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Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &

Occlusal Register

Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California & American Dental Associations

November/December 2016

President’s Report

Jared R. Gianquinto, DMD

It has truly been a privilege to serve as President of the Kern County Dental Society this year, and with the support of the KCDS leadership, we have made some great strides this year in services to our members. I have greatly en- joyed meeting so many of you at our events throughout the county, sharing ideas with CDA and collaborating with other component presidents. This year has heightened my appreciation for organized dentistry, and its importance in preserving our profession into the future.

KCDS has had a busy fall season, hosting the 3rd annual CDA Foundation Gala in September, and raising nearly $14,000 to support CDA Cares here in Bak- ersfield. We can all be proud that our comparatively small component has been the leader in CDA Cares fundraising for the past three years, and it is now time to take our efforts to the next level. The board has procured profes- sional planning and promotion services for next year's fundraising events leading up to the weekend of CDA Cares at the Kern County Fairgrounds on October 6 and 7. Stay tuned for some fun and exciting events in the coming year!

This year has brought many changes to the operation of small organizations such as ours, and how their charters must be structured. In September, CDA reviewed our bylaws and recommended multiple updates to ensure compli- ance with state regulations. Our bylaws committee reviewed these sugges- tions, which will lessen administrative burden by moving many functions and standing committee requirements out of our bylaws, and into a policy manual that can be more easily changed by the Board of Directors. This will allow the board to respond to the needs of the membership more quickly, and retain relevance in the years to come. The bylaws committee will present their revi- sions to the board during the November meeting, which will then be brought to a general membership vote.

Many thanks are in order to our Executive Director, Shannon Ford. It may come as a surprise, but KCDS is a leader in providing Continuing Education, hosting the best attended and most profitable CE events among similar-sized components in the state. Through Shannon's efforts, our CE program is tre- mendously successful, and we look forward to a great program in the future.

Thank you for the opportunity to be your president. I am looking forward to working with the board next year, and welcoming our next president, Dr. Kurt Sturz. I hope to see many of you at our annual installation dinner at the Guild House on December 9, and extend my warmest wishes for a wonderful holi- day season.

Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &

Mission Statement

It is the mission of the Kern County Dental Society to be the recognized source for serving the needs and issues of its members while assist- ing them in their service to the pub- lic.

Vision

KCDS membership is comprised of all dentists who share its core val- ues and Code of Ethics, working together, cooperating in preventing oral disease and providing care for all in need.

Core Values

Integrity

~

Ethics

Leadership

~

Inclusiveness

Professionalism

 

~

Service

Education

~ Responsibility

All statements of opinion and sup- posed fact are published on the au- thority of the author under whose name they might appear and are not to be regarded as the views of the Kern County Dental Society unless such statement has been adopted by the KCDS Board of Directors. Ac- ceptance of advertising does not imply approval or endorsement by the Kern County Dental Society of products or services advertised herein.

930 Truxtun Ave, Suite 101 Bakersfield CA 93301 Phone: (661) 843-7715

Fax:

(661) 843-7717

E-mail: kcds@lightspeed.net Website: www.kerncountyds.org

The Kern County Dental Society is a proud component of the California Dental Association & the American Dental Association

Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
Occlusal Register Official Publication of the Kern County Dental Society, a Component of the California &
News & Notes  Congratulations to Dr. Chris Kiuftis and his wife, Julia as they welcomed"Nondiscrimination Requirements Under the Affordable Care Act (Section 1557)" at cda.org/practicesupport. (reprinted from cda.org)  Don’t forget to fall back one hour on Nov 6, 2016!!    Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-2" src="pdf-obj-1-2.jpg">

News & Notes

Congratulations to Dr. Chris Kiuftis and his

wife, Julia as they welcomed their second daugh- ter, Eleni on Nov 1, 2016. She weighed in at 8 lbs

and is healthy and happy. I am sure her big sister is overjoyed!!

