Aqualis Offshore has appointed GangYeoung Jeong as general manager of the
companys office in Busan, South Korea.
EnerMech has promoted Niall Conlon to
director of its Australian operations. Ciaran
Hallinan has joined the company as general
manager.
Wellsite Fishing and Rental Services has
named Wes Heiskell as president and Mark
Johnson as COO.
MAST has hired Tony
Armour as client development and marketing
director.
Vallourec has appointed
William Gamisans as
managing director for
Vallourec Tube-Alloy
Armour
worldwide, Francis Nwabudike as managing director for
Vallourec Drilling Products worldwide, and
David Bousquet as vice president, operations
support for Vallourec Drilling Products. Trina
Rauscher-Cooper, currently vice president,
human resources for Vallourec USA, will also
assume human resources responsibilities for
Vallourec Drilling Products and Vallourec
Tube-Alloy worldwide.
MSIS has appointed John Forrest as non-

executive chairman, Scott Laing as business


development manager, Mike Ironside as
senior account manager, Alex Cain as account manager, and Sarah Brown as account
manager.
M-Flow Technologies has appointed James
Buckee as non-executive director and board
member.
Seatronics Ltd. has promoted Derek Donaldson
from vice president Asia
Pacific to vice president
global operations. He will
be based in Singapore and
will continue to manage the
regional office, while mainDonaldson
taining a global presence.
Duncan Baillie has
joined LUX Assure as business development
manager, OMMICA product line.

Company News
The US Bureau of Ocean Energy
Management (BOEM) has agreed for the
national academies to form a new committee
on environmental science and assessment for
offshore energy and minerals resources. The
committee will provide independent information on issues relevant to BOEMs environmental studies and assessment activities and
support discussions on relevant issues. The
committee will operate under a three-year contract with the National Research Council,
the operating arm of the National Academy
of Sciences, and the National Academy of
Engineering. The panel will comprise of 15
experts from academia, the private sector, and
other organizations with scientific disciplines
relevant to BOEMs environmental assessment and studies programs. Committee
members will not be compensated.
GE Oil & Gas has opened its new Innovation Centre in Newcastle, northeast England,
which will develop technology for subsea fields.
The complex houses a wide range of testing
equipment for flexible pipelines, and is said
to simulate underwater conditions in some
of the worlds harshest offshore regions. The
companys focus will be on R&D for the next
generation of flexibles for ultra-deepwater and
high-pressure/high-temperature reservoirs.
Katalyst Data Management has acquired
the Perth, Australia-based oil and gas data
management division of SpectrumData Pty
Ltd. SpectrumDatas geoscience service division will be rebranded KDM SpectrumData.
Halliburton Co. and Baker Hughes Inc.
have agreed to extend the time period for
closing of the acquisition to no later than Dec.
1, 2015.
Royal IHChas formed IHC Concept in
Newcastle, northeast England, to offer engineering services to the oil, gas, offshore, and
marine sectors. The team specializes in the
www.offshore-mag.com August 2015 Offshore 105

BUSINESS BRIEFS

design and build of a wide range of offshore


equipment and subsea infrastructure.
Aqualis Offshore has opened an office
in Busan, South Korea. The Busan office will
offer the companys full range of services with
support from other group offices. However, its
initial focus will be on dynamic positioning consultancy, transportation and installation, marine
warranty, and construction supervision.
Wood Group has acquired BETA Machinery Analysis in a deal valued at $14.3 million.
The engineering consultancy will operate under
Wood Group Kenny, specifically within the
Wood Group Integrity Management business.
Conductor Installation Services Ltd.
(CIS), an Acteon company, has received its second consecutive Gold Medal for Occupational
Health and Safety from the UKs Royal Society
for the Prevention of Accidents. CIS completedits 10th consecutive year of operation
without an accident or a lost time incident.
Polarcus has relocated its North & South
America regional office in Houston, to new
premises in the Cobalt Center in Memorial City.
The new office is located in a Class A-designated building, LEED-certified by the US Green
Building Council. The location is adjacent to the
Energy Corridor in West Houston. The facility
is also close to the companys data processing
partner DownUnder GeoSolutions.
Well Control School (WCS) has renovated

