‘MISS SLOANE’ IS A

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WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19

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NATION PAGE 7

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016 • XVII, Edition 92

Burlingame ice rink proposed
Nonprofit Mid-Peninsula Ice Rink Foundation seeks skating for Golf Center site
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Faced with the closure of the San Mateo
and Belmont ice rinks, a group of advocates
have made a formal proposal to create a new
facility in Burlingame.
The newly formed nonprofit MidPeninsula Ice Rink Foundation announced it
submitted a formal application to redevelop
city-owned, and recreationally-zoned, land

at the Burlingame Golf Center site.
The city is seeking either a new manager
for its driving range or proposals for a new
recreational or entertainment use at the 12acre site in Bayside Park on Anza
Boulevard. Now, the nonprofit is hoping to
rally support to create a new rink in the
region.
“We have always believed that if we could
secure recreationally-zoned land along the
Peninsula working in partnership with

local communities that we would be successful in developing this project,” said
Michael Strambi, a San Mateo resident and
president of the nonprofit.
The proposal includes an indoor facility
with at least two sheets of ice, locker
rooms, a training center, restaurant, parking and youth homework center, Strambi
said. The existing sports fields would
remain and the nonprofit would be
responsible for financing construction

and finding an operator.
Burlingame has received two other proposals for its former landfill site, from Top
Golf International and USBC Group. Staff is
reviewing the proposals and will schedule
interviews with the applicants before presenting the options to the City Council and
going through a public hearing process,
said Park and Recreation Director Margaret

See RINK, Page 23

Council in favor
of keeping South
City marina deal
With facelift up for Oyster Point,
city says Harbor District marina
operations should remain intact
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

MARK & TRACY PHOTOGRAPHY

Though a massive development stands to forever alter the
landscape near Oyster Point, South San Francisco officials
would like to keep intact an agreement for running the adjacent marina.
The South San Francisco City Council discussed during a
study session Wednesday, Nov. 30, opportunities to alter,
terminate or extend the existing joint powers agreement
with the San Mateo County Harbor District overseeing
Oyster Point Marina/Park operations.
With the existing agreement set to expire in 2026 and 2
million square feet of biotechnology office space proposed
nearby, officials felt it was due time to examine the future of

The cast of Hillbarn Theatre’s ‘Mary Poppins.’

See MARINA, Page 18

Magic happens in Hillbarn
Theatre’s ‘Mary Poppins’
Great holiday fare for all ages in energetic production
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Hillbarn Theatre creates magic with
“Mary Poppins,” the stage musical
version of the beloved 1964 Walt
Disney film.
Even though Hillbarn’s small space
doesn’t allow for spectacular special
effects, director Dan Demers, his cast

and crew are so deeply invested in the
show that the audience can use its
imagination to envision what’s happening.
For example, in the “Let’s Go Fly a
Kite” sequence, there’s only one small
kite at the end of a short rope.
However, other characters act as if
they’re flying kites, creating the illusion of many more than one.

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Most of the action takes place in the
home of George and Winifred Banks
(Fred Feizollahi and Abby Haug) and
their two young children, Jane (Katie
Maupin) and Michael (Andrew
Marheineke).
After yet another nanny leaves
because of the children’s behavior,
Mary Poppins (Caitlin McGinty)

See PLAY, Page 23

State attorney general pick
pledges affront to Trump
Xavier Becerra pledges to build on some of the
issues that Gov. Jerry Brown hopes to preserve
By Jonathan J. Cooper
and Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — The longtime
Democratic congressman slated to
become California’s next attorney general immediately took a combative
stance against Republican Presidentelect Donald Trump’s incoming adminis- Xavier Becerra

See BECERRA, Page 31

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Great minds have purposes; little minds
have wishes. Little minds are subdued by
misfortunes; great minds rise above them.”
— Washington Irving, American author

This Day in History

1816

The first savings bank in the United
States, the Philadelphia Savings Fund
Society, opened for business.

In 1 8 0 4 , Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of the
French.
In 1 8 2 3 , President James Monroe outlined his doctrine
opposing European expansion in the Western Hemisphere.
In 1 8 5 9 , militant abolitionist John Brown was hanged for
his raid on Harpers Ferry the previous October. Artist
Georges-Pierre Seurat was born in Paris.
In 1 9 2 7 , Ford Motor Co. unveiled its Model A automobile
that replaced its Model T.
In 1 9 3 9 , New York Municipal Airport-LaGuardia Field
(later LaGuardia Airport) went into operation as an airliner
from Chicago landed at one minute past midnight.
In 1 9 4 2 , an artificially created, self-sustaining nuclear
chain reaction was demonstrated for the first time at the
University of Chicago.
In 1 9 5 4 , the U.S. Senate passed, 67-22, a resolution conREUTERS
demning Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., saying he had A handler swims with a horse from the Garrison Savannah in the Caribbean Sea near Bridgetown, Barbados.
“acted contrary to senatorial ethics and tended to bring the
Senate into dishonor and disrepute.”
In 1 9 6 1 , Cuban leader Fidel Castro declared himself a
Marxist-Leninist who would eventually lead Cuba to
Child killed when car crashes
For environmental dogs,
Mountain lion gets reprieve
Communism.
sniffing out doody is their duty
from dead alpacas owner
In 1 9 7 0 , the newly created Environmental Protection into Los Angeles apartment
Agency opened its doors under its first director, William D.
FAIR
HAVEN,
N.J.

Some
polluMALIBU — A Malibu rancher who
LOS ANGELES — A small boy was
Ruckelshaus.
fatally injured early Thursday when a tion-sniffing dogs at the Jersey shore got a permit to shoot a mountain lion
car crashed through the wall of a have shown they’re No. 1 at sniffing believed to have killed her 10 pet
alpacas said Thursday she never
ground-floor unit of a South Los out No. 2.
A team of specially trained dogs has planned on having the cougar killed
Angeles apartment building.
Four others in the apartment and the pointed out more than 70 spots in and hopes that it is relocated instead.
Victoria Vaughn-Perling made the
car’s driver were hurt in the crash three towns near the Navesink River
shortly
after
midnight,
Fire where human waste may be making its declaration after a storm of protest
Department
spokesman
Brian way into the waterway, parts of which erupted over the possibility that the
are closed to shellfishing because of male lion named P-45 would be killed.
Humphrey said.
One of her neighbors had said he would
The boy and a man had to be extri- high bacteria levels.
They sniffed out potentially broken use her permit to shoot the lion if he
cated from under the car.
saw it but would not actively hunt it.
Police Sgt. Rafael Quesada told or leaking sewer pipes, failed septic
Vaughn-Perling last weekend found
reporters he was able to speak with the systems, and places where waste might
be
mishandled
or
improperly
disposed,
her
alpacas dead and part of one eaten at
Pop singer Britney
trapped boy when he checked for vital
Senate Minority
Actress Lucy Liu is
according to a report released her ranch in the rugged Santa Monica
Spears is 35.
signs.
Leader Harry Reid,
48.
Wednesday by the Clean Ocean Action Mountains above Malibu’s coast, and
D-Nev., is 77.
But the boy was in grave condition environmental group.
said on Monday she had obtained a 10Former Attorney General Edwin Meese III is 85. Actress when he was taken away and died at a
Fair Haven Mayor Ben Lucarelli said day permit to shoot the mountain lion.
Cathy Lee Crosby is 72. Movie director Penelope Spheeris is hospital. It was unclear whether the the dogs were invaluable in laying out
A small number of the big cats live in
71. Actor Ron Raines is 67. Country singer John Wesley boy was 4 or 5.
in just a few days’ time a map for the the mountain range despite many
A sheet of paper in the debris town to make repairs.
Ryles is 66. Actor Keith Szarabajka is 64. Actor Dan Butler is
threats to their survival — and hunappeared
to be a letter from the boy
62. Broadcast journalist Stone Phillips is 62. Actor Dennis
“At first the scientists and the PhDs dreds of people inundated wildlife offiChristopher is 61. Actor Steven Bauer is 60. Country singer asking Santa Claus for a bike, Quesada we brought down to look at the prob- cials with complaints after learning Psaid.
lem kind of looked at the dogs and 45 might be killed.
Joe Henry is 56. Rock musician Rick Savage (Def Leppard) is
The driver was identified as a 23- said, ‘What can they do?”’ he said. “It
What was supposed to be a workshop
56. Actor Brendan Coyle is 53. Rock musician Nate Mendel
year-old woman who was arrested for turns out the dogs were excellent. Wednesday night for residents to learn
(Foo Fighters) is 48. Actress Suzy Nakamura is 48. Actress
investigation of driving under the What started out as ‘Are you kidding?’ how to protect their livestock was all
Rena Sofer is 48.
influence.
evolved into ‘Wow, this is awesome!”’ but hijacked by animal activists who
Police Lt. Nate Williams told KNBCTHAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Lucarelli said his town has shouted out in anger.
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
TV the woman said she swerved to $250,000 set aside in its capital budg“It’s sickening that this animal is
avoid a car that cut her off.
et that it can draw on to do the repairs, going to be executed,” one person
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
“It’s just senseless loss,” Quesada which will include snaking cameras wrote on the Facebook page of the
to form four ordinary words.
said. “There’s really no reason or justi- along sewer pipes to pinpoint where a Santa Monica Mountains National
fication for this type of stuff.”
fix may be needed.
Recreation Area.
GISNE

