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Genesis Hernandez AEAH 4780.001 Fall 2016


Unit PLAN
University of North Texas

Art Education

I. 4 Lessons, 1 Unit
Grade Level: High School, Art I
Title: Changing Perspectives
Duration: 4 weeks, 8 sessions, block schedule.
II. Unit Rationale:
Students will learn basic art-related skills and gain confidence when creating conceptual artwork.
Lessons will give students the opportunity to learn to observe and replicate their environment through
sketching and drawing. Students will explore space, color, and various other Elements of Art through
watercolor and digital photography manipulation. This unit will serve as the beginnings of a foundation
in art making and art terminology. This unit will engage students in considering their point of view
when reacting to and understanding conceptual artwork. Students will use the knowledge they attain
throughout the unit to have a discussion about concepts addressed throughout the lessons. Students will
learn to critique work and relate their own experiences and opinions in reference to art. This unit will
integrate math skills and technology into the art classroom.
III. Key Concepts:
Change and perspectives/point of view.
IV. Essential Question:
What influences change?
What influences a perspective/point of view?
What influences how you interpret/understand art/art concepts?
How does changing a works Elements of Art changed how it is perceived?
How does someones point of view make them see art differently than you?
V. Unit Objectives:
On completion of this unit students will be able to express a specific point of view through works of art
ranging from drawing to watercolor to photography. Students will be able to consider the Elements of
Art and perspectives in their work and in others, and be able to have a discussion critiquing the
interpretation of shared artwork.
VI. Specific Art Content:
Students will observe an environment and learn to recognize and distinguish one-point perspective
from their familiar surroundings. Students will learn how to handle and control graphite pencils and
watercolor paint, as well as digital photography and photo editing software. Students will study color
theory and how colors affect the way an image is perceived by an audience. Students will create a
concept and express a specific feeling, emotion, or story through their work of art. Students will be
involved in critiquing artwork and will discuss the way perspectives can change how art is received by
an audience.
VII. Resources & Materials for Teacher:
Paola Pivi, Maam exhibit (2016)
https://www.perrotin.com/exhibitions/paola_pivi-maam/2519

Elements of Art PowerPoint Presentation


http://www.rcsdk12.org/cms/lib04/NY01001156/Centricity/Domain/4552/The%20Elements
%20of%20Art.ppt
Projector for demos
Misc. art supplies

VIII. Resources & Materials for Students:


Sketchbooks (8.5x11in.), pencils, colored pencils, erasers, thin permanent ink markers, rulers, drawing
paper, brushes, watercolors, watercolor paper (16x20 in.), digital camera, computer, photo editing
program.
LESSON PLAN #1: One-point Perspective Sketch
IX. Instruction and Its Sequencing:
Day 1 of the Lesson
1. Lesson Objectives:
The student will be able to define and identify the Elements of Art (line, shape, space, and
form).
The student will be able to recognize and sketch their environment in one-point perspective
through the help of teacher instructed demo.
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Teacher will present on the Elements of Art using PowerPoint presentation, specifically
focusing on line, space, shape, and form. Students should take notes of presentation for future
reference in their sketchbooks. Introduce one-point perspective with website under XII.
Resources & References for this lesson.
3. Guided Practice
Teacher will demo example of different lines, shapes, forms, and space. Students may follow
along in their sketchbooks to have a reference for later use. Teacher will introduce one-point
perspective by showing example of one-point perspective through website and showing
references to the Elements of Art. Ex. How does line play into one-point perspective? How is
space shown through one-point perspective?
4. Independent Practice
Ask students to verbally give examples of one-point perspective from their surroundings. Ex.
hallways, classrooms, library, cafeteria, etc.
5. Closure
Briefly check students sketchbooks for progress. Ask students to start considering what part of
school they would like to sketch for next part of lesson.
6. Formative Evaluation
Students should have followed along with their sketchbooks and participated during
presentation.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Teacher will be continually moving around the classroom while giving presentation to be more
interesting to students and to ensure students are on task. Make sure every student has their
sketchbook out.
Day 2 of the Lesson
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Teacher will demo one-point perspective. Use website as reference.
3. Guided Practice