and expanded its training center in Laurel,


Mississippi, in order to be able to offer more
accredited courses for the WCS and IADC
WellCAP/WellSharp certification programs.
The renovated facility includes additional
state-of-the-art simulators to accommodate
more students, as well as more computer stations for its System 21 e-Learning program.
Hermes Datacomms has partnered with
O3b Networks to deliver communications
to a global oil company. Under the contract,
Hermes will deliver communications for an
operator in West Africa and a connection back
to its regional headquarters in Europe.
Cargostore International Ltd. has appointed Niels Winther Shipping Esjberg as
the companys offshore agent in Denmark.
Wellsite Rental Ser vices and Viking Oil
Tools have agreed to merge to form Wellsite
Fishing and Rental Ser vices. NGP Energy
Technology Partners is the majority owner
of both the merging companies.
Swire Oilfield Ser vices has secured a
five-year contract with Weatherford International plc in Brazil. The contract calls for
Swire to provide DNV 2.7-1 cargo carrying
units to the oil and gas service company to
ensure the safe transportation and storage of
project critical equipment offshore.
BASF SE has selected Fluor Corp. as its
global engineering partner for future chemi-

cal and petrochemical plant projects around


the world. The services agreement includes
conceptual and front-end engineering, detailed
engineering, procurement, project management, construction management, and other
services. Fluor will use its global network of
offices to execute future BASF plant projects
around the world.
V.Ships Offshore has opened a new office
in Aberdeen. Located in Westhill, Aberdeenshire, the office is strategically placed to provide an extensive range of ship management
and technical services to its offshore clients
and the maritime industry worldwide.
Permasense has appointed a local agent
for Australia, New Zealand, and Papua New
Guinea. Corrosion Control Engineering will
work with Permasense to provide business
development and customer support in the
Asia/Pacific region.
Beier Radio has changed its operating
company name to Beier Integrated Systems.
The company will continue to provide turnkey
vessel control, navigation, and communications equipment.
Brown & Root is moving its corporate
headquarters to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from
Houston. The headquarters will be at Citiplace
on Corporate Boulevard. The first group of executives is to be in Baton Rouge by the end of
this year, and the remainder by the end of 2016.

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INVITATION TO JOIN OUR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS
BE PART OF WEST AFRICAS PREMIER TECHNICAL OIL & GAS EVENT
The 20th Anniversary edition of Offshore West Africa will return to Lagos,
Nigeria on 26-28 January 2016, delivering the premier technical forum
focused exclusively on West African offshore exploration and production.
The conference will deliver the latest technological innovations, solutions
and lessons learned from leading industry professionals.
Offshore West Africa Conference and Exhibition remains the leading
source of information on new technology and operating expertise for this
booming deepwater and subsea market.
Offshore West Africa registration is now open, so do not delay, ensure you
join us for our anniversary in Lagos.

For information on Exhibit Sales & Sponsorship at Offshore West Africa,


please contact:
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PENNWELL PETROLEUM GROUP
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71 Allen Ave, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria
PHONE +234 802 223 2864
Dele Olaoye dele.olaoye@q-she.com

Aero Tec Laboratories, Inc. ..................... 108


atlinc.com
Aker Solutions .............................................9
www.akersolutions.com
Alimak Hek .................................................40
www.alimakhek.com
Allseas Group ..............................................3
www.allseas.com
American Association of Drilling
Engineers ...................................................93
www.aade.org
Archer .........................................................39
archerwell.com
ATV S.p.A. .............................................16-17
www.atvspa.com

Offshore Energy Center ............................95


www.oceanstaroec.com
OneSubsea .................................................23
www.onesubsea.com
Orion Instruments .................................... C2
www.orioninstruments.com
ORR Safety Corporation ...........................91
www.konggloves.com

B
Baker Hughes ............................................59
www.bakerhughes.com
BigLift Shipping B.V. .................................79
www.bigliftshipping.com
Bluebeam Software, Inc. ...........................31
www.bluebeam.com
Bredero Shaw............................................. 13
www.brederoshaw.com
Bristow Group, Inc. ....................................47
bristowgroup.com
C
CGG Services US Inc. ...............................29
www.cgg.com
Check-6.......................................................21
ChecklistCulture.com
Clover Tool Company ................................51
www.clovertool.com
Cortec Fluid Control ..................................37
www.uscortec.com
D
Dril-Quip .......................................................1
www.dril-quip.com
E
EMAS AMC .................................................83
www.emas.com
F
FMC Technologies .................................... C4
www.fmctechnologies.com
Fugro Geoconsulting Ltd. ......................... 11
www.fugro.com
H
Heerema Marine Contractors SE ..............75
www.heerema.com
K
Karmsund Maritime Offshore
Supply.........................................................45
www.kamos.no
KOREAN AIR ..............................................33
www.koreanair.com
L
LAGCOE .................................................... C3
www.lagcoe.com

