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Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Backward Design HASS UNIT PLAN


Title: What do we learn about sustainability from Australias First People?
Year Level: Four.
Teacher: Miss Shannon Bruce.
Focus Curriculum Area (s): Humanities and Social Sciences, English and Visual Art. Duration: Four weeks.

STAGE 1: Curriculum Links


Students are required to learn ways in which natural resources can be used sustainability and how the Aboriginal and Torres
Straight Islander People groups achieved this by adapting their ways of living to available resources.
General
Capabilities
(GP)
Crosscurriculum
Priorities
(CCP)

Year Level
Content
Descriptors

Literacy

Numeracy

Ethical Behaviour

Personal and Social

Aboriginal & TSI Histories and

Asia & Australias Engagement

Culture

with Asia

HASS:
Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples ways of living were adapted to
available resources and their connection to country/place has influenced their
views on the sustainable use of these resources, before and after colonisation
(ACHGK023).
The natural resources (eg. water, timber, minerals) provided by the
environment and different views on how they can be used sustainably
(ACHGK024).
Visual Arts:
Use a variety of techniques and forms such as sculpture, mixed media,
printing, drawing and painting (ACAVAM111).
Presentation and display of artworks to enhance meaning (ACAVAM112).

ICT

Critical and Creative


Thinking

Intercultural
Understanding

Sustainability

Year Level
Achieveme
nt
Standards

Students identify the main


characteristics of their
natural environments and
describe the importance of
the interconnections
between people, plants
and animals at the local to
global scale. Students
recognise that people have
different views on the

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

English:
Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
containing key information and supporting details for a widening range of
audiences, demonstrating increasing control over text structures and language
features (ACELY1694).
Use a range of software including word processing programs to construct, edit
and publish written text, and select, edit and place visual, print and audio
elements(ACELY1697).

Knowledge

Skills

Students are expected to learn

Students are expected to be able to do

The natural resources (eg. water, timber, minerals)


provided by their environment.
Why it is important to live sustainably.
Views on how resources can be used sustainably,
specifically:
o Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander
Peoples ways of sustainable living.

sustainable use of natural


resources and describe
how they can be managed
and protected. Students

Develop questions to research a topic/topics.


Analyse collected information for different perspectives and
present in different formats.
Evaluate information by drawing conclusions and making decisions
from it.
Present findings in a range of communication forms and reflect on
learning.
Use a variety of art techniques and forms such as sculpture, mixed
media, printing, drawing and painting.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Students will be able to...

List the [seven] main natural resources provided by their environment.

List the different views people have on the sustainable use/management of natural resources.

Research information on the importance of the interconnections between people, plants and animals, and present findings in
various formats.
Describe the connection that Australias First Peoples have to Country/Place.
Demonstrate, using visual arts, an Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples way of sustainable living.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

STAGE 2: Assessment Evidence

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Summative task One:

Task description:
Students are expected to be able to answer the question: Why is it important to sustainably manage natural resources? In the form
of one of four product options:
Written: Informative newspaper article.
Oral: Informative radio news report (as a voice recording).
Visual: Informative infographic (ICT).
Combination: Informative news report (as a video recording).
Students are to complete the draft of this task individually and then work in pairs for the final product; this task will be due by the end
of topic one. The target audience includes the parents/carers and other receivers on the email list of the schools weekly news bulletin
(one page will be dedicated to four differently presented written, oral, visual (in the form of a web-link) and combination products
each week).
Assessment Criteria:
Students identify the main characteristics of their natural environments and describe the importance of the interconnections between
people, plants and animals at the local to global scale.
Assessment recording template:
Appendix A rubric with criteria: Describes why it is important to sustainably manage natural resources in reference to the
interconnections between people, plants and animals at the local to global scale.
Feedback:
After students complete their draft they are encouraged to reflect and have their pair reflect on the draft against Appendix A. All
students who were predicted by themselves/their partner to be below a five are to receive effective strategies from educator in order
to help them progress to the required level for them to commence their final product.
After final product, educator lists commendations, recommendations, and effective strategies in order to help student progress to the
required/next level - In appendix A.
Self-assessment:
Students fill out Appendix A after completing their final product according to how they think they went/how they can improve.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Summative task two:

Task description:
Students are expected to be able to answer the question: If you applied an Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples view of
sustainable living to your own life (or the life you want in the future), what would it look like? In the form of one of five product
options:

Sculpture: Representation (1.5m2 maximum) plus explanation (200-words max).