Senate Bill 137 became law and was effective July 1. This requires all health plans to maintain accu- rate provider directories. This law requires den- tists contracted with dental plans to respond to a plan’s request for accurate directory information with 30 days or face payment delays, reimburse- ment reductions or, ultimately, termination of their participating provider agreement. Additionally, dentists must notify the dental plan within five business days when there are changes in the den- tist’s capacity to accept new patients/plan enrollees.

Thank you to our Safe Halloween Volunteers - Once again, the dental office at the Kern Pioneer Village was a popular place for little trick or treat- ers during the event. More than 4,000 toothbrushes were given away over two evenings. We could not have done it without our volunteers. Our apprecia- tion and sincere thanks go out to:

Dr. Melissa Primus Dr. Sarah Koyama Dr. Edward and An Jelyn Dove Alison Howard, RDH, and Nathan Swift Melissa and Jonathan Boyd Dona and Paul Schilling Estella, RDA and Joshua Alaniz And a special thank you to Brianna Espitia and her group from the Stockdale High National Honors Society for helping decorate the build- ing.

Nearly $1.8 million dollars in volunteer oral

health care services were provided to 2,066 peo- ple Oct. 15-16 at CDA Cares in Stockton. During the two-day event at the San Joaquin County Fair- grounds, dentists and dental professionals provided 14,178 dental procedures, including fillings, extrac- tions, cleanings and oral health education. 250 com- plete and partial dentures and repairs were provid- ed. More than 2,500 volunteers donated their time and services at the event, including 850 health pro- fessionals - dentists, dental hygienists, dental assis- tants, nurses and lab technicians - as well as com- munity volunteers who assisted with registration, translation, data entry and escorting patients.

The Taft Dental Hygiene Program is looking for patients. Particularly those with perio case types 2 & 3 and those with moderate to heavy deposits. The students are able to perform analog and digital x-rays. Appointments are approximately 1/2 day, 8 -12 or 1-5. The fee is $20.00 per patient, no extra charge for x-rays. The x-rays can be forwarded to their regular dentist. The program is not trying to take money out of the dental community but they do need patients to hone their skills on. Please send a referral or two their way.

Dentists participating with Denti-Cal or Medi- care (including Medicare Advantage plans) must comply with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office for Civil Rights' final rule imple- menting the prohibition of discrimination under Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act. By Oct. 16, dentists will need to comply with the following:

Post a Notice of Nondiscrimination in English in dental practices, on websites and in significant pub- lications or communications. Post taglines in the top 15 non-English languages spoken in California offering free language assis- tance. Post them in dental practices, on websites and in significant publications or communications. For offices with 15 or more employees, post infor- mation regarding the dental practice's grievance procedure. For assistance with meeting the compliance dead- line, including the required notices, download the CDA resource "Nondiscrimination Requirements Under the Affordable Care Act (Section 1557)" at cda.org/practicesupport. (reprinted from cda.org)

Don’t forget to fall back one hour on Nov 6, 2016!!

News & Notes  Congratulations to Dr. Chris Kiuftis and his wife, Julia as they welcomed"Nondiscrimination Requirements Under the Affordable Care Act (Section 1557)" at cda.org/practicesupport. (reprinted from cda.org)  Don’t forget to fall back one hour on Nov 6, 2016!!    Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-76" src="pdf-obj-1-76.jpg">

News & Notes  Congratulations to Dr. Chris Kiuftis and his wife, Julia as they welcomed"Nondiscrimination Requirements Under the Affordable Care Act (Section 1557)" at cda.org/practicesupport. (reprinted from cda.org)  Don’t forget to fall back one hour on Nov 6, 2016!!    Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-84" src="pdf-obj-1-84.jpg">

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 2

Trustee Report By Brenda Buzby, DDS Discussions: The board of trustees (board) met on Oct. 7

Trustee Report

By Brenda Buzby, DDS

Discussions:

The board of trustees (board) met on Oct. 7 in Sac- ramento. The next board meeting is scheduled for Dec. 8 (teleconference). The following actions were taken and discussions were held.