P
PCM SA.......................................................85
www.pcm.eu
PennWell
Deep Offshore Technology
Conference & Exhibition ............... 97-102
www.deepoffshoretechnology.com
Deepwater Operations
Conference & Exhibition ..............49, 103
www.deepwateroperations.com
Offshore Group ......................... 4, 94, 110
www.offshore-mag.com
Offshore West Africa
Conference & Exhibition ....................109
www.offshorewestafrica.com
PennEnergy JOBS ..............................106
www.pennenergyjobs.com
PennWell Books......................................6
www.PennWellBooks.com
POWER-GEN Natural Gas
Conference & Exhibition ....................104
www.powergennaturalgas.com
Subsea Tieback Forum &
Exhbition .......................................96, 103
www.subseatiebackforum.com
Topsides, Platforms & Hulls
Conference & Exhibition ..............96, 107
www.topsidesevent.com
Perupetro SA ..............................................53
www.perupetro.com.pe
PH Industrie-Hydraulik
GmbH & Co. KG .........................................27
www.ph-hydraulik.de
R
R.M. Young Company ................................89
www.youngusa.com
Rembe GMBH Safety + Control ................36
www.rembe.de
Rolls Royce Marine ....................................43
www.rolls-royce.com
S
Scantrol ........................................................7
www.scantrol.com
T
Tiger Offshore Rentals ..............................55
tigeroffshorerentals.com
U
UT99 ............................................................78
www.ut99.com
V
Valvitalia S.p.A. ..........................................44
www.valvitalia.com
Van Beest B.V. ............................................41
www.vanbeest.com
Van Oord Offshore B.V. ............................. 19
www.vanoord.com

Midis Energy Services ..............................73


www.midisenergyservices.com
Modulift UK, Ltd. ........................................77
www.modulift.com
MSH Ship Management ............................. 15

Washington State University .................. 108


www.voiland.wsu.edu
Weatherford..................................................5
weatherford.com
Williams Inspection Services, Inc. ...........36
www.williamsinspection.com
Wood Group Mustang ...............................87
www.mustangeng.com

N
National Oilwell Varco ...............................35
www.nov.com
NOV Fiber Glass Systems .........................25
www.fgspipe.com
Nylacast ......................................................57
www.nylacast.com

Z
Zeeco, Inc. ..................................................81
www.zeeco.com
The index of page numbers is provided as a
service. The publisher does not assume any
liability for error or omission.

BEYOND THE HORIZON

Discussion on Britains future gas supply


should focus on North Sea
Britains shale gas debate is serving as a huge distraction in the
face of more immediate challenges facing the UKs energy sector
namely the plight of the North Sea oil and gas industry and the lack
of progress in building a new generation of nuclear power stations.
All projections suggest the UK will continue to need large quantities of natural gas into the 2020s, even more so if the construction
of nuclear power stations is further delayed. The net result could
be that the UK will need more natural gas for longer than currently
projected.
Energy security is one of the main arguments put forward by the
government in favor of shale gas development. But the reality is that
even before the recent decision by Lancashire County Council not
to approve fracking by Cuadrilla, significant commercial shale gas
production onshore in the UK was probably a decade away.
From an energy security perspective, it might be wiser to plan
on the basis of a UK shale fail. The attention afforded shale gas
should instead be directed at maximizing the economic return
from the North Sea. The benefits are clear to see: the infrastructure, although aging, is already in place and the industry supports
a substantial workforce and generates significant income for the
UK economy. Put another way, the clear and present danger is not
whether the UK can develop a shale gas industry, it is whether it can
arrest the decline in investment in the North Sea and ensure that it
maximizes the output of oil and gas from the basin. This is a pressing matter as forces are conspiring to create a perfect storm that
could leave large amounts of oil and gas left in the ground.
For those that campaign against oil and gas development, leaving it in the ground is the best solution; but this belies some simple
truths about the governments proposed low carbon energy transition. First, this is not going to happen overnight and the UKs decarbonization project set a target of an 80% reduction in emissions 35
years from now. Second, in the immediate future the UK is going to
continue to need significant amounts of oil and gas. In a relatively
short time, the UK has become a significant net importer, with imports accounting for 31.9% of oil and 54.9% of natural gas consumption. If the rate of production decline in the North Sea cannot be
arrested then the level of imports will be significantly greater in the
2020s, with all the attendant geopolitical and price security concerns.
One of the things that the current shale gas debate has revealed is
just how little the public understands about the UKs energy system
and the challenges that it faces. Citizens are complacent about their
24/7 access to energy services at prices that are lower than much of
Europe, no matter how much they complain about the energy companies. More than 80% of households in the UK heat their homes
and cook with natural gas, yet they have an inflated view of the cur-

