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LEI4724 Activities Portfolio #5

Ashley Font

Facilitation Technique Category: Mindfulness


Activity Title: Pebble Meditation
Source: Exercise- Four Pebble Meditation | My Meditative Moments." Exercise- Four Pebble
Meditation | My Meditative Moments. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.
Equipment: 4 pebbles, Quiet room
Activity Description: Mindfulness is the state of being aware of the present moment that comes
from nonjudgmental attention. The use of mindfulness practice has proven positive effects on
persons with mental health conditions. Mindfulness reduces stress, depressive symptoms,
reflective thinking, and anxiety, as well as increase well-being, empathy and self-compassion.
The purpose of the activity, Pebble Meditation, is to increase awareness and cultivate four
qualities of happiness that essentially help one let go and feel free. Each pebble has its own
representation, one is a flower, another is a mountain, the third one is still water, and the last one
is space. First the participant is invited to sit up straight and relaxed with the pebbles places to
their side. Before the actual mindfulness exercise beings, they must tune into their breathing for a
moment as the room drops into a silence. Full care and attention with three deep breaths are
instructed to feel the body as a whole. Each meditation exercise with the four pebbles will be
performed three times. When ready, as the participant continues their deep breathing, he/she
picks up the first pebble. As they gaze at the pebble they must visualize it as a flower to help one
refresh themselves in the garden of humanity. As they hold onto the pebble while breathing in
the participant is going to say out loud, I see myself as a flower, and when breathing out, I
feel fresh. Afterwards, mentally, one says, flowerfresh. After the third time, when ready,
the second pebble is picked up and visualized as a mountain. Breathing in and saying, I see
myself as a mountain, breathing out, I feel solid. Breathing continues as they mentally saying,
mountain solid. The mountain signifies solidity within ones self, mentally and physically.
When the participant picks up the third pebble, they must visualize it as still water. Breathing in
one must say, I see myself as still water, breathing out, I reflect things as they truly are, and
mentally, still water reflecting. This is the practice of calming to see things clearly. Lastly
the fourth pebble is picked up and visualized as space. While breathing in say, I see myself as
space, breathing out, I feel free, and mentally, space free. Where there is freedom and
space, there is room for happiness. Before finishing the meditation exercise, the activity is closed
with stillness as the participants continues to breathe in and out as they rejoice the present
moment and the happiness all around. After a few moments the session is concluded with
reviewing the four different pebbles, flower, mountain, still water, and freedom, and discussing
the difficulties faced when meditating and focusing on each different aspects of the participants
true nature living in happiness.
Leadership Considerations: The CTRS functions as the meditation instructor for the Pebble
Meditation activity and he/she participates in the session with the participant. Mindfulness
Meditation Teacher Certification is suggested, but not necessary. The therapist must be fully
aware of the participants health conditions and disability in order to carry on a successful
meditation session. They must explain all four aspects regarding each pebble and each
affirmation that needs to be said. Emphasize the importance of deep breathing and focusing on

LEI4724 Activities Portfolio #5

Ashley Font

the moment and how gathering each aspect of the pebble helps free them from fear and suffering.
It is highly recommended for the therapist to exhibit love and compassion to oneself and others.
The therapist must not let the participant get out of focus and if they happen to do so, try to
refocus them on the intention of the current pebble.
Adaptations:
Participants with Borderline Personality Disorder: BPD is a mental disorder characterized by
unstable moods, behavior, self-image, and relationship (Borderline personality disorder, 2013).
Due to impulsive actions and unstable relationships a person with BPD may experience anger,
depression, and anxiety. To ensure a successful meditation session with a participant with BPD,
the therapist must be present with them every step of the way. If the therapist needs to step away
for a moment, make sure to thoroughly explain where they are headed and that they will be back
and find coverage. A person with BPD suffers from a sense of abandonment, so making sure
they understand that you may step away, but be back is very important (Borderline personality
disorder, 2013). Supervision is always a must because of intense anger problems that can occur,
which my lead to self-harming behavior. A person with BPD may also harm others with their
actions, so conducting the sessions in a quiet room where only the therapist and patient are
present is suggested. Affirmations are helpful when coping with symptoms for BPD. Changing
the affirmations according to the participants severity it is possible. Examples of different
affirmations could be I see myself as loveI feel connected, I see myself as healthyI feel
unconditional, or I see myself as positiveI feel peaceful.
Participants with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: PTSD is a disorder that develops in people
who have experienced shocking, scary, or dangerous event (Post-traumatic stress disorder,
2013). Many people who have PTSD may experience negative behavioral, psychological, and
emotional symptoms. During the Pebble Meditation activity the therapist should avoid any
unsupervised meditation time. Resting quietly during meditation can prompt relaxation-induced
anxiety that can trigger disturbing memories (Bloom, 2016). Mindfulness practice, at first may
be hard and overwhelming for people with PTSD. If the activity is too intense for the participant,
the therapist should consider practicing with fewer pebbles, maybe starting with one and increase
from there. The participant may feel a sense of rage due to not being able to relax and the
activity may become a stressor instead of a relaxer (Manotas, 2015). Therapist should always be
aware of body language and notice any discomfort or change in attitude.
Adaptation References:
Borderline personality disorder. (2013, July 31). Retrieved
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/borderline-personalitydisorder/index.shtml#part_145390

October

13, 2016, from

Post-traumatic stress disorder. (2013, August 13). Retrieved October 13, 2016, from
https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml
Bloom, P. (2016, October 4). Can Mindfulness help treat PTSD? Retrieved October 13, 2016,
from
http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/can_mindfulness_help_treat_ptsd

LEI4724 Activities Portfolio #5

Ashley Font

Manotas, M. (2015, October 21). Mindfulness meditation and trauma: Proceed with
caution. Retrieved October 13, 2016, from http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/mindfulnessmeditation- and-trauma-proceed-with-caution-1021154