Mixed media: Representation plus explanation (200-words max).
Printing: Representation (A3 minimum) plus explanation (200-words max).
Drawing: Representation (A3 minimum) plus explanation (200-words max).
Painting: Representation (A3 minimum) plus explanation (200-words max).
Students are to complete this task in groups no larger than four by the end of this unit of work/week four. The target audience
includes members of the local council and school board; students decide which authority group they wish to give a presentation of
their representative artwork to (minimum seven artworks total) in order to convince council/board members of a better view on
sustainable resource management.
Assessment Criteria:
Students describe how natural resources can be managed and protected by adapting their way of living to available resources, in
reference to Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples ways of living and how their connection to country/place has influenced
their views on the sustainable use of resources.
Assessment recording template:
Appendix C rubric with criteria: Describes how natural resources can be managed and protected by adapting their way of living to
available resources, in reference to Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples ways of living and how their connection to
country/place has influenced their views on the sustainable use of resources.
Feedback:
Appendix D peer marking rubric: Once plan for artwork and written draft is complete students find another group and peer mark each
others work, with feedback. If work is marked below a level seven students are to refer to educator for further feedback.
Appendix C rubric: Final product is graded and feedback is given through teacher-group (all group members in assessment piece)
interview. Conference: Students and educator all collaborate to suggest ways they could improve, areas they excelled in, future goals
and what they can do next to reach their future goals.
Self-assessment:
Appendix E: After students participate in interview they individually write a reflection on the whole unit of work according to how they
responded to the learning.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

STAGE 3: Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction


L
A
*
1

Learning Experiences

Assessment For/As
Learning (Formative
Assessment)

Resources

In your groups try and list as many natural


resources as you can think of. Present what your
group came up with for educator to write them on
the board. Once all seven main resources are
listed present Appendix F as the answers on
Interactive White Board (IWB).
Take a walk around the school and observe
the uses of natural resources (eg. school
vegetable patch, buildings, drinking
fountains etc.). Ask questions such as:
Where did these building materials come
from?
Back in class ask: We know about resources and
weve discussed some ways they can be used
what is a problem we could research? Think of a
focus question we can explore together. Students
discuss answers in pairs/groups and write down
best question/s into twitter voting, then have
students vote individually on iPads which question
is the best to research?

Informal diagnostic
assessment:
Anecdotal record used to
gauge prior knowledge
during group discussions
(write concerns on sticky
labels).
Informal formative
assessment: Appendix
G.
(Appendix G is a checklist
to gauge students
understanding and,
therefore, which students
need more guided
learning) checklist
includes concern
regarding students
answers/questions and
involvement during
discussions.

Appendix F and G.
Access to twitter (twitter.com).
iPads (one per student).

Research the question (questions could include:


What would happen if we used up all our natural

Informal formative
assessment: Appendix

Print off newspaper and students

Sticky labels.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


resources? Why are plants and animals so
important for our survival? What would happen if
we didnt sustainably use the resources we have?)
using a variety of sources and individually take
notes (five dot points on lined paper). Students
post photo of dot points to their online portfolios.

G.
Notes and note taking
skills: Students expected
to accurately summarise
information and write at
least five dot points in
own words. Peer then
educator assistance is
given to students
unable/struggling to
complete task as notes
will be used for
summative assessment
one.

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Students complete summative assessment task one.


Students post assessment one to their online portfolios.

read page four from:


http://www.aaee.org.au/wpcontent/uploads2/2013/11/ozEEne
ws-Feb-2013a-2.pdf
Articles from:
http://www.cleanlink.com/sustaina
bility/articlelist.aspx
Books on sustainability: The Lorax
Dr Suess, Where the forest
meets the sea Jeanne Baker (or
others from
http://childrensbooksdaily.com/100
-of-the-best-books-for-children-onsustainability/).
Videos on sustainability:
https://jr.brainpop.com/search/?
keyword=Plant+Life+Cycle
Access to online portfolio
(app.seesaw.me/).
iPads (for voice/video recordings).
Computer: to type newspaper
article and infographic.
Appendix A.
Access to online portfolio
(app.seesaw.me/).

