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Our

OurChildren
About

Useful Information
for the Next Generation
of Jewish Families

Curtain Up

Local Theater Season Unfolds


Eye-Opening Book on Vision
Anxiety and Adolescents
Supplement to The Jewish Standard November 2016

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T:10

T:13

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Learn more at atlantichealth.org/chilton or call 888.4AH.DOCS.


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2 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN OCTOBER 2016

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Our
OurChildren
About

November 2016

Helping Our Daughters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5


Teaching them to navigate their social lives

Curtain Up! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Lights on for local theater

Helping Youngsters on the Spectrum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8


Applied behavior analysis making a difference

Eye-Opening Book on Vision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10


Little-known problem gets light shed

Anxiety in Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12


Teaching youngsters coping skills

Enough is Enough. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13


When gratitude is the attitude

Loving Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15


Key traits to make it happen

Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..16
Pictures of our children

Top Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17


Great picks for November

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Things to do this month

Simchas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..19
Marking the milestones

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

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OurChildren
About

musings from the editor


I

was 12 when I saw my first Broadway play.


It was Tinas 12th birthday and
her gift was a night of theater, and I
was luckily Tinas plus one (we actually
were three, including Tinas mother.)
I remember that night vividly. It was a
special occasion so I dressed accordingly. I wore a long, plaid, pleated skirt
and a white, satin puffed-sleeve shirt
and my fancy shoes. We boarded an
express bus from our Brooklyn neighborhood into Manhattan to the Great

White Way. The play that we were going to see was Raisin, a musical adaption of Lorraine Hansberrys A Raisin
in the Sun, which was the story about
an African-American family in the 50s in
Chicago and their struggles.
We had great seats in the orchestra section. Our seats were so close
to the stage, I remember seeing the
sweat come off some of the actors.
The whole experience was
exhilarating.
Yehuda also was 12 when he saw
his first Broadway play.
Jeff, Shaina, and I were taking Yehuda out for his birthday. We headed
into Times Square with the ruse that
we were going to Dave & Busters (not
a place of choice for Yehuda). While
pretending to walk to the arcade, we
crossed the street and headed towards the Foxwoods Theatre.
Surprise!
We were going to see one of the
most spectacular, one of the most expensively produced and technically
complex shows ever on Broadway,
Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. It
was a perfect gift for Yehuda, who was
a major Spidey fan. The play, with its
many sequences of characters flying

MissionStatement

and engaging in aerial combat, had an


additional thrill factor. When the actors landed in the audience, they did
so right next to Yehudas seat.
After the show, in true fan form,
we waited at the backstage door for
the actors to leave the theater. One
by one, out they came, makeup wiped
off and clad in their jeans and street
clothes to greet the anxious aficionados who stood patiently for their autographs and to pose for pictures. There
was the actress who played Mary Jane
Watson, and others. But the biggest
kick was seeing Peter Parker/SpiderMan played by actor, Reeve Carney. He
even wished Yehuda a happy birthday.
The entire encounter will never
fade from memory.
There have been other Broadway
theater excursions, as well as other
off-Broadway experiences.
There was Cinderella with Shaina. (I bawled when hearing decades
after my childhood, the Rogers and
Hammerstein score.) There was Peter and the Starcatcher. There was
Pippin. And recently, there was Fiddler on the Roof.
Academics and social scientists
say that seeing live theater may be

particularly beneficial for youngsters.


It promotes tolerance, increases attention span and deepens their knowledge. They also say that it teaches
them to recognize the emotions of
others. Theater works best when actors can convey what they are thinking and feeling to an audience. The intensity of that experience may provide
the audience with practice in reading
the nuance of emotions, a skill that is
being blurred by social media and its
one-dimensionality.
Thats all good and well.
But whats even better is when I
hear Shaina humming Matchmaker,
Matchmaker or Yehuda telling how
he understood a particular scene days
after weve left the darkened theater.
When I see how the theater experience has touched them, its then that I
want to go back to the box office.
Cheers,

About

About Our Children is designed to help Jewish families in our area live healthy, positive lives that make the most of
the resources available to them. By providing useful, current, accurate information, the publication aims to guide parents to essential information on faith, education, the arts, events, and child-raising in short, everything that todays
Jewish family, babies to grandparents, needs to live life to the fullest in northern New Jersey and Rockland County.

OurChildren
James L. Janoff

Natalie Jay

Heidi Mae Bratt

Peggy Elias
Janice Rosen
Brenda Sutcliffe

Publisher
Editor

Deborah Herman

Art Director

Advertising Director

Slovie Jungreis-Wolff
Adina Soclof
Devorah Weiss-Rechenberg

Contributing Writers

Account Executives

AdvisoryBoard
Dr. Annette Berger, Psy.D.

Jane Calem Rosen

Psychologist, Teaneck

Marketing and Communications Specialist

Michelle Brauntuch, MS,CCLS

Barry Weissman, MD

Child Life Specialist, Englewood Hospital, Englewood

Pediatrician, Hackensack and Wyckoff

Hope Eliasof

Cheryl Wylen

Marriage and Family Therapist, Midland Park


Howard Prager, DC, DACBSP

Holistic Chiropractor, Oakland

4 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

Director of Adult Programs and Cultural Arts


YM-YWHA of North Jersey, Wayne

About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.;
e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com.

Dont Miss About Our Children in December


Published on November 18, 2016

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OurChildren
About

Teaching Your Daughter


to Navigate the Social Roller Coaster
A D I N A S O C LO F

solve their own conflicts. We


dont want to give them the answers or try to solve their problems: Dont let Shana get to
you. When she doesnt let you
play with her jump rope, just
walk away!
Instead, we want to gently
empower girls to think of solutions themselves, by asking the
following questions:
What did you try?
How did it work?
What else can you try?
Asking these questions
gives girls the message that
they are not helpless; they can
manage the inevitable ups and
downs of friendships.

riendships are important for


everyone, and even more so
for girls. Part of friendships
is learning to be a good friend
and finding good friends. Sometimes that can take a lot of trial
and error and social conflict. It
seems to be a necessary but painful part of growing up.
Girls will often lose friends,
fight with friends, and get their
feelings hurt by their friends.
They might also be the ones doing the hurting. The social lives
of girls can be a roller coaster
ride and it is not easy to be the
ones watching from the sidelines. How can we help our girls
manage their social lives and
come out whole?

Be a Good Role Model


Our children learn so much
from how we act, our own behavior. We need to model appropriate social behavior, being friendly, making time for
friends a priority, and by acting
in a way that shows respect for
others. Refraining from gossip
and talking about friends behind their back is important.
We want to teach children the
basics of choosing good friends
and being a good friend.
People who know how to
choose good friends look for
steady confidantes, and people
who like you for who you really are. Good friends are those
that value you for yourself and
share common interests.
As adults, we also know that
its okay for friends to make some
mistakes but we also know that
if you are constantly feeling put
down or controlled then that
friendship should end.
When we want to get this
message to our children, in
addition to our modeling the
behavior, we can use talk out
loud technique. When our children are in earshot we can let
them over hear our conversations with our spouse or even
ourselves. The Shwartzs just
had a baby. I am going to bring
them over a lasagna. This

Making new friends


one friend that I have always
seems to criticize me, my hair,
my clothes. I know that people
who do that are insecure about
themselves. At any rate, I think
I need to say something to her.

Just listen
Social conflict can be painful at
all ages. Sometimes watching
our children go through difficulties with their friends can bring
us back to our own childhood.
It may stir up old hurts and social anxieties. We need to separate our own emotions from our
daughters. It doesnt help to rush
in and fix the problem. We need
to give our daughters the tools
that they need to independently
manage their social issues.
One way to do that is to
give girls a safe space to vent
their feelings. No advice, no
interventions, just listening.
Many times a conversation
with our daughter about their
friends goes like this:
Daughter: Molly didnt let
me sit next to her at lunch. She
is so mean!
Mom: I dont know why you
play with that girl. You are always
complaining that she is not nice
to you. You need to find someone
who is truly a good friend.
Daughter: There is no one
else to play with!
Mom: What about Kayla?

