Sie sind auf Seite 1von 53

UNIVERSITY OF WIEN

Structure &
Content
Master Program in Supply Chain Management

Contents
Geographic Information Systems for Transport and Logistics...............................3
Logistics Management..........................................................................................7
Operations Research............................................................................................8
Advanced Operations Research...................................................................................10
Operations Management....................................................................................11
Supply Chain Operations....................................................................................12
Advanced Geographic Information Systems for Transport and Logistics............13
Supply Chain Controlling...........................................................................................17
Supply Management...........................................................................................18
Enterprise Resource Planning Systems..............................................................19
Global Supply Chain Design...............................................................................20
Supply Chain Planning........................................................................................22
Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1................................................................25
Business Analytics in Supply Chains 2................................................................26
Location Analytics and Geospatial Data 1..........................................................26
Location Analytics and Geospatial Data 2..........................................................28
Retail Marketing 1...............................................................................................30
Retail Marketing 2...............................................................................................31
Supply Chain Finance and Risks 1......................................................................32
Supply Chain Finance and Risks 2......................................................................33
Sustainable and Humanitarian Supply Chains 1.................................................34
Sustainable and Humanitarian Supply Chains 2.................................................35
Transport and Logistics 1....................................................................................36
Decision Models and Analysis.............................................................................37
IT Seminar Course..............................................................................................38
Transport & Logistics (Seminar Course)..............................................................39

1st Year
The first year introduces students to the basics of operations, transport, and logistics, focussing
on the relevant concepts of business information systems and geo-informatics as well as
mathematics and statistics. Fundamental principles, methods, techniques and information tools
necessary for the analysis, management, and operation of supply chains are presented.

1st Semester Foundation (Duration: begin of October - end of January)

October/November:

u
u
u

Geographic Informations Systems for Transport & Logistics (GIS-T)


Logistics Management (LM)
Operations Research (OR)

December/January:

u
u
u

Advanced Operations Research (aOR)


Operations Management (OM)
Supply Chain Operations (SCO)
2nd Semester In-depth Knowledge (Duration: begin of March - end of June)
March/April:

u Advanced Geographic Information Systems for Transport & Logistics (aGIS-T)


u Supply Chain Controlling (SCC)
u Supply Management (SCM)
May/June:

u Enterprise Resource Planning Systems (ERP)


u Global Supply Chain Design (GSCD)
u Supply Chain Planning (SCP)
3

Geographic Information Systems for Transport and Logistics


Contents
The course is divided into two sub-modules. The first discusses data models and design issues that are
specifically oriented to GIS-T, and identifies several improvements of the traditional network data model
that are needed to support advanced network analysis in a ground transportation context. These
improvements include turn-tables, dynamic segmentation, linear referencing, traffic lanes and nonplanar networks. Then we will deal with issues of populating a GIS-T database with data and issues
surrounding GIS data sources and integration for transportation and logistics related applications. We
will review basic mapping concepts and georeferencing methods as well as methods for collecting
geographic data for transportation (including GPS, remote sensing and traffic recording devices). GIS-T
data products, data integration, spatial data quality form the foundation of any sucessful GIS-T
application. We will discuss these topics as well as integration issues such as areal interpolation and
network conflation, network aggregation and generalization. The second sub-module shifts attention to
GIS-based spatial analysis & modeling, especially to GIS network routing problems that have become
prominent in GIS-T: the travelling salesman problem and selected examples of real-world GIS-T
applications using adequate software tools. The focus is on theory and algorithms for solving these
problems.
Learning outcomes
Objectives: The course focuses on principles of GIS-T, theory and methods underlying geographical
information systems for transportation and logistics. At the heart of GIS-T are data models to represent
the complexity of transportation networks and to perform different network algorithms in order to fulfil
its potential in the field of transportation and logistics.
Learning Outcomes: After successful completion of the module, students should be

familiar with network representation issues, GIS-T network data models as well as data sources
and the fundamental network routing problems,
able to apply GIS-T theory, methods and techniques to solve real-world transportation and
logistics related problems.

Teaching/learning method(s)
Lecture and discussion
lab course tutorials
assignments
Assessment
Tasks: max. achievable points = 100 (+extra Points)

assignments (50)
possible extra points (8)
final exam (50)

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
4

Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%


Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1
Author: Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S-L.
Title: Geographic Information Systems for Transportation. Principles and Applications
Publisher: Oxford University Press, New York
Remarks: selected chapters, see the course overview
Year: 2001
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book
2

Author: Longley, P.A., Goodchild M.F., Maguire, D.J. und Rhind, D.W.
Title: Geographic Information Science and Systems
Publisher: John Wiley, Hoboken NJ
Edition: 4th
Remarks: selected chapters, see the course overview
Year: 2015
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
Type: Book

Unit details
Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

1
Unit 1: Introduction
Introduction to the course concept, organizational issues, software, literature and course texts,
etc.
A first look at GIS-T (09:00 AM - 10:30 AM @ seminar room)

Transport, geography and Information Systems


Transport terms and transport systems
GIS for transportation [GIS-T]
Why does GIS matter?
Some applications

First hands-on training with ArcGIS (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer lab)


Unit 1: Readings and slides (learning modules unit 1 --> catalog of contents)

Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for
Transportation: Principles and Applications [Chapter 1: Introduction, pp. 1-7]. New
York: Oxford University Press
5

Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W. (2015): Geographic
Information Science & Systems [Chapter 1: Systems, Science, and Study, pp. 1-33],
4th edition. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
Slides: 01_GIS-T_Introduction

Assignment 1: Getting Started with ArcGIS

set up your ESRI Global Account


work in the WU computer labs or install ArcGIS 10.4.1 including all extensions on
your private PC
learn the GIS basics

2
Unit 2: GIS Data Modeling and Database Design (09:00 AM - 10:30 AM @ seminar room)
Data domains and data modeling

data base (DB)


logical, physical, real, and virtual domains
DB design implications

Data modeling techniques

data models in general and in GIS


conceptual data modeling
logical data modeling
object oriented data modeling

Further modeling and design issues

Distributed databases and interoperability


Spatiotemporal data modeling
Metadata and data warehousing

Readings and Slides (learning modules unit 2 --> catalog of contents)


Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for Transportation:
Principles and Applications, pp. 14-52 [Chapter 2: Data Modeling and Database design]. New
York: Oxford University Press
02_Slides_Data_Modeling+Database_Design
Hands-on training with ArcGIS (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer lab)

Point-, line- and polygon-data in a geodatabase


querying objects using map- and tables-view
table operations and calculations
basic map-based analysis
6

Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

Assignment 1 Extra-Points: Learn more ArcGIS Basics


3
Unit 3: GIS-T network data models (09:00 AM - 10:30 AM @ seminar room)
Mathematical foundations

graph theory: components of a graph


planar vs. non-planar graphs
graphs and networks

Network representation of a transportation system

nodearc representation
data models for the nodearc representation
weaknesses of the node-arc representation

Linear referencing methods and systems [LRS]

components of LRS
linear referencing methods
fixedlength and variablelength segmentation
using dynamic segmentation for multimodal routing
enterprise LRS data models
Transportation data models for ITS and related applications

Readings and Slides (learning modules unit 3 --> catalog of contents)


03_Slides-GIST-data-models
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for Transportation:
Principles and Applications, pp. 14-52 [Chapter 3: GIS-T Data Models]. New York: Oxford
University Press
Complementary readings for a quick overview
Fischer, M.M. (2004): GIS and Network Analysis. In Hensher, D., Button, K., Haynes, K. and
Stopher, P. (eds.): Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems, pp. 391-408.
Elsevier, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford [=Handbook in Transport 5] (relevant for unit 3 are
sections 1 an 2)
Hands-on training with ArcGIS (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer lab)
Assignment 2: POPitUP_Case
4
Unit 4: Graph theory, shortest path and the traveling salesman problem (09:00 AM 7

Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

10:30 AM @ seminar room)


Fundamental network properties

mathematical representation,
connectivity in a network - graph theory
fundamental properties of algorithms - exact vs. heuristic algorithms

Routing vehicles within networks

Shortest path problem


Traveling saleman problem [TSP]
TSP overview
TSP formulation
optimization based heuristics
construction heuristics
improvement heuristics
other methods

Readings and Slides (learning modules unit 4 --> catalog of contents)