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Teacher will demo how to sketch out basic features (horizon line, vanishing point, etc.) of
classroom in one-point perspective. Students should be following along in their sketchbooks to
have a reference for later use.
4. Independent Practice
Students follow along in their sketchbooks during one-point perspective demo. Students should
be able to identify line, space, shape, and form. Students can have link to website for further
reference outside of class.
5. Closure
Emphasis again the correlation between the Elements of Art (line, shape, space, form) and onepoint perspective. Think about the shapes and forms of objects in the environment, the space
receding into one-point perspective, and important lines such as horizon line.
6. Formative Evaluation
Students should have an example of one-point perspective sketched out from the demo in class.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
If students have difficult time grasping concept, teacher will continue demo to further help
students understanding. Teacher will be continually moving around from student to student in
class to ensure students are on task with their work.
Day 3 of the Lesson
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Sketchbooks are out and ready at beginning of class. Instruct students to move to certain parts
of school to draw one-point perspectives from life. Remind of examples they gave from first
day of lesson.
3. Guided Practice
Teacher will designate specific areas close together in the school that students can choose to
draw for their sketch. Ex. Courtyard, cafeteria, certain hallways.
4. Independent Practice
Students will sketch their chosen one-point perspective on a full 8.5x11 in. page in their
sketchbook. Students will use graphite pencils for this sketch.
5. Closure
Students will work until end of class. Check progress of students sketches before end of class
session to add on the necessary amount of further studio days. As students start to complete
work, encourage adding more details to sketch so students do not finish early.
6. Formative Evaluation
Studio work day evaluation will be dependent on student participation and progress.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Teacher will be continually moving around from student to student around the designated area
of the school to ensure students are on task with their work. Move problematic students to
specific area that is supervised. Consider allowing students to listen to music to minimize
talking and not disturb other classrooms in session.
Add necessary additional studio days for class to complete project.
X. Summative Assessment and Evaluation:
Final sketch will be part of cumulative evaluation for next project (one-point perspective watercolor).
XI. Interdisciplinary Connections:
Students will use math skills throughout the one-point perspective sketching process (measuring,
adding, etc.).

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XII. References & Resources:
http://www.technologystudent.com/designpro/roomper1.htm
XIII. Art TEKS XIV. National Art Standards
117.302. Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.
(c) Knowledge and skills.
(1) Foundations: observation and perception.
(A) consider concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and
imagination for original artwork;
(B) identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form,
space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
(C) identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern,
movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and
(D) make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and
metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately.
LESSON PLAN #2: One-point Perspective Watercolor
IX. Instruction and Its Sequencing:
Day 1 of the Lesson
1. Lesson Objectives
The student will be able to recall one-point perspective and transfer their one-point perspective
sketch to large scale.
The student will be able to define and identify the Elements of Art (color, value, texture).
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Teacher will present on the Elements of Art using PowerPoint presentation, specifically
focusing on color, value, and texture. Scaffold in previous Elements of Art and connect them all
together.
3. Guided Practice
Teacher will demo how to use watercolors properly. Give examples of color schemes. Use
slides on analogous colors, complimentary colors, split-complimentary colors, triadic colors,
and monochromatic colors from the Elements of Art PowerPoint. Students should be taking
notes in their sketchbook for further reference.
4. Independent Practice
Students will use sketch from previous lesson to create a large drawing of the school
environment on 16x20 in. watercolor paper.
5. Closure
Students may be able to start on large drawing before class session is over, or begin process
during next class session.
6. Formative Evaluation
Studio work day evaluation will be dependent on student participation and progress.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Teacher will be periodically moving around classroom to ensure students are on task with their
work. Have art supplies out and accessible to students but keep close eye on how supplies are
handled.
Day 2 of the Lesson
2. Introduction/Motivation:

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Teacher will have projects and supplies ready and accessible for students at beginning of class.
Demo using watercolor again if necessary.
3. Guided Practice
Have students choose one, or several, color schemes to paint their images in. Refer back to
Elements of Art PowerPoint presentation and sketchbook notes on color schemes. Ex. How
does changing the color of the environment from the original, natural color to a vibrant,
unnatural color scheme change the way you perceive the drawing?
4. Independent Practice
Once students have their one-point perspective drawing fully rendered they will outline image
with a thin permanent ink marker. After outlining, students will move on to adding color to
their artwork with watercolors.
5. Closure
Teacher should measure progress of students at this point in the lesson, add on additional studio
days as necessary.
6. Formative Evaluation
Studio work day evaluation will be dependent on student participation and progress.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Teacher will be periodically moving around classroom to ensure students are on task with their
work. Have art supplies out and accessible to students but keep close eye on how supplies are
handled.
Add necessary additional studio days for class to complete project.
X. Summative Assessment and Evaluation:
Students will be assessed at varying points throughout the project. Sketch, participating in classroom
studio work, and completion of final product will create a cumulative evaluation.
One-point Perspective Excellent
Good
Average
Watercolor Project
100-88%
87-75%
74-%
Sketch
Participation
Final

Sketch is complete
and transferred
accurately
Student uses studio
time wisely and
appropriately
Drawing is outlined in
marker and fully
watercolored

Sketch is partially
complete but
transferred accurately
Student uses most of
studio time wisely and
appropriately
Drawing is partially
outlined in marker/
watercolored

XI. Interdisciplinary Connections:


Students will use math skills in this lesson.
XII. References & Resources:
n/a
XIII. Art TEKS XIV. National Art Standards
117.302. Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.
(c) Knowledge and skills.
(1) Foundations: observation and perception.

Sketch is
incomplete/not
transferred accurately
Student does not use
studio time wisely or
appropriately
Drawing is not
outlined/not
watercolored

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(A) consider concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and
imagination for original artwork;
(B) identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form,
space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;
(C) identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern,
movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and
(D) make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and
metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately.
LESSON PLAN #3: Digital Photography Editing
IX. Instruction and Its Sequencing:
Day 1 of the Lesson
1. Lesson Objectives:
The student will be able to compose a digital photograph that conveys a specific feeling,
emotion, or story.
The student will be able to convey their concept through modification of their image through
digital photo editing software.
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Introduce project by connecting technology to the art classroom. Show examples of digital
cameras students may use, or allow students to use of their cellphone camera.
3. Guided Practice
Teacher will task students to think of a specific feeling, emotion, or story they wish to convey
or share. For example, the feeling of sunlight on your skin, sadness, or a person who was
lonely, went for a walk, and found happiness. Have students jot down ideas for concepts in
their sketchbooks.
4. Independent Practice
Students will be tasked to take a photograph that will convey through interpretation the feeling,
emotion, or story they wish to address. Students will take class period time to take photographs.
Consider taking students for a walk around school grounds for better opportunity of photo
variety.
5. Closure
Students may continue, and will be urged, to take photographs outside of class. Students should
have a wide variety of compositions to choose from before moving on to photo editing.
6. Formative Evaluation
Students will be evaluated based on engagement during studio time.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Students can use their cellphones with cameras for this project. Teacher should keep students
on task and free of distractions while using their cellphone for this assignment. Teacher will
check out digital cameras to students who need them and will ensure technology is properly
and safely handled.
Day 2 of the Lesson
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Teacher will begin class by introducing students to the different characteristics of photographs
that can be manipulated digitally, including contrast, saturation, and brightness. Connect to the
Elements of Art, such as color, value, and space.
3. Guided Practice

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Teacher will demo how to use simple digital photo manipulation tools. Consider how changing
saturation, value, shadows, tint, opacity, scale, contrast, etc. change the interpretation of the
photograph to better express the students concept (feeling, emotion, or story). Ex. How does
changing the shadows in the photo change the audiences interpretation of the art work? How
does changing the values of the photo change audience perspective of the expressed concept?
4. Independent Practice
Once students have their set of photographs they should pick one they will edit to convey the
feeling, emotion, or story of their choice. Students have their photo of choice and background
concept so may begin editing. Editing will take place either in computer lab, or in classroom
with appropriate technology available for every student. Final product must be conceptually
expressive of students feeling, emotion, or story.
5. Closure
Students may experiment with online photo editing software outside of class time to complete
final photo.
6. Formative Evaluation
Students will be evaluated dependent on commitment to studio class time and progress of work.
Students will upload their final piece to class blog/website/online gallery. Students will be able
to view their work, as well as their peers work, online.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
Ensure students are on task while using computers and other technology. With access to the
internet, ensure students are not on unrelated website and are focused on completing class
work.
Add necessary additional studio days for class to complete project.
X. Summative Assessment and Evaluation:
Students will turn in digital copies of their original, unedited photographs as well as the final, single
edited photograph of their choice. Students will be evaluated according to criteria outlined regarding
compositional photographs and completed final product.
Digital Photograph
Excellent
Good
Average
Edit
100-88%
87-75%
74-%
Concept
Participation
Final