What about Shana? You never


play with Rachel, you used to
play with her a lot
This kind of conversation
can just exacerbate the situation. Although the mom is trying to be helpful, her underlying
message is, You dont know
how to be a friend or manage
friendships.
What our daughters need
most is for us to carry on a conversation that gently reflects
what they are saying:
Daughter: Molly didnt let
me sit next to her at lunch. She
is so mean!
Mom: That could be
upsetting..
Daughter: Yeah, she said
that she got a chocolate bar
from her uncle and she didnt
want to share it.
Mom: Oh, a chocolate bar
from her uncle
Daughter: Yeah, if I had a
chocolate bar, I would share it
with her.
Mom: You would feel comfortable sharing a chocolate
bar with a good friend.
Daughter:
She
never
brings candy to school, her
Mom only packs her healthy
stuff, she usually does share
Mom: She usually is able
to share her stuff
When we empathize with our
daughters and reflect back what

they are saying, they can hear


themselves think and they are
also more likely to come to their
own conclusions on how to manage their social situations. To further help them, we can also ask,
Do you want to vent or do you
want advice? When we empathize and take the time to listen,
we send our children the following message, This is not a bad
situation, you can handle this,
you can manage this friendship
and make good decisions about
your friends. Unless we know for
sure that there is overt bullying
going on, this is the best course
of action.

Teach girls to stand up


for themselves
We can teach girls to use I
statements to express and
stand up for themselves when
they feel like they are being
treated badly:
I dont like to be called
names. It hurts my feelings.
I feel left out when you
walk home with Sara
Similarly, we can also teach
them to apologize to their
friends if they were being hurtful: Im sorry, I didnt mean to
hurt your feelings

Let them be independent


thinkers
Girls need help learning to re-

If your child is moving to a


new class and does have trouble making new friends, it is
helpful to give her a brief tutorial in making friends.
In a quiet time, you can say,
Lets see you are moving into a
new class this year. That means
new friends. I just read this article about making friends. It
gave two simple ways to make
friends:
Make an effort. Dont sit
around and wait for someone
else to strike up a conversation
with you, you can smile, and
give a compliment like, I love
your yellow headband.
Find people who like the
same things that you do and
ask them to join you in that activity, like jump rope, crafts or
soccer.
Helping girls navigate their
social lives can be tough. However, being a good role model,
being a listening ear, teaching
girls to stand up for themselves
and asking them questions to
help them solve their own problems can help.
Adina Soclof, is the director of
Parent Outreach for A+ Solutions
facilitating How to Talk so Kids
will Listen and Listen so Kids will
Talk workshops and Siblings
Without Rivalry workshops, She
runs ParentingSimply.com. Visit
her at www.parentingsimply.com.

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

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OurChildren
About

Curtain Up
on Childrens Theater for the Season
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

oost literacy? Stretch imagination? Cultivate curiosity? Extend attention span? Just lift the curtain on some live theater and make sure to bring
the children.
No one would argue the virtues of reading, writing
and arithmetic to build skills, but studies have shown
that consistent participation in the arts, such as theater, improves a childs academic performance. Facts
are facts, and a calculator or a hit of Google can yield
an answer. But teaching a childs mind to be flexible and
subtle, to think about nuance of character and themes,
takes more. Live theater jumpstarts a youngsters imagination, while sitting in a darkened theater and watching the story unravel can lengthen attention.
And our area is ripe with theater possibilitiesespecially this season.
At bergenPAC in Englewood, for example, the performing arts center dedicates about 20 percent of its
annual events to family-friendly performances, a commitment that is underscored by presenting two to three

Mutts Gone Nuts: Canine Cabaret

shows for youngsters and families each month.


In a time when the arts are continuously being
cut by schools due to lack of funding, making the arts
accessible to children is vital, said Dominic Roncace,
CEO and president of bergenPAC. The arts programs,
offered by bergenPAC, give children an outlet to explore
their creativity and learn outside of the usual class-

room setting.
bergenPAC works to be an educational resource
through our childrens and family programming at the
theater, and has made the arts accessible to over 3,500
children in 33 school districts this year alone as part of
the BeyondbergenPAC program.
On tap at bergenPAC in November are several
events, including Mutts Gone Nuts: Canine Cabaret,
a must-see comedy starring dogs. It plays Nov. 6.
The show caps a month-long fundraiser in support of
Save The Animals Rescue Team (START II), a volunteer
group based in Englewood, which supports the no-kill
animal shelter. On Nov. 19, as part of its Kidz Cabaret
Series, Turtle Dance Music, an interactive music and
movement concert for youngsters, which includes
youngsters with special needs. This movement-focused performance is designed to engage children with
movement, music, original stories, incredible visuals,
exciting play and interactive music technology, while
it promotes fitness, healthy eating and going to the library. On November 27, Odd Squad: Live!, based on the
PBS Kids series, brings its version of mystery solving

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2:00 P.M.*


Pinkalicious the Musical

Based on the book Pinkalicious by Elizabeth and Victoria Kann


Special gifts will be handed out at the end of the show from Arts and Creations
Pottery Studio. artscreationspotterystudio.com
*1:00 p.m. pre-show creative activities

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 7:00 P.M.

The Moscow Ballet's The Great Russian Nutcracker


Performed to the original Tchaikovsky score.
Premium packages are available by calling the box office.

FALL 16 SPRING 17

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17 2:00 P.M.*

Lightwire Theater's A Very Electric Christmas

Brighten your holidays with this magical tale of family, friendship, and hope, set
to timeless holiday hits by Nat King Cole, Mariah Carey, and Tchaikovsky.
1:00 p.m. pre-show activities

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 3:00 P.M.


Christmas from the Emerald Isle

Featuring the McLean Avenue Band and the Emerald Fire Dancers
Direct from Ireland, this ensemble performs dazzling Irish music, song, and
dance with a holiday flair.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2017, 2:00 P.M.*


Jeff Boyer's Bubble Trouble
Shea Center for Performing Arts

*1:00 p.m. pre-show creative activities

SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 2017, 2:00 P.M.*


Wayne, NJ

6 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

Big Nazo Creature Show

*1:00 p.m. pre-show creative activities

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AOC-7

New jersey Ballets Nutcracker

using STEM skills to unravel clues and


stop villains.
In December, the New Jersey Ballets
Nutcracker takes the stage on December 3, and Hanukkahs favorite a capella
singers, The Maccabeats perform on December 14.
In January, the Kidz Cabaret series
features Story Pirates on January 14,
Pinkalicious, the Musical, will take place
on January 22, and the Hans Christian
Andersens classic, The Ugly Duckling,
gets a modern interpretation with Light
Wire Theater and Corbian Visual Arts
and Dance on January 31.
At the Berrie Center for Performing and Visual Arts at Ramapo College
in Mahwah, director Stephanie Chaiken, said that bringing a broad range of
beautiful art to the community, is part
of her mission. And because the theater has 338 seats, its a lovely place to
bring families because every seat in the
house is good.
Just in time for the holiday, the Berrie Center for Performing and Visual Arts
will stage Chanukkah, Festival of Light
on Dec. 10 featuring Yiddish singer Eleanor Reissa, and Grammy Award-winner
Frank London, who will be performing
with Londons Klezmer Brass Allstars.
On February 11, the New York Theatre Ballet presents three ballets that will
delight audiences young and old. Cinderella; There, And Back Again, a modern
tale on the beloved tale of Hansel and
Gretel; and Double Andante, which is set
to Beethovens Sonata in D.
In Wayne at the Shea Center for Performing Arts at William Paterson Uni-

versity, Pinkalicious the Musical will be


performed on November 5. In the play,
the protagonists penchant for pink, as
in eating too many pink cupcakes, lands
her in trouble. A delight for youngsters.
Also at the Shea Center, the Moscow
Ballet presents The Great Russian Nutcracker on December 8, which includes
40 top Russian dancers. The Shea Center
and the dance company have teamed up
with a local school, The Garden Street
School for Performing Arts in Hoboken,
to involve several youngsters who will
be participating in the production, said
Craig Woelpper, event-marketing coordinator for the Shea Center.
In December, for the 19th consecutive season, the Donetsk ballet company and Miss Pattis School of Dance
will present the music and magic of a
timeless dance tradition, Tchaikovskys
The Nutcracker. The performances
benefit pediatric cancer research care
and treatment. Accompanied with live
music by the award-winning Adelphi
Orchestra, three performances are
scheduled December 9 through December 11 at Paramus Catholic High
School in Paramus. The performances
are sponsored by JulieDance, a nonprofit arts organization founded in 1997
by Patti and Darryl Vigon, owners of
Miss Pattis School of Dance in Midland
Park, in memory of their daughter, Julie, a promising young dancer who died
at 12 of Ewings sarcoma, a rare form of
bone cancer
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.