04_Slides-Graph-Theory_Shortest-Path_Routing
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for Transportation:
Principles and Applications, pp. 130-165 [Chapter 5: Shortest paths and Routing; pp. 143-157
(implementing the SP algorithm, SPs through surfaces] are excluded)]. New York: Oxford
University Press
Complementary readings for a quick overview
Fischer, M.M. (2004): GIS and Network Analysis. In Hensher, D., Button, K., Haynes, K. and
Stopher, P. (eds.): Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems, pp. 391-408.
Elsevier, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford [=Handbook in Transport 5] (relevant for unit 4 are
sections 3 an 4; download see unit 3)
Hands-on training with ArcGIS Network Analyst (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer
lab)
Assignment 3: Solving the TSP - The SACHEM COMPANY CASE
5
Unit 5: Georeferencing, Basic Mapping Concepts and GIS-T Data Capture (09:00 AM 10:30 AM @ seminar room)
Part 1: Georeferencing, Basic Mapping Concepts
Introduction
Placenames
8

Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

Postal addresses and postal codes


Linear referencing systems
Latitude and longitude
Projections and coordinate systems
Converting georeferences

Part 2: GIS-T Data Capture

Introduction
Global Navigation Satellite Systems [GNSS] and Global Positioning Systems [GPS]
Satellite Remote Sensing and Areal Photography
Surveying
Flow and interaction data collection
Managing a data capture project and data transfer
Summary

Readings and Slides (learning modules unit 5 --> catalog of contents)


Slides: 05_GIS-T_Part1-Georeferencing
Slides: 05_GIS-T_Part2-Data-Capture
Readings:
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for Transportation:
Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 4: Transportation Data Sources and
Integration]. New York: Oxford University Press
Hands-on training with ArcGIS Network Analyst (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer
lab)
6
Unit 6: GIS-T Data Products and Data Integration (09:00 AM - 10:30 AM @ seminar
room)

Introduction
Public and private sector data products free of charge or with fee
Data standards
Data integration methods: areal interpolation, network conflation, address matching,
integrating digital imagery
Spatial Data Quality: precision, accuracy, errors
Spatial and Network Aggregation
Conclusions

Readings and Slides (learning modules unit 6 --> catalog of contents)


06_Slides_Transportation_Data_Sources_and_Integration
Readings:
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for Transportation:
9

Uni Dat
t
e

Contents

Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 4: Transportation Data Sources and
Integration]. New York: Oxford University Press
Hands-on training with ArcGIS Network Analyst (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM @ computer
lab)
7

Unit 7: Final Exam and Concluding Remarks

Logistics Management
Contents
The course provides an introduction to the basic knowledge in the area of Logistics and Logistics
Management. Hence, first some definitions of Logistics and Supply Chain Management are discussed.
The importance of network structures and of network flow orientation in Logistics and SCM is
highlighted and the major aims and objectives of Logistics Management are explained. Moreover, an indepth discussion of the different logistical functions (inventory holding, order management,
transportation etc.) and sub-systems (inbound, production, outbound and reverse logistics) is given.
Finally. Logistics services and outsourcing decisions are discussed.
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should be able to understand and explain different
views of Logistics and Logistics Management and the historical development of the views regarding
Logistics understand and explain the role of the Logistics function in the wider context of the firm
explain the major aims and objectives of Logistics Management and apply appropriate measures to
judge the degree to which these aims are achieved in specific situations structure Logistical systems, to
explain their different parts and to analyse the way they work know and apply different strategies in
Logistics Management (e.g. Postponement, Lean Logistics) know which services are offered by
Logistics service providers and how these service providers operate judge the advantages and
disadvantages of Logistics outsourcing
Teaching/learning method(s)
Seminar-style class (lecture with discussion), Literature review, Home work / case studies as class
preparation and wrap-up
Assessment
Case study 1: 20 points
Case study 2: 20 points
Final exam : 60 points
Grading scale:
Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%
Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

10

Readings
1
Author: Bowersox, D.J., Closs, D.J., Cooper, M.B.
Title: Supply Chain Logistics Management
Publisher: McGraw Hill
Edition: 3rd ed.
Year: 2010
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book
Unit details
Unit

Date

1 06/10/2016

Contents
Logistics and the 21st-Century Supply Chains, Objectives and Structure of
Logistics Systems Customer Accommodation (Chap 1,2)
Prof. Sebastian Kummer

2 13/10/2016
Customer Accomodation (Chap 3)
Procurement, Production, Distribution, Disposal Logistics/Green Logistics (Chap 4)
Prof. Sebastian Kummer
3 14/10/2016
Procurement, Production, Distribution, Disposal Logistics/Green Logistics (Chap 4,
continued)
Information Technology (Chap 5)
Prof. Sebastian Kummer
4 20/10/2016
Case Study 1 (Presentation)
Inventory (Chap 7), Warehousing (Chap 10) Packaging and Materials Handling (Chap
11)
Prof. Sebastian Kummer
5 03/11/2016

Logistics at Fast Moving Consumer Goods Companies


Miguel Suarez

6 10/11/2016
Case Study 2: (Presentations)
Transportation Infrastructure (Chap 8); Transportation Operations (Chap 9)

11

Unit

Date

Contents
Prof. Sebastian Kummer

7 17/11/2016

Final Exam

Operations Research
Contents
The course provides an introduction to the theoretical aspects and practical adaptation of Operations
Research methods for modeling and solving linear optimization problems, especially in production,
transportation and logistics. Furthermore, elementary concepts of probability as well as discrete and
continuous distributions are reviewed and the relevance for basic Operations and Supply Chain
Management (OSCM) models is demonstrated.
Topics include:
Formulation of a linear or integer optimization model
Basics of the mathematical solution
Solution using standard software (Excel)
Sensitivity analysis
Basics of probability and discrete and continuous random variables
Single period inventory model with discrete demand distribution
Capacity management with queuing models: Poisson and exponential distribution
Demand aggregation (pooling): Sum of Normal distributions
Learning outcomes
After attending this course, students will be able to:
Formulate a certain class of decision problems as linear or a (mixed) integer programs
Solve a linear or integer program
Interpret the optimal solution and perform elementary sensitivity analysis
Use network planning procedures for solving logistics problems
Understand and apply elementary probability laws and random variables and their moments
(Expectation, standard deviation, coefficient of variation) to OSCM models
Analyze basic inventory-related performance measures and their relationships (expected sales
and lost-sales, cycle service level, fill rate)
Formulate a queuing model with exponential processing times and Poisson demand and to derive
the expected waiting time, cycle time and work in progress (WIP)
Understand the independence and correlation of random variables and their impact on
centralization of demands of products or locations (Example: Normal distribution)
Teaching/learning method(s)
The course is taught using a combination of lectures, class discussions,homework exercises and in-class
assignments.
Assessment
The main topics will be presented in class. You will be required to do homework exercises and inclass assignments.
Assessment

Homework exercises, 30 points (6 homeworks)


12

In-class assignments, 20 points (4 assignments)


Final exam, 50points: Min. 20 points out of 50 are required for passing the course

Grading scale:
Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%
Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.
Readings
1
Author: Dimitris Bertsimas and Robert Freund
Title:
Data, Models and Decisions, The Fundamentals of Management Science
(Chapters 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10)
Publisher: Dynamic Ideas
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book
2

Author: Anderson, Sweeney, Williams, Martin


Title:
An Introduction to Management Science
(Chapter 21)
Publisher: South-Western Cengage Learning
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book

Author: Frederick Hillier and Gerald Lieberman


Title: Introduction to Operations Research
Publisher: McGraw-Hill International (HL)
Content relevant for class examination: No
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book

Unit details
Unit

Date

Contents

1 06.10.2015

Fundamentals of Probability

2 13.10.2015

Probability Distributions

3 20.10.2015

Applications: Queueing and Pooling

4 27.10.2015

Decision Analysis and Dynamic Programming


13

Unit

Date

Contents

5 03.11.2015

Linear Programming

6 10.11.2015

Discrete Optimization

7 17.11.2015

Final Exam

Advanced Operations Research


Contents
The course provides an introduction to the theoretical aspects and practical adaptation of Operations
Research methods for modelling and solving linear optimization problems and analysing data using
regression models, especially in production, transportation, logistics and marketing.
Topics include:
Data analysis and regression
Forecasting
Modelling of optimization problems
Introduction to solving optimization problems using standard software
Sensitivity analysis
Learning outcomes
After attending this course, students will be able to:
Apply techniques learned in OR 1 to solve problems
Generate solutions using standard software
Interpret the optimal solution and perform elementary sensitivity analysis
Create elementary simulations of typical production, logistics and service systems.
Teaching/learning method(s)
The course is taught using a combination of lectures, classdiscussions, homework and in-class
assignments.
Assessment
The assessment of OR 2 is based on two marks: a group mark for assignments and an individual mark
for the exam. The overall structure is as follows:
Group mark (50%):The group mark is composed of 4 group assignments with 12.5% each
Individual mark (50%): The exam at the end will be undertaken on an individual basis.
Grading scale:
Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%
Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.
Readings
1

Author: Frederick Hillier, Gerald Lieberman


Title: Introduction to Operations Research
Publisher: McGraw-Hill International (HL)
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book
14

Author: James R. Evans


Title: Business Analytics
Publisher: Pearson Education
Edition: 1st
Year: 2013
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
Type: Book

Operations Management
Contents
A detailed syllabus can be found in the downloads section.
The course provides an introduction to the foundations of Operations Management (Process, Quality,
Capacity and Supply Chain Management) with a focus on Operations Strategy. The strategic objectives
and drivers of operations performance as well as the elements of Total Quality Management, Lean
Management and pull and push production systems are introduced. Especially, the challenges for the
capacity strategy and the benefits of flexibility with respect to operational and demand risks are
discussed.