In other news ...

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Ernesto P. Garcia

Obituaries

Ernesto “Ernie” P. Garcia, born Nov. 16,
1970, died peacefully Nov. 5, 2016.
He was born in the
Philippine Islands on
Nov. 16, 1970, and grew
up in the San Francisco
Bay Area before moving
to Nevada. He lived in the
Reno and Las Vegas areas
before returning to the
Bay Area in 2000. He was
an accomplished hair
stylist and a graduate of Marinello School of
Beauty.
Survived by his partner Sean Kelly; brothers Wilfredo Garcia, George Garcia and
Christopher Garcia; sisters Ana Liza Jones
(Todd) and Florence Arkin; nieces Olivia
Arkin and Calie Garcia; nephews Joseph
Correa and Dylan Garcia; and pet Guinness.
Preceded in death by his parents Ernesto and
Fe Garcia.
“Ernie was a devoted and loving uncle, a
wonderfully cheerful and positive force in
the life of his friends and extended family.
His light will always shine in the hearts of
those he left behind. We love you and will
miss you always.”
Visitation begins at 3 p.m. followed by a
memorial service 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, at

Police reports

Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral
Home, 977 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo,
CA.

Frank Anthony Corey
Frank Anthony Corey, born November
1946, died peacefully November 2016.
He was the son of Ann
Marie Denham, brother
to Annette and Anthony.
Brother-in-law to Richard
Cortese and Cheryl
Corey. He held dear to his
heart the love of his
nieces and nephews
Heather,
Patrick,
Anthony, Ann, Cathy
and great nieces and nephews Alyssa, Nicky
Jr. , Lizzie, Mollie, Christopher and
Cameron.
“His smile and laugh and love will deeply
be missed by his family and all who knew
him.”
Frank fought for his country with three
missions to Vietnam and three years of
Naval Reserves, he was proud to be an
American.
“Rest in peace Frank, we will always love
you and miss you dearly.”
Ralston and Sixth avenues before 12:45
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18.

BURLINGAME

Faux pas
A person used $4,000 in counterfeit
bills to purchase two laptops on the
800 block of Third Avenue in Half
Moon Bay before 8:30 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 9.

BELMONT
Burg l ary . Someone broke into a home and
stole jewelry, money and electronics on
Sunnyslope Avenue before 3:19 p. m.
Thursday, Nov. 17.
S us p i c i o us c i rc ums t an c e . A person
came home to find their front door open on
Arthur Avenue before 6:20 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 18.
Acci dent. The drivers of a Maserati and a
Honda were involved in an accident near

Sus pi ci o us pers o n. A person was seen
lying in the street on Alpine Avenue before
8:21 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 17.
Burg l ary . Someone broke into a vehicle
and stole an iPad and personnel paperwork
on Old Bayshore Boulevard before 8:58
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 16.

FOSTER CITY
Theft. A motorcycle valued at $10,000 was
taken from a carport on Bounty Drive before
9:01 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22.
Parki ng v i o l ati o n. A trailer was blocking a driveway on Comet Drive before 5:43
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22.
Burg l ary . At least six storage lockers were
broken into on Shell Boulevard before 1:16
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21.

CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burl i ng ame Ci ty Co unci l will discuss plans for the
Peninsula/101 interchange project during a meeting next week.
The talks are part of an ongoing effort by officials in both
Burlingame and San Mateo, as well as Cal trans and other regional transportation agencies, to address congestion and safety concerns at the problematic exchange.
The Burlingame City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 5, in
council chambers at 501 Primrose Road. 

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

3

4

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Teamwork fuels a holiday celebration
Redwood City civic groups collaborate to
pull of this year’s ‘Hometown Holidays’
By Anna Schuessler
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Arctic charm will descend upon downtown
Redwood City this Saturday as the city and
key community organizations collaborate
to welcome visitors to its annual
“Hometown Holidays” celebration.
The event will take place this Saturday,
Dec. 3, from 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. at
Courthouse Square.
The family-oriented programming will
bring the holidays to life with live entertainment and ample opportunities for visitors to check items off their holiday shopping lists. This year’s event will feature free
photos with Santa, a snow lot, artisan vendors and live entertainment on the
Courthouse Square stage. The afternoon’s
events include a children’s parade, treePHOTO COURTESY OF LAUREN SPINELLI
lighting ceremony and Magic Lantern show
Visitors play in the snow lot at last year’s ‘Hometown Holidays’ celebration.
on the San Mateo County History Museum
facade.
The Redwood City Downtown Business
Group led the effort to plan this event with
support from the Parks, Recreation and
Community Services Department. The
department contributed public safety and
waste management support. Chris Beth, the
Parks, Recreation and Community Services
director, welcomed the Downtown Business
Group’s leadership in coordinating this
event.
“With the city putting on so many events
on our own, it’s great to have a partnership
with another group that is really running the
show,” he said.
Nina Kadera and her husband Keith Kadera
of the Downtown Business Group have been
working on this event for more than 10
years.
“This is a group of volunteers. We give

our hours to create a not-for-profit event for
the public,” said Kadera.
This year, event organizers called upon
the
Redwood
City
Improvement
Association, also known as the RCIA, to
contribute $27,000 toward the purchase of
red, green and white LED lights for a new
tradition, the lighting of two, large
Redwood trees in Courthouse Square. The
tree-lighting is slated to be the highlight of
the event, replacing the fireworks show that
had served as the parade’s grand finale in
previous years. The fireworks show was discontinued due to increased popularity of the
event as well as noise and safety considerations.
Eric Lochtefeld, an RCIA board member
and co-owner of the Fox Theatre, said that
the RCIA is focused on projects that
enhance the city’s beautification efforts and
contribute to order in the city. Ideally, the
group’s investments pay off over a number
of years, he said.
“We like to spend money on things that
will last a long time,” he said. “What we
really spent money on is lights for 10
years.”
The day’s culminating event, a Magic
Lantern show on the History Museum, will
showcase another one of the RCIA’s longterm investments: the projection equipment
and sound system behind its Tuesday light
shows in Courthouse Square.
“The RCIA owns that equipment and it has
value for years. What you have is this amazing light show and it’s creating vibrancy
every Tuesday night.”
Kadera says the event has historically
attracted over 5,000 guests, and one year
brought in a record high of 12,000. Visit
hometownholidays.org for more information.

STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

5

Around the state
California seeks to block
state-employee strike on Monday

California’s new conservation plan includes creating customized water-use limits for urban water districts, so that arid Palm
Springs, for example, would have a different amount of water budgeted than San Francisco.

State’s new water conservation
plan focuses on cities and towns
By Ellen Knickmeyer
and Scott Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRESNO — California officials
crafting a new conservation plan for
the state’s dry future drew criticism
from environmentalists on Thursday
for failing to require more cutbacks of
farmers, who use 80 percent of the
water consumed by people.
Gov. Jerry Brown ordered up the
state plans for improving long-term
conservation in May, when he lifted a
statewide mandate put in place at the
height of California’s drought for 25percent water conservation by cities
and towns.
Ben Chou, a water-policy analyst
with the Natural Resources Defense
Council, criticized state planners for
not mandating any new water-savings

by farm water districts.
“There’s been a huge difference all
along in what urban water districts
have been required to do and what ag
water districts are required to do”
regarding conservation, Chou said.
Under the governor’s order, state
agencies this week released the plan
for a long-term water diet for
California. They anticipate climate
change to cause the Sierra Nevada
snowpack — one of California’s
largest sources of water — to decline
by half by the end of the century.
The plan includes creating customized water-use limits for urban
water districts, so that arid Palm
Springs, for example, would have a
different amount of water budgeted
than foggy San Francisco. City water
districts would have until 2025 to fully
set and meet the budgets, and risk state
enforcement if they fell short.

Other changes for urban water districts in this week’s proposal include a
new focus on fixing leaks that drain
away upward of 10 percent of
processed water. And cities and towns
would be required to draft contingency
plans for droughts up to five years, up
from the current requirement for a
three-year supply of water.
But critics say the plan does little to
address California’s $47 billion agricultural industry, which leads the
nation, growing nearly half of the
fruits, nuts and vegetables produced in
the United States.
Diana Brooks, head of water efficiency at the Department of Water
Resources, which oversees farm water
use, said the proposal would require
agricultural water district managers to
keep better track of how their water is
being used, and better think through
possible steps for saving water.

UC’s 10 schools will not aid federal agencies on immigration
By Jocelyn Gecker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The University
of California has made a bold pledge to
protect its students who entered the
country illegally, saying it will not
assist government agencies trying to
enforce federal immigration laws.
In a “Statement of Principles,” UC
President Janet Napolitano says the

system’s 10 campuses will also refuse to
turn over confidential student records
without court orders or cooperate with
any federal effort to create a national
registry based on race, religion or
national origin. Napolitano has repeatedly sought to ensure undocumented students they can feel safe on UC campuses
since the election of Donald Trump, who
made illegal immigration a key point of
his campaign.

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The new measures mark the first formal “system-wide policy” approach to
federal immigration issues, UC spokeswoman Dianne Klein said Thursday.
Earlier this month, California State
University Chancellor Timothy P.
White made a similar pledge that its 23
campuses would remain “safe and welcoming” for all students and would not
help local, state or federal authorities
enforce federal immigration laws.

SACRAMENTO — A state board that oversees labor
relations asked a judge Thursday to prohibit California’s
largest public-employee union from encouraging some of
its members to participate in a one-day strike planned for
Monday.
The Public Employment Relations Board acted in
response to a request by Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration, which last month asked the board to seek an order
blocking a strike by all 95,000 state workers who are
members of the Service Employees International Union.
The board instead asked to block about 6,000 members
of the local who are deemed essential to public health or
safety. Those include nurses, cooks and janitors who
work at state mental hospitals, prisons, veterans homes,
care centers for the disabled and schools for the deaf and
blind.
A hearing was scheduled for Friday afternoon.
The state will ask the judge to block a strike by all
workers or, failing that, to add more employees to the list
of essential personnel, said Joe DeAnda, a spokesman for
the California Department of Human Resources.
A spokesman for the union, Mike Roth, said he could
not immediately comment on the filing.

Court revives lawsuit against
California bullet stamping law
SAN FRANCISCO — Gun manufacturers have the right
to present evidence supporting their claim that technology does not exist to comply with a California law requiring new models of semi-automatic handguns to stamp
identifying information on bullet casings, a state appeals
court said Thursday.
The ruling by the 5th District Court of Appeals in
Fresno overturned a lower court ruling rejecting a lawsuit
by two firearms trade associations that challenged the
law.
The appeals court sent the case back to the lower court
for further consideration.
“It would be illogical to uphold a requirement that is
currently impossible to accomplish, ” Justice Herbert
Levy wrote for the appeals court.
Supporters of the law signed by Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger in 2007 touted it as the first such law to
go into effect in the nation and said it would help law
enforcement solve gun crimes by allowing them to link
bullet casings to guns.

6

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the nation
White House announces
support for women in military draft
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration declared its
support Thursday for requiring women to register for the
military draft, a symbolic but significant shift that reflects
the U.S. military’s evolution from a male-dominated force
to one seeking to incorporate women at all levels.
President Barack Obama has been considering whether to
adopt the position since last December, when Defense
Secretary Ash Carter ordered the military to open all jobs to
women, including the most arduous combat posts. Ned
Price, a spokesman for the White House’s National Security
Council, said Obama believes women have “proven their
mettle,” including in Afghanistan and Iraq.
“As old barriers for military service are being removed,
the administration supports — as a logical next step —
women registering for the Selective Service,” Price said,
using the formal name for the military draft.
The White House emphasized that the administration
remains committed to an all-volunteer military — meaning
women, like men, wouldn’t be forced to serve unless there
were a national emergency like a major world war.
Changing the policy would require an act of Congress, and
there are no signs that lawmakers plan to move swiftly to
alter the law.

‘A clear shot’ — police kill suspect, rescue children
SEATTLE — A Washington state police officer responding to a domestic violence call was fatally shot and his fellow officers were still “taking fire” as they removed him
from a home, beginning an 11-hour standoff during which
authorities say the gunman used two young children as
human shields.
The fallen officer, Reginald “Jake” Gutierrez, had served
with the department since 1999 and was highly respected
and experienced, Tacoma Police Chief Donald Ramsdell told
reporters Thursday.
Dozens of officers had surrounded the home in Tacoma on
Wednesday night, urging nearby residents of the working
class neighborhood of single-family homes to shelter in
place.
Early Thursday, authorities say a deputy got “a clear shot”
and killed the suspect as officers rescued an 8-year-old girl
and a 6-year-old boy.
Pierce County sheriff’s spokesman Ed Troyer said the
gunman had refused to surrender during negotiations. His
name was not released.

REUTERS

Troopers from the Tennessee Highway Patrol help residents leave an area under threat of wildfire after a mandatory evacuation
was ordered in Gatlinburg, Tenn.