Frank London, left, and Eleanor Reissa

ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

Wond
Fami erful
ly Cla
ssic

netsk
o
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c
mi
Dyna et Troupe
Ball kraine
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from

Making a Difference
for Children
on the Spectrum
D E VO RA H W E I SS - R E I C H E N B E R G

PROUDLY PRESENTS

Nutcracker
The

Featuring the internationally acclaimed Donetsk ballet


from Ukraine and ballet students of Miss Pattis School of
Dance with the award-winning Adelphi Orchestra
Net proceeds to benefit...
Pediatric Cancer Research Care & Treatment
Sunday
Saturday
Friday
Dec. 11th
Dec. 10th
Dec. 9th
2:00PM
7:00PM
7:30PM
Paramus Catholic High School, 425 Paramus Road,
Paramus, New Jersey
All Performances $40 & $45 Seats
Group rates available. Call for tickets & Information

201.670.4422

Visa, American Express & MasterCard accepted


8 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

he first indication something was


wrong came when Yaels kindergarten teacher complained she didnt
participate in group activities, didnt follow directions given to the class, and required a separate invitation to line up for
lunch, bathroom, or dismissal. She also
complained that during free play Yael
didnt interact with her peers and chose
to sit on the beanbag with her thumb in
her mouth.
Things seemed to get harder as Yael
grew older and she was expected to sit,
read and write. She fidgeted in her seat
and couldnt concentrate on a task for
more than a few seconds at a time. The
slightest noise distracted her. The lights
were too bright, the chair too stiff. At
home, Yael was unable to complete routine tasks, such as dressing, without several reminders. She seemed to get stuck at
intervals and forgot what she was doing.
At age 6, Yael didnt initiate play or
conversation with her friends or siblings.
She sat on the sofa and stared into space
for hours. She had few interests. Although
she craved friendship, she had no idea
how to interact with peers. After a series
of formal assessments by the school psychologist, it was determined that Yael had
a sensory processing disorder, ADHD, and
problems with social skills.
After several unsuccessful attempts
at treating her ADHD with medication,
however, Yaels parents brought her to
a developmental pediatrician for a sec-

ond opinion. At age 8, Yael was correctly


given the diagnosis of ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). Yaels parents called
Proud Moments Therapy to request
the support she needed. Together with
trained therapists, a BCBA supervisor,
and classroom staff, a behavior intervention plan was soon in place, and within
weeks positive changes were observed
in Yaels behavior in school and at home.
Q: What is ASD?
A: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
is a disorder characterized, in varying
degrees, by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviors. Many
people have a specific picture of what
autism looks like and this picture is often extreme, with behaviors that include
arm flapping and head banging. However, ASD covers a wide spectrum of behavioral challenges, and many children
with this diagnosis are high-functioning
individuals. In fact, many of the children
that we serve are in mainstream schools
or integrated classes.
Q: Why is ABA (Applied Behavior
Analysis) known as the medical communitys treatment of choice for individuals with ASD?
A: While there are many alternative
treatments that claim to treat or even
cure ASD, ABA is the only treatment that
has been scientifically proven to effectively treat individuals with ASD. When
implemented properly, ABA treatment
has far superior results than any other
methodology. This is due, in part, to the

OurChildren
About

years of research and development of


ABA by experts in the field
Q: What is ABA?
A: Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)
is an evidence-based approach that has
been scientifically proven successful in
helping children and young adults with
ASD. It is a behavioral therapy, which
views each behavior in the context of
its environment and aims to arrange
this environment to bring about positive
change. It utilizes individualized behavior
plans that focus on increasing desirable
behaviors, such as functional communication and adaptive learning skills, while
decreasing behaviors that are less appropriate. Progress is monitored throughout
the duration of the therapy to ensure that
a behavior plan is effective.
Q: What is Proud Moments Therapy?
A: We are a team of professionals,
board-certified behavior analysts, and
trained behavioral technicians, providing individualized behavioral therapy to
children and young adults with ASD. We
provide services in a wide variety of environments, at home, in the community,
or other settings. Services are covered
by most major insurance companies
and are in addition to any other services
the child may be receiving. Depending
on the insurance, we are able to provide
8 to 25 hours of service per week at no

out-of-pocket charge to parents.


Q: What kind of strategies do you use?
A: Using ABA, children are taught
appropriate ways to behave, to develop
and strengthen communication skills,
and to enhance their social skills. ABA
strategies are used systematically, breaking each area of focus into smaller components that can be closely measured to
ensure a childs progress and growth.
Q: How do you teach social skills?
A: As they develop, most children
learn the social rules naturally. For
some, however, this doesnt come naturally and they need to be taught the
skills, just as children need to be taught
math and spelling. Our social skills program is designed to provide an engaging
curriculum based on the principles of
ABA that is tailored to each childs individual needs. We work on developing social skill goals using a hierarchy of tools
that are organized in a progressively developmental order.
Devorah Weiss-Reichenberg is the clinical director at Proud Moments Therapy
in North Jersey (www.proudmomentsaba.
com). She has 15 years of experience working with children and young adults with an
ASD diagnosis and has specialized training in Natural Environment Teaching and
Errorless Learning.

Celebrity Kids Closes After 27 Stylish Years


Celebrity Kids, the fashionable childrens clothing and toy store in Tenafly
is closing its doors because its sistersin-law, owners are retiring. To mark the
occasion, the store is launching a major farewell sale on Nov. 1.
As they look forward to their next
stage, co-owners and sisters-in-law Rea
Epstein and Vikki Price reflect on the
memories of serving the Tenafly and
broader Bergen County communities
for the last 27 years.
We have been very connected
with our customers over the years, and
we cant thank them enough for their
support, Ms. Epstein says. Its been
an honor to have been such an integral
part of the communities in this area,
and we know that now is the right time
for us to end this amazing ride.
Ms. Price adds, Our customers

have been so devoted. It has been extremely gratifying to see the young
moms from the early years still coming
in today, with their grown children and
new grandchildren. We will miss our
customers and the wonderful women
who have worked with for so long.
In retirement, Ms. Price and Ms.
Epstein will travel and pursue other
leisure passions. Most of all, both are
looking forward to spending more time
with their own celebrity grandkids, Lucas, Zack and another soon-to-arrive
baby boy.
Family has always been core to
the Celebrity Kids mission, Epstein
says. We will always put family at the
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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

AOC-10
OurChildren
About

With Young Learners,


Vision is More than Meets the Eye
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

eeing is not always believing or


understanding especially
for
youngsters, says author Wendy
Rosen. Vision not just eyesight, but
vision is so critical to learning that it
impacts a childs academic success in
very significant ways. There are untold
numbers of youngsters struggling with
their learning because their visual skills
are not functioning properly. And too often, these youngsters are not diagnosed,
theyre misdiagnosed, or they are shunted to the side and labeled.
Ms. Rosen, a Highland Park resident
who grew up in Paramus, has authored
a groundbreaking, eye-opening book
about this little-known learning and behavioral problem. In The Hidden Link
Between Vision and Learning: Why Millions of Learning-Disabled Children Are

Misdiagnosed (Rowman & Littlefield)