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should be able to:- define, analyze and measure the
performance of business processes- explain the relationship between different performance measuresperform capacity analysis of business processes- position a process in the Operations Management
triangle by reducing workloads and increasing information- make suggestions for process improvement
using the principles of quality management - apply queuing theory to operations management problems analyze business processes using Rapid Modeler Software - identify strategies for achieving flexibility
and determine the appropriate level of flexibility for buffering variability - evaluate the benefits of
flexible production lines and flexible network design
Teaching/learning method(s)
Insights from basic Operations Management principles and modelsBest practices from
industryExperiental learning using softwareCase examples and case studies
Assessment
In-class assignments (12%)
Case examples (38%)
Final exam (50%) (min. 20 points out of 50 required)
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
15

Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%


Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: W. Hopp/M. Spearman


Title: Factory Physics
Publisher: McGraw Hill
Edition: 3rd ed.
Year: 2008

Author: J. Van Mieghem


Title: Operations Strategy: Principles and Practice
Publisher: Dynamic Ideas
Year: 2008

Author: G. Cachon/C. Terwiesch


Title: Matching Supply with Demand: An Introduction to Operations Management
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Edition: 3rd ed
Year: 2012

Author: G.W. Jordan / S. Graves


Title: Principles on the Benefits of Manufacturing Process Flexibility
Remarks: Management Science, Vol. 41, Nr. 4. 577-594
Unit details
Unit Date

Contents

1
Operations Management: Matching Supply with Demand
Operations and Capacity Strategy
Littles Law - Linking operational and financial performance
2
Process Variability
Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)
Process Flexibility
System Flexibility
Lean Production
3
Lean Production
16

Unit Date

Contents

Quality Management
4
Quality Management
Basics of Multi-stage queuing Systems
5
Capacity Management
6

Final Exam

chains

Supply Chain Operations


Contents
With the increased division of labor across the supply chain, the importance of inter-organizational
shipping increases. This course covers the basics of organization and execution of international goods
movements as a part of supply chain management in times of globalization and integration of world
trade today.
Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, students should have a basic knowledge about actual trade practice, including
contracting, customs procedures and documentary paperwork, means and modes of payment, transport
management as well as security, compliance and risk management issues. This should enable them to
plan successfully shipping and handling for international goods movements.
Teaching/learning method(s)
Seminar-style class (lecture with discussion), Essays / case studies as class preparation and wrap-up
Assessment
Individual Level (75%):
- Container Tracking Report (10%) based on completeness and quality of content
- Commodity Assessment Report (15%) based on completeness and quality of content
- Written Exam of 60 min. (50%), with 4 out of 5 open questions (no case study)
Group Level (25%):
- 2 Case Study Assessments (2x10%=20%)
- 1 Case Study Presentation and participation in group discussions (5%)
based on completeness, quality of content and group presentation in-class
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%

17

Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%

Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%

Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%

Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.
Readings
1
Author: David, P.A.
Title: International logistics - the management of international trade operations
Publisher: Cicero Books LL, Berea OH
Edition: 4th. ed.
Remarks: ISBN-13: 978-0-9894906-0-3 print, ISBN-13: 978-0-9894906-1-0 ebook
Year: 2013
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book
Unit details
Unit Date

Contents

Introduction, Trade Environment: Legal framework and export/import regulations

Security, Compliance and Risk Management

Customs Management: Customs practices and trade facilitation

Trade Management: Contracting, Paperwork and Payment Issues

Transport Management: Carrier Liability, Packaging and Insurance Issues

Transport Management: Choice of Transport Mode and Routing

Final exam: 60 min. with 4 out of 5 open questions (no case study)

Advanced Geographic Information Systems for Transport and


Logistics
Contents
The course focuses on transportation and logistics related real-world applications of GIS-T. It is divided
into two major sub-modules. The first deals with issues of GIS-based spatial analysis & modeling and
selected examples of real-world applications in general using adequate software tools. The second submodule shifts attention to GIS-based spatial analysis & modeling, especially to GIS network routing
problems that have become prominent in GIS-T: the vehicle routing problem with pickup, delivery and
time windows and selected examples of real-world applications in general using adequate software tools.
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students are able to design a GIS-T (network) data and
analysis model in a given application context and solve network routing and network allocation
problems.
18

Teaching/learning method(s)
lecture and discussion
lab course tutorials
pre-/after-class work: preparatory readings, assignments
Assessment
Deliverables: 50%

Assignment 1: 10%
Assignment 2: 20%
Assignment 3: 20%

Final exam:

50%

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S-L.


Title: Geographic Information Systems for Transportation. Principles and Applications
Publisher: Oxford University Press, New York
Remarks: selected chapters, see the course overview
Year: 2001
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book

Author: Longley, P.A., Goodchild M.F., Maguire, D.J. und Rhind, D.W.
Title: Geographic Information Systems and Science
Publisher: John Wiley, Hoboken NJ
Edition: 3rd
Remarks: selected chapters, see the course overview
Year: 2011
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book

Unit details
19

Unit Date

Contents

1 03/02/16
Unit 1: GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling
Introduction to the course concept, organizational issues, software, literature and course
texts, etc.
What is spatial analysis?

Definition
Snow Map
Some examples

Categories of Spatial Analysis (with ArcGIS hands-on Lab examples @ TC.3.02)

Queries and reasoning


Measurements
Transformations

Conclusions
Unit 1&2: Readings and slides
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for
Transportation: Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 7: GIS-Based Spatial
Analysis]. New York: Oxford University Press
More readings:
Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W. (2011): Geographic
Information Systems & Science, pp. 275-295 [Chapter 14: Spatial Data Analysis].
Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
Assignment 1 Working with ArcGIS Network Analyst
2 03/09/16
Unit 2: More GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling
Unit 1 round-up
Categories of Spatial Analysis ctd. (with ArcGIS hands-on Lab examples)

Queries and reasoning


Measurements
Transformations

Using WIGeoNetwork and the TomTom MultiNet (WIGeoNetwork 10.x User Manuals
20

Unit Date

Contents
(eng. and dt.))