Actions Taken: Actions of the board, which are determined to be under the authority of the House of Delegates (CDA house), will be moved to the CDA house as a separate resolution.

Minutes: The board approved prior meeting minutes.

2017 CDA Operating and Capital Budget: The board approved the 2017 budget.

Innovations Model Task Force Funding: The board approved funding to support the work of the innovations in membership models task force.

Strategic Plan: The board approved modifica- tions to the CDA strategic plan.

New Volunteer Governance Shadowing Pro-

gram: The board approved the development of a pilot program to allow new volunteers to attend

and observe CDA governance meetings and events. New Dentist Voting Roles on Judicial Council

and Council on Membership: The board approved the inclusion of a new dentist at-large non-voting position on the judicial council and a new dentist at- large voting position on the council on mem-

bership.

At-Large Trustee Positions on the Board of Trustees: The board approved that the recommen- dations of a new dentist task force to add elected at -large trustees be referred to a newly constituted task force and postponed consideration of the com- position and charge of the task force until the March 2017 board meeting.

Deadline for Introduction of New Business at the House: The board approved a recommendation that the deadline for the introduction of new busi- ness at the CDA house be modified to create great- er flexibility in the meeting schedule.

Presentation on Integrated Health Care: Dr. David Gesko, dental director and senior vice presi- dent for HealthPartners, presented an overview to the board of Health Partners’ integrated health care model.

House Agenda Update: The board received a verbal update on the CDA house agenda.

2017 Management Objectives of the CDA Ex-

ecutive Director: The board reviewed the proposed 2017 management objectives for the CDA execu-

tive director.

Tobacco Tax Presentation and Initiatives Over- view: Jim DeBoo, campaign manager for the Prop- osition 56 campaign, provided an overview to the board on the Yes on 56 campaign and addressed other initiatives on the November ballot.

Healdsburg Fluoridation Update: The board received a verbal update on the Healdsburg fluori- dation campaign.

The board also received verbal updates on activ- ities of the ADA, CDA Foundation, TDIC/TDIC Insurance Solutions, TDSC, CalDPAC, CDA Presents board of managers, judicial council and the charter review subcommittee.

Welcome to our Newest Members!!

Dr. Kenneth Ricks 5601 Auburn St, Unit B Bakersfield, CA 93306 (661) 432-7773

Dr. Kyle Baker

8625 Liberty Park Dr Ste 101

Bakersfield, CA

93311

(661) 322-2263

Dr. Luz House 1625 S “H” St Bakersfield, CA 93304 (661) 398-1744

Trustee Report By Brenda Buzby, DDS Discussions: The board of trustees (board) met on Oct. 7

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 3

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Employee classification isAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 4 " id="pdf-obj-3-2" src="pdf-obj-3-2.jpg">

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications

Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association

Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that applies to dentists who own a practice. By a general principle, exempt employees possess management and decision-

 

time was not performing exempt work and was en- titled to overtime. Simply working independently and following checklists or office protocols isn’t considered “independent responsibility.”

Hygienists, generally, do not qualify for exempt

making responsibilities as a majority of their essential job functions (51 percent minimum).

Unless an employee clearly meets the job duties of an exempt position, it’s best to always assume an employ- ee is nonexempt, thus, entitled to overtime and appro- priate meal and rest breaks. Oftentimes, dental offices classify office managers, team leaders and hygienists as salaried exempt employees. However, it’s relatively rare for most employees of a dental practice to be clas- sified appropriately as salaried exempt employees. The consequences of not following particular guidelines can result in audits by the Department of Industrial Rela- tions or costly lawsuits by employees who claim they were misclassified. These types of lawsuits can revolve around overtime pay, meal and rest breaks and wage statement violations.