Death toll from Tennessee wildfires increases to 11
By Adam Beam
and Jonathan Mattise
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GATLINBURG, Tenn. — Crews discovered the remains of more people as
they searched the rubble of wildfires
that torched hundreds of homes and
businesses near the Great Smoky
Mountains, bringing the death toll to
11, officials said Thursday.
Authorities set up a hotline for people to report missing friends and relatives, and after following up on dozens
of leads, they said many of those people had been accounted for. They did
not say whether they believe anyone
else is still missing or may have died.
“I think it’s fair to say that the
search is winding down, ” Sevier

County Mayor Larry Waters said. “And
hopefully we will not find any more.”
He said the searches would likely be
completed Friday.
Nearly 24 hours of rain on
Wednesday helped dampen the wildfires, but fire officials struck a cautious
tone, saying people shouldn’t have a
false sense of security because months
of drought have left the ground bonedry and wildfires can rekindle.
The trouble began Monday when a
wildfire, likely caused by a person,
spread from the Great Smoky
Mountains National Park into the
tourist city of Gatlinburg as hurricaneforce winds toppled trees and power
lines, blowing embers in all directions.
“We had trees going down every-

where, power lines, all those power
lines were just like lighting a match
because of the extreme drought conditions. So we went from nothing to
over 20-plus structure fires in a matter
of minutes. And that grew and that
grew and that grew,” Gatlinburg Fire
Chief Greg Miller said.
More than 14,000 residents and visitors in Gatlinburg were forced to evacuate, and the typically bustling tourist
city has been shuttered ever since. At
least 700 buildings in the county have
been damaged.
“Gatlinburg is the people; that’s
what Gatlinburg is. It’s not the buildings, it’s not the stuff in the buildings, ” Mayor Mike Werner said.
“We’re gonna be back better than ever.
Just be patient.”

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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Trump’s ‘thank you’ tour
gets off to raucous start
By Jonathan Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Trump’s tariffs on imports could be costly
By Paul Wiseman
and Joe McDonald
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — American consumers and businesses would pay —
literally — if President-elect Donald
Trump followed through on his campaign pledge to slap big taxes on
imports from China and Mexico.
Trump said during the campaign
that he’d impose tariffs of 35 percent
on Mexican imports and 45 percent
on Chinese imports to protect
American jobs from unfair foreign
competition. Companies that import
those goods would pay the tax at the
border.
Many of those firms would likely
try to heap as much of the cost as
possible on their customers. The
result is that American consumers
could end up paying more for foreignmade clothing, tablet computers and
other electronics.
A 45 percent tariff on Chinese-

made goods could drive up U.S. retail
prices on those goods by an average
of about 10 percent, Capital
Economics
has
calculated.
Consumers would find it hard to
escape the price squeeze.
“There are few alternative sources
for the main products the U.S. buys
from China,” says Mark Williams,
Capital Economics’ chief Asia economist. He notes, for example, that
China supplies about 70 percent of
the world’s network equipment, cellphones, laptops and tablet computers.
Since Trump’s election, his team
has de-emphasized the use of tariffs,
describing them as a potential tool to
be used to pry concessions from
America’s trading partners.
“Everybody talks about tariffs as
the first thing, ” Wilbur Ross, an
investment banker who is Trump’s
choice for Commerce secretary, told
CNBC Wednesday. “Tariffs are part of
the negotiation.”

CINCINNATI — Donald Trump
returned to his campaign roots
Thursday in his first major public
appearance since Election Day, resembling the pugnacious, brawling campaigner more than the traditional president-to-be as he held court in front of
thousands of adoring fans — and even
announced a Cabinet pick from the
stage.
Trump’s first stop on this “Thank
you” tour to salute his supporters was
in Ohio and, ever the showman, he
made the surprise announcement that
he will be offering the post of Defense
Secretary to retired Marine Corps Gen.
James Mattis. Trump said he was supposed to unveil that Monday, so he
jokingly warned the Cincinnati crowd
to “not tell anyone.”
The raucous rallies during the Trump
campaign road show often had the feel
of a rock concert, and Thursday night
in Cincinnati had all the hallmarks of
a reunion tour: Trump took a veiled
swipe at fellow Republicans. He
remembered his general election foe
by joking, “We had fun fighting
Hillary, didn’t we?” He boasted about
size of his victory and repeatedly
bashed the media. Protesters briefly
interrupted the proceedings. And the
crowd chanted “Build the Wall” and
“Lock Her Up.”
The president-elect had eased up on
those campaign promises recently,
suggesting the U.S.-Mexico border
wall could be part-fence and indicating
no willingness to pursue criminal
charges against Democratic opponent
Hillary Clinton.
Perhaps befitting an encore presentation, the downtown arena that Trump
packed in October — drawing a crowd
that was one of the loudest of the campaign — was only about half-full
Thursday night. But the thousands who
were there cheered Trump as he declared
to restore American to greatness, saying, “Now is not the time to downsize
our dreams.”

7

Around the nation
To move into White House,
Trump may have to dump D.C. hotel
NEW YORK — Donald Trump may have to give up one
property on Pennsylvania Avenue if he wants to move
into another down the street.
One is the newly opened, glittering jewel in the president-elect’s hotel empire. The other, of course, is the
White House.
Whether he’ll need to relinquish his stake in the Trump
International Hotel in Washington, D.C., could come
down to how a few words on a lease are interpreted.
Trump negotiated for more than a year to secure the
rights to use the government-owned building where the
hotel is now housed. The resulting lease itself runs for
hundreds of complicated and dreadfully dull pages.
Dull, save for clause 37.19 on top of page 103, which
has suddenly become the subject of great discussion
among experts on government contracting law, and not a
few Trump critics.
If some of the experts are correct — a big if — the first
43 words of this clause could force Trump to unload his
equity stake in the hotel just down the street from the
White House. The key part: No “elected official of the
Government of the United States” shall be “admitted to
any share or part of this Lease.”

Some welcome Pence to new
neighborhood with gay-pride flags
WASHINGTON — Some of Vice President-elect Mike
Pence’s new Washington neighbors are welcoming him to
the area with gay-pride flags.
WJLA-TV reports that several people on Pence’s new
block have hung rainbow pride flags to show their displeasure about his positions on LGBT issues.
Pence is living in the neighborhood during the transition before he moves into the vice president’s mansion on
the grounds of the Naval Observatory next year.
LGBT activists have criticized Pence for a “religiousobjections” law he signed as Indiana governor that they
said could sanction discrimination against gay people.
IIsle Heintzen is one of Pence’s new neighbors.
Heintzen says the flag was designed to be a “respectful
message” expressing her disagreement with Pence’s
thinking.

Wisconsin election recount
begins; Michigan’s is challenged
MADISON, Wis. — The tedious task of recounting
Wisconsin’s nearly 3 million votes for president began
Thursday with scores of hastily hired temporary workers
flipping through stacks of ballots as observers watched
their every move.
The action in Wisconsin could soon be duplicated in
Michigan and Pennsylvania, where Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein was pushing for recounts. Donald
Trump narrowly beat Hillary Clinton in all three states,
but recounts were not expected to flip nearly enough votes
to change the outcome in any of the states.