Reporting:
In an email to parent/carer include information on: Online portfolio (email confirmation from parents must be granted for
access to only their childs work), how their child is going, make them aware of previous/current/future learning, list
commendations of their child, and recommendations for homework (if needed to further students learning to
higher/appropriate level). Ensure parent/carer is aware of your availability and eagerness to be contacted for any of their
childs needs.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Ask: Now that we understand the importance of


sustainability what could we research? Think of a
focus question we can explore together.
Students discuss answers in groups of three/four
and write it on a placemat, the best question goes
in the centre to be announced to the whole class.
Class and educator chooses focus question (eg.
How can we use resources sustainability?).
Students research question (using resources in
resource section), then create a Venn diagram (in
pairs) listing (in dot points) some of the different
views found on sustainable resource management
(two or three views depending on ability: Students
with lower needs present three-way Venn diagram
on A3 paper. Students with higher needs present
two-way Venn diagram on A4 or A3 paper).
Students post photo of Venn diagram to their
online portfolios.

Students individually write up a compare and


contrast table on A4 or A3 paper that answers the
question: What are some different views on how
natural resources can be used sustainably? One
view in compare/contrast table must be an
Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples
way of sustainable living. Students post photo of
compare/contrast table to their online portfolios.

Informal formative
assessment: Appendix
G.
Checklist: students
answers/questions and
involvement during
discussions. Note taking
skills: Students expected to
summarise information and
write dot points in own
words.
Venn diagram: accurately
displays enough
information to progress to
next task/formal formative
assessment.
Peer then educator
assistance is given to
students unable/struggling
to complete task.
Self reporting
strategy:
Prior to learning
activity, students give
thumbs
up/down/middle to
demonstrate
understanding of topic
(Appendix H).
Formal formative
assessment:
Appendix B.
Students fill out Appendix

Shannon Bruce, 17057006


Placemats drawn on A3 paper
(one per group).
A4 and A3 paper for Venn
diagrams.
Access to online portfolio
(app.seesaw.me/).
Videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=XMKYybtUJ-o and
http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/
media/1423363/
Videos/factsheets/diagrams from:
http://www.wettropics.gov.au/rain
forest_explorer/4/401unique/401
mainframe.htm
Digital library:
http://www.coolaustralia.org/stud
ent-toolbox/
A4 and A3 paper (one per
student)
Appendix B and H.
Access to online portfolio
(app.seesaw.me/).

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006

B after completing their


compare/contrast table for
self-assessment. Then
educator lists
commendations,
recommendations, and
effective strategies in
order to help student
progress to the
required/next level also in
appendix B.
Reporting:
In a three-way interview (parent/carer, teacher and student conference) remind parents of the online portfolio, make them
aware of previous/current/future learning, list commendations of their child, recommendations for homework (if needed to
further students learning to higher/appropriate level), and ensure they are fully aware of attendance of guest speaker and
presentation expectations of assessment task two.
Informal formative
Access to Trello (trello.com)
6 Have an Aboriginal Elder come and speak to the
students about the ways in which Indigenous
assessment: Appendix
iPads (one per student)
Australians believe our natural resources should
G.
be managed and how their connection to
Checklist: students
country/place has influenced their views on the
answers/questions and
sustainable use of resources. Students are
involvement during
encouraged to ask questions in order to better
discussions.
understand this view of sustainable resource
Trello: Students Trello
management. Students use Trello to list new
answers assessed as to
information learned from guest speaker and
whether they are
information learnt over the semester to
justifiable, accurate, insummarise learning for final summative
depth etc.
assessment.
Art materials (sculpture, mixed
7 Students complete summative assessment task two.
Students post assessment two and self-reflection to their online portfolios.
media, printing, drawing and
painting materials).