Ms. Rosen takes a very complex subject
and clarifies it for the lay person, bringing to light the issue through her assiduous research and her own experience as
a mother to a youngster who overcame
vision-related learning problems. It is
her mission, Ms. Rosen says, to make
parents, educators, pediatricians, psychologists all those who deal with
children, more aware of this problem.
Ms. Rosen will be speaking on November
9 at 5 p.m. at the Bank Street Book Store,
2780 Broadway, Manhattan.
Here, Ms. Rosen shares her thoughts
with About Our Children.
About Our Children: What are vision-based learning problems?
Wendy Rosen: First, it is essential to understand that an accurate,
broad-based cultural understanding
of vision and the role that it plays in

www.tofutti.com

10 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

learning needs to become common


knowledge. We typically think of vision
as a 20/20 reading, or some variation of
this. But it is far beyond this measurement, which only represents acuity,
or eyesight, which is how well we see
at a certain distance. Vision actually
involves more than two dozen lesserknown skills that help us navigate our
way through life. They are critical to a
childs overall development. Some of
these lesser-known skills include: vergence, binocularity, focus accommodation, visual closure, figure ground, and
laterality and directionality.
When one or more of these skills are
not functioning optimally, our capabilities are compromised in ways we are often not aware of. When this occurs in a
child, they may have an unrecognized vision problem that can greatly affect their
ability to learn and succeed in school,
and in other areas of their lives.
Vision-related learning problems
affect 1 in 4 school-age children. Few
people are aware that a breakdown in
the visual system can be at the core of
a learning disability. Many symptoms
of vision-related learning problems can
mimic other conditions such as ADHD

and dyslexia. There are, consequently,


countless numbers of children who are
classified as special education students
or are medicated, or both, who may be
wrongly diagnosed and are not getting
the help they need. Vision-related learning problems can affect every child, from
those outwardly struggling the most to
those who may be at the top of the class.
There are signs and symptoms that
can clue us in to a potential problem.
Knowing what to look for could make all
the difference.
AOC: Why havent we heard about
this before?
Ms. Rosen: There are several explanations for this that I go into in depth in
the book. One reason is that vision problems are inherently difficult to recognize
given that they are most often hidden.
When a child exhibits a speech problem,
we can hear it. We have no way of knowing, however, what the world looks like
to a child, and they typically dont question what they are seeing. It is highly unusual for a child to articulate how they
see, let alone describe any symptoms
that may offer clues about why they are
having such a hard time in school. The
concealed nature of these types of vision

ICES

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AOC-11
OurChildren
About

carry these challenges with them into


adulthood. Some learn to compensate
and will get by. Some wont. Alarmingly, vision-related learning problems are
present in 3/4 of the juvenile delinquent
population, prisoners, and illiterate
adults. When these problems go unrecognized and untreated, lives can unravel.
If after learning about this subject an
adult feels he or she may have struggled
with this as a child, it is never too late
to be evaluated by a behavioral optometrist. Vision therapy is an effective protocol for adults as well.
AOC: Why the controversy about vision therapy and its efficacy?
Ms. Rosen: There is, sadly, a modest
amount of misinformation and disparity
out there that inaccurately challenges
the efficacy of vision therapy and the integrity of this field. Valid research on the
merits of vision therapy dates back fiftyplus years. Documented studies over
these past five decades have shown the
effectiveness of vision therapy. There is
an abundance of research published in
refereed scientific journals backing this
field that illuminates the scientific basis
for the diagnosis and successful treatment of vision disorders.

There is, unfortunately, an absence


of progressive dialogue between sectors
of the eye care profession, which has resulted in a lack of genuine understanding of what this field and its treatment
protocols address. Slowly, this is starting to get attention. The controversy is
so important to understand Ive devoted
a whole chapter of the book to addressing the myths and hopefully clarifying any confusion that sometimes dissuades people from seeking evaluation
or treatment.
AOC: Anything else you would like
to add or share?
Ms. Rosen: With so many children
struggling with learning and behavior
issues, and so many schools struggling
to meet these needs and so often falling
short, The Hidden Link Between Vision
and Learning will speak to, literally, millions. This groundbreaking book will offer hope and help to countless parents,
teachers, pediatricians, therapists and
child study teams seeking answers to
the root cause of a childs struggles.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.

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sensory activities that help retrain the
addressing them.
We
help
YOUR
CHILD with
brain and
thecan
eyes to
function
properly,
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an
Autism
Spectrum
with a success rate of over 90 percent. diagnosis
overview of the field of behavioral opAOC: When should a youngster be
tometry (sometimes also referred to as
We can help YOUR CHILD with
evaluated, and should adults be evaludevelopmental optometry). This suban Autism Spectrum diagnosis
ated as well?
specialty of optometry dates back to its
We can help YOUR CHILD with
Ms. Rosen: A comprehensive eye
origins in the 1920s. It correlates its puran Autism Spectrum diagnosis
exam differs from a screening in that it
pose and practice with the function of
encompasses an in-depth evaluation of
learning, and focuses on diagnosing and
all visual skills. The American Optomettreating visual and perceptual problems.
ric Association recommends that this
While there is a wonderful pool of litexam be done first at six months of age,
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INTO PROUD MOMENTS
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ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016 11

AOC-12
OurChildren
About

Recognizing and Dealing with


Anxiety in Youngsters
H E I D I M A E B RAT T

ust like adults, children and teens


feel worried and anxious at times.
Throughout a childs life there will
be times when they feel anxiety. For instance, many feel anxious when going
to a new school or before tests. Some
may feel shy in social situations. But if
a childs anxiety starts to affect their
well being, they may need help to overcome it.
About Our Children consulted with
Dr. Kai-ping Wang, the Medical Director of Pediatric Psychiatry at the Valley
Medical Group, for his expertise.
About Our Children: Are we seeing
more anxiety in children and teens these
days than in the past, and what is causing so much anxiety?
Dr. Kai-ping Wang: Traditionally
anxiety has been vastly under recognized. Its often highly internalized
and thus causes fewer problems than
depressive or behavior disorders.
Previously only more severe manifestations, like panic attacks or school
refusal, merited attention. Thankfully,
there is a growing awareness of mental health and the impact of untreated
anxiety in childhood. There may be
some external factors, as well. While
we are lucky to not have the food
anxieties and safety worries of basic
needs of refugees or some strife-filled
countries suffer, we, as humans do always seem to find something to worry

about. The hyper-connectiveness of


social media is fertile ground for envy,
insecurity and self-judgment as we
compare ourselves to others. Media
is rife with fear-driven stories. The importance of testing in schools and increased academic expectations raise
the perceived stakes for getting into
the best college possible.
AOC: When does normal anxiety
such as taking tests or going to a new
school become more worrisome?
Dr. Wang: While anxiety is clearly
problematic if it affects behavior or function, such as in school refusal, physical
complaints, insomnia, moodiness, isola-

tion, etc., any anxiety that adversely affects experience/enjoyment of is worth


exploring. Even children with normal
anxiety benefit from learning how to
cope or deal with worry.
AOC: What can a parent do to help
their children experience less anxiety?
Dr. Wang: Parents need to tread
carefully, as there is danger in excessively protecting our children from harmful
experiences. We hate seeing our kids suffer, but part of parenting and childhood
is learning to deal with lifes adversities,
including anxiety and fears. This can
take the form of teaching a child how to
manage stress, understand the nature of

fear/anxiety, having coping strategies,


and building confidence.
AOC: Should a parent be on the
lookout for physical symptoms of anxiety, and what are they?
Dr. Wang: Yes, things like stomach
upset, headaches, tension, fatigue, sleep
issues, appetite changes, heart racing,
etc.
AOC: At what point should a parent
refer the child or teenager to a health
professional and if so who would be
best suited?
Dr. Wang: Level of severity and lack
of (or limited) progress in coping with
anxiety can be some guidelines in seeking an assessment. Most mild to moderate anxiety should be first addressed
with therapy, but a good psychiatric
assessment can also be of value if there
is suspicion of medical involvement
in anxiety.
AOC: Is there anything else you
would like to add?
Dr. Wang: Anxiety is not bad, nor to
be avoided. There are a lot of benefits
to anxiety. Often it helps drive performance, is protective, or helps us be more
connected. Excessive anxiety however,
can cause needless worry or effort and
stymie growth. Learning to recognize
and deal with anxiety appropriately is
a critical skill with far reaching benefits
into adulthood.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.

Teaching Teens to Cope with Their Anxiety


H E I D I M A E B RAT T

eenagers face a plethora of


stresses that may lead to anxiety.
There are the social stresses
of trying to fit in. There are the stresses of doing well in school and academic performance. There are family
stresses, whether it is a challenging or
difficult relationship between parent
and child, siblings, or the dynamic between parents. And in some families,
there is also financial stress.
It is a lot of manage for an adolescent while he or she is trying to figure

12 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

out who they are now and who they


want to be. Add to the growing list of
stressors, the omnipresence and pressure of social media, and it seems that
teens carry a weighty load indeed.
Temima Danzig, a clinical social
worker who practices in Teaneck, says
the key to managing the inevitable
stresses is to learn effective coping
techniques. In her practice, which targets adolescents and adults, Ms. Danzig uses cognitive, behavioral therapy,
which focuses on thoughts, feelings
and behaviors. Cognitive behavioral
therapy (CBT) is a short-term, goal-

oriented psychotherapy treatment that


takes a hands-on, practical approach to
problem solving. Its goal is to change
patterns of thinking or behavior that
are behind peoples difficulties, and so
change the way they feel.
I try to teach coping skills on
how to handle the negative thinking,
so it doesnt lead to problematic behavior patterns and bad feelings, said
Ms. Danzig.
Through several different techniques, including visualization, mindfulness, and other techniques to stop
distracting lines of thinking, Ms. Dan-

zig says that teens can learn to ebb


their anxiety and better deal with the
stress that comes naturally with life as
an adolescent.
If problems bubble up during
these years, its a good idea, says Ms.
Danzig, to teach these youngsters
these skills. We want to be able to
teach adolescence how to deal with
their emotions and teach effective
coping skills, so they would have
them for the rest of their lives.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.