rent significant of renewable energy in the UKs energy mix and the
role that such intermittent power can play in the near term. Offshore
oil and gas production is simply out of sight and out of mind.
For those in the industry and in the halls of Westminster the current plight of the North Sea is well understood; even if some of the
problems are the result of an own goal by the Treasury in terms of
earlier tax increases. The Wood Review provided a precise diagnosis
of the challenges and a clear set of recommendations as to what
needs to be done. The government accepted all of those recommendations and is in the process of implementing them. The new Oil and
Gas Authority has been created and is bedding in, improvements to
the fiscal regime have been made, and more are likely. However, the
dramatic fall in the oil price has overwhelmed these initiatives as the
status of the UKCS as a mature high-cost basin is exposing it to costcutting and early decommissioning of infrastructure.
Commenting on the Energy Institutes recent Energy Barometer Report, Malcolm Brinded, chairman of the Shell Foundation,
noted that attracting investment to the North Sea now is critical
because there is only a short window of opportunity to maximize
output from existing producing fields, and to find and develop remaining small prospects, while aging infrastructure is still in place.
At its recent annual conference in Aberdeen, the new head of Oil
and Gas UK, Deirdre Michie, suggested that the industry must find
a way to be sustainable in a world of $60 oil. Of course, tax cuts help;
but only significant efficiency gains within the industry can make
the necessary difference. But the critical point is that both the UK
government and the offshore industry need to make the case that an
effective regulator, a competitive fiscal regime, and an efficient and
technologically dynamic industrial base is now in place in the North
Sea making it an attractive place to invest. This is critical to preserving jobs, maintaining production, and ensuring the maximum
economic return on the remaining reserves offshore.
Whether or not there is to be a shale gas industry onshore in the
UK is far from clear; what is clear is that the government and the
offshore industry in the UK need to do more to educate the public
as to the critical importance of maximum economic recovery, and
they need to demonstrate to international investors that they are doing what is needed to make investment now an attractive prospect.
Failure to do so will have far a more significant impact on UK energy
security than the recent decisions in Lancashire.

Michael Bradshaw

Professor of Global Energy


Warwick Business School

This page reflects viewpoints on the political, economic, cultural, technological, and environmental issues that shape the future of the petroleum industry. Offshore
Magazine invites you to share your thoughts. Email your Beyond the Horizon manuscript to David Paganie at davidp@pennwell.com.

112 Offshore August 2015 www.offshore-mag.com

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AUGUST 2015

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

n recent decades, French oil and gas companies have grown used to market
fluctuations, but the current downturn in the oil price has challenged the very
fundamentals of the industry, triggered unprecedented structural changes and
brought need for reform in the French oil and gas industry front and center. The
French hydrocarbons sector, which traces its roots back to the turn of the 20th century,
has proven to be resilient, technologically adept and resourceful in finding innovative
ways to cope with the current crisis.

Patrick Pouyann, CEO

While the current slowdown is compelling major French companies to

of Total, places the blame

introduce cost-effective solutions, many regret that these measures

for the current slowdown

werent adopted sooner. Philippe Crouzet, Chairman of Vallourec, explains

on price fluctuations, the

that prior to this crisis, the oil and gas sectors performance data had sent

unexpected

a clear signal indicating a need for reform, which companies initially ig-

emergence

of unconventional hydrocarbons and competition

Patrick Pouyann,
CEO, Total

nored. Indeed, returns on capital expenditure had drastically diminished


long before oil prices started to crumble.

between various forms of

Some French companies were more attentive to market signals. We

energy. Frances flagship

were among the first companies to sound the alarm, says Jean-Georges

oil and gas company is to-

Malcor, CEO of CGG. In December 2013, we outlined the details of our

day

seeking

transformation plan, which consisted of reducing our footprint in acquisi-

spending cuts, but as

tions and reducing our cost base to become more agile. When market

actively

Pouyann explains, this


was not a priority just a
few years ago. While

Thierry Pilenko,
chairman and
CEO, Technip

Philippe Crouzet,
chairman,
Vallourec

conditions worsened in 2014, CGG furthered its efforts by reducing its


fleet size and cutting its global headcount by 12 percent, drastic measures
that Malcor presents as a necessary evil. The situation paradoxically

cost-cutting might seem

helped us complete this transformation faster than expected. There has

obvious today, it was not the case a few years

fortunately been positive feedback from the market.