Here are several things dentists should know when it comes to classification of employees in dental practic- es.

status. A common practice is to pay hygienists a flat daily rate. Under the federal Fair Labor Stand- ards Act, dental hygienists could be classified as exempt employees as “learned professionals,” pro- vided the employee meets certain requirements un- der a “primary duty” test. This is permitted only if

the hygienist has successfully completed four years of academic pre-professional and professional study in an accredited college or university ap- proved by the Commission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Programs of the American Dental Association. As such, the hygienist generally meets the duties requirements for the “learned professional” exemption (similar to dentists). However, California law imposes a more restrictive standard, generally making it harder for California employers to establish an employee’s exempt status. California law provides that those

Employers should have each employee track

their time using a software system. Dentists

Employees aren’t classified by job title alone. According to the California Chamber of Com-

employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi-

 

merce, “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not

always mean that an employee will be exempt.

neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.

It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to

should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks.

qualify as exempt employees. Review the “Exemptions from the overtime lawsby the De- partment of Industrial Relations.

When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same

Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee.

Continued on page 5

 
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-93" src="pdf-obj-3-93.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-95" src="pdf-obj-3-95.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-97" src="pdf-obj-3-97.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-99" src="pdf-obj-3-99.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-101" src="pdf-obj-3-101.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-103" src="pdf-obj-3-103.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-105" src="pdf-obj-3-105.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-107" src="pdf-obj-3-107.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-109" src="pdf-obj-3-109.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-111" src="pdf-obj-3-111.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-114" src="pdf-obj-3-114.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-116" src="pdf-obj-3-116.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-118" src="pdf-obj-3-118.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-120" src="pdf-obj-3-120.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-122" src="pdf-obj-3-122.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-124" src="pdf-obj-3-124.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-126" src="pdf-obj-3-126.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-128" src="pdf-obj-3-128.jpg">
Employee classification is an important and complex piece of being a business owner, and that appliesAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 " id="pdf-obj-3-130" src="pdf-obj-3-130.jpg">
Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Employee classification isAccording to the California Chamber of Com- employees who are state licensed or certified and primarily engaged in the practice of law, medicine, accounting, teaching, optometry, architecture, engi- merce , “Job titles do not determine a California employee’s exempt or nonexempt status. An em- ployee with an impressive job title may not qualify as an exempt employee if his/her actual duties do not meet the requirements for one of the exemp- tions.” For example, the title of “manager” does not always mean that an employee will be exempt.  neering and dentistry may be considered exempt professionals. Importantly however, California law does not automatically consider the professional exemption for the dental profession and excludes most dental hygienists.  It’s rare for employees of a dental practice to should pay appropriate overtime when applicable and provide appropriate meal and rest breaks. qualify as exempt employees. Review the “ Exemptions from the overtime laws by the De- partment of Industrial Relations.  When determining exempt versus nonexempt status, the employee should clearly qualify. Em- ployers should always err on the side of caution if there’s a question and classify employees as nonex- empt. The California Chamber of Commerce warns employers to “exercise caution if you have manag- ers that supervise employees and perform routine nonexempt tasks at the same time.” A California court ruled that a manager who had nonexempt re- sponsibilities while supervising staff at the same  Understand the minimum wage salary require- ments and recent minimum wage increase ($15 per hour by 2022) and how that will affect the practice over the next few years. With the recent federal changes and tiered California minimum wage in- creases through 2022, it will be important that em- ployers stay on top of exempt salary thresholds. Navigating the terrain between California and fed- eral rules can be complicated. Employers must comply with the law that gives the most protection to the employee. Continued on page 5 Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 4 " id="pdf-obj-3-132" src="pdf-obj-3-132.jpg">

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 4

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Continued from page

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications

Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association

Continued from page 4

It is important to note that licensure or an advanced degree is not the determinative factor for classifying an em- ployee as exempt. One must still consider the quantitative component, that is, whether a particular employee actually spends more than 51 percent of his or her work time performing exempt duties, as well as the qualitative component, namely whether the employee exercises discretion and independent judgment in performing those duties. This generally leads to a case-by-case determination. It may be the case that one hygienist in the same office is “exempt” while another hygienist is “nonexempt.” Taking precautions and completing a self-audit can prevent misclassification of an employee and avoid costly penalties.