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AOC-13

When Enough Is Enough


S LOV I E JU N G R E I S - WO L F F

id you ever notice how so many


children today seem unhappy?
No matter how much they
have, no matter how hard you try to give
them more, they never seem content.
They should be the happiest children
who ever lived. They have traveled to islands, gone jeeping through the deserts
of Israel, swam with dolphins, but there
is a sense of discontent.
There are children who have
iPhones, iPads, wiis, Gameboys, American girl dolls, and basements filled with
toys. Summertime brings talk of sleep
away camp, shopping with long lists in
hand or planning trips to faraway places.
Even with the difficult economic situation, the reality is that we would rather
do without ourselves than have our children feel as if they are lacking.
A father called me recently. He said
that each summer he rents a home for
his family in beautiful surroundings. It is
a neighborhood where some people buy
lavish homes, others rent. Even though
he has always enjoyed their summer
place, his 13-year-old daughter made it

clear that she was unhappy.


At 2 a.m. she decided to have
a meltdown.
I am ashamed of the house we stay
in every summer, she cried. All my
friends have much better houses, why
cant we? If we take this same house as
always I dont want any of my friends
coming over. Dont even think about inviting them!
She stomped to her room and
slammed the door, leaving her father
hurt and perplexed.
I try so hard, he said to me. What
is she thinking? Doesnt she see how
much I sweat to make a buck?
How do we combat the unhappiness?
Of course there are many reasons
our children act miserably. You can say
it is awful chutzpah, too much stuff, absence of parental involvement, or deficient discipline. Others will say there is
not enough one on one time, children
who do not feel really accepted, a lack of
self-esteem or just plain arrogance.
We mistakenly believe that the more
we give, the happier theyll be. Wrong.
But at the root of the misery lies a
basic glaring lack of gratitude. When

OurChildren
About

children are not cognizant of their blessings, they do not begin to recognize
how much they have. They overlook the
good, both the big and the small, and
they grow more entitled with each day.
We mistakenly believe that the more
we give, the happier they will be.
Wrong. Instead, it is the more they
appreciate, the happier they will grow.
I explained to this father that it is
time he sat down with his daughter
and introduce her to the concept of
dayenu. On Passover we recount all
of Gods many kindnesses. After each
kindness we pause and say: dayenu it
would have been enough for us! We are
encouraged to recognize each gracious
act of giving and realize that every deed
deserves thoughtful appreciation. We
dont take anything for granted. We stop
and contemplate the blessing of enough.
I received an incredibly long list that
had been drawn up for this 13 year old.
Heres part of the list:
We have a beautiful home.
We rent a lovely summerhouse in a
gorgeous neighborhood.
We have traveled to Israel.
We have traveled to Paris.

We have traveled to Italy.


We have gone skiing in Utah.
We eat in delicious restaurants.
We have gone to Miami every Hanukkah vacation since you were a baby.
We have celebrated your bat mitzvah with an amazing party.
We have sent you to sleep away
camp since fourth grade.
We have a loving family.
We have grandparents who cherish us.
We have good health.
After each line, the father wrote dayenu. And then he explained to this child
who had been blessed with more than
she had ever understood (and more
than most could ever imagine) that it
was time to appreciate the blessings of
that which we have, instead of focusing
on that which we think that we are missing in life.
There is one more missing link
herethe presence of parents who live
with the motto of dayenu in their own
lives. When children hear their mother
or father constantly commenting on oth-

Enough continued on page19

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AOC-14
OurChildren
About

Temima Danzig, LCSW


Adult & Adolescent Psychotherapy

- Anxiety
- Social Challenges
- Depression
- Life Transitions
- Adjustment to - Stress Management
Chronic Illness

201- 357- 5796


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Teaneck, NJ 201.445.1900

Open Houses for Kaplen JCC Nursery School


The Leonard and Syril Rubin Nursery School at the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades features a warm, childcentered environment rooted in
Jewish tradition, where children can
become confident, responsible and
successful learners. To showcase all
it offers, the school is holding three
open houses, on Nov. 18, Dec. 9, and
Jan. 13, where prospective families
can meet the director, learn about
the school and its curriculum, ask
questions, tour the facilities and
spend time in the classrooms.
I am looking forward to meeting new families and showcasing all
our school has to offer, says Devin
Zukofsky, early childhood director.
Our goal is to introduce our children to new interests in a warm,
fun and caring environment, where
they can gain a strong sense of self
and accomplishment.
The school provides innovative
programming that allows children
to explore and understand new concepts in a fun, dynamic way. The
goal is to enrich each childs world
through exposure to language arts,
science, reading and math readi-

The Heschel School


OPENING MINDS, BRIDGING DIFFERENCES, LIVING JEWISH VALUES.
Ariela Dubler, Head of School

NURSERY - 12TH GRADE

High School Open House Dates:


Tuesday, September 27 | Wednesday, November 16
To RSVP contact Iris Klein, Co-Director of Admissions
iriskl@heschel.org
Early Childhood, Lower School, and Middle School Tours:
Contact Erica Panush, Co-Director of Admissions ericap@heschel.org
212.784.1234
www.heschel.org
30 West End Avenue, New York, New York 10023

ART
Lessons

Art of Excellence Studio

Unlock your Creativity with Classes in


Drawing and Watercolor
Structured Lessons - Relaxed Atmosphere
Fabulous Results!
Age 7 to Adult - All levels of ability
Art Portfolio Preparation Available
Artist, Rina Goldhagen 201-248-4779
www.artofexcellencestudio.com
14 About Our Children november 2016

ness, music, art, Judaic programming, physical education and swimming. Nurturing social interaction is
an integral part of all programs.
The curriculum includes cognitive learning and enrichment; fine
and gross motor skills; reading
readiness skills; sensory experiences; Judaic programming; art, music,
dramatic play and cooking; gym
and swimming; and preparation for
Kindergarten and more. It is a state
licensed, accredited program for
12-month-old to five-year-old children and offers half, three-quarter
and full day sessions with extended

day options for three or five days a


week according to age. Our experienced, professional staff works
closely with each child to promote
his or her social, emotional and intellectual development.
Classes meet in attractive,
modern, sunny, well-equipped
classrooms and students have access to other JCC facilities, including two gyms with professional athletics coaches; junior swimming
pools with experienced aquatic
staff; a teaching kitchen; beautiful
playgrounds & cheery playroom; a
lending library; and fun and enriching after school programs offered
through the JCCs School-Age, Athletic and Aquatics Departments,
School of Dance, School of Theatrical Arts, and the JCC Thurnauer
School of Music.
JCC membership is required to
enroll in the school. Limited scholarships are available. Applications
may be obtained at the nursery
school office. For more information
www.jccotp.org/nursery-school or
Elissa Yurowitz at eyurowitz@jccotp.org or 201-408-1436.