Online geocoding of address data


Working with Geoevents
Routing, distance matrices and supply trees
Service areas, catchment areas and service networks

Unit 1&2: Readings and slides


Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for
Transportation: Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 7: GIS-Based Spatial
Analysis]. New York: Oxford University Press
More readings:
Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W. (2011): Geographic
Information Systems & Science, pp. 275-295 [Chapter 14: Spatial Data Analysis].
Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
Submit until 03/14/16 08:00 AM! Assignment 1 Working with ArcGIS Network
Analyst
Keep in mind submission deadline 04/18/16 08:00 AM !!!
Assignment 2 - Sachem Company: Service area and delivery cost analysis
Assignment 3 - Integrated Case: Advanced Geographic Information Systems for
Transport and Logistics & Global Supply Chain Design
3 03/16/16
Unit 3: Advanced GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling

Descriptive Summaries
Optimization
Hypothesis Testing

Unit 3+4: Readings and slides


Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for
Transportation: Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 7: GIS-Based Spatial
Analysis]. New York: Oxford University Press
More readings:
Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W. (2011): Geographic
Information Systems & Science, pp. 381-401 [Chapter 14: Spatial Analysis and
21

Unit Date

Contents
Inference]. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
Keep in mind submission deadline 04/18/16 08:00 AM !!!
Assignment 2 - Sachem Company: Service area and delivery cost analysis
Assignment 3 - Integrated Case: Advanced Geographic Information Systems for
Transport and Logistics & Global Supply Chain Design

4 04/06/16
Unit 4: More Advanced GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling

Descriptive Summaries
Optimization
Hypothesis Testing

Hands-on training with ArcGIS


Unit 3+4: Readings and slides
Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001): Geographic Information Systems for
Transportation: Principles and Applications, pp. 85-129 [Chapter 7: GIS-Based Spatial
Analysis]. New York: Oxford University Press

More readings:
Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W. (2011): Geographic
Information Systems & Science, pp. 381-401 [Chapter 14: Spatial Analysis and
Inference]. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
Keep in mind submission deadline 04/18/16 08:00 AM !!!
Assignment 2 - Sachem Company: Service area and delivery cost analysis
Assignment 3 - Integrated Case: Advanced Geographic Information Systems for
Transport and Logistics & Global Supply Chain Design
5 04/13/16
Unit 5: Vehicle routing problems - the fleet version of the TSP

VRP overview
o solutions central for distribution of goods, services and people
o applies in various real-world transportation related problems
o generalizes TSP, is NP-hard
VRP formulation and variants
22

Unit Date

Contents

o main components: networks, customers, depots, vehicles and drivers,


operational constraints, objective
o capacitated VRP (CVRP)
o distance constrained VRP and CVRP
o VRP with time windows
o VRP with backhauls
o VRP with pickup and delivery
VRP solution algorithms - 3 categories of heuristics
o construction heuristics: savings algorithm
o two-phase heuristics: cluster first - route second (Sweep), route first cluster second
o improvement heuristics: local (eg tabu) search , population search (eg
genetic algorithms), learning mechanism based search (ant colony
optimization)
VRP with pickup and delivery and time windows: formulation and solutions

Unit 5: Readings and slides


Keep in mind submission deadline 04/18/16 08:00 AM !!!
Assignment 2 - Sachem Company: Service area and delivery cost analysis
Assignment 3 - Integrated Case: Advanced Geographic Information Systems for
Transport and Logistics & Global Supply Chain Design
6 04/20/16
Unit 6: Round-up: Preparing for the exam and hands-on training with the
Network Analyst
Round-up Advanced GIS-T
Preparing for the exam
Q&A
Conclusions
Hands-on training in the lab

What is special about the Network Analyst?


The network analysis layers: route, service area, closest facility, OD cost matrix,
vehicle routing problem, location-allocation
Algorithms used by the Network Analyst
Some analysis and conclusions

Submit until 04/18/16 08:00 AM! Assignment 2 - Sachem Company: Service area and
delivery cost analysis and/or Assignment 3 - Integrated Case: Advanced Geographic
Information Systems for Transport and Logistics & Global Supply Chain Design
7 05/02/16
Final exam

23

Supply Chain Controlling


Contents
See unit details below
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should be able to understand the essential contents
of supply chain controlling and its instruments. Further, students should achieve an understanding of the
differences between a company related and an overall company controlling perspective and how it is
captured through supply chain controlling. Moreover, practical knowledge for the implementation of
supply chain controlling is gained.
Teaching/learning method(s)
Seminar-style class (lecture with discussion), literature reviews on special topics, assignments to prepare
and wrap-up
Assessment
Individual Level (50%):

Written Exam of 60 min. (50%)

Group Level (50%):

Two assignments (30% in total) based on completeness and quality of content


One essay assignment about special topics with group presentation (20%) based on
completeness, quality of content and group presentation in-class.

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Seuring, S. and Goldbach M. (eds)


Title: Cost Management in Supply Chains
Publisher: Physica Verlag Heidelberg
Edition: 1st ed
Remarks: ISBN 978-3-7908-1500-9
Year: 2002
24

Content relevant for diploma examination: No


Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
Type: Book
2

Author: Weber, J, and Schffer, U.


Title: Introduction to Controlling
Publisher: Schffer-Poeschel, Stuttgart
Edition: 1st ed.
Remarks: ISBN 978-3-7910-2759-3
Year: 2008
Content relevant for class examination: No
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
Type: Book

Unit details
Unit

Date

Contents

1 03/03/2016

Schramm: Introduction, fundamentals and characteristics of logistics and supply


chain controlling, organizational integration and main problems (with distribution of
essay assignments)

2 03/10/2016

Schramm: Controlling, Cost Accounting and Calculation (with distribution of


first assignment)

3 03/17/2016

Suarez: Performance Management (with distribution of second assignment)

4 04/07/2016
Suarez: Value Chain Analysis (with discussion of second assignment)
5 04/14/2016
Schramm: Discussion first assignment and Operational Supply Chain Controlling
(esp. Activity-based Costing)
6 04/21/2016

Schramm: Other Supply Chain Controlling Tools (with presentations of essay


assignments)

7 04/28/2016
Final exam: 60 Minutes

Supply Management
Contents
The course provides an introduction to the foundations of Sourcing and Supply Management. Strategic
sourcing is discussed as an integral part of operations strategy. The benefits of outsourcing based on the
total cost of ownership and on the term-structure of supply relationships are discussed. The terms of the
relationship and its management over time is considered, focusing on different types of formal supply
contracts.
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
> evaluate outsourcing decisions and alternative types of supply relationships
25

> select suppliers (single vs. multiple sourcing, dual sourcing, local vs. global sourcing)
> determine the optimal way of cooperation (formal contracting or informal supplier scorecard,
centralized vs. decentralized control)
> design supply contracts (vendor managed inventory, buy-back, quantity discounts, option contracts,
revenue sharing, quantity flexibility contracts)
> select an appropriate inventory policy (base stock, service level, supplier lead time)
> understand quick response with (limited or unlimited) reactive capacity
> check the state of deliveries (tracking and tracing, global positioning systems, RFID)

Teaching/learning method(s)
Insights from basic Operations Management principles and models, best practices from industry,
experiental learning using software, case examples and case studies
Assessment
Individual assignments incl. class participation: 14%
Group assignments (case examples and case studies): 36%
Final exam: 50%
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 20 points in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Chopra, S./ Meindl, P.


Title: Supply Chain Management Strategy, Planning and Operation
Publisher: Pearson
Edition: 6th ed.
Remarks: chapter 3, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 15
Year: 2014
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Type: Book

Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

26

Contents
Content: Understand the implementation of Production and logistics in an ERP system and its
integration into management accounting. Master data for the MRP process: Implementation of the
organizational structure, materials master and material planning, product structure, cost center planning
and work centers, linkage between cost accounting and production/logistics, work centers and their
capacity, routings. MRP and accounting: Deriving sales projections and primary requirements, MRP,
planned production orders and purchase requisitions, customizing the MRP process, linking MRP to
accounting. Procurement logistics and accounting: Master data in procurement, information records,
processing the purchase requisitions produced by the MRP run and deriving purchase orders; delivery
and billing of the items ordered. Production planning and control: Entering and checking production
orders, lot splitting/summarizing, capacity planning and smoothing; process-oriented customizing with
respect to scheduling, availability check, calculation schemes, and order execution/confirmation. Sales
logistics and revenue accounting: Selling items, price determination, accounting, inventory management,
customer management (credit limit, customer-specific discounts, etc.). Specific Teaching Strategies:
Interactive, problem-based lectures and seminars will demonstrate the linkages between concept and
practise for the above-mentioned processes through illustrating in real-time how these matters can be
implemented in SAP R/3. Entity Relationship Models for master data entry and Event-driven Process
Chains (EPCs) for operational processes will help students to navigate through the R/3 system and to see
the link between the concept to be implemented and the actual information system.
Learning outcomes
Every student implements the business case in a separate virtual company in SAP ECC. Students
perform all steps which have to be implemented also in a real-world implementation project:- Cost
accounting - planning cycle: Implementation of cost accounting for a production environment,
implementation of the value flow in a company (allocations, surcharges, activity inputs) in SAP ECC. Master data for the MRP process: organizational structure, materials master and material planning,
product structure, cost center planning and work centers, linkage between cost accounting and
production/logistics, work centers, initialization of capacity planning, definition of routings. - Sales
projections and primary requirements. - Procurement logistics and accounting: Master data in
procurement, processing the purchase requisitions produced by the MRP run and deriving purchase
orders, delivery and billing of the items ordered. - Production planning and control: Entering and
checking production orders, lot splitting/summarizing, capacity planning and smoothing, processoriented customizing with respect to scheduling, availability check, calculation schemes, and order
execution/confirmation.- Cost accounting - actual costs: Production and procurement activities create
actual costs enabling plan/actual analyses. - Sales logistics and revenue accounting: Order processing,
price determination, inventory management, customer management. In all steps, students are confronted
with a business case and have to implement the case in SAP ECC, that is, the system has to be
customized to the given case.
Assessment
Method of Assessment:
Written exam (individual) 33,33%
which assesses the conceptual component of the subject (EPC, ERM).
Practical exam using the SAP R/3 system (individual) 33,33%
which assesses the application component of the subject.
A case study to be implemented independently: 33,33%
Since the initial case study in the lecture is implemented iteratively, it is imperative that students are
present at all times.
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
27

Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%


Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Prosser, A.; Bagnato, D., Mller-Trk, R.:


Title: Integration Management with SAP ECC
Publisher: Facultas, Vienna
Year: 2009
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book

Global Supply Chain Design


Contents
The lecture is structured as follows:
1.) Supply Chain Network Design in the Global Environment
2.) Fundamentals of Supply Chain Modeling
3.) Fixed and Variable Costs in Supply Chain Networks
4.) Coordinated Product and Supply Chain Design
5.) Global Supply Chain Design and Risk Management
6.) Supply Chain Network Design in Practice

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should have acquired an understanding about the
topics of globalization and integration of worldtrade. Students should have the skills and competence to
evaluate the international environment and its implications for global supply chain design. Furthermore,
students should be able to develop quantitative models that support decision-making in global supply
chain networks.
Teaching/learning method(s)
The course is based on lectures, discussion of assigned readings, cases, and application exercises. You
are expected to have completed assignments, read the assigned material, and rework class exercises and
28

demonstrations after each class session. If your expectations for the course are not being met or if
you are concerned about your grade or other course related matters, please talk to your instructor
as soon as possible during the semester.

Assessment
Homework assignments: 30%
Case Studies: 20 %
Final Exam: 50 %
In order to pass the class, you need attend at least 60 % of all classes, get more than 40 % on the final
exam and more than 50 % overall. If you fulfill these criteria, the following grading scale will be:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.
HOMEWORK:
An electronic version of the homework is due at the start of class on the day assigned. Any
homework that is late will receive a score of zero. Cooperation with other students on homework
assignments is encouraged. However, the final write-up must be done individually. Duplicate
homework write-ups are unacceptable and will receive a score of zero.
CASES:
You will work in teams of 4 students on two case studies. Every member of your team will receive
the same score, subject to controls for "free riding."
Readings
1

Author: Sunil Chopra, Peter Meindl


Title: Supply Chain Management
Publisher: Pearson New Jersey
Edition: 4 th Edition / 5 th Edition
Remarks: Chapters 4, 6.3 and 6.7
Year: 2010
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Type: Book

Author: Watson, Lewis, Cacioppi, Jayaram


Title: Supply Chain Network Design
Publisher: Pearson
Remarks: Chapters 1-8 and 12-14
Year: 2012
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Type: Book

Author: Simchi-Levi, Kaminsky, Simchi-Levi


Title: Designing and Managing the Supply Chain
Publisher: McGrawHill Boston
Edition: 3 rd Edition
Remarks: Chapters 10 and 11
29

Year: 2009
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Type: Book
4

Author: Shapiro
Title: Modeling the Supply Chain
Publisher: Thomson
Remarks: Chapters 12
Year: 2011
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book

Supply Chain Planning


Contents
The course provides an introduction to the foundations of Supply Chain Planning (forecasting, S&OP,
master planning, order fulfilment and available-to-promise, short term planning and distribution
planning), with a focus on quantitative aspects of the planning process. The course is designed such that
regular interactive teaching sessions run in parallel to a larger case study. The case is introduced in the
first session, and all course sessions are designed such that each session contributes to different aspects
and questions in the case study. A final presentation of the case results concludes the course.
Content:

Supply Chain Planning in the SCM context: planning frameworks, SCOR model
Demand forecasting: Qualitative and quantitative approaches, S&OP, forecast accuracy,
managing the forecast process
Master planning: Level, chase, mixed strategies, application of linear programs for master
planning, aggregation in time, product, place, process, etc.
Demand fulfilment: Distribution planning, detailed demand fulfilment planning, available-topromise
Short-term planning: Production planning and scheduling

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students will

Be able to discern and apply appropriate planning techniques to analyse and solve common
supply chain planning problems
Be able to select and apply appropriate demand forecasting techniques for different product
characteristics
Be able to evaluate the application of forecasting techniques to a given set of products and
critically discuss their applicability, strength and weaknesses
Be able to select, apply and evaluate the application of appropriate master planning techniques
such as level and chase strategy, and mixed strategy as well as solutions based on linear
programs
Be able to select, apply and evaluate the application of appropriate demand fulfilment and
available-to-promise planning techniques
Be fully aware of the limitations of various supply chain planning techniques in a problem
context
30

Be able to conduct a real-world based supply chain planning exercise, and to present and
critically discuss the findings

Teaching/learning method(s)
The course follows a bottom up approach: First the development needs in the field are identified
through a case study, followed by theoretical presentations, interactive case discussions and
exercises
Lecturers refer to best practices from industry
Assessment
The final mark in this course is composed of three parts:
1. In-class assignments
2. Exam
3. Presentation and written report on DrinkCo case
Grading scale:
Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%
Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Stadtler H, Kilger C


Title:
SupplyChain Management and Advanced Planning, Concepts, Models, Software,and Case Studies
Publisher: Springer
Edition: 4
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
Type: Book

Author: Stadtler H, Fleischmann B, Grunow M, Meyr H, Srie C


Title:
AdvancedPlanning in Supply Chains
Publisher: Springer
Edition: 1
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Strongly recommended (but no absolute necessity for purchase)
31

Type: Book

nd

2 year
In the second year, students select two in-depth electives according to their individual interests.
Furthermore, in advanced seminars and the Master's thesis students learn to apply the concepts and
methods learned to real world environments.

3rd Semester - Specialized Expertise (Duration: begin of October - end of January)


Specialization areas - select two:

u Business Analytics in Supply Chains (BA)


u Location Analytics and Geospatial Data (LAGD)
u Retail Marketing (RM)
32

u Supply Chain Finance and Risks (FR)


u Sustainable and Humanitarian Supply Chains (SH)
u Transport and Logistics (TL)
Seminar Course in Supply Chain Management - select one:

u Decision Models and Analysis (SC DMA)


u IT Seminar Course (SC IT)
u Transport and Logistics (SC TL)
4th Semester Synthesis (Duration: begin of March - end of June)

u Research Seminar in Supply Chain Management (RS)


u Master's Thesis

Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1


Contents
Students learn to design and implement a data warehouse using SAP BW. In class, they each create their
own individual data warehouse in the system; the work is supplemented by a case study that has to be
implemented in independent coursework.
Learning outcomes
"Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1" and "Business Analytics in Supply Chains 2" form a unit that
prepares students for the complex tasks of building and using systems for business analysis and
simulation. In "Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1" students learn how to design and implement a
data warehouse as well as decision support and reporting functions on top of the warehouse. This course
lays the foundations for the strategic enterprise management and business simulation in "Business
Analytics in Supply Chains 2". The course starts with the methodological foundations that are necessary
to transform a user requirement for a decision support system into a data warehouse design
specification:

Dimensional Fact Modeling: extraction of a basic warehouse model from information on


operational IS,
33

Aggregation Path Array: planning the aggregation hierarchies to support specified reporting
requirements,
Logical Model specification of the warehouse.

Each method is immediately applied in a group assignment for a given technical specification and
business problem, resp. students then learn to implement the specification incorporated in the above
models in a data warehouse product, SAP BW. Each student works in a separate virtual data warehouse
implementing the system from scratch. The implementation steps are:

Defining the multi-dimensional data structures, the time series, and the aggregation hierarchies
for high-level aggregates, which are needed for the analytical applications of the data warehouse,
Defining sources for data imports, data validation and reconciliation schemas,
Physically loading the warehouse using pre-arranged data thereby filling the above data
definitions,
Defining procedures for periodical data update and the refresh of aggregate data in the
warehouse.