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting

Shannon Bruce, 17057006


Appendix C, D and E.
Computer: to type explanation.
Access to online portfolio
(app.seesaw.me/).

Reporting:
In a phone call to parent/carer remind them of the online portfolio, make them aware of the effect their presentations had
on the school board/local council, let them know how student is going and what future learning will take place, and ensure
parents that all feedback and results have now been posted on their childs online portfolio.

*LA = learning area.

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


Shannon Bruce, 17057006

Explanation of Unit of Work


Central Focus
The key enquiry question in this unit of work is: What do we learn about
sustainability from Australias First People? Students are required to learn
ways in which natural resources can be used sustainability and how the
Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander People groups achieved this by
adapting their ways of living to available resources. Therefore, the learning
includes exploring the different views on how natural resources can be
sustainably managed and protected, and why the future of people, plants
and animals is directly dependent upon one anothers existence. The major
viewpoint on sustainability for research and application in this unit of work is
that of the Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Peoples; with focus on how
their ways of living reflected their connection to the land.
Content descriptors
A major section of the year four Humanities and Social Science (HASS)
achievement standards require that students identify the main
characteristics of their natural environments, describe the importance of the
interconnections between people, plants and animals, recognise that people
have different views on the sustainable use of natural resources and describe
how they can be managed and protected, as well as explaining the
connection that Australias First Peoples have to Country/Place. This directly
links to the chosen HASS curriculum content descriptors: ACHGK023 and
ACHGK024; focus sections of which reveal ideas about how the Aboriginal
and Torres Straight Islander Peoples ways of living were adapted to available
resources and their connection to country/place has influenced their views
on the sustainable use of these resources, and how the natural resources
provided by the environment can be used sustainably.
The English and Arts curriculum were also implemented in this unit of work
through assessment pieces, the first including the chosen English curriculum
content descriptors: ACELY1694 and ACELY1697, which address the
production of informative and persuasive texts using a variety of software,
and the second encapsulating the chosen Visual Arts curriculum content
descriptors: ACAVAM112 and ACAVAM112, which involves students using a
range of techniques and forms to create art for display purposes in order to
enhance meaning.
Understanding by design
The Understanding by design (UbD or backwards design) approach that
informed this unit of work intending to develop students knowledge and
abilities attempts at keeping the focus on the learning outcomes by bringing
this and assessment to the front of the planning process. This UbD planning
process takes three steps, the first being to come up with a goal or inquiry
question, the second to create summative assessment pieces that attempt
at evaluative whether the goal is reached, and the third is to design the
activities and experiences necessary in assisting students to reach said goal.
This design process is flexible yet purposeful in regard to curriculum planning
and removes the problems associated with textbook learning (teacher
centered) and activity oriented teaching (student centered). The Inquiry
Learning (IL) approach also influenced the design of this unit of work in
regard to the activities and experiences included. The IL strategy requires