Jean-Georges
Malcor, CEO,
CGG

back. Things had escalated to the point that

While all companies, irrespective of size and position in the value chain, endorse cost-

many in the industry had forgotten that when

cutting measures, they fail to agree on who exactly should bear the burden. The dramatic

working with commodities, its essential to

changes occurring in our business environment and their implications to our clients cash

carefully manage your expenses and your

flows compelled them to enact drastic measures. Their reaction is only natural but they need

cash break even. Even Frances IOC has

to seek further cooperation with their contractors to foster a resilient cost-environment.

been shaken by the current situation. Our

asserts Thierry Pilenko, Chairman and CEO of Frances leading engineering, construction

size may prevent us from collapsing in the

and project management company Technip.

short term but we must remain extremely

Some companies have managed to mitigate the effects of the crisis through good port-

cautious and acknowledge what economic

folio management. In spite of strong challenges generated by the slowdown, we are enter-

signals are telling us.

ing this difficult period having achieved a record of order intakes in 2014, reveals Pilenko,

What clearly distinguishes the current

The steps we have taken to broaden our portfolio of solutions have contributed signifi-

crisis from previous ones is that some of the

cantly to our solid performance. We won many projects in the subsea world thanks to our

oil majors have almost immediately initiated a staff reduction, explains Thierry Pilen-

F1: RETURN ON CAPITAL EMPLOYED (ROCE) VS PRICE OF BRENT

ko, Chairman and CEO of Technip. What

No one had introduced the topic of

in the US. When I realized that this new industry was growing, and growing very
quickly, it was very unexpected. Of course,
shale hydrocarbons were known but we
were convinced that these hydrocarbons

15%
10%

5% - 15%

$80

10% - 15%

$60
$40

5%

$20

0%

$0

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013

economist. It had barely started to emerge

$100

15% - 20%

20%
ROCE

Ren Bauquis, a prominent geologist and

20% - 25%

25%

from both IOCs and NOCs.

Brent $/barrel

the 2009 crisis is the immediate reaction

shale gas before I left Total in 2002, admits

$120

30%

also differentiates the current situation with

would forever remain economically unviable to produce.

Source: IHS Upstream Competition Service

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

AUGUST 2015

complete set of solutions.


Reactivity and proximity are the new watchwords of Dominique
Henri, Chairman and CEO of Heurtey Petrochem, an engineering
and project management company specialized in two market segments; process furnaces for refining, petrochemicals & hydrogen
production, and natural-gas treatment, through its subsidiary
Prosernat. We capitalize on our new fabrication facilities, project
management and engineering offices in India to deliver our services
more effectively in Asia and the Middle East, he explains.
The ability of E&P and EPC companies to drastically reduce costs
and introduce internal flexibility has created an unprecedented window of opportunity for ambitious niche players that can assist them
in fulfilling this objective: Our business model consists of enabling
oil and gas companies to provide quality at a global level without

SeaOwl, an asset management and technical assistance company.


Gauthier firmly believes that the oil and gas industry cannot afford
to be conservative and complacent, and must

enduring unbearable costs, explains Arnoult Gauthier, president of

SE OWL

outsource wherever possible to reduce costs.


For instance, in asset management, we provide
integrated services that cover the marine side of
FPSOs, Gauthier explains. Our role is to assess
from a global perspective, which people will be
Arnoult Gauthier,
president,
SeaOwl

needed in which positions, and where the risks lie


in terms of safety.

GENERATIONS OF UNLOCKING
TECHNOLOGICAL BARRIERS

FROM SUPERVISION TO
OPERATIONS, USE OF OUR
NETWORK OF DRILLING, MARINE
& SUBSEA EXPERT CONSULTANTS

Although France doesnt have any significant hydrocarbon production of its own, it has nevertheless managed to create an oil and gas industry
composed of market leaders in virtually every

WWW.SEAOWLGROUP.COM

segment of the value chain. Very few people


know that France is the worlds second largest oil
services industry in terms of exports, says Jean

YOUR PROVIDER OF
FACILITY MANAGEMENT
& QUALITY MANPOWER
SERVICES TO THE
OIL & GAS INDUSTRY

Jean Ropers,
chairman 20092015, GEP-AFTP

Ropers, the former chairman of the French Association of Companies and Professionals in the oil, gas and related
industries, or GEP-AFTP.
Frances involvement in oil and gas dates back to the end of the
First World War. Successive governments recognized the significance of oil and gas as a pivotal resource to win major wars. In
1924, the French government created an ad hoc company called
Compagnie Franaise Des Ptroles, explains Daniel Valot, Technips Chairman & CEO from 1999 to 2007. Later on, wishing to
monitor its oil supplies more closely, the French authorities enacted
a law in March 1928 that gave the French state a monopoly on importing and refining crude oil, but would delegate this monopoly to
AUGUST 2015

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

various French companies.