For more information and advice on this and other employment matters, contact CDA Practice Support at 800.262.7645 or contact your legal counsel.

This is the second of a five-part series on best hiring practices for dentists.

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Continued from page
   

Help is one step away ...

DO YOU NEED HELP?

Alcohol and drug addiction can touch any of us. The CDA Well Being Committee is an organization of dental professionals who can give confidential assistance to members of the profession, their spouses and staff members. Anyone needing information and/or help may contact:

Northern CA Regional Well-Being Committee Assist individuals in Alpine/Mono Counties 530.310.2395, Curtis Vixie, DDS

Southern CA Regional Well-Being Committee Assist individuals in Inyo/Kern Counties 818.437.3204, William Slavin, DDS or 714.814.7732, Diane White, DDS

or

call the Kern County Dental Society Office at

661.843.7715.

The CDA Well-Being Program

 

A Service to the Dental Community

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Continued from page

What: Installation Dinner/ Holiday Party

When: Friday, Dec 9 – 6pm

Where: The Guild House

Price: $55 per person or $100 per couple

Email : kcds@lightspeed.net to rsvp

Best Hiring Practices: Understand Employee Classifications Reprinted with permission from California Dental Association Continued from page

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 5

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments

By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted with Permission from California Dental Association

A memorable case of mine in assisting dental offices in payment problems was one where the office had sub- mitted a claim to an out-of-state dental plan and the plan denied it because it was filled out by hand. We contacted the state insurance commissioner’s office to ask whether state law defines what constitutes a valid claim. In other words, did the fact that a dental claim had been written by hand make it an invalid claim? The answer was no, a claim prepared by hand, if legible, would be considered valid. When told that a dental plan in their state had rejected a claim from a California dentist simply because it was prepared by hand, the insurance commissioner’s office contacted the plan and prevailed upon them to process the claim, which was paid.

In reporting this to the dental office, I asked in passing why they prepare their claims by hand. The billing manager said, “Oh, we don’t have a computer in our office. We don’t even have a typewriter.” What works, works. But filling out claims by hand begs the ques- tion: How prepared will a dental practice be in doing business in the “information age” if they conduct their business with only a pen in hand?

Interestingly, the dental plan industry reports that more than 70 percent of dental claims received by plans are sent electronically. In California, that number is closer to 75 percent. Practice management software, and the standardization of forms for electronic transactions, have made this possible. The advantages of electronic transactions have also made the major transactions be- tween dental practices and dental plans electronic.

Through electronic claims submissions, dental offices get a receipt of claims sent and can receive rapid notifi- cation of plans’ receipt of claims, the status of claims being processed and eventual payment. Most claims are now auto-adjudicated, which means faster processing of simple claims, resulting in fewer rejections and less back-and-forth between the plan and the dental office to acquire needed documentation. Not only do electron- ic claims also save staff time on filing and tracking claims, but they also save the practice in postage.

Another technological wonder of the electronic age is upon us, and admittedly is causing some nervousness. That is the electronic transfer of claim payments through electronic fund transfers (EFT) by means of direct deposit into the accounts of dental practices.

Because of HIPAA requirements, all dental plans have the means to receive claim payments through electronic submission. They also have developed the means to pay claims electronically. Ten years ago, one dental plan established a system whereby any complete claim submitted electronically by the end of business of a particular day would be paid through automatic deposit into the dental practice’s bank account by midnight that night. So, EFT as a means of payment isn’t new. What’s new is that dental plans are starting to shift to EFT/direct deposits as the preferred method of pay- ment: no more physical checks and payments made directly to practice accounts.