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


Shannon Bruce, 17057006
the learning to begin with engagement; drawing students in with
familiar/interesting knowledge; students then explore the ideas by
questioning, researching and explaining concepts to then elaborate on; and
finally, students evaluate their newfound knowledge and present it for
meaning and reflection (Reynolds, 2014, p. 54). The IL approach ensures
learning experiences are student centered (which, when combined with the
UbD process, also ensure curriculum and teaching focus), relevant (thus
increasing motivation) and, finally, it incorporates the constructivist view of
cognitive development to enhance student understanding.
Assessment types and recording formats
Diagnostic assessment
The simple and informal diagnostic assessment undertaken in this unit of
work involved the educator taking anecdotal records (with concerns written
on sticky labels) of students answers and engagement during initial
discussion to gauge prior knowledge. This is a safe environment where
students are not pressured to share in front of the class, and fairness and
equal opportunity is valued.
Formative assessment
The informal formative assessments requires the educator use a checklist
(appendix G) to tick off when each student achieves success in specific
subject area, these include: answers/questions and involvement during
discussions (participation and relevance), Twitter voting (justifiable),
note-taking skills (able to summarise in own words), Venn diagram
(accurately displays enough information to progress), and Trello board
postings (justifiable, accurate, in-depth etc.). Each of these informal
formative assessment pieces ensures students who are unable/struggling
to complete the task can receive peer then educator assistance (if
required and desired). Also included half way through the unit of work is
a self-reporting strategy so students have the chance to give a thumbs
up/down/middle to demonstrate understanding of topic and whether
further assistance is required (Appendix H). The formal formative
assessment piece involves student self-reflection and direct educator
feedback so both students and educators can gauge where the student is
at in their learning and where they need to go next, this is done
according to a rubric (appendix B) so to directly answer learning
objectives. The feedback students are constantly given throughout the
unit of work encourages them in their learning and equips them with the
knowledge and skills needed to succeed in future tasks, this also ensures
students believe they are individually cared for with equity and respect.
Summative assessment
Through the various diagnostic and formative assessment tasks students are
given an equal opportunity to succeed in summative tasks, as well as grow
an eagerness to reach excellence in aforementioned and future tasks
through instilled motivation and purpose. The two summative assessments,
although vastly different, are recorded in similar formats (Appendix A, C and
D) to give a sense of familiarity to students; these tasks also include selfassessments and teacher/student/collaborated feedback. The purpose of
assessment one is to summarise the learning so far, make school aware of
current learning, and build a solid knowledge base for future learning. The
purpose of assessment two is to summarise the whole unit of work in order

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


Shannon Bruce, 17057006
to apply the learning to real world experiences (refer to next paragraph). A
self-reflection (Appendix E) then finalises students learning and, combined
with constructive feedback, assists students in reviewing the effectiveness
and development of skills.
Authentic summative assessments
Summative task one
The first summative assessment asked students to describe why it is
importance of sustainable resource management [in reference to the
interconnections between people, plants and animals at the local to global
scale] in the form of a newspaper article, news report (audio or video), or an
infographic to be presented to parents/carers and other receivers on the
email list of the schools weekly news bulletin. Students begin to understand
the importance of sustainability when considering the impact of running out
of natural resources and pondering the question, Why are plants and
animals so important for our survival? Once a realisation is found that
sustainability greatly affects their future and the future of those around
them, students are more receptive to the value of their assessment task. By
presenting said task in a newspaper/report format students are familiar with,
they may better understand the common purpose of such formats and see
reason behind informing others of this important issue through it.
Summative task two
The second and final summative assessment asked students to describe how
natural resources can be managed and protected by adapting their way of
living to available resources through applying an Aboriginal and Torres
Straight Islander Peoples way of living to their own (or futuristic) lifestyle
and presenting it in a visual art form to authority figures. Motivation and
purpose through understanding real world application of sustainability should
already exist in students at this point in the unit of work, however, with this
task students actually have the chance to create change and a better future
for themselves (and others). Students are to creatively produce a visual
representation of their interpretation of sustainability with the authentic
intention of convincing local council and school board members of a better
view on sustainable resource management, thus attempting to make a real
difference in the world.
Feedback
Oral feedback
The Appendix G checklist is used to gauge individual students
understanding, as well as to observe which students need more guided
learning. Those who do not reach a level of success in informal formative
assessments (according to tick chart) receive guidance and oral feedback,
including effective strategies from the educator, in order to help them
progress to the required level.
Written feedback
The Appendix A rubric for summative assessment one is implemented
after students complete their draft, in it they are encouraged to reflect,
and have their partner reflect, on the draft against Appendix A. All
students who were predicted by themselves/their partner to be below a
five are to receive effective strategies from educator in order to help
them progress to the required level for them to commence their final

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


Shannon Bruce, 17057006

product. After the final product, educator lists commendations,


recommendations, and effective strategies (in appendix A) in order to
help students progress to the required skill level for the next learning
experience.
Students fill out the Appendix B rubric for the formal formative
assessment after individually completing their compare/contrast table
for self-assessment purposes (the educator also gives feedback). The
purpose of self-assessment and feedback is to ensure students
understand the learning intentions, know what future learning is to
take place, reflect on how they learn best and have the chance to act
on their feedback to refine skills.
The final summative group assessment product is graded and feedback
is given through teacher-group (all group members in assessment
piece) interview according to Appendix C. In this conference students
and educator all collaborate to suggest ways they could improve, areas
they excelled in, future goals and what they can do next to reach their
future goals.
Appendix D is applied during the drafting process of summative
assessment two, to complete this students find another group and peer
mark each others work, with feedback. Such feedback includes a list
of what has been done well, what needs to be improved to reach
learning goals and advice on how to achieve that improvement. If
peers mark work below a level seven students are to refer to educator
for further feedback.