Student chose concept


and expressed it
through photograph
Student uses studio
time wisely and
appropriately
Student has original
photograph and final
image complete

Student chose concept


and attempted to
express through photo
Student uses most of
studio time wisely and
appropriately
Student has original
photo and final image
partially complete

Student did not choose


concept/did not
express concept
Student does not use
studio time wisely or
appropriately
Student does not have
original photo/final
image complete

XI. Interdisciplinary Connections:


Students will be incorporating technology in the classroom by using digital photography and computerbased photo editing programs.
XII. References & Resources:
Access to computer lab in school
or, student tablets/laptops

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Computers with photo editing software (Preview, Photoshop, etc.)
or, Internet access to use online photo editing software (Pixlr, Befunky, etc.)
XIII. Art TEKS XIV. National Art Standards
117.302. Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.
(c) Knowledge and skills.
(2) Creative expression.
(A) use visual solutions to create original artwork by problem solving through direct
observation, original sources, experiences, narrations, and imagination;
(B) communicate a variety of applications for design solutions;
(D) create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;
(F) demonstrate effective use of art media and tools in drawing, painting, printmaking,
sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, and digital art and media.
LESSON PLAN #4: Conceptual Critique and Discussion
IX. Instruction and Its Sequencing:
Day of the Lesson
1. Lesson Objectives:
The students will be able to discuss the previous work they completed throughout the unit and
compile it into a final class critique.
2. Introduction/Motivation:
Students will set up their work from the duration of the unit to be displayed for the whole
classroom. Students will take a moment at beginning of class to walk around room and view
peer work. Set up artwork from Paola Pivis exhibition Maam as examples of artwork that
changes perspective. Pivis artwork can serve as juxtaposition of professional art with student
art and potential discussion starter.
3. Guided Practice
Teacher will ask series of questions to begin and facilitate discussion and critique.
Ex. What do you believe the message of this work is? What do you believe the student is trying
to convey in their piece? Why do you believe so? What is it about the work that leads you to
that conclusion? How do these pieces work together? Is this artwork successful in conveying
this message? Do you see any connections between the formal artist and your own student
work? What are your immediate thoughts on Pivis line of work?
4. Independent Practice
While the teacher moderates the discussion, students will do the majority of leading the critique
with their own points of view and opinions.
5. Closure
Conclude the discussion by giving a brief overview of key points touched upon in the
discussion. Reiterate interesting comments made by students.
6. Formative Evaluation
Teacher will keep track of participation from students. Teacher will keep participation grading
sheet on hand throughout duration of class to mark students involvement.
7. Classroom Management Procedures
The teacher will act as a moderator to the classroom discussion. Teacher will ensure the critique
stays on topic and also facilitate by asking questions to move discussion along.
X. Summative Assessment and Evaluation:

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Students will be evaluated according to their degree of participation throughout the discussion critique.
Assessment will be completed using a rubric outlining the necessary participation by students and
quality of comments and overall discussion.
Critique Discussion
Excellent
Good
Average
Grading Rubric
100-88%
87-75%
74-%
Art Commentary

Commentary directly
correlated to artwork

Commentary often
about artwork

Commentary
sometimes on artwork

Participation

Full and deliberate


participation

Moderate participation

Sparse participation

Insight

Deep, thoughtful, with


references

Interesting, considerate Base level, lacking


of learning
substance

XI. Interdisciplinary Connections:


n/a
XII. References & Resources:
n/a
XIII. Art TEKS
117.302. Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.
(c) Knowledge and skills.
(4) Critical evaluation and response.
(A) interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists
such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;
(B) evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as
describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and
evaluating the success of the artwork.