Most dental plans desire to use EFT to pay for claims they have received. There are advantages for both the plan and the dental practice. For the dentist, plans are touting these advantages: payments received faster, in days rather than weeks; same-day access by the dental practice to funds deposited; online documentation available to reconcile payments; payments made direct- ly to a practice’s account —eliminating the need to run to a bank to make deposits and reducing the number of mistakes that might occur while making the deposit. With direct deposits, the potential of a breach of HIPAA requirements on patient confidentiality or breach of security of a patient’s record is not a concern, or is certainly of less concern. One problem that CDA hears on a regular basis – that of a check lost in the mail sent to a wrong address – will be resolved through EFT/direct deposits. Any office that has gone through having to correct a check being sent to the wrong ad- dress or being lost in the mail knows that this can take a considerable amount of time to rectify.

Despite the reasons on the plus-side for of accepting EFT/direct deposits of payments, some concerns have been raised by dentists. Some providers are not want- ing to disclose their bank account information;

Continued on Page 7

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 6

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments

By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted with Permission from California Dental Association

Continued from page 6

a concern about not being able to tie a claim to a pay- ment; and the inability to decipher a bulk payment. CDA has been assured by a dental director with a ma- jor plan in California that these concerns are dealt with through safeguards built into the process. For example, explanation of benefits (EOB) forms are available on plans’ websites and are easily retrieved. Dental offices are encouraged to speak with representatives of plans who approach them about converting to EFT payment to discuss any concerns the practice may have. At this stage, if a plan is moving to EFT/direct deposit, often- times it will allow practices to opt out and continue to receive paper checks in the mail.

Another expressed concern is that for some plans, a dentist not participating in the direct deposit payment method may receive a virtual credit card (VCC) in lieu of a paper check. This becomes problematic in that, like a credit card, there is a processing fee for drawing on the card. It’s important to know that plans that use VCCs to pay on claims will instead allow the EFT/ direct deposit method or will allow a dental practice to opt out of receiving the VCC in favor of continuing to be paid by check. However, it should also be known that some payers may begin to pay via a VCC as a de- fault, particularly if a practice doesn’t enroll in EFT/ direct deposit. This isn’t a current policy, but it may be a coming thing. A specific request to opt out and to receive a physical check may have to be made to avoid receiving a VCC. From what CDA has heard from den- tal plans, EFT/direct deposit comes with no cost.

One of the first plans to switch to EFT/direct deposit or VCC is Aetna. Aetna comments that this move for its dental plan is being driven by the medical plan side of its company, and its desired compliance with all priva- cy laws and protection against potential breaches of those laws.

While other dental plans are not moving to EFT/direct deposit as the primary payment method, it is clear that the industry is moving in that direction. One dental plan representative told CDA, “We are following the lead of other carriers in the industry. Our expectation is that there will be a day sometime in the future where the industry is paperless in regard to claims and reim- bursements, and establishing an EFT ability for pay- ments is our first step toward that reality. We know that there are offices out there that are not yet technologi- cally set up to accommodate EFT. In these cases, we

Dental Plans Moving to Direct Deposit Claim Payments By Greg Alterton, Dental Benefit Plan Specialist Reprinted

will not require the office to enroll in EFT, thus they can opt out.”

Another dental plan confirmed with CDA that it had enabled EFT/direct deposit as an option in 2014.

“To date, we have not required direct deposit and it remains elective for our dental healthcare practitioners. We’ve elected not to enable virtual payments (credit/ debit cards) for dental offices that elect not to partici- pate in EFT and choose to stay on paper checks,” a rep- resentative said.