In spite of its rigid labor market and high labor

The credibility and quality of this French ex-

costs, France is home to the research, execution

pertise arguably stems from the scientific excel-

and project centers of several international com-

lence of engineering schools such as Ecole Poly-

panies. Saipem France has become a leading

technique, and various research institutes and


associations have successfully translated this engineering excellence into oil and gas expertise.Olivier Appert, chairman and CEO of IFPEN

project execution center for Saipem globally,


Olivier Appert,
chairman &
CEO 2003-2015,
IFPEN

Fabio Pallavicini,
CEO, Saipem SA

declares Fabio Pallavicini, CEO of the French affiliate. Technological development is undeniably

critical to our success and explains the importance of our Paris office

from 2003 to 2015, the institute that has over the

as a project execution center. We have established lasting relation-

last 70 years accompanied oil and gas companies during phases of

ships with French universities and research centers to develop new

radical technological transformation, explains how within the French

technologies.

oil and gas community, IFPEN symbolizes the epitome of innovation

Many leading French companies have come to terms with the

and successful R&D. We are an innovative center, developing

fact that they can no longer compete with emerging economies on

products and processes to match the demands of both the industry

costs, and must focus now on added value: To remain competitive

and society at large. We always have one foot in pure science but

in the long run, we must remain at the vanguard of innovation in

keep an eye on commercialization, Appert explains. IFPEN con-

relation to project management and engineering, declares An-

tributed to the creation of companies like Technip and Coflexip, but

toine Bresolin, CEO of Eiffage Metal. We are perpetually commit-

also niche market leaders such as Eurecat, a renowned supplier of

ted to engineering in steel construction. We seek the brightest en-

catalyst processes, and Axens, an engineering company that still

gineers. I have one goal for the coming years: excellence.

conducts research programs in cooperation with IFPEN and devel-

France has fostered a dense network of small but competitive

ops state-of-the-art technologies, services, catalysts and adsorbents

SMEs dedicated to oil and gas, many of which capitalize on the fact

with optimum performances for the refining, petrochemical, gas

that their technologies and engineering capabilities can allow them

and alternative fuels industries.

to become market leaders in small niches. Doris Engineering is an

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AUGUST 2015

DeepEnergy - Courtesy of Technip and Jerome Retru

example of a French company that built on that


niche position to great effect, eventually being
presented with the OTC award in 2006, perfectly
illustrating Frances position as an engineering
powerhouse. Nicolas Parsloe, Doris CEO, attriNicolas Parsloe,
CEO, Doris
Engineering

butes his companys success to its way of relentlessly seeking to unlock technological barriers.
Our philosophy has always consisted in pushing

the limits forward, he explains, One of Doris fundamental characteristics is that people who work here are passionate and so we are
able to take on new challenges when we believe we can address an
issue that remains unsolved. Our competent staff that masters the
technology to develop projects anywhere in the world remains our
greatest asset. Parsloe insists that the pool of talented engineers
available in France has contributed to the companys success. R&D
has always been at the heart of our philosophy. France is always innovative as French people are very keen on mathematics and physics and take pride in developing cutting edge-solutions. Doris
boasts very bright and competent young professionals.

NO DOMESTIC SAFETY NET


The lack of significant domestic oil and gas production means that
many French companies must seek international growth without
proving their concept domestically first. French companies operatAUGUST 2015

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

HALF A CENTURY OF DRILLING EXPERTISE

ntrepose Drilling was founded in 1958 as COFOR

rig itself that Entrepose Drilling can really make a difference, he explains.

and has drilled thousands of wells worldwide.

Recently, the company has decided to leverage its oil and gas drilling

The company which belongs to the Entrepose Group,

experience to specialized niche segments including deep aquifer systems,

itself part of Vinci, relies on its conventional and au-

deep geothermal wells and coal bed methane. We have built extensive

tomated modern hydraulic rigs to offer its clients a

experience in geothermal drilling in France, and have become a leader in

wide spread of solutions for drilling and workover


applications. We invested in the most recent generation of drilling rigs, reveals David Richard, CEO

David Richard,
CEO, Entrepose
Drilling

that aspect. We are even able to address turnkey wells, says Richard, before admitting that like most players in the French oil and gas community,
Entrepose Drilling had to seek international expansion to sustain its activ-

of Entrepose Drilling. We therefore improve safety

ity. The market slowdown in Europe encouraged us to seek opportunities

levels via highly automated rigs. Environmentally, they have a smaller foot-

both geographically and technologically. Geographically, we are involved

print and limited noise levels. We foster innovation through the type of rig

in West Africa, India and the Middle East.