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8

LOCAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

BART service cuts
considered for Transbay
Tube seismic upgrades
The BART Board of Directors awarded a $267 million contract Thursday
for seismic retrofits to the Transbay
Tube, work that could cause service disruption to riders between Oakland and
San Francisco for more than two years.
While BART officials stressed that
the 3.8-mile tunnel can currently withstand a large earthquake, the proposed
upgrades would make it able to withstand the kind of catastrophic earthquake only expected to hit the Bay
Area every 500 or 1,000 years.
The work would involve installing
better interior liners as well as the
installation of a new pumping system.
The $267, 083, 110 contract was
awarded to the lowest of three bidders,
a joint venture of Oakland-based
Shimmick
Construction
and
Pleasanton-based
California
Engineering Contractors. Funding for
the project will primarily come from
earthquake safety improvement bonds
authorized by voters in 2004.
Work on the upgrades would begin in
July 2018 and could take up to two and
a half years. But BART management
said it could go faster if there are temporary cuts to service at night and
early in the morning.
The work would take place during the
overnight hours before service opens
Monday through Friday, but to extend
the available working hours, the
agency is considering having only a
single track open in the tube after 9:30
p.m. and to open service an hour later,
at about 5 a.m.
The reduced service could help the
work be completed four months faster
and save nearly $15 million but would
affect thousands of daily riders.

Local briefs

THE DAILY JOURNAL

becoming a crisis counselor can visit
crisistextline.org/volunteer.

More than 2,600 people who take
BART between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. would
need to make other arrangements.

Menlo Park hires
20 firefighters this year

Caltrain seeks to
prevent suicides through
crisis support text service

The Menlo Park Fire District hired
20 new firefighters and firefighter
paramedics this year, marking “the
largest, single most aggressive hiring
effort since at least the 1980s, if ever,”
Fire Chief Harold Schapelhouman said
Wednesday.
Nine of the new firefighters graduated from the County Fire Academy this
week and will soon be assigned to one
of the stations in Atherton, East Palo
Alto, Menlo Park or unincorporated
San Mateo County.
Fire District officials held off on hiring new employees during the economic recession, Schapelhouman
said.
“We’ve been working hard to catch
up to where we needed to be on staffing
by hiring the best qualified individuals
we could find for this organization,”
Schapelhouman said in a statement.
The Fire District spends about
$4,100 on the hiring process for each
candidate, including $1,402 for entrylevel fire academy, $975 background
checks and $900 on medical and physiological exams.
The district provides fire academy
graduates with $12, 353 in safety
equipment, including uniforms, wildland firefighting equipment and
breathing equipment, Schapelhouman
said.
The starting salary for a Menlo Park
firefighter is $173,779 with benefits,
and $186,747 for a firefighter-paramedic.
The district’s turnover rate is less
than 1 percent, Schapelhouman said,
adding that most firefighters serve in
the district for at least 30 years.

Caltrain is the first rail service to
partner with a national nonprofit that
assists people who are having suicidal
thoughts through text messages.
The train service has seen dozens of
intentional deaths on its right-of-way
throughout the years, including 17 of
the 20 track fatalities in 2015 being
ruled as suicides, Caltrain spokeswoman Tasha Bartholomew said.
“We realize that there is a problem.
Most times they are intentional acts
and not accidents,” she said.
Caltrain is one of many Bay Area
groups announced Thursday as a partner with Crisis Text Line, a national
nonprofit that guides people in crisis
24/7 over text messages, with more
than 25,000 conversations in the Bay
Area since its 2013 launch.
The texting service supplements an
800 number displayed for riders if
they’re feeling depressed, having suicidal thoughts or have a mental disorder, Bartholomew said.
While the agency can’t stop all
deaths on its tracks, it has worked to
help the public through its suicide prevention initiatives, she said.
Beginning Monday, Caltrain commuters can expect to see more signs on
platforms and trains displaying the
nonprofit’s text message service,
Bartholomew said.
Anyone seeking help in a crisis can
contact Crisis Text Line by texting
“BAY” to 741741. Those interested in

Reporters’ notebook

I

t’s time for Santa Paws ! The Peni ns ul a Humane
So ci ety is hosting its annual photo shoot for pet
owners looking for a special holiday keepsake.
Visitors can bring their pets to pose with Santa from
noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, and Saturday, Dec. 10.
The cost is $20 per photo, or up to $35 for three different poses. Participants will gain access to an online
photo gallery where they can download images taken by
a professional photographer. All proceeds benefit the
local shelter.
All pets are welcome and in years past Santa has met
cats, goats and even a snake! Multiple pets can pose in
one photo so long as their owner can control them. Dogs
must remain on leashes and cats should be brought in carriers.
The PHS’ Center fo r Co mpas s i o n is located at
1450 Rollins Road, Burlingame. Call (650) 340-7022
ext. 328 for more information.
***
Were you naughty or nice this past year? Let Santa
know!
So uth San Franci s co Ci ty Hal l has a mailbox for
you to send your letters to Santa and explain whether you
were naughty or nice, and what you are asking for this
year. 
Please drop off your letters at the Ci ty Hal l Santa
mailbox, 400 Grand Ave., no later than end of day,
Wednesday, Dec. 7, to ensure your child receives a reply
from Santa postmarked from the North Pole.
***
The San Franci s co Internati o nal Ai rpo rt recently welcomed additional Co pa Ai rl i nes flights to
Panama to meet increased travel demand. In early
November, Panama-based airline added a second daily
nonstop flight between SFO and Panama City, Panama.
Copa, a member of the Star Al l i ance global airline network, launched nonstop daily service from SFO in
September 2015.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from
the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the Friday
edition.

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OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Letters to the editor
HOPE Act will help
patients with Alzheimer’s
Editor,
I’m writing to thank U.S. Rep.
Jackie Speier for helping to win a
huge improvement in care for the millions of Americans living with
Alzheimer’s disease through her cosponsorship of the HOPE for
Alzheimer’s Act.
Both my mother and mother-in-law
have late-stage Alzheimer’s.
Because Alzheimer’s is so poorly
understood, care planning is crucial
to give people living with it, and
their families information on available treatments, clinical trials and
local support services that can
improve the entire family’s quality of
life.
On Nov. 3, the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services finalized its
decision to pay for assessment and
care planning for patients newly
diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease
and other cognitive impairments,
which goes into effect next year.
Finally, people being diagnosed with
Alzheimer’s disease will get a professional care planning consultation as
a routine follow up to their diagnosis,
instead of being left to figure out how
to deal with this devastating, lifealtering disease on their own. Proper
care planning results in fewer hospitalizations, fewer emergency room
visits and better medication management, all of which improve the quality of life for both patients and caregivers while keeping health care
costs down.
CMS’s decision is a direct response
to the huge bipartisan support in
Congress for the HOPE Act, which
called for Medicare to cover
Alzheimer’s care planning, and I want
to publicly thank the congresswoman
for her role in making it happen.

Michael Fox
Hillsborough

Quote of the day
Editor,
Quote of the day: “We can have
democracy in this country or we can
have great wealth concentrated in the
hands of the few, but we can’t have
both.” — Justice Louis D. Brandeis.
Most Americans still haven’t
recovered from the Great Recession.
Wealthy Americans, on the other
hand, are doing better than ever. After
the recession hit, the top 1 percent
captured an incredible 91 percent of
the nation’s income growth. Our
nation’s 20 wealthiest individuals, a
group small enough to fit in a single
Gulfstream jet, have more wealth than
the bottom half of the entire U.S.
population.

Guy M. Guerrero
Burlingame

Gov. Brown’s legacy
Editor,
While Gov. Jerry Brown is waiting
for some big issue to define his legacy, there is a very straightforward
action he could take that would assure
his legacy. Gov. Brown could mandate that all current state vehicles be
replaced by all-electric vehicles by
2021, cars by 2019 and all vehicles
by 2021.
This action would reduce the cost of
maintenance of gas and diesel vehicles, eliminate state vehicle
pollution and generate revenue to
help pay for the program. The state
workers who currently maintain gas
and diesel vehicles could to trained to
design, build, install and maintain
solar-powered recharging stations
across the state. This single action
would decrease vehicle pollution,
generate revenue for the state, encourage electric vehicle production and
set the standards for the other states
to follow.