It’s safe to say that all dental plans have established a system of making claim payments through EFTs, and while only one plan has made this the means of making payments, all plans are likely moving in that direction. While for most plans use of EFT/direct deposits is vol- untary on the part of the dental practice, it is an emerg- ing trend. Having the capability to accept EFTs from plans and understanding the benefits and the safeguards to practices in participating in EFT/direct deposits will alleviate concerns with any future transition and will reduce potential problems.

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Three Ways to Help KeepYour Dental Office Staff Happy By Tim McNeely, LifeStone Wealth Management You83% of all surveyed employees said that individual praise was more rewarding than any form of bonus or gift. There are a few ways in which you can offer praise. You can do it in a standardized way that's open to all employees. Popular forms of this kind of praise include an Employee of the Month award or contests that are tied directly to some performance metric. Another good way to praise is in one - on - one conversa- tions. Performance reviews present a perfect opportuni- ty to offer praise. Continued on page 9 Happy staff, happy life? Quite possibly. Although there's no guarantee that a happy staff leads to a happy dentist, you can be sure that a satisfied staff strengthens your practice. When your staff is discontented, that feeling manifests itself in the form of turnover, some- thing you don't want to see with any frequency. Turnover is bad for your practice for a few reasons. It costs you money to recruit new staff and train them. You may even have to turn down appointments be- cause you don't have enough staff on hand. Turnover also hurts morale in both your employees and your patients. Employees notice their co - workers leav- ing and wonder whether they too should look for a new job with another practice. Patients see frequent turno- ver among your staff and wonder why their favorite hygienist or receptionist is no longer around. Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-2" src="pdf-obj-7-2.jpg">

Three Ways to Help KeepYour Dental Office Staff Happy

By Tim McNeely, LifeStone Wealth Management

You can limit turnover by making your office an enjoy- able place to work.

1. Give praise. Study after study has shown that em- ployees—regardless of industryview praise as the single most rewarding benefit they can receive. In a recent study, 83% of all surveyed employees said that individual praise was more rewarding than any form of bonus or gift.

There are a few ways in which you can offer praise. You can do it in a standardized way that's open to all employees. Popular forms of this kind of praise include an Employee of the Month award or contests that are tied directly to some performance metric.

Another good way to praise is in one-on-one conversa- tions. Performance reviews present a perfect opportuni-

ty to offer praise.

Continued on page 9

Happy staff, happy life? Quite possibly. Although there's no guarantee that a happy staff leads to a happy dentist, you can be sure that a satisfied staff strengthens your practice. When your staff is discontented, that feeling manifests itself in the form of turnover, some- thing you don't want to see with any frequency.

Turnover is bad for your practice for a few reasons. It costs you money to recruit new staff and train them. You may even have to turn down appointments be- cause you don't have enough staff on hand.

Turnover also hurts morale in both your employees and your patients. Employees notice their co-workers leav- ing and wonder whether they too should look for a new job with another practice. Patients see frequent turno- ver among your staff and wonder why their favorite hygienist or receptionist is no longer around.

Three Ways to Help KeepYour Dental Office Staff Happy By Tim McNeely, LifeStone Wealth Management You83% of all surveyed employees said that individual praise was more rewarding than any form of bonus or gift. There are a few ways in which you can offer praise. You can do it in a standardized way that's open to all employees. Popular forms of this kind of praise include an Employee of the Month award or contests that are tied directly to some performance metric. Another good way to praise is in one - on - one conversa- tions. Performance reviews present a perfect opportuni- ty to offer praise. Continued on page 9 Happy staff, happy life? Quite possibly. Although there's no guarantee that a happy staff leads to a happy dentist, you can be sure that a satisfied staff strengthens your practice. When your staff is discontented, that feeling manifests itself in the form of turnover, some- thing you don't want to see with any frequency. Turnover is bad for your practice for a few reasons. It costs you money to recruit new staff and train them. You may even have to turn down appointments be- cause you don't have enough staff on hand. Turnover also hurts morale in both your employees and your patients. Employees notice their co - workers leav- ing and wonder whether they too should look for a new job with another practice. Patients see frequent turno- ver among your staff and wonder why their favorite hygienist or receptionist is no longer around. Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-37" src="pdf-obj-7-37.jpg">