Teaching/learning method(s)
The entire course will emulate a real-world warehouse implementation project from its early planning
stages to final use. The system used will be SAP's Business Warehouse (SAP BW). SAP is the world
market leader of Enterprise Resource Planning systems (SAP ECC), but also offers a data warehouse
product which can be used indepentently of ECC.
Assessment
Assessment will be based on: 1 hr. written exam in data modelling for data warehouses
Implementation of the warehouse case study in BW.
Both criteria account for 50% of the overall assessment each
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1
Author: Prosser, A; Ossimitz, M.-L.
Title:Data Warehouse Management Using SAP BW
Publisher: UTB fr Wissenschaft, Stuttgart
Year: 2001

34

Business Analytics in Supply Chains 2


Contents
This subject is based upon "Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1" and provides an introduction to
business simulation with SAP's strategic enterprise management tool. A balanced score card (BSC) will
be created and a business case will be implemented and analysed in the system.

Learning outcomes
Students learn to model an analytical information system on top of a data warehouse. The example used
in this subject is a balanced scorecard. Students create their own scorecard and the underlying data
warehouse structures in the SAP BW system.

Teaching/learning method(s)
Based upon the data warehouse skills of "Business Analytics in Supply Chains 1", a BW data model will
be built in the sytem. Based on the data model, a balanced score card (BSC) will be created and a
business case will be implemented and analysed in the system. The information stored in the data
warehouse will be aggregated to build a BSC and to analyse a given business case. The busines case
under review reveals structural weaknesses in the company's operation that have to be identifed and
analysed. Students have to devise a counter strategy and to suggest changes in the the company's
business. The subject builds business and technical skills that are crucial in state-of-the art business
analysis and simulation.
Assessment
Assessment will be based on the case study implementation.
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Prosser, A, Auer, J., Kellermann, S.


Title: Balanced Scorecards with SAP Strategic Enterprise Management
Publisher: Facultas, Wien
Year: 2005
35

Location Analytics and Geospatial Data 1


Contents
This course provides an advanced introduction to state of the art network-based transportation and
supply chain modeling with a specific focus on recent developments in
exploratory geospatial analysis
location/allocation analysis
cloud-based services and open-source data infrastructures & tools
We will use real-world data and case studies in various industries for

Locating facilities, e.g., a new warehouse of a major retail chain, a new hub/spoke in a
distribution network
Allocating, e.g., customers to retail/service outlets, regional warehouses to a central warehouse,
resources to production sites
Evaluating, e.g., service/infrastructure networks and customer potentials, trade area and
distribution/production network (re-)design, geospatial risks and sustainability effects

The topics are addressed from a methodological-theoretical as well as an empirical perspective, both
with a particular emphasis on spatial aspects. Considerable attention will be paid to gaining hands-on
experience in the application of spatial analysis techniques of events that occur on and alongside
networks in empirical practice, using spatial analytics methods and tools like ArcGIS Desktop and
ArcGIS Online as well as Open-Source Software like GeoDa, CrimeStat, GWR or SANET.

Learning outcomes
Students learn selected theoretical and empirical methods and get a good understanding of the
fundamental questions that are addressed in the context of SCM, the methods with which these are
addressed, and the current state of affairs in the literature.
By the end of this course students

possess a relevant background and a good mastery of models, methods and techniques used in
the domain
have the ability to select and apply appropriate modeling tools in specific decision making
contexts

Teaching/learning method(s)
Lecture and discussion
papers to read
lab course tutorials
assignments
Assessment
Tasks (max. achievable points = 100)
readings and assignments (45)
active participation in class discussion (5)
final exam (50)
36

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Unit details
Unit Date
1 10/05/16

Contents
Lecture and discussion
Introduction to LAGD Location Analytics and Geospatial Data
Exploratory geospatial analysis in SCM
Learning materials for Unit 1: Exploratory geospatial analysis (coming soon)
Computer lab

hands-on exploratory geospatial analysis using


open & licensed tools (ArcGIS, CrimeStat, GeoDa, GWR),
case studies

2 10/12/16
Excursion to WIGeoGIS Knowledge Day

Web-based GI-/geomarketing solutions, e.g. sales network (re)design, telco


broadband infrastructure,
Business analytics based on real-time traffic data (TomTom)
Full-service geoanalytcs for the cooperative business network ANWR Group
The language of the event is German but I guess, all students are able to
understand at least some German AND it is GIS-based project content which is
going to be presented
Knowledge Day attendees usually are representatives/users from big Austrian
companies using solutions by WIGeoGIS (networking opportunities at the cometogether buffet )

Doodle poll (if more than 50% of the students vote for the Excursion, hands-on
training and discussion of methods and tools will be extended to unit 3)
Venue: Wolke 19, Ares Tower, Donau-City-Str 11, 1220 Wien
Public transport from Campus WU: U2 (direction Karlsplatz) to Praterstern, change to U1
(direction Leopoldau) and exit at stop Wien Kaisermhlen-VIC, then walk about 8
minutes to Ares Tower ( Marcel-Prawy-Promenade); see e.g. Wiener Linien

37

Unit Date

Contents
arrival at 1:15 PM at the latest!
Opening: 1:30 PM

3 10/19/16
Lecture and discussion Location-Allocation-Models in SCM
Please read carefully to be prepared for this unit and for the next lab-unit:

for overview and introduction read Church, RL(2005): Location modeling and
GIS, in Longley, PA, Goodchild, MF, Maguire, DJand Rhind, DW (eds):
Geographical Information Systems: Principles, Techniques,Management and
Applications [Chapter 20, on CD-ROM]
some more specifications are provided in Miller, H.J. and Shaw, S.-L. (2001):
Geographic Information Systems for Transportation: Principles and Applications,
pp. 199-213 [Chapter 6: Network Flows and Facility Location; facility location
within networks part only]. New York: Oxford University Press

see the Learning activities


More hands-on ESDA with ArcGis, CrimeStat and GeoDa

global and local spatial autocorrelation


hotspots in point patterns, kernel density
case studies

4 11/02/16
Hands-on Location-Allocation-Modeling in ArcGIS and Extensions
Learning materials for Unit 4: Lab tutorial: Location-Allocation Models
5 11/09/16
Lecture and discussion Location Analytics in the Cloud
Cloud services and the Internet of Things (IoT)
(semi-)open geospatial data incl. sensor network data
sharing/publishing in SC business environments
Slides Location Analytics in the Cloud
6 11/16/16 Computer Lab: hands-on LAGD in the Cloud: ArcGIS Online and Extensions
7 11/23/16
Written exam: models and methods

Location Analytics and Geospatial Data 2

38

Contents
In this course, the major issues are the application of methodological and technical skills to real-world
network-based transportation and supply chain modeling problems, and the critical discussion of results
which are presented in the literature. Students are supposed to carry out case studies in small teams in
which they apply the relevant theories, methods and techniques discussed during the lectures in LAGD1, and learn to use appropriate software tools.
Main topics covered in case study projects are:

Locating facilities, e.g.,


a new warehouse in a major retail chain,
a new hub/spoke in an airline network

Allocating e.g.,
customers to retail outlets,
regional warehouses to a central warehouse,
resources to production sites

utilizing cloud-based data and tools for publishing SCM decision support relevant information

Case study data, spatial network analysis and location analytics software tools like ArcGIS Desktop and
ArcGIS Online as well as Open-Source Software like GeoDa, CrimeStat, GWR or SANET are made
available.

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the class, students should be able to

link theory to empirical research in the field


read literature in a critical way and discuss relevant topics
analyse and solve small-scale real-world problems in selected industries and businesses
develop and present solutions in a team

Teaching/learning method(s)
case study-based team work
project management and seminar paper
presentations
discussions
case study coaching
Assessment
Tasks (max. achievable points = 100)

active class participation (10)


case study projects development and documentation (70)
39

case study project presentations (20)

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Unit details
Uni Date
t

Contents

1 11/30/16
Introduction to Case Studies
Academic writing wrap-up
2 12/07/16
Class project proposal presentation, discussion
case-study coaching & assistance with respect to methodological and technical concerns
3 12/14/16
Class project proposal presentation, discussion
case-study coaching & assistance with respect to methodological and technical concerns
4 12/21/16
Progress reports presentation, discussion and coaching
5 01/11/17
Progress reports, discussion and coaching (on demand)
6 01/18/17
Final presentation and discussion of class projects
Please, hand in final reports drafts until 01/23/17 09:00 AM.
7 01/25/17
Final presentation and discussion of class projects
Please, hand in final reports drafts until 01/23/17 09:00 AM.