Haworth Teen Honored by


National Award for Heroic Service Activity
Sabina London, 18, of Haworth has been
named a 2016 honoree by the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes. Each year,
the Barron Prize celebrates 25 inspiring,
public-spirited young people15 winners and 10 honorees ho have made
a significant positive difference to people and our planet. This years Barron
Prize honorees are a diverse group of
outstanding young leaders chosen from
nearly four hundred applicants across
North America.
Sabina founded Girls Science Interactive, a non-profit that provides free
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) summer camps for elementary and middle school girls. Her
camps, usually held for 25 students at
public libraries in mostly low-income
neighborhoods, are designed to spark
girls interest in science. They provide
hands-on exploration of topics such as
chemistry, global warming, neuroscience, and renewable energy, and demonstrate the real-world applications
of science.
In just two years, Sabina has grown
her program from a single camp in one
location to 13 camps at sites in Florida,
Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, New
York, and Pennsylvania. She has recruited and trained a team of 17 high school
and college students

all of whom

share her passion for girls and STEM


to serve as regional directors. Sabinas
inspiration sprung from her work for the
past four years in a professional biomedical research lab and from her recognition that boys hugely outnumber girls in
her advanced science and math classes.
People shouldnt be afraid to try
something new, says Sabina. I think
everyone should strive to give back to
their communities in some way, even if
they start small.
The Barron Prize was founded in
2001 by author T.A. Barron and was
named for his mother, Gloria Barron.
Each years 25 Barron Prize young heroes are as diverse as their service projects. They are female and male, urban
and rural, and from many races and
backgrounds. Half of them have focused
on helping their communities and fellow
human beings; half have focused on protecting the environment.
Nothing is more inspiring than stories about heroic people who have truly
made a difference to the world, says Mr.
Barron. And we need our heroes today
more than ever. Not celebrities, but heroes people whose character can inspire us all. That is the purpose of the
Gloria Barron Prize: to shine the spotlight on these amazing young people so
that their stories will inspire others.

OurChildren

S LOV I E JU N G R E I S - WO L F F

amily is forever. When a family feels bonded, parents and children share life experiences on a different level. Difficult times are filled with moments
of strength, connection and encouragement. Happy
occasions become sweeter, brighter, and more joyous.
Are there daily choices we can make that would make a
difference in our homes? Can we implement behaviors
and attitudes that help our family grow stronger?
Here are some ways in which to strengthen your
family bond:

1. Loyalty
For families to thrive, there needs to be a sense of security. We create a home that is a haven by allowing
each child (and parent) to feel safe with one another.
Together time should never evoke sentiments of fear
or insecurity. No family member should feel the need to
withdraw within a shell to feel protected.
How can we build family loyalty?
Support each others dreams and stand up for
one another
Dont use verbal zingers, sarcasm, or derogatory
comments to strike each other down
Convey that family sacrifices for one another.
Sometimes it is physical, like sharing a crowded space
or cutting a favorite piece of cake in half. Other times it
is emotional, like giving time or a listening ear.
Parents model respect when disagreeing with
each other. They dont shame each other.
Create a tone in the home that does not cultivate
fear. This means that verbal abuse, yelling, screaming
at one another, or looking for someone to constantly
blame are all off limits. (Of course, physical abuse and
fighting is never allowed).
Siblings show concern when one is hurting, experiencing pain or disappointment.
While we cant fix the situation the least we can do
is care. Indifference shows a callousness of the heart.

2. Acceptance
We all need to feel that we belong. If a family member
feels alone, there is the danger that he or she will look
elsewhere for love. Acceptance means that I can lean
on you when I fall and you will encourage me when I fail.
If I make a mistake, I am not afraid to confide in you because you are approachable. You believe in me flaws
and all. This does not just apply to children. Husbands
and wives, too, need to feel accepted by their spouse.
This doesnt mean that we dont give consequences
or ignore misbehavior. Rather, there is an underlying
sentiment of being loved that allows the relationship to
flourish despite the discipline. Acceptance means that
we feel positively about our place in the family even if
we have caused disappointment.
How can we create an environment of acceptance?
Get to know your family. As children grow parents
realize that they are clueless and wonder where my
little guy or girl has gone. Here, too, it is crucial for
husbands and wives to continue to make time for one
another as years go.
Find your childs inner star. Some children natu-

rally shine and others need to have the light brought out.
Help reveal each childs inner gifts by showing interests in their likes, challenging their curiosity about
the world, and joining them in this quest of discovery.
Encourage uniqueness. We are all different, even
if we were born to the same parents. Dont try to raise
cookie cutter children. Allow for individual likes and
tastes.
Dont over schedule your child. Seeking exceptionality brings parents to over expect. Children are
made to feel as if they are inadequate if they do not invent a start-up, star on a team, score high on their ACT,
or play the violin. What about just being a human being
who is kind, sensitive and a pleasure to be with?
Never slam a door on a family member or do
something that creates the feeling that they are rejected
from the home. Be careful when upset not to say something that can be interpreted as being hateful. While we
can dislike the behavior, we must not allow a child or
spouse to feel discarded from the family.

3. Appreciation
The foundation of every home must be gratitude. Appreciation is the oxygen of marriage. Childrens gratitude towards their parents, life opportunities, natural
gifts and numerous physical blessings creates an environment of respect. We dont take our family or things
for granted. We speak thoughtfully. We take care of our
possessions. We dont allow our children to grow entitled. The entire atmosphere in the home is transformed.
How can we encourage an attitude of gratitude?
Parents model thankfulness to one another. This
means that acts that we take for granted, such as making dinner, driving carpool, family leisure time and
trips, buying clothing, are all recognized and voiced
with appreciation. Children should be taught to follow
in parents direction.
Dont over buy. We want to create happy homes
so many of us make the mistake of equating happiness
with things. We overindulge our children. We keep getting them the latest fads and cant deal with their tears
when we say no. Then we are surprised by their lack
of appreciation and shocked by their disrespect. Truth
is we are to blame. The cycle of great expectations has
been created. Somehow, it is never enough and theyve
never learned to be happy with what they have.
Stop texting while talking. When we look down at
our phones while communicating with our loved ones
who are standing in front of us, we are clearly showing that they are not important enough for us to even
look at. How can I value you if I cannot take the time to
see you? Checking emails when returning home from
work or when children (or a spouse) are trying to share
thoughts with you is plain disrespect. Family time becomes downgraded in childrens eyes.
Combined with the traits of loyalty, acceptance and
appreciation is the ability of parents to create an environment of spirituality that anchors the home. Strong
roots keep the family grounded.
Slovie Jungreis-Wolff is a parenting and couples coach and
teacher. She is the author of Raising a Child With Soul, (St.
Aish.com
Martins Press). 

Gymnastics Jazz Silks

C
P A

300 Knickerbocker Rd Cresskill

Watch Your Child Soar


in the Arts

Our passion is your child:


dancing, singing, acting, fencing,
flying on silks, and having
a wonderful time learning and growing!
Class for students
with learning differences
and special needs

Fencing Princess Dance and more age 2-1/2 to adults

Traits to Create
a Loyal and Loving Family

Dance Acting Musical Theater Voice Choreography

About

Rhythm and Hip-Hop based


dance classes.
2016
Everyone deserves the chance to dance! READERS
CHOICE

201-390-7513 201-266-8830

studio-info@cresskillperformingarts.com
www.cresskillperformingarts.com

Come Smile with Us

TEANECK DENTIST
We put the Care
into Dental Care!
Richard S. Gertler, DMD, FAGD
Michelle Bloch, DDS
Ari Frohlich, DMD

100 State Street Teaneck, NJ

201.837.3000

www.teaneckdentist.com
Visit us on Facebook

Convenient Morning, Evening & Sunday Hours


ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016 15

AOC-12

1. Alan Moskin, a former WWII soldier


and concentration camp liberator, was
the featured speaker recently at The
Chabad Center of Passaic. More than
50 people listened to Mr. Moskin, who
serves on the Holocaust Museum
Board of Trustees, and shares his story
with school groups and adults, and has
been featured on PBS network.
2. Temple Emeth in Teaneck honored
its students entering the religious
school in a consecration ceremony as
part of its Sukkot service recently. From
left, second row, Cantor Ellen Tilem,
Religious School Director Dora Geld
Friedman and Rabbi Steven Sirbu.
3. Cantor Emeritus Mark Biddelman
teaches the children at the Early
Childhood Program at Temple Emanuel
in Woodlake Cliff songs for the holidays. I love teaching the 2, 3, and 4
year olds. They are so attentive and
they love singing along with me as I
play my guitar, he said.

16 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

5
4. This year Chai4ever, an organization that offers
help to families where a parent is ill, debuted a
camp. More than 100 boys joined Camp4ever!
for a two-week tour of the Atlantic Coast, culminating in a Disney adventure. The campers
shared their unique challenges and the support
of specially trained staff.

6
5. IAC Eitanim, a unique entrepreneurial program for high school students conceived by the
Israeli-American Council (IAC), is being offered
at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
The program includes 10 mandatory sessions
and an optional summer summit (at additional
cost), and is designed to allow students to connect, explore, and experience Israel while preparing for college and professional careers.

