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Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

Solar Oven Challenge


Stage 1: Research
1. What is a solar oven? (Research on the internet links on schoology)
A solar oven is a device used to cook or heat a drink or type of food. It uses the sun rays to
attract heat to light object apart of the solar oven. They can also attract heat by black
objects. UV light rays in and then converts them to longer infrared light rays that cannot
escape. Infrared radiation has the right energy to make the water, fat and protein molecules
in food vibrate vigorously and heat up.

2. With a diagram, explain how a solar oven works. (Find examples/explanations on the
internet links on Schoology)
Firstly, the sun sends heat and light down to earth through radiation, it will then hit the tin
foil reflecting onto the black cardboard turning the light into heat and using the existing heat.
The heat is trapped situated on the top that only lets heat radiation in and not let convection
out.
Labeled diagram:

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

Stage 2: Design
1. In your team, design a solar oven that you can construct easily in two lessons.
2. Write a list of all the materials you will need (these need to be easily sourced).
Post box, black paint, glad wrap, tin foil, 2x pieces of black paper.
3. With a labeled diagram (showing the materials used), explain why you chose these
materials (i.e. What is it about these materials that will make your solar oven as
effective as it can be?)
The post box will be used to support all of the items we are using. The black paint will be
used to absorb heat to the box. The tin foil was used for reflecting the sun rays in to the
box which will result in heating up the chocolate.one of the pieces of black paper will be
used at the bottom of the box acting as a hot plate for the chocolate to sit on. The other
piece of paper will be used to make a frame for the top of the box to make no hot air
escape. The glad wrap will be used to go inside the frame to make no hot air escape.
Labeled diagram:

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

Stage 3: Construction
In your team, spend no more than two lessons constructing your solar oven prototype.

Stage 4: Testing the Prototype


1. Write an experimental procedure that describes how you will test the effectiveness of your
solar oven.
Things to consider:
- Will you leave the thermometer inside the oven or only put it in when we take the
temperature?
- How often will you take readings?
- What it the total length of time you will take readings for?
We are using an electrochromic thermometer so it will be going under the lid while the lid
will be still on top of the box. Then we will take readings on the device then email them to
ourselves. Thus leaving the graph on out laptop.
2. Create a table that you will use to record your observations/results.
time

heat

18.3

20.3

10

22.8

15

24

20

24.3

25

25

30

26.5

3. Conduct your test and record your results in the table above.

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

Stage 5: Re-Designing the Prototype


1. In your team, choose one element of your solar oven to change in order to improve
its effectiveness.
We made the glad wrap tighter to let more light in
2. Explain why you chose to change this particular element and what impact you think
this will have on the effectiveness of your solar oven.
We have chosen to change the placement of the tin foil. It was falling off each time we
opened the lid so we decided to staple it to the box. So when we took the lid off, the tin foil
didnt fall anymore.
3. Draw a diagram of your re-designed solar oven. Use labels to help explain the
changes you made.

4. Identify the independent variable (the variable you are changing in order to see what
effect it has on the dependent variable):
The heat inside the oven
5. Identify the dependent variable (the variable that responds to changes in the
independent variable):
The box will be responding to change because it will now have staples attaching the tinfoil
to it.
6. Identify any other variables that need to be controlled (kept the same) in order to
make it a fair test:
One of the variables we could not change is the design of the box and the location of the
box, so the heat is consistent all the way through so we can measure the efficiency of the
oven.
7. Write a hypothesis for your investigation. (i.e. What prediction can you make about
the impact of your change on the effectiveness of the solar oven?)
State your hypothesis as a relationship between the independent and dependent
variables.

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

If the solar oven is put in direct sunlight, then it will heat up to 30 degrees in half an hour
increasing slower and slower as the heat inside the oven gets hotter than the outside
outside of the oven.
8. Explain why you made this hypothesis/prediction.
The heat outside will be about 19 degrees meaning that the heat will start at 19 degrees
and the sun ray will constantly be heating it but as it gets hotter the heat will want to leave
to fill a cooler substance (air).
Stage 6: Construction and Re-testing
1. Make the necessary changes to your solar oven.
2. Re-test your solar oven, using the same procedure that you used in the first test.

3. Copy your results table into the space below. Add another column/row to enter your
results from the re-test.
5 min

20

10

25

15

27

20

30

25

32

30

34

35

34

40

36

4. Using graph paper provided to you by the teacher, construct a graph that best
represents your data from the table above.

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

Chart Title
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

Name: Joseph Cooper and Will Lienert

5. Stage 7: Data Analysis and Evaluation


1. Analyse your data. Are there any patterns or trends in your data? What is the
relationship between the variables you have investigated? Is the hypothesis
supported by the data?
it seems to go up by 2 degrees then as it gets higher increases slower at .5 degrees as said
in the hypothesis. The heat is escaping easier as it gets hotter making it harder to heat up
as it gets hotter.
2. Using science concepts (e.g. thermal equilibrium, convection, conduction,
insulators, conductors), explain the patterns, trends or relationships you have found
in your data.
The heat radiation comes from the sun heating it consistently but when the oven gets to hot
the heat needs to escape. Because we have glad wrap over the top it makes it harder for
the heat to leave through convection. The heat has to leave through conduction through the
glad wrap then convection onto the air that is colder, through all this the oven is still being
heated up by the sun, but slower because of the escaping heat.
.
3. What were the main sources of experimental error (e.g. measurement error, poor
control of variables)?
Sometimes the top of the oven fell off (glad wrap) meaning it was inconsistent, but didnt
seem to mess up anything majorly
4. How confident are you with your conclusions? How much error/uncertainty is
associated with your data?
We are very confident with the conclusion as the it matches up with our hypothesis very
much.
5. How could the design of the experiment have been improved to reduce error?
We could have had a bigger lid covering the top better and we could have had the oven a
bit better built.
6. Do the results support your hypothesis? Explain.
The results were almost supporting the hypothesis but changed from day to day. We were a
few degrees of but our guess about how the temperature increasing was pretty spot on.