40

Retail Marketing 1
Contents
The course gives an introduction into Marketing Research and Analytics with an emphasis on problems
in Retailing. All analyses will be done using R. In this part of the course, a general introduction into R
and fundamentals of Data Analysis will be covered.
Learning outcomes
After completing this course students will have a basic knowledge of fundamentals of Data Analysis for
Marketing problems. They are able to describe and visualize data with R and apply models for advanced
marketing applications. Students will learn about decision problems in retailing like pricing, assortment
or advertising planning. Beside an understanding of the problem structure, students will learn to apply
mathematical and statistical tools to support decision making. Apart from that, completing this course
will contribute to the students ability to efficiently work and communicate in a team, work on solutions
for complex practical problems by using modern statistical software.
Teaching/learning method(s)
The course will combine alternative ways to deliver the different topics to the students. On the one hand,
a classical lecture style approach where the instructor presents the software will be used; on the other
hand, students will have to solve hand on problems in class and as homework.
Assessment
The final grade of the course will depend on

final oral exam (60%)


homework assignments (40%)

Please note that there will be no possibility to retake the final exam. The assessment of the homework
assignments is based on a regular grading scheme that is indicated with the sample problems.
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Chapman/MCDonnell Feit


Title: R for Marketing Research and Analytics
Publisher: Springer
Year: 2015
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students
Type: Book
41

Retail Marketing 2
Contents
The course gives an introduction into Marketing Research and Analytics with an emphasis on problems
in Retailing. All analyses will be done using R. In this part of the course, linear models, Data complexity
reduction techniques, segmentation analysis and market basket analysis will be covered.

Learning outcomes
After completing this course students will have a basic knowledge of fundamentals of Data Analysis for
Marketing problems. They are able to describe and visualize data with R and apply models for advanced
marketing applications. Students will learn about decision problems in retailing like pricing, assortment
or advertising planning. Beside an understanding of the problem structure, students will learn to apply
mathematical and statistical tools to support decision making. Apart from that, completing this course
will contribute to the students ability to efficiently work and communicate in a team, work on solutions
for complex practical problems by using modern statistical software.

Teaching/learning method(s)
The course will combine alternative ways to deliver the different topics to the students. One the one
hand, a classical lecture style approach where the instructor presents theoretical insight into this topic
will be used; one the other hand, students will have to solve assignments as homeworks and work on the
simulation within the teams.
Assessment
The final grade of the course will depend on

final oral exam (60%)


homework assignments (40%)

Please note that there will be no possibility to retake the final exam. The assessment of the homework
assignments is based on a regular grading scheme that is indicated with the sample problems.
Grading scale:
42

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Chapman/MCDonnell Feit


Title: R for Marketing Research and Analytics
Publisher: Springer
Year: 2015
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Recommendation: Essential reading for all students

Supply Chain Finance and Risks 1


Contents
The lecture is organized as follows:
Introduction to supply chain finance:Background, Definition, Supply Chain Strategies (Suarez)
Shareholder value creation (Schramm)
Supply chain value drivers for cash-flowmaximization II (Schramm)
Supply chain value drivers for risk mitigation(Suarez)
Decision framework (Suarez)
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should be able to understand and measure the
impact of supply chain management on the financial performance of the companies involved. Basic
definitions, company valuation methods as well as supply chain value drivers will be introduced.
Further, students should achieve an understanding how to apply supply chain finance in stable and
volatile market environments.
Teaching/learning method(s)
Seminar-style class (lecture with discussion), literature reviews on special topics, one assignment to
prepare in groups and wrap-up.
Assessment
Individual Level (60%):
Written Exam of 60 min.
Group Level (40%):
43

Case Study with group presentation based on completeness and quality of content (30%), group
presentation and discussion in-class (10%).
Gradingscale:
Excellent(1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good(2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory(3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient(4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail(5): <50.0%
Readings
1

Author: Rappaport, A
Title: Creating shareholder value - A guide for managers and investors
Publisher: Free Press: New York.
Edition: 2nd
Year: 1998
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book

Author: Stewart, G.B.


Title: The quest for value: the EVA management guide
Publisher: Harper Business: New York
Year: 1991
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Content relevant for diploma examination: No
Recommendation: Reference literature
Type: Book

Unit details
Unit Date

Contents

1 03/10/16
Introduction to supply chain finance: Background, Definition, Supply Chain Strategies
(Suarez)
2 10/10/16

Shareholder value creation, Supply chain drivers for cash-flow maximization I, Case
study introduction (Schramm)

3 17/10/16

Supply chain value drivers for cash-flow maximization II (Schramm)

4 24/10/16

Supply chain value drivers for risk mitigation, Decision framework I (Suarez)

5 07/11/16

Decision framework II (Suarez)

6 14/11/16

Case study group presentations and discussion in-class (Schramm)

7 21/11/16

Written Examination of 60 min- closed book

Supply Chain Finance and Risks 2


Contents
The course provides the basics of supply chain riskmanagement with applications to different supply
chain management problems. Thetopics to be covered include:
44

basics of risk management process


risk measures such as value at risk, conditional value atrisk, and mean-deviation rules
including risks in strategic network decisions
operational mitigation strategies for dealing with supplydisruptions

Learning outcomes
Students will become familiar withrisk management strategies applicable to specific risk sources. Further,
students will be able toapply quantitative methods to measure and optimize decisions under risks.
Teaching/learning method(s)
Lectures with discussions
Literature reviews
Case studies
Assessment
Individual assignments (20%)
Case study discussions and presentations (25%)
Paper discussion (25%)
Final exam (30%)
Grading scale:

Excellent (1) : 87.5% -< 100.0%


Good (2) : 75.0% -< 87.5%
Satisfactory (3) : 62.5% -< 75.0%
Sufficient (4) : 50.0% -< 62.5%
Fail (5) : < 50.0%

Sustainable and Humanitarian Supply Chains 1


Contents
Session 1: Lecture (Introduction)
Session 2: Lecture / case study presentation
Session 3: Lecture / case study presentation
Session 4: Lecture / case study presentation
Session 5: Final exam
Session 6: Student paper presentations
Session 7: Student paper presentations
This course deals with the topic of humanitarian supply chains. It starts with an introduction into the
basics and fundamental concepts of humanitarian logistics. The main challenges of disaster relief
operations are discussed and the main differences to logistics in a business environment are described.
While the second session is focused on the preparedness phase of a disaster, the third session will be
45

devoted to the disaster response phase. In the fourth session, different recent research areas are discussed
(Humanitarian Funding, Needs Assessment).
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of this course, students will be able to reflect upon basic and advanced
concepts in the area of humanitarian logistics and their application in practice. They have an
understanding of different modelling approaches that can support decision making in the humanitarian
context. Furthermore, students can critically assess and discuss results of such models. Finally, they
prepare presentations on special topics in the area of humanitarian supply chain management and thus
improve the ability to present and discuss their work.
Teaching/learning method(s)
This course has the character of a seminar. The students have to prepare case studies and research
articles beforehand and the contents of these are discussed in class. In the second half of the course
student teams will present and critically evaluate research papers on special topics of humanitarian
supply chains.
Assessment
There are in total four sessions on defined contents, one session for the exam and one or two sessions
(depending on the number of attendants) for final presentations. The final grade is composed of the
following:
Case study assessment (handout max. 2 pages, 10%) and presentation (group, 10%)
Exam (individual, 50%)
Discussions (group, 5%) (Each paper presentation group is assigned to be a discussion group at
another groups' presentation, responsible for )
Paper presentation (teams of three, 10%) (40min presentation, 20 min discussion guided by
discussion group)
Written evaluation of the papers (teams of three, max. 6 pages, 15%)
Prerequisite for passing the course is the minimum performance of 40% in the exam and a total of at
least 50% of all individual activities.
Grading Scale
Excellent(1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good(2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory(3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient(4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail(5): <50.0%

Readings
1

Author: Tomasini, Rolando M., and Luk N. van Wassenhove


Title: Humanitarian Logistics
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Edition: 1
Remarks: Can be obtained as an ebook from the WU library
Year: 2009
Content relevant for class examination: Yes
Type: Book

Author: Kovacs, Gyongyi, and Karen M. Spens


Title: Relief supply chain management for disasters: humanitarian aid and emergency logistics
Publisher: Business Science Reference
46

Remarks: Can be obtained as an ebook from the WU library


Year: 2012

Sustainable and Humanitarian Supply Chains 2


Contents
This course deals with the topic of sustainability in supply chains. It starts with an introduction into the
basics and fundamental concepts of sustainability in operations and supply chain management. It is
discussed how these concepts can be transferred to certain key performance indicators (KPIs) and if/how
these KPIs are collected and reported by todays companies. For that, the reporting standards of the
Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) are discussed in detail. In the second and third session the focus lies
on incorporating sustainability concepts into decision models in the context of supply chain
management, namely location decisions and routing decisions. The fourth session is dedicated to
sustainable sourcing and the problems and risks that can occur when critical materials or rare earth
elements have to be procured. Finally, special issues in sustainable supply chain research and practice
are discussed in depth.