6. Temple Beth Tikvah, a Reform congregation in Wayne, led families in a fun, musical
Sukkot service. Rabbi Meeka Simerly and
Cantor Emeritus Charles Romalis presided
over the event that was capped by a pizza
dinner followed by dessert in the sukkah.

AOC-17
OurChildren
About

TopChoices
CO M P I L E D BY H E I D I M A E B RAT T

N O V E M B E R 2 0 16

Mutts Gone Nuts:


Canine Cabaret

It is Bah-loon! Pre-Parade Fun


On the day before Thanksgiving, the giant balloons for the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade
come to life to the oohs and ahhhs of children and their parents. SpongeBob, Big Bird, Shrek,
Snoopy and many other iconic inflatables are filled with helium and then held down with giant
nets until they get released for the big Thanksgiving Day Parade. Watching the balloons fill
up the night before is an event second, if not first, to watching the parade itself. The balloonfilling event can be viewed on Nov. 23 from 3 to10 p.m. Located from 77 and 81 Streets,
between Central Park West and Columbus Avenues in Manhattan.

Expect the unexpected,


as canines and comedy
collide in a performance,
Mutts Gone Nuts: Canine
Cabaret at bergenPAC.
The show is leaving audiences howling for more.
From shelters to showbiz,
these furry friends are
unleashing havoc and
hilarity in a breathtaking,
action-packed, comedy
dog spectacular, featuring
some of the worlds most
talented four-legged performers. The show follows
a month-long fundraising
drive for Save The Animals
Rescue Team (START II), a
volunteer group based in
Englewood, which supports
the no-kill animal shelter.
Sunday, Nov. 6 at1 p.m.
bergenPAC, 30 N. Van
Brunt St., Englewood. 201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.

Alix Mitnick Performs


at The Jewish Museum
Emmy Award-winning childrens entertainer Alex Mitnick and his group of
fun-loving musicians of Alex & the
Kaleidoscope have been captivating
families with their fresh approach to
music for over a decade. From pop
beats to island rhythms, Alex & the
Kaleidoscope takes a multicultural
musical journey in the show that is well
suited for youngsters ages 3 to 10.
Performance is on Sunday, Nov. 20,
11:30 to12:30 p.m. at the Scheuer
Auditorium, The Jewish Museum,1109
Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-4233200, www.thejewishmuseum.org.

Taking Action
at Liberty Science Center
Test your sports skills in a new, high-tech training camp at the Liberty Science
Center. The Action Zone is a Liberty Science Center original. A state-of-the-art
simulator lets you pass a football, toss a dodge ball at zombies, boot a soccer
ball, and more. Visitors can also balance on a beam, give the broad jump their
best shot and scramble up a rotating climbing wall. Youll be so physically active,
youll forget youre inside a museum. Liberty Science Center, Liberty State
Park, 222 Jersey City Boulevard, Jersey City. 201-200-1000.
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016 17

AOC-18

The Good Life With Kids

N OV E M B E R

To Our Readers: This calendar is a day-by-day schedule of events. Although all information is as timely as we can make it, its a good idea to call to
verify details before you go.

Sunday, October 30

Story Time in Paramus: Stories and crafts or


activities in the Childrens Department at Barnes
& Noble. 11 a.m. 765 Route 17 South, Paramus.
201-445-4589.

All Aboard: An original play, When Jessie


Came Across the Sea, based on the PJ Library
story at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. 10:30
a.m. Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place,
Manhattan. 646-437-4202, www.mjhnyc.org.
Family Art Project: Papermaking in autumn
color. Join visiting artist and papermaking expert
Randy Brozen and learn how to make paper
using pulp. Use a simple process to fashion your
handmade paper into a leafy shape or add a
found leaf for decoration. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wave
Hill House, Wave Hill, 649 W 249 St., Bronx,
718-549-3200, www.wavehill.org.
Yellow Sneaker at Museum: Join the musical
group Yellow Sneaker and their puppet pals for a
program that nurtures family bonds and bridges
connections to Jewish life and traditions. 10:30
a.m. The Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery
Place in Lower Manhattan. www.mjhnyc.org/families, 646-437-4202.
Mutts Gone Nuts: Canine Cabaret at bergenPAC, 1 p.m. bergenPAC, 30 N. Van Brunt St.,
Englewood. 201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.
Super Sundays in Teaneck: Pink Flamingo
Puppets perform for children 4 and older. 2
p.m. Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road,
Teaneck, 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Saturday, November 5

Wednesday, November 9

Hands-On Art: Bring the family for a hands-on


exploration of art. For children 1 to 7 years old.
There will be selected works from the Jerusalem
Biennale, which explores the intersection of
contemporary art and the Jewish world. 10 a.m.
to noon. JCC Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave.,
Manhattan. 646-505-4444, www.jccmanhattan.
org.

Tuesday, November 1
Casting Call for Willy Wonka: The Wayne Ys
Rosen PAC, in partnership with Pushcart Players,
will hold casting calls from 1 to 4 p.m. for this
years annual youth show, Willie Wonka Jr. To register and sign up for an audition slot, 973-5950100. The Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.
Toddler Time in Teaneck: Library fun for youngsters, walkers up to age 2. From 10 to 11 a.m.
Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road,
Teaneck, 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Wednesday, November 2

Nature vs. Nurture: Lecture by psychologist, Steven Tobias, for the Adoptive Parents
Committee. 6 to 8 p.m. The Kinnelon Library, 132
Kinnelon Road, Kinnelon. 201-301-2816.

Sunday, November 6
Casting Call for Willy Wonka: The Wayne Ys
Rosen PAC, in partnership with Pushcart Players,
will hold casting calls from 1 to 4 p.m. for this
years annual youth show, Willie Wonka Jr. To register and sign up for an audition slot, 973-5950100. The Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.

Story Time in Paramus: Stories and crafts or


activities in the Childrens Department at Barnes
& Noble. 11 a.m. 765 Route 17 South, Paramus.
201-445-4589.
Wendy Rosen Speaks: Highland Park resident and author Wendy Rosen, who wrote the
eye-opening book, The Hidden Link Between
Vision and Learning: Why Millions of LearningDisabled Children Are Misdiagnosed discusses
her research and the book at Bank Street Book
Store at 5 p.m. 2780 Broadway, Manhattan. 212678-1654.

Thursday, November 10
Family Gaming in Teaneck: Children of all ages
are invited to play on Wii consoles. Families welcomed. From 1 to 2 p.m. Teaneck Public Library,
840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, 201-837-4171,
www.teaneck.org.
Family Movies in Teaneck: Join in to watch a
movie on the big screen. No registration required.
Children 9 years and younger must be accompanied by a caregiver. 3 p.m. Teaneck Public Library,
840 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, 201-837-4171,
www.teaneck.org.

Saturday, November 12
Sports With Friendship Circle: The Friendship
Circle sports clinics for children with special
needs and their siblings will take place 6:30 to
8 p.m. Work on balance, team, playing and ball
sports of all kinds. Chabad Center of Passaic
County, 194 Ratzer Road, Wayne. 973-6946274, www.fcpassaiccounty.com

Sunday, November 13

When Jessie Came across the Sea, see


Sunday, November 6.

18 ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016

Rummage Sale at Temple Beth El: The


Sisterhood of Temple Beth El holds its semiannual Rummage Sale from 9 a.m. to noon and 1
to 3 p.m. Bargains galore on high-quality, gently
used clothing and coats for the entire family.
Other merchandise includes toys, books, baby

OurChildren
About

To Add Your Event to Our Calendar


Send it to:
Calendar Editor
About Our Children
New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666 AboutOCaol.com
or fax it to: 201-833-4959

Deadline for December issue


(published Nov. 18): Tuesday, Dec. 8

Papermaking at Wave Hill House, see Sunday, November 6.


accessories as well as many household items and
collectibles. 221 Schraalenburgh Road, Closter,
201-768-5112.

Tuesday, November 15
Toddler Time in Teaneck: Library fun for youngsters, walkers up to age 2. From 10 to 11 a.m.
Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road,
Teaneck, 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

Wednesday, November 16
Story Time in Paramus: Stories and crafts or
activities in the Childrens Department at Barnes
& Noble. 11 a.m. 765 Route 17 South, Paramus.
201-445-4589.