Alignment
Inquiry
HASS
Learning
Achievement
Skills
Standard
Students
Students identify
reflect on
the main
prior
characteristics of
knowledge.
their natural
environments.
Students
Students describe
begin their
the importance of
learning by
the
developing
interconnections
questions to
between people,
research.
plants and animals
at the local to
global scale.
Students
Students
then analyse recognise that
collected
people have
information
different views on
for different
the sustainable
perspectives use of natural
and present
resources and
in different
describe how they
formats.
can be managed

Learning
area

Resources

LA1
(Week 1)

For LA1 instruction:


Appendix F.

LA1-2 & 4
(Week 1-2)
3.
Supportive
classroom
environme
nt.
LA3-5
(Week 2)
4. Working
with and
valuing
difference.

For LA2 research:


Page four of newspaper from:
http://www.aaee.org.au/wpcontent/uploads2/2013/11/ozEEne
ws-Feb-2013a-2.pdf
Articles from:
http://www.cleanlink.com/sustaina
bility/articlelist.aspx
Books on sustainability: The Lorax
Dr Suess, Where the forest
meets the sea Jeanne Baker (or
others from
http://childrensbooksdaily.com/100
-of-the-best-books-for-children-onsustainability/).
Videos on sustainability:
https://jr.brainpop.com/search/?
keyword=Plant+Life+Cycle

Task 3: Planning, Assessing, Record Keeping and Reporting


Shannon Bruce, 17057006
Students
evaluate
information
by drawing
conclusions
and making
decisions
from it.
Students
present
findings in a
range of
communicati
on forms and
using a
variety of art
techniques
and forms.
Students
reflect on
learning.

and protected.
Students describe
the connection
that Australias
First Peoples have
to Country/Place.

Students present
findings using a
range of
communication
forms appropriate
to audience and
purpose, using
relevant terms.
Students reflect on
findings to
propose an action.

For LA4 research:


Videos on different views of
sustainability:
1.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
Intellectual
v=XMKYybtUJ-o and
quality.
http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/
media/1423363/
Videos/factsheets/diagrams from:
LA7
http://www.wettropics.gov.au/rainf
(Week 3-4)
orest_explorer/4/401unique/401m
ainframe.htm
2.
Digital library:
Connected
http://www.coolaustralia.org/stude
-ness.
nt-toolbox/
LA6
(Week 3)

LA7
(Week 4)

For LA6 instruction:


Guest speaker (Aboriginal
Elder, eg. Simon Forrest)
clarifies and confirms
information, and gives
perspective.

Reporting justification
The three methods used to report to parents include: an email, a three-way
interview and a phone call. In each method of reporting parents/carers will
be informed of their childs achievement, strengths, effort, compliance and
attitude all in reference to personal philosophy and school policy. Each report
will also include routines and policies (only if changes in consecutive
reports), information on what the child has learned (through a link to their
personal online portfolio: app.seesaw.me/), what they are currently learning,
and what they are to learn in the future. Finally, parents/carers are requested
to respond to reports (if not be fully involved with their childs learning), and
students are to collaborate with the teacher on items for discussion with
parents/carers to ensure full transparency and so each party gains a
common understanding.
The reason why the interview was three-way, as opposed to the common
parent-teacher conference is because parents/carers are informed
independent of their child through the other two reporting methods, and it
gives students the opportunity to demonstrate what they know by showing
their parents/carers themselves. Another benefit of the three-way conference
is that strategies for improvement can be negotiated with student input,
promoting shared responsibility for learning and empowering them to take
ownership of their participation (thus enhancing their self esteem).