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Lesson Plan Four Column Format

Title: Foundations of Social Studies- Communities

Content Area: Social Studies

Teacher Name: Savannah Buchman

Grade Level: 2nd

OVERARCHING GOALS FOR THE LESSON


Children should learn what a community is and
understand what makes up our local communities,
such as their neighborhoods, towns, and
classroom.

LESSON OBJECTIVES AND STANDARDS


Standard 2-1: The student will demonstrate an
understanding of the local community as well as
the fact that geography influences not only the
developments of communities, but also the
interactions between people and the environment.

IMPORTANT CONTENT CONNECTION:


The lesson is based off the Social Studies Standards, 2-1. Therefore, they have already been introduced to the
lesson of Communities in 2-1. This lesson will allow students to learn and share their opinions on communities
and their geographic influences.
IMPORTANT THEORETICAL CONNECTIONS & FOUNDATIONS: Describe the important theoretical underpinnings of
the lesson, both general and content-specific theories of learning and development.

Students have has Social Studies lessons in the past. They should be fimalir with communities and what they
are.

MATERIALS.
The book, On the Town: A Community Adventure
Caseley, J. (2002). On the town: A community adventure. New York: Greenwillow Books.
Components of the
Anticipated Student
Teaching notes
Evidence of learning.
DIFFERENTIATION: list
Evaluation points or
lesson. learning activities
Responses and solution
and key questions (and time
allocation)

LINK PRIOR
KNOWLEDGE.
What do you think a
community is?

When you think of a


community, who do
you think of?

strategies. (Potential Barriers


& Misconceptions)

Students will most


likely give some
examples of their
homes as their
communities and tell
me about their
family and friends,
possibly places that

adaptations for ELL, EC, LD

For students who


struggle with
disabilities, they may
not be able to
comprehend the
questions Im asking.
Their peers may
answer aloud too

assessment questions.

Can students tell me


what a community
is?
Have they heard this
term used before?
Do we consider our
classroom a
community?

make up their
community.

INSTRUCTIONAL
STRATEGIES.
First, I will introduce
the topic of
Communities by
reading the book,
On the Town: A
Community
Adventure.
The book is an
example of a student
and what makes up
his community.
After reading the
story, I will ask
students what are
interactions that
make up a
community? What
kind of environment
are communities in?
Movement break (1):
I will ask students
what makes up our
classroom
communities.

Some students may


not comprehend the
book correctly. It will
be important to
review the book and
highlight main
points.
I will remind
students what a
noun is, which is a
person, place or
thing, therefore they
may be able to
come up with items
which make up a
community.

fast, and they dont


have time to think.
For these students, I
may ask the entire
class to write down
their answers. Then,
after giving every
student enough time
to process their
thinking, I will ask
students to share.
Students with
disabilities may have
trouble following
along with the read
aloud. I know some
students wander and
become distracted. I
think it would be
beneficial to stop
and pause after a
few pages and
engage my students.
I can engage them
by asking them
questions about the
story, standing up to
stretch, or walking
around the
classroom once.

Are students able to


answer the
questions I ask from
the story?
Can students find
what make up their
communities?
What makes our
classroom a
community?

Students will lightly


jog around the
classroom or skip
and search for items
that we share in the
classroom. This
movement break is
intended for students
to find what makes
up our community,
while getting some
exercise.
I will teach what a
community is and
what people, places,
and things make up
one.
REFLECT and
SUMMARIZE.
Movement break (2):
When I name a place
that makes up a
community, students
will march in place.
When I name a
person that makes
up a community,
students will do 10
jumping jacks.
When I name a thing
that makes up a
community, students
will do 10 toe
touches. This reviews
the lesson and
students will need to
pay attention in

Some students may


be confused with
people, places, and
things that make up
communities.
Some students dont
always complete
their homework.

For students with


learning disabilities, I
would recommend
sending an email
home, regarding the
homework
assignment.

Do students
understand what I
am asking?
Do they move
appropriately?

order to know what


movement they
should be doing.
Homework: When
students go home,
they will create a list
of people, places,
and things the
encounter for the
week that make up
their community.
EXTENSIONS/CONNECTI
ONS.
This lesson connects
to our classroom.
Students should
think about what
else we can do as a
whole to make our
classroom more of a
community.

Students can better


our classroom in the
future, by coming
together to create a
classroom
community. (Ex.
What do we share?
Are we nice to our
peers?)

I will clear up any


misunderstandings
throughout the
lesson and after. I
want students to
know what
communities are,
and eventually go
out in their own
community one day
to better it.

Can students relate


the lesson in our
classroom?
Do they understand
what communities
are, who makes up
one, and how we can
better them?

REFLECTION: After the lesson, reflect on what went well and what didnt go well. Write changes you might implement the
next time the lesson is taught.

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