Session 1
Session 2
Session 3
Session 4
Session 5
Session 6
Session 7

Introduction and Sustainability Basics


Sustainable Sourcing: Conflict Minerals and Rare Earth Elements
Network Design Decisions with Sustainability Considerations
Green Logistics and Transportation Planning
Sustainability Reporting
Exam
Students paper presentations

Learning outcomes
After successfully completing this course, students will be able to reflect upon basic and advanced
concepts of sustainability and their implementation and application in theory and practice. They
understand the different modelling opportunities of sustainability indicators and are capable of extending
certain decision support models by sustainability aspects themselves. Furthermore, the students can
analyse, assess, critically scrutinize and discuss the results of such models. Finally, they independently
prepare presentations on special topics of sustainable supply chains and thus gain the ability to argue,
discuss and defend their work in front of others.
Teaching/learning method(s)
This course has the character of a seminar. The students have to prepare research articles beforehand and
the contents of these papers are discussed in class. Furthermore, written assignments on the topics to
discuss have to be prepared and handed in. In the second half of the course each student will receive
actual research literature on a certain special topic of sustainable supply chains and needs to process and
present his/her paper.
Assessment
There are in total four sessions on defined contents, one session for the exam and one or two sessions
(depending on the number of attendants) for final presentations. The final grade is composed of the
following:
Reading and homework assignments (individual, 32%)
Exam (individual, 36%)
Discussions (individual, 10%)
47

Paper presentation (group, 12%)


Handout (group, 10%)
Prerequisite for passing the course is the minimum performance of 40% in the exam and a total of at
least 50% of all individual activities.
Grading scale:
Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%
Good (2): 75.0% - < 87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - < 75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - < 62.5%
Fail (5): < 50.0%

Transport and Logistics 1


Contents
Transport and Logistics 1: Transport-Economics
Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the module, students should have acquired an understanding about the
topics of transport economics, especially EU politics initiatives, infrastructure planning as well as the
main characteristics of the transportation function from a shipper perspective. Furthermore, students
should be able to develop market analysis, evaluate and develope transport politics initatives and design
and implement a transportation management unit in a company.
Teaching/learning method(s)
Seminar-style class (lecture with discussion) Literature review Assignment Case Study
Assessment

Assignment (20%)
Case Study (20%)
Final Exam (60%)

Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Readings
1

Author: Stuart Cole


Title: Applied Transport Economics
Publisher: Kogan Page
Edition: 3ed
Year: 2005
48

Content relevant for class examination: Yes


Unit details
Uni
t

Date

1 25/10/2016

Contents
Corporate Transport Management 1

Strategic Transport Planning


Transport Sourcing

Introduction of Case Study


DI Miguel Suarez, MBA
2 8/11/2016
Corporate Transport Management 2

Transport Contracting
Carrier Management
Supply and Delivery Management

DI Miguel Suarez, MBA


3 10/11/2016
Development of the Transport Market / Future Trend
Introduction of Assignment
Prof Dr. Alexander Eisenkopf
4 11/11/2016

Transport Economics
Prof Dr. Alexander Eisenkopf

5 11/11/2016
Transport Policy
Prof Dr. Alexander Eisenkopf
6 15/11/2016

Corporate Transport Management 3

Supply and Delivery Management


Transportation Management Systems (TMS)

Case Study Group Presentations


DI Miguel Suarez, MBA
7 22/11/2016

Final Exam

49

Decision Models and Analysis


Contents
In the seminar course, the major issues are the application of theoretical insights on SCM to real-world
planning problems, and the critical discussion of results which are presented in the SCM literature.
Students will work in teams on different real-world or theoretical problems, will develop solutions and
present them to the study group.
This semester's main emphases:

Decision criteria in optimization


Efficiency measurement with data envelopment analysis
Behavioral supply chain management
Decision tools for project management

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the class, students should be able to

analyse and solve real SCM planning problems


develop and present solutions in a team
critically evaluate and discuss published results from the SCM literature

Teaching/learning method(s)
Autonomous group works, presentations, discussions
Assessment
Homework assignments (20%)
Mid-term exam (20%)
Seminar work progress presentation (10%)
Seminar work final presentation with discussant (20%)
Seminar paper (30%)
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

IT Seminar Course
Contents
The overall goal of this seminar course is to povide the students with the skills necessary for the
successfull use of information systems for solving real-world SCM problems. The students will develop
skills in the areas information systems concepts in SCM, IS project management, IS modelling, IS
implementation and IS integration via the implementation of case studies based on modern standard
software like SAP Business by Design or ArcGIS. These skills are necessary for implementing modern
planning and execution concepts in real-world SCM processes.
50

Learning outcomes
After successful completion of the class, students should be able to

develop an IS-model for a given SCM problem setting


customize SCM standard software
develop and present solutions in a team
synchronize work as part of a larger project team
understand the problems arising when integrating several software tools

Teaching/learning method(s)
autonomous groupworks
presentations
discussions
seminar paper describing IS design and implementation
Assessment
Max. achievable points: 100
5 for class participation
15 for presentations of ongoing work (group work)
30 for final presentation (group work)
50 for seminar paper (group work)
Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Prerequisite for passing the course: minimum performance of 40% in the final examination.

Recommended previous knowledge and skills


Students should have a good knowledge of ERP-, GIS and Datawarehouse Systems, project
management techniques and IS-modelling
An introduction to the information systems used in the seminar is given at the beginning of the course.

Transport & Logistics (Seminar Course)


Contents
The course consists of
a kick-off session,

four sessions about research tools and methodologies,


51

a written seminar paper to be submitted

and two presentations to be held in class,


namely a proposal / research plan and a final presentation.

In the kick-off session, topics for seminar papers are assigned which are either more practice-or
more theory-oriented. Practice-oriented topics include applied research solving an actual problem in
collaboration with an outside project partner (like a theory-based consultancy project), whereas in more
theory-oriented topics, the research process aims to deriver recommendations from theory for practice.
Learning outcomes

Identify and discuss a relevant and non-trivial theory or practice based problem in the field of transport /
logistics / supply chain management.

Develop and discuss an appropriate research design, methodology and method for solving this problem
Analyse real-life primary or secondary data with a theoretical framework developed and discussed
Critically evaluate results (especially in terms of validity and reliability)
Develop an action plan for a theory-based consultancy project and reflect on implementation issues.
Alternatively, generate recommendations for practice when the seminar paper is more theory-oriented.

Manage the project work and external relationships with outside project partners in a professional way.

Teaching/learning method(s)
Lectures about research methods and methodology
Seminar work: setting up a research plan, writing a seminar paper and present it in the final
presentation session.
Assessment
The final grade of the course will depend on i) the quality of the research plan, ii) the quality of the
seminar paper and iii) presentations during the course. Grading scale:

Excellent (1): 87.5% - 100.0%


Good (2): 75.0% - <87.5%
Satisfactory (3): 62.5% - <75.0%
Sufficient (4): 50.0% - <62.5%
Fail (5): <50.0%

Total max. 100 points (max. 30 points individual assignments / 10 per session, max. 40 points seminar
paper, max. 10 points presentation of proposal / research plan, max. 10 points final presentation, max.
10 points participation in discussion)

Unit details
Uni
t

Date

1 06/10/2016

Contents
Kick-off Session
52

Uni
t

Date

Contents

2 13/10/2016

Lecture by Univ.-Prof. Dr. Kummer

3 18/10/2016

Lecture by Dr. Schuhmayer

4 27/10/2016

Lecture by Assoz. Prof. PD Dr. Frst

5 03/11/2016

Lecture by Dr. Schramm

6 07/12/2016

Presentation of proposal / research plan (1st session)

7 14/12/2016

Presentation of proposal / research plan (2nd session)

Individual coaching...

9 01/02/2017

Final presentation of seminar paper.

53