we select, which in turn address environmental concerns. It is through the

ing in the oil and gas industry are therefore experienced in compet-

in Iraq for its particular niche service of integrated drilling and engi-

ing in foreign markets where they are not favored as natural partners

neering services. Even though the country was chaotic and unsafe,

of choice. Since French oil and gas players cannot rely on a domes-

I found it had potential, he says, discussing the challenges of the

tic safety net, most of them achieve a substantial portion of their

project. We ran the operations from our Abu Dhabi office. The best

turnover internationally. Prior to earning a global reputation, French

way for us to enter the country was through inspection and technical

companies must build networks and overcome fierce international

assistance services. Bourdon sincerely believes that these bold de-

and local competition without boasting longstanding credentials.

cisions characterize the oil and gas industry. We now have constant

Several SMEs have even admitted that risk wasnt enshrined in their

activity in Abu Dhabi in the commissioning of land rigs coming ei-

culture and that they sometimes dithered too long before finally en-

ther from the USA or China or their numerous launching of offshore

tering a market.

platforms. From there, we have spread to neighboring countries like

We have already established subsidiaries across the globe but


our main objective in years to come is to have foreign companies

Yemen, Oman, Qatar and Iraq.


Ludovic Villatte, CEO of ITP Interpipe, a global leader in the de-

use our French concepts and technologies, explains Guy Bardot,


founder and CEO of Bardot Group, a mid-sized
French company specialized in strategic polymer
parts and subsea umbilicals, risers and flowlines

F2: START-UPS CONTRIBUTING


TO 2017 PRODUCTION
% EPC progress of major start-ups
0%

(SURF). By 2020, the company aims to grow to


USD 100 million based on this model. We want
Guy Bardot,
chairman, Bardot
Group

to duplicate our model to every region of the


world, notably the United States and the United
Arab Emirates. We decided to seek industrial
partnerships with companies in demand of engineering processes and recipe for polymers. We
now boast partnerships in the US, Brazil, Europe
and Malaysia.
In our business, we always arrive before or af-

Jean-Claude
Bourdon,
executive vice
president,
Dietswell

ter a revolution. We need to be aware of that

100% Start-up
June 2014
Jan 2015
Jan 2015
Jan 2015
2Q 2015
3Q 2015
2H 2015
2H 2015
2H 2015
2016
2016
2016
2016
2017
2017

Progress made generally speaking


Progress since Feb 2014

without putting ourselves in danger, says JeanClaude Bourdon, executive vice president of Dietswell, who recently signed two major contracts

50%

CLOV
Eldfisk 2
Ofon 2
West Franklin 2
Termokarstovoye
Laggan-Tormore
GLNG
Surmont 2
Vega Pleyade
Ichthys
Incahuasi
Martin Linge
Moho Nord
Egina
Kaombo

Source: Total

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

AUGUST 2015

sign, provision and fabrication of highly insulated pipes, is convinced that preserving his plant in France contributes to his companys success in the long run. Several French exporting SMEs
subscribe to this vision and have received positive feedback from
their international clients. According to them, many players in
emerging markets consider that the Made in France label constitutes a pledge of quality, which serves to explain the commitment

Your Independent
Engineering Partner
Since 1965

of French SMEs to preserve a production facility in France. We are


committed to preserving our manufacturing facility in France because it serves as a center of progress and excellence. Our plant
enables us to dispatch qualified equipment and trained engineers
across the world.
Frances historical, linguistic and cultural links to a number of African countries have provided a wealth of opportunities for French

OTC Distinguished
Achievement Award

oil and gas companies. We are also convinced that the African continent will constitute our main market of interest according to its
forecasted growth levels, reveals SeaOwls Gauthier. A few majors
used to dominate Africa. Nowadays, the advent of ambitious national players, with insatiable demands for technical assistance, has
opened a considerable window of opportunity for suppliers of expertise and manpower like SeaOwl.
Small and mid-sized French service providers rejoice every time
Patrick Pouyann expresses Totals continued commitment to Africa, as partnering with the IOC on projects in African countries allows
them to grow and build lasting partnerships with local players. Companies like Krohne, Sofregaz, Eras and SDV Logistics have long admitted that the development of their activities in Africa was the basis of their international expansion elsewhere. Several companies
have built on success in Francophone Africa to gradually expand
toward Anglophone and Portuguese Africa and seize opportunities
in key markets like Nigeria, Angola and Mozambique. Indeed, Doris
Engineering recently won an important contract in Angola, while Eiffage Metal has contributed to the OFON projectin Nigeria.