Bob Krainz
Belmont

Mysterious whistle
Editor,
In reference to the letter by William
Kelsey (“Mysterious Whistle”) published in the Daily Journal Nov. 14,
regarding hearing an “old time” “quittin’ time” factory whistle, I hear it as
well in North Central San Mateo near
the Congregational Church.
The whistle actually emanates from
the northwest in Burlingame
(although it is probably heard in
most all directions). I know where it
comes from, but am not authorized to
say. In any case, it’s not very loud
and doesn’t last long. It’s just a vestige of an era long passed.

Robert Frost
San Mateo

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Samantha Weigel, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Anna Schuessler, Austin Walsh
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

Cigarettes versus marijuana
Editor,
Sir, I am greatly confused. This
country, since the 1940s when everyone smoked, has spent millions of
dollars encouraging everyone not to
smoke. In fact, there is not one public building where smoking is
allowed. Smoking caused cancer,
heart problems, skin to age, teeth to
fall out, etc.
Now, we have said that smoking
marijuana is OK. In spite of the fact
that marijuana is 20 times stronger
than any cigarette, it slows reaction
time, it affects decision ability and
inhibits problem-solving ability. It
increases the heart rate by 20 percent

BUSINESS STAFF:
Michael Davis
Charles Gould
Dave Newlands

Henry Guerrero
Paul Moisio
Joy Uganiza

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Renee Abu-Zaghibra Robert Armstrong
Jim Clifford
Dan Heller
Tom Jung
Mona Murhamer
Karan Nevatia
Jeanita Lyman
Brigitte Parman
Adriana Ramirez
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Joel Snyder
Megan Tao
Gary Whitman
Cindy Zhang

Charles Tooth
South San Francisco

Supermajority
Editor,
Now that the Democrats have a
supermajority in the California
Legislature (“Democrats get supermajority” in the Nov. 30 edition of the
Daily Journal), I hope that your readers will hold onto their wallets before
the Democrats, especially the progressive wing, get to it. You can
anticipate your wallet getting “progressively” more slim with tax
increases rewarding their constituents.

John Dillon
San Bruno

Self-absorbed liberal Democrats
Editor,
President-elect Trump won in a
landslide. Final results were 306 to
232 in Electoral College votes.
Liberal elite media suppress these
facts, just like Wikileaks exposed
CNN leaking debate questions to
Hillary, and the New York Times,
MSNBC and Politico providing final
article drafts to Clinton to edit before
publication. 
Liberal Democrats live in selfabsorbed, arrogant and pompous bubbles, particularly in the snobbish San
Francisco Bay Area. But, according to
the Economist, 80 percent of America
is Republican, while Democrats exist
only on the two coasts. Go ahead,
call a percentage of America
“deplorables” — racists, sexists,
homophobes, whatever — throw your
tantrums, trash cities, burn American
flags, whine — and don’t look within, ever. Don’t look outside your bubble and your liberal echo chamber
because that would require humility
and self-awareness to know that,
“Hey, maybe I’m not always right,
and maybe everyone else isn’t always
wrong.”
How you lose shows your character,
or lack thereof.

Mike Brown
Burlingame

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Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

up to three hours after smoking a
joint. Cannabis users have fasting
insulin levels 16 percent lower than
normal. Their insulin resistance is 17
percent lower. None of the aforementioned is good for one’s health.
It seems to me that the people who
want people to smoke marijuana want
people to be unhealthy, lack good
decision-making skills and have
insulin problems. The research is in.
It cannot be refuted.

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal
• Emailed documents are preferred:
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• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
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Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.

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Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

9

First Avenue, and
the march of time
I

often wondered who Little Bobby Duncan was. And
maybe even what he’s doing now. Walking along
First Avenue in San Mateo, I’d see the mural by the
train station of what I initially thought was Abraham
Lincoln leading a team of horses next to a old-style train
and saw three names scrawled along the bottom. One was
Little Bobby Duncan. Was he really little, or just little at
the time? Is he big now? I’ll likely never know.
Turns out there was a bit more to the mural than I once
thought. It wasn’t Abraham Lincoln at all, but rather it was
a depiction of William Ralston, who reportedly liked to
race trains from San Francisco all the way down the
Peninsula. Ralston, he of Ralston Avenue fame, and also
Ralston Hall, the mansion whose home is now Notre Dame
de Namur University, founded
the Bank of California, and
was one of the Founding
Fathers of the Peninsula. So
there was some history to that
mural.
I thought more about that
mural when it was announced
that it would be replaced with a
new mural. Seemed sad to me,
but the organizers of the mural
project had tried to contact the
original artist who reportedly
was not interested in rehabilitating it. It was also in poor
condition, with paint peeling.
And it happened to be on private property, so essentially
the owner could do what they wanted despite its place in
my conscious, and perhaps the collective conscious of San
Mateo.
Time marches on, however, and the new mural is excellent — with notions of San Mateo old and new. My daughter loves it because she can point out things she recognizes and it also provided me with an opportunity to
explain private property rights and how sometimes things
change. In her mind, for the better. And she now has the
chance to say she remembers when that mural was painted
in 2016.
You will see some changes if you walk along First
Avenue. It is certainly not a very long street, maybe five
blocks long reaching its fingertip from a section of residential neighborhood east of downtown through the very
heart of downtown. Its terminus is South Ellsworth
Avenue, where the City Hall campus once was on the west
side, with Fire Station 21 as the final vestige of it. First
Avenue may not stretch for long, but it is the first avenue
of the city and at the heart of its founding in the 19th century as a place of recreation for city folk.
On Delaware Street, the oldest house in the city sits
regally at the corner with its steamboat gothic facade
being painted from white to a mustard yellow. Across the
street is the former Wisnom’s hardware once run by a
renowned San Mateo family. It is now Hassett Hardware, a
multi-generational hardware store with its origin in Palo
Alto, but now extending its family-run reach. One block to
the west is Ching Lee Laundry, shuttered since the end of
October after 112 years in the same location and 140 years
in San Mateo. It was last run by Jacque Yee, a scion of the
Yee family that started the business, and a woman with a
heart of gold. The business now sits empty, a testament to
changing times.
The mural, now new, welcomes visitors to the city and
residents alike as they make their way to and from work or
other obligations or activities. The station itself is relatively new, and not in its original location just to the
south, but now holds a tech company and a fondue restaurant, despite the original idea of having a book store or
cafe there. And at the corner of B Street is a doughnut shop
in a former video store, with the Dutch Van Dalen Scale
Co. tucked in the back with its display window of scales
and food machines across the street from a former livery
building, once run by the man who resided in that oldest
house in the city a few blocks back. At least the legend
goes.
The livery building that once held horses now holds
offices and a soon-to-opened fitness place, right across
from recently installed electric vehicle charging stations.
There is history around if you look for it, and sometimes
it takes a change, or a few changes, to make you appreciate
what once was, and how it evolves over time that constantly tick tick ticks around us and within us marking the
past, the present and making way for the future.
I wonder if a scribe stood looking at a wall at the tail end
of the Roman Empire admiring a new painting, while missing the old one, wondering about his own incarnation of
Little Bobby Duncan, and never even considering that the
city he loved all around him would one day be ruins. Or if
he did have that consideration, if he just appreciated it
while he could.
Jon May s is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdaily journal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmay s.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Oil and banks take Dow to new highs
By Marley Jay