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 8

Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer

Leadership

President

Dr. Jared Gianquinto

President-Elect

Secretary-Treasurer

 

Dr. Kurt Sturz

Dr. Jared Simpson

Immediate Past - President Dr. Paul Mallouk

Immediate Past-President Dr. Paul Mallouk

Trustee Dr. Brenda Buzby Editor Dr. Nicole Watson Board of Directors
Trustee Dr. Brenda Buzby Editor Dr. Nicole Watson Board of Directors
Trustee Dr. Brenda Buzby Editor Dr. Nicole Watson Board of Directors

Trustee

Dr. Brenda Buzby

Editor

Dr. Nicole Watson

Board of Directors

 
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.
Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr.

Dr. Marshall Chey Dr. Maziyar Ghalambor Dr. Thomas Stewart Dr. Scott Tangeman Dr. Robert Reed Dr. Dana Yeoman Dr. Scott Wallace Dr. Andrew Dreyer Dr. Brian Danielsson (Ridgecrest) Dr. Cameron Hopkins (Bishop)

Committee Chairs

Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics
Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics

Access to Care Dr. Robert Reed Advocacy Dr. Scott Wallace Continuing Ed Dr. Martha Sanger Ethics Dr. Robert Reed Leadership Dr. Kurt Sturz Mass Disaster Dr. Robert Reed Membership Dr. Dana Yeoman Study Club Dr. Jared Gianquinto Peer Review Dr. John Alexander

Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared

Three Ways to Help Keep Your Dental Office Staff Happy

By Tim McNeely, LifeStone Wealth Management

Continued from page 8

You can also do it when it's not expected. Pull a high-performing employee aside and let them know how they're doing. Tell an improving employee that you notice and appreciate their efforts. These actions may seem small, but they pay big dividends.

2. Help them with retirement. Your employees are worried about retirement. They're concerned that they won't have enough saved and that they'll have to continue working long past their desired retirement date.

You can show your appreciation for their efforts by helping them save for retire- ment. A 401k plan can be an effective way to do this. It gives your staff the op- portunity to save money for their own retirement and it gives you a vehicle to contribute. If your office is small and you think a 401k may be too complex or expensive, you could talk to your financial advisor about alternatives retirement plans.

Many employees expect some kind of group benefit plan at their place of em- ployment. If you don't have one, you may have difficulty recruiting quality tal- ent. Your current employees may view their benefits as inferior to those offered at other practices.

3. Create a bonus plan. Your staff knows that you make significantly more money than them. They're likely fine with that. After all, they also know that you bear all the risk of owning the practice.

However, they also know that they contribute a great deal to your success. When your business is operating at full speed, they like to be recognized for their con- tributions—and not just with praise.

A bonus plan can foster the feeling that you're all on the same team. It can create a direct link between your employees' performance and their compensation. You can tie the bonuses to the practice's overall performance or you can tie it to spe- cific job functions.

One note on bonuses, though. Whatever system you put in place, be sure to make the system easy to understand and transparent. If employees feel that bo- nuses aren't fair, bitterness and resentment could develop.

It's easy to get caught up in the day-to-day management of your practice. How- ever, always remember that your staff is a crucial part of your practice's success. Invest in their happiness and you're likely to see the benefits.

Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared
Leadership President Dr. Jared Gianquinto President - Elect Secretary - Treasurer Dr. Kurt Sturz Dr. Jared

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 9

3rd Annual Foundation Gala
3rd Annual Foundation Gala

3rd Annual Foundation Gala

3rd Annual Foundation Gala
3rd Annual Foundation Gala

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 10

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Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 11

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 12

Nov / Dec 2016 - Page 12