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Created by Dana Wood

Lesson Title:
Name:

Guess the Creepy Crawly!

Lesson #
Subject:

Dana Wood

Language Arts

Date:

November 2016
Grade(s):

4/5

Rationale: (lesson context and reasons why lesson matters)


This lesson brings the unit theme Creepy Crawlies into Language Arts and explores non-fiction and fiction as genres for writing
about bats. Students will look at non-fiction text to make predictions and inspire their fictional writing.

Curriculum Connections :
Big Ideas:
-Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world
Curricular Competencies:
-Access and integrate information and ideas from a variety of sources and from prior knowledge to build understanding
-Use a variety of comprehension strategies before, during, and after reading, listening, or viewing to deepen understanding of
text
-Consider different purposes, audiences and perspectives in exploring texts
-Apply a variety of different thinking skills to gain meaning from texts
-Respond to text in personal and creative ways
-Exchange ideas and perspectives to build shared understanding
Content:
-Forms, functions, and genres of text
-Writing processes

Prerequisite Concepts and Skill :( for student success)

Learning Intentions

Activity

-I can see how different of genres of text


can convey information

Pre-reading: teacher(s) uses projector


to reveal facts about a particular creepycrawly and allows students to make
guesses as to what the creepy crawly is.
(Fruit bat)

-I can look at clues to make predictions


-I can use non-fiction as inspiration for
my own writing

Main Lesson:
Students are challenged to write a ministory, paragraph or poem about following
a Fruit Bat into the grocery store: Last
week, I followed a fruit bat to the grocery
store! When I chased it inside
Allow students to read their writing to the
class, if they want.

Assessment
-Engagement in class predictions
-Participation in exploration of non-fiction
-Participation in writing activity
-Engaged in student sharing

Created by Dana Wood


Teacher gives a couple examples of fun
poems about bats (Shel Silversteins
Batty poem and Twinkle Twinkle Little
Bat by Lewis Carroll). Poems can be
viewed using projector. Teacher
challenges to search for clues about bats
in the poems.
Post Lesson:
Teacher discusses the types of text we
explored in this lesson: paragraph,
poem, narrative, fiction, and non-fiction.
Share that all these different forms of text
can explore one topic and and all can be
useful for different reasons.
Review learning intentions

Prerequisite Concepts and Skill:


Prior experience in writing short stories, poems or paragraphs would be helpful but not essential.

Materials and Resources with References/Sources:


Teacher
-Projector + screen
-Projector print-out of About Me page
-Projector print-out of Shel Silversteins Batty
-Projector print-out of Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat by Lewis
Carroll
-30 writing activity hand-outs

Students
Pencils and erasers

Differentiated Instruction (DI): (accommodations)


Everyone in the class this lesson was designed for should be able to participate in all parts of the lesson. If students are
struggling with spelling, they are encouraged to sounds words out and spell them phonetically and then circle those words that
they found challenging.
For other classes: to accommodate unconfident writers, students could work in mixed-level groups and a volunteer from the
group could be the scribe.

Organizational/Management Strategies: (anything special to consider?)


Allow students to write where they are most comfortable in the classroom. Some students can stand or work by the window, if
that helps them to concentrate.
There are students at a wide variety of learning levels in the class this lesson was designed for. Allow those who want to write
more to use their own paper, or add an illustration. Offer support to those who are having trouble getting started.
Possible Aboriginal Connections / First Peoples Principles of Learning
http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/abed/principles_of_learning.pdf and
https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/sites/curriculum.gov.bc.ca/files/pdf/aboriginal_education_bc.pdf

Created by Dana Wood

Lesson Activities:

Teacher Activities

Student Activities

pacing

Participate in Who Am I activity. Make guesses! To


make a guess, student must raise their hand and be
called upon by the teacher.

5 min.

Introduction (hook/motivation/lesson overview)


Teacher(s) tells the students to take a seat at their
desks and give their attention to the projector screen
for a game of Who Am I? Teacher uses projector +
print-out to reveal facts about a particular creepycrawly (Fruit bat) and allows students to make
guesses as to what the creepy crawly is.
Body

(lesson flow/ management)

Teacher hands out writing activity hand-outs and tells


the student that their assignment is to spend 15
minutes developing a short story, paragraph, or poem
that follows the writing prompt on their hand-out. The
prompt is: Last week, I followed a fruit bat to the
grocery store! When I chased it inside

Write a paragraph, short story or poem on the handout.

15
mins.

Allow students to share to the class, if they want.


Students may read their writing aloud if they want

Teacher puts Shel Silversteins Batty poem and Lewis


Carrolls Twinkle Twinkle Little Bat poem on the
projector and reads them to the class. Then teacher
challenges students to search for information about
bats in the poems

Read poems and search for bat facts in the fiction


writing. Share ideas with the class by raising hand
and waiting to be called upon by the teacher

10
mins.

5 min.

Closure:
Teacher discusses the types of text we explored in
this lesson: paragraph, poem, narrative, fiction, and
non-fiction. Share that all these different forms of text
can explore one topic and and all can be useful for
different reasons.

Listening

5 min.
Review learning intentions
Ask by show of hands who considers Fruit bats to be
creepy and crawly.

Total time:

40
mins.

Created by Dana Wood

About Me:
I am a mammal.
My body is approximately 13 inches long.
I have a furry face and snout.
I am part of a colony.
I am found in Africa, Asia, and Australia.
My wingspan is almost 90 centimetres!
I help to pollinate the trees that I eat from because my fur collects pollen that drops onto plants as I
fly.
I am nocturnal.
I live in moist, tropical forests.
I like to search for food at twilight.
I will eat insects if I hate to
...but I usually eat flowers and fruit.
I am related to a Flying Fox and a Vampire.

Name: ________________________

Date: ______________________

The Fruit Bat


With their furry face, long snout, and pointed ears, these animals look enough like a dog to be called flying foxes. But fruit bats have a
very different diet from their meat-eating look-alikes.
Fruit bats are very social animals. A group, called a colony, roosts together in a camp treeits their home base. The most dominant
bats get the top branches of the tree. Females and young males hang from lower or side branches.
As the sun goes down, the bats leave the camp tree in search of fruit. When a fruit bat finds a meal, it uses its tiny, sharp teeth to bite a
piece off. Then it presses the pulp against the roof of its mouth to squeeze out all the juice and spits out what is left.

Created by Dana Wood


As a feeding fruit bat brushes against flowers, pollen gets caught in its fur. When the bat flies to another tree or flower, some of the
pollen falls off. This is one way that fruit bats help the trees that give them food.
http://kids.sandiegozoo.org/animals/mammals/rodrigues-fruit-bat

Student Challenge:
Last week, I followed a fruit bat to the grocery store! When I chased it inside
(write a short story, paragraph, or poem about what happened next).
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