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Technology
companies plunged Thursday, and
high-dividend stocks also took
hefty losses as bond yields rose to
their highest level in more than a
year. But more big gains for bluechip banking and oil stocks pulled
the Dow Jones industrial average
to a record high.
Big names like Facebook and
Oracle fell as technology companies took their biggest losses in
two months. Rising bond yields
pushed income-seeking investors
away from real estate and utility
companies. Health care stocks
also slumped.
Banks continued to soar as
investors expect them to make
bigger profits on loans as interest
rates rise. Oil prices climbed for
the second day after the countries
of OPEC agreed to trim oil production next year.
Karyn Cavanaugh, senior market strategist for Voya Investment
Strategies, said a focus on
President-elect Donald Trump’s
trade policies might be hurting
tech stocks. On Thursday Trump
toured a Carrier factory in Indiana
after announcing the company
will keep some operations at the
facility instead of moving them to
Mexico. He warned of conse-

High:
Low:
Close:
Change:

19,214.30
19,138.79
19,191.93
+68.35

OTHER INDEXES

quences for companies that send
jobs out of the country.
“If you’re going to bring jobs
back to America and make stuff
here, tech is going to be pretty
vulnerable,” she said. “If there’s
going to be a trade war, tech is
pretty vulnerable.”
The Dow gained 68.35 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 19,191.93, its
highest close on record. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
dropped 7.73 points, or 0.4 percent, to 2, 191. 08. The Nasdaq
composite fell 72.57 points, or
1.4 percent, to 5,251.11.
Stock indexes set records after
the presidential election last

month, but lately they have wobbled as different industries were
pulled in opposite directions.
Banks and industrial and materials
companies are rising while tech
stocks have weakened.
Bond prices continued to tumble, sending benchmark yields
higher. The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.44 percent
from 2.38 percent, its highest
since July 2015. That sent bank
stocks higher because higher
bond yields are linked to higher
interest rates, which allow banks
to make more money from lending.
Goldman Sachs jumped $7.34,

S&P 500:
NYSE Index:
Nasdaq:
NYSE MKT:
Russell 2000:
Wilshire 5000:

2191.08
10,828.99
5251.11
2229.95
1313.80
22,914.55

-7.73
-9.47
-72.57
-11.74
-8.54
-76.52

10-Yr Bond:
Oil (per barrel):
Gold :

2.44
51.82
1,173.60

+0.07
+1.48
-0.30

or 3.3 percent, to $226.63 and
JPMorgan Chase picked up $1.62,
or 2 percent, to $81.79. Goldman
is trading at its highest price since
December 2007.
Facebook skidded $3.32, or 2.8
percent, to $115.10 and chipmaker Analog Devices dropped $5.23,
or 7 percent, to $69.01. Microsoft
lost $1. 06, or 1. 8 percent, to
$59.20.
After a big gain Wednesday, the
dollar slipped to 114.04 yen from
114. 22 yen. The euro rose to
$1.0645 from $1.0599. In the last
few weeks the dollar has reached a
13-year high compared to other
currencies. A strong dollar hurts

profits and sales for companies
that do a lot of business overseas,
and the technology companies on
the S&P 500 get almost 60 percent of their revenue outside the
U.S.
Oil prices rallied again and
reached their highest level since
mid-October. Benchmark U. S.
crude picked up $1.62, or 3.3 percent, to close at $51.06 a barrel in
New York. Brent crude, the standard for pricing international oils,
added $2.10, or 4.1 percent, to
$53. 94 a barrel in London.
Chevron gained $1.73, or 1.6 percent, to $113.29 and Phillips 66
rose $1.90, or 2.3 percent, to
$84.98.
The price of oil soared 9 percent
Wednesday after the members of
OPEC, which collectively produce
more than one-third of the world’s
oil, agreed to a small cut in production starting in January. The
price of oil has mostly traded
between $40 and $50 a barrel
since early April. It dipped as low
as $26 a barrel in February.
A big post-election rally has
faded in the last few days, but
Cavanaugh said she thinks major
indexes will move higher. She
noted that corporate earnings
grew in the third quarter for the
first time in more than a year, and
U. S. manufacturing has been
recovering.

Four changes shoppers will see as they buy on their phones
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Shoppers buying on their
phones this holiday season will see new
ways stores are making it easier and faster
as they try to lock in sales before people
swipe to the next site.
“It’s not just a shopper’s tool,” said
Tamara Gaffney, principal analyst and director at Adobe Digital Insights, the research
arm of Adobe Systems. “It’s now so embedded in our existence we don’t even think
about the fact that we pulled out our phone
and bought things.”
Mobile shopping accounted for $4.61
billion in sales from Thanksgiving through
Monday, according to Adobe Digital
Insights.

Four ways smartphones are changing the way people shop
MORE IMPULSE BUYING: Mobile shopping entices people
to buy right when they’re thinking about it, Gaffney said,“It’s
this sense of urgency.” She noted that retailers that had more
mobile traffic enjoyed a 30 percent increase in online
revenue.
Retailers need to make it easier to find items so shoppers
don’t quickly move on.
“They want it fast,” said Peter Cobb, co-founder and executive
vice president of eBags, which says mobile accounted for 43
percent of visits and 20 percent of sales for the five-day
period. The handbags and luggage site now highlights the
top five sales hits to save people from sorting through 90,000
products.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., which has worked to improve its app
including the browse feature, said 70 percent of
Walmart.com traffic and 60 percent of orders Thursday and
Friday were driven by mobile devices.
FOCUSED ON DEALS: Even in an improving economy,
shoppers are fixated on deals — and mobile phones make it
easier to grab them.
Customers look to have spent nearly 3.5 percent less on
average for the four-day weekend starting Thursday than a

year ago, according to a survey conducted over the weekend
by the National Retail Federation trade group. Much of the
drop had to do with the heavy discounting shoppers
demand. The NRF’s survey showed more than 36 percent of
shoppers said everything they bought this past weekend
was on sale, compared with 32.5 percent a year ago.
Retailers are shifting to a stream of discounts and alerts
during the entire week via email and social media. Toys R Us
is doing more flash sales, and eBags introduced a page called
“Steals and Deals” highlighting items that are heavily
discounted for a limited time.
Market Track, which monitored nearly 1,500 products online
from Thanksgiving through Cyber Monday, says stores
changed prices more often than last year, and more were
lowered than raised.
SEEKING SPEEDIER SERVICE: People buying on the go want
a swifter response when they need help.
“When you have shoppers who are engaged, you have to try
to capture as much revenue as you can,” said Kevon Hills,
senior vice president of operations at StellaService, which
tracks customer service for retailers and online companies.
Two years ago, 97 percent of retailers offered email as a way

HP Enterprise disputes
claims in Rhode Island lawsuit
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Hewlett Packard
Enterprise is defending itself against a lawsuit Rhode Island filed over an unfinished
computer system, saying the company has
spent nearly $34 million more than the state
has paid HP Enterprise to create the system
for the state’s Division of Motor Vehicles.
WPRI-TV reports that court documents
show the Palo Alto-based company says it’s
spent $46.9 million on the project since
2008, while the state has only paid it $13
million.
The state sued HP Enterprise last month
after the company threatened to walk off the
job unless it received more money. A judge
has ordered the work to continue for now.
Robert Hull, director of the state
Department of Revenue, said in a statement
this week that HP Enterprise needs to fulfill
an amended contract it signed last year to
complete the project by Sept. 28, at a price
tag of about $13.5 million after refunds. But
HP Enterprise interprets the contract differently, and the two sides have been in mediation.