Thursday, November 17
Gumpert Teachers Workshop: The Resettlement
of Survivors of Genocide, Crimes Against
Humanity and Mass Atrocity: Past and Present.
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Trustees Pavilion, Ramapo
College of New Jersey, 505 Ramapo Valley Road,
Mahwah.
Young Fantasy Reads: Join the Young Fantasy
Reads book group at 7:30 p.m. as they discuss
Lois Lowrys, The Giver. Barnes & Noble, 765
Route 17 South, Paramus. 201-445-4589.

Friday, November 18
Tot Shabbat at Temple Beth El: Rabbi David S.
Widzer, Rabbi Beth Kramer-Mazer, Cantor Rica
Timman and Music Lisa will lead the service
starting at 5:15 p.m. The theme is Helping
Others. Open to 2 to 5 year olds and their families. 221 Schraalenburgh Road, Closter. 201-7685112, www.tbenv.org.
Family Shabbat at Temple Beth El: Join a
Shabbat family service at 6:45 p.m. led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer, Rabbi Beth Kramer-Mazer and
Cantor Rica Timman. 221 Schraalenburgh Road,
Closter. 201-768-5112, www.tbenv.org.

Sunday, November 20
Family Concert at The Jewish Museum: Emmy
Award-winning childrens entertainer Alex

Mitnick and his group of musicians of Alex & the


Kaleidoscope perform from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at the Scheuer Auditorium in The Jewish
Museum. Show good for youngsters 3 to 10. 1109
Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-423-3200, www.thejewishmuseum.org.
Bookaneer Book Fair: An amazing selection of
books, find the latest and greatest books for your
children to treasure and get everyone excited
about reading. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Crafts from 11
a.m. to noon. Special performance 2:30 to 3:30
p.m. Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton
Ave., Tenafly. 201-569-7900, www.jccotp.org.
Alix Mitnick at The Jewish Museum: Emmy
Award-winning childrens entertainer Alex
Mitnick and his group of fun-loving musicians of
Alex & the Kaleidoscope perform 11:30 at the
Scheuer Auditorium, The Jewish Museum, 1109
Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-423-3200, www.
thejewishmuseum.org.

Monday, November 21
Bookaneer Book Fair: An amazing selection of
books, find the latest and greatest books for your
children to treasure and get everyone excited
about reading. 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenafly. 201-5697900, www.jccotp.org.

Wednesday, November 23
Story Time in Paramus: Stories and crafts or
activities in the Childrens Department at Barnes
& Noble. 11 a.m. 765 Route 17 South, Paramus.
201-445-4589.
Balloon Blow Up: Watch the balloons that float
along the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade come
to life from 3 to 10 p.m. between 77 and 81
Streets and Central Park West and Columbus
Avenues.

Tuesday, November 29
Toddler Time in Teaneck: Library fun for youngsters, walkers up to age 2. From 10 to 11 a.m.
Teaneck Public Library, 840 Teaneck Road,
Teaneck, 201-837-4171, www.teaneck.org.

AOC-19

Simchas
Birth
TAYLOR
MARIE CHANANIE
Taylor Marie Chananie was
born August 29, 2016 at 5:10
p.m., at Hackensack University
Medical Center to Arlene
and Joshua and Chananie of
Clifton. She weighed 7 pounds,
3 ounces, and was 20 3/4
inches long. She joins a sister,
Kylie Frances, 2.
Taylors grandparents are
Beth and Robert Chananie
of Paramus, and Suzanne
Kullman of Staten Island, N.Y.
CAM PHOTOGRAPHY, CLIFTON
Kylies great-grandparents are
Frances and the late Richard
Chananie of West Palm Beach, Fla., formerly of Englewood Cliffs, the late Wilbur F. Kullman of
Staten Island, and the late Ruth and Morris Janoff of Teaneck, formerly of Jersey City.
Proud aunts, uncles, and cousin are Rachel, Adam, and Rebecca Shara Jay of Springfield; and
Michael and Alyson Chananie of Fanwood.

B'nai Mitzvah
MAX GLUCK
Max Gluck, son of Hayley and
Jeff Gluck of Ridgewood, celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on October 15 at Temple
Israel & Jewish Community
Center of Ridgewood.

Friendship Circle of Bergen County will


hold several mini-day camp sessions
for special needs students when public
schools are closed in November. Yedidainu is open to all special education students, ages 5 to 16 who receive services
in public school.
All activities, including music,
games, sports, art, baking and field trips
to local attractions, are closely supervised and modified to accommodate
each individual campers abilities. The
mini-camp follows the Teaneck school
district calendar and will be held this
year at the following locations and times:
Camp will be held Tuesday, Nov. 8
from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Torah Academy of Bergen County, 1600 Queen Anne
Road in Teaneck. Thursday, Nov. 10 from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Maayanot Yeshiva

High School, 1650 Palisade Avenue in


Teaneck. Friday, Nov. 11 from 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. at The Moriah School, 53
South Woodland Street in Englewood.
This location is for students up to age 12.
In addition to the November dates,
Friendship Circle will also hold a winter
camp program from Tuesday, December
27 through Friday, December 30 at the
Frisch School, 120 West Century Road in
Paramus. The winter camp program, like
its summer counterpart, offers a range
of creative and recreational activities,
and field trips.
To register a child for the November
mini-camp days or the December winter
camp week, contact Zeesy Grossbaum
at 201-262-7172 or Zeesy@bcfriendship.
com. www.bcfriendship.com.

Cooking Up a Storm in the Kitchen


The Chabad Jewish Center in Franklin
Lakes is offering a new, innovative cooking program for children called Kids
in the Kitchen for youngsters in pre-K
through 3rd grade. The young chefs
learn valuable culinary skills while also
learning about Jewish culture and traditional foods.
The children participate in every
aspect of the preparation of real recipes,
peeling, cutting, mixing, rolling, tasting,
and even comparing different recipes of
the food they make, said Mimi Kaplan,

the educational director at Chabad.


Recipes change each session so
children are learning about a new
dish, ingredient or technique, and become more adventurous about food as
they progress.
The club meets monthly on Thursday from 4 to 5 p.m. and includes custom child-sized apron with full membership. Registration is limited. Annual club
membership is $100 or $20 per session.
For registration or information, www.
chabadplace.org/kitk.

PARTY

HAYDEN BLOCH
Hayden Bloch, son of Heather
and David Bloch of Park
Ridge, celebrated becoming
a bar mitzvah on October
15 at Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake.

Enough

Friendship Circle Mini-Camp

REBECCA COHEN
Rebecca Cohen, daughter of
Jodi and Douglas Cohen of
Woodcliff Lake and sister of
Josh, celebrated becoming a
bat mitzvah on October 22
at Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley in Woodcliff
Lake.

continued from page 13

er peoples homes, enviously recounting


the way others vacation, or having conversations about the expensive clothing
and furniture that their friends seem to
have, we are implanting the ugly roots of
discontent and unhappiness in our childrens hearts.
How can we teach the blessing of
enough when are days are spent wanting more and more?
Unfortunately, these parents spent
many hours bickering. But it is not only
financially that we come up short in our
minds. Somehow, in every conflict, this
husband and wife each felt unappreciat-

ed. Both expressed frustration that their


spouse was not doing their share.
If I am always concentrating on what
my spouse does not do instead of recognizing the good that he does, I end
up destroying any potential for joy that
I may have. My life becomes filled with
negatives and I grow bitter and unhappy.
Let us take the lesson of dayenu to
heart. It is time for us all to contemplate
the blessing of enough.
Slovie Jungreis-Wolff is a parenting and
couples coach and teacher. She is the
author of Raising a Child With Soul, (St.
Aish.com
Martins Press).

Include:
1 hours of skating (during public session)
Private decorated party room
Off ice party attendant
Skate rental
Invitations for party guests
Pizza and soda
Personalized Carvel ice cream cake
Favors and candy
FREE skating pass for future use
Birthday child receives FREE Ice Vault T shirt

973-661-9368
ABOUT OUR CHILDREN NOVEMBER 2016 19

AOC-20

Top quality care.


Again and again.
The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proud to be recognized as a leader
in gynecology services in our region. Healthgrades has awarded us with a 5-star
rating for gynecologic surgery. Healthgrades also rated The Valley Hospital
among the top 5% in the nation for gynecologic surgery.
Providing top quality care is our number one priority.
We believe its why women choose us.
Again and again.

www.ValleyHealth.com

16-VHS-0429_GYNAward_About Our Children_10x13_v1.indd 1

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