Copyright: DORIS Engineering / F. Lucazeau

SAFETY: BELIEF OR COMPLIANCE?


Cost reduction strategies have not dampened the enthusiasm for
continuing to embrace safety as a core value and priority for French
companies: the oil and gas industry has witnessed tragic incidents in
the recent past, which French oil and gas players have sworn never
to repeat, committing to a stringent set of HSE norms and standards, irrespective of size and turnover.
Pouyann expresses the importance of safety by including it in a
list of five words for the future of Total, which urges all its professionals dispatched around the world to respect its safety guidelines and
recommendations. Safety will systematically constitute a perma-

www.doris-engineering.com

nent key concern for Total, he observes. We are aware that nowadays, safety may put the future of a company at stake as we have
AUGUST 2015

OIL & GAS FINANCIAL JOURNAL

WWW.OGFJ.COM

ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLUTIONS AND LOCAL PROXIMITY

major French operators and EPCs.

safety as a core value, certification companies

The need for coordinated solutions between subsidiaries is growing

have worked to get as close as possible to their cli-

increasingly important, according to Deschoolmeester. We are handling

ents. In this respect, DNV GL has built a subsidiary

a project for Technip and Total in the North Sea: project management for

s the oil and gas industry increasingly embraces

in Paris to work with French clients during the design

verification is conducted from Paris, while execution falls under the um-

Anje
Deschoolmeester,
manager Southern
Europe Oil & Gas,
DNV GL

phase of both domestic and international projects.


This strategy is starting to bear fruit: Until a few years
ago, DNV GL didnt participate in calls for tender issued by Total for classification, but three years ago,

brella of our Danish and Korean offices; risk and reliability management is
coordinated between here and Oslo. Our teams must adapt and adopt the
culture of every country where we operate. It is critical for us to understand
and recognize the specific regulations, customs and requirements in each

we broke this trend by winning an important classi-

country. According to Deschoolmeester, DNV GLs French entity revolves

fication contract on behalf of Total in Congo, explains Anje Deschool-

around safety and risk management systems and reliability studies, while

meester DNV GLs manager for oil and gas in Southern Europe, Since

the global groups competitive advantage resides in its unparalleled invest-

then, DNV GL is regularly asked to present its services and solutions to

ments in innovation.

observed after the tragic Deep Horizon accident in the Gulf of Mex-

no longer compromised or dismissed at the ex-

ico. Total recently encountered and addressed serious safety

pense of other investments and cost saving.

threats in Yemen and Libya. In Yemen, as rebel forces approached

Safety is a critical component of our success and

our LNG facilities, we not only cautiously evacuated our expatriates

will never be disregarded or compromised in any

but also our local staff after having safely and orderly shutdown our

economic context.

operations. Technips Pilenko is also keen to explain that safety is

Didier MichaudDaniel, CEO,


Bureau Veritas

Oil and gas companies no longer seek to implement safety measures for the sake of compliance but rather because they are fully aware of
the risks implied: Customers in the past focused

on safety to satisfy growing government requirements, says


Thibault Fourlegnie, general manager and EMEA operations director of Oldham, a provider of gas detection systems. They are now
pursuing the highest standards of safety to protect their staff and
ensure tranquility during the course of their missions. Fourlegnie

Getty Images

also emphasizes the growing role of support services and mainte-

THE TECHNICAL
ADVISOR TO THE OIL
AND GAS INDUSTRY
DNV GL enables safe, reliable and enhanced
performance in oil and gas projects and operations.
Risk management advisory
Technical advisory
Technical assurance including


  

and inspection

Noble Denton marine

assurance & advisory



    
Software solutions

www.dnvgl.com

nance in his business: On the maintenance side, we have 45 field


technicians in France and a trusted network of distributors dispatched across the world. We deliver process control and need to
ensure adequate maintenance, operation, inspection and prevention around the products we deliver.
As safety prevails as a core concern in the oil and gas industry,
certification and inspection companies play a growing role in accompanying their clients HSE development and compliance.
QHSE is the core activity of our company, explains Didier Michaud-Daniel, Bureau Veritas CEO. Operators have unanimously
expressed their commitment to continue their efforts in this field.
The impact of QHSE within the deployment of these projects is undeniable and has encouraged Bureau Veritas to accompany and
adapt these new trends and developments in mentalities and busi-

SAFER, SMARTER, GREENER

10

ness philosophies.
ENERGYBOARDROOM.COM

AUGUST 2015