Wells Fargo splits chairman,
CEO roles after sales scandal
NEW YORK — Wells Fargo is splitting the
jobs of chairman and CEO and making other
major changes to the composition of its

to interact with customers, but that fell to 81 percent
heading into this holiday season, StellaService said. Some 90
percent use live chat, up from 80 percent two years ago. And
in 61 percent of chat interactions over the holiday weekend,
someone responded within 20 seconds, up from 45 percent
a year ago.
VISITING STORES FOR DIFFERENT REASONS: Even people
who’d bought lots of items on their phones were spending
time in stores on Saturday and Sunday, said Marshal Cohen,
chief industry analyst at research firm NPD Group Inc.
“In the past, consumers did their research online and then
purchased in-store, but brick and mortar stores are now
critical to consumers’ research needs,” he wrote in a blog
post. He said “consumers came and bought, impulsively and
socially.”
Technology beyond shopping apps means people use stores
differently.
“They do research online, compare prices, look for deals and
even try on an outfit and Snapchat it to a friend, all while in
the store,” said Tom McGee, CEO of the mall group
International Council of Shopping Centers.
They’re also using the phone to buy right in the store.

Business briefs
board of directors in an effort to make the
bank more accountable following a scandal
over sales practices.
The bank said Thursday it was amending
its corporate bylaws to require that separate
people fill the job of chairman and the job of
CEO. The chairman and vice chairman will
have to be independent directors, the bank
said.
Wells’ previous chief executive, John
Stumpf, held both the CEO and chairman
jobs before he abruptly retired in October.
Stumpf was replaced by Tim Sloan, and
Stephen Sanger is Wells’ chairman.

SpaceX shooting for
mid-December launch
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX is
shooting for a mid-December launch, its
first since a dramatic rocket accident on the
pad.
Iridium Communications Inc. said
Thursday that 10 of its satellites will be
aboard the SpaceX Falcon rocket tentatively
scheduled to take off from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in California on Dec. 16. That
would end a 3 1/2-month launch hiatus by
SpaceX.
The Federal Aviation Administration must
first sign off on the accident investigation.
SpaceX says the investigation is nearly
complete.

PATIENCE PAYING OFF: AFTER A BUMPY START, RAIDERS GM REGGIE MCKENZIE HAS TEAM BACK ON TOP >> PAGE 12

<<< Page 14, Records, not All-Star Game,
to determine home-field advantage
Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Mills is no
match for
St. Francis
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

The Menlo-Atherton volleyball team, PAL Bay and Nor Cal Division I champ, was led by the likes of outside hitter Jacqueline DiSanto, left, and setter
Kirby Knapp, will play in its second straight CIF state championship match. The Bears enter Friday’s Division I final against Edison-Huntington Beach
having won 29 of their last 30 matches.

Bears, Knights vie for titles
M-A makes second-straight state final, Menlo in for first time since 2013
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Edison-Huntington Beach will be making its
first appearance in program history in the CIF
Division I state volleyball championship
when it meets Menlo-Atherton Friday night at
4 p.m. Despite the historic leap, Edison head
coach Matt Skolnik isn’t surprised to see his
team playing on California high school volleyball’s grandest stage.
“I wasn’t surprised, ” Skolnik said. “It’s

exciting to be here but we had a good team this
year.”
Menlo-Atherton isn’t surprised either. From
the outset of the season, the Bears set their
sights on returning to the state championship
match. Last year they reached the annual title
game at Santiago Canyon College in Orange,
being swept by Redondo Union, marking the
first time M-A has been swept in the playoff
match since 2011.
“There were a lot of juniors on that team,” MA setter Kirby Knapp said. “So we wanted to do

it again this year.”
M-A and Edison have similar experience at
the setter position.
No setter in the Central Coast Section has
been more productive than Knapp over the past
four years. The three-time all-Peninsula
Athletic League first-team setter cooled this
year, splitting time with senior Casey Olsen
for much of the regular season. Come the postseason though, the Bears have returned to their

See STATE, Page 15

The Mills girls’ basketball team
should, once again, be right in the
mix for a Peninsula Athletic League
South Division title.
But even playing their best game,
the Vikings were destined to be in for
a tough time against St. Francis in the
Kelly Shea Gallo Shootout Thursday
in Millbrae.
Mills was hardly at its best against
the Lancers and the result was predictable: a 77-33 drubbing at the
hands of St. Francis.
“We played like [garbage],” said
Mills coach Dave Matsu. “We played
a very good team. They have a lot of
talent. It was a great learning experience. You have to play hard all four
quarters.”
Mills (2-1) played decent for about
a quarter-and-half: most of the first
quarter and the third, during which
Mills was outscored 37-23. In the second and fourth periods, however, St.
Francis had its way with the Vikings,
outscoring the host 40-10.
“We’re so young,” said Matsu, who
added the Vikings have only three
seniors, to go along with four sophomore and two freshman.
“The seniors know what’s going
on, but everyone else, they’re trying
to figure this out,” Matsu said.
Things started OK for the Vikings.
They won the opening tip and senior
wing Aubrie Businger scored the first
bucket on a driving layup just seconds
into the game. Senior center Zelie
Zshronack followed with a basket and
a long jumper from the right corner to
give the Vikings a 6-2 lead two minutes in. When Businger, who led
Mills with 15 points, knocked down
a 3-pointer at the 4:42 mark, the
Vikings held a 9-7 advantage.
Little did the Vikings know that
Businger’s triple would be the only
made 3 of the game for them as they
finished 1 for 15 from behind the arc.
And the struggles weren’t just

See MILLS, Page 16

Monster Energy NASCAR’s new title sponsor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — NASCAR has announced
Monster Energy will take over as title sponsor of its top series in 2017, ending a
lengthy process of finding a replacement
for Sprint.
It was not immediately announced what

Corona,
California-based
Monster
Beverage Corporation will pay for the naming rights deal or how long the agreement
runs.
NASCAR Chairman Brian France made the
announcement Thursday at the Wynn Las
Vegas, site of Friday’s season-ending
awards banquet.

Cellular company Sprint ended its 13-year
run as title sponsor following the 2016 season, which ended last month with Jimmie
Johnson winning his record-tying seventh
series title.
NASCAR had hoped to have a new sponsor in place by early fall. The delay had produced uncertainty for a sport that has suf-

fered attendance and television ratings
declines in recent years.
The lack of a deal also led NASCAR to
announce details of its 2017 season-opening non-points race at Daytona without a
sponsor, something Sprint had handled in
the past. Monster Energy will sponsor

See NASCAR, Page 17

12

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rockets 132, Warriors 127

Raiders can thank GM
Houston ends Dubs’ McKenzie for rebuild

streak in double OT
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — James Harden
notched his fourth triple-double of
the season with 29 points, 15
rebounds and 13 assists, and the
Houston Rockets outlasted the
Warriors 132-127 in double overtime Thursday night to end Golden
State’s 12-game winning streak.
Harden put his team ahead on a 30footer with 3:12 left in the second
overtime and hit a pair of free throws
with 2:10 to go following a flagrant
foul on Draymond Green.
Eric Gordon followed Harden’s
free throws with a floating jumper
and scored 23 off the bench as
Houston snapped an eight-game
skid to the Warriors, who lost MVP
Stephen Curry with 3:25 left in the
last extra session when he was whistled for a charge. Ryan Anderson
also scored 29 with five 3-pointers
and the teams combined to shoot 88
3s, 44 apiece.
Kevin Durant matched his season
high with 39 points to go with 13
rebounds. Green had 20 points, 15
rebounds and nine assists. Curry
scored his team’s first six points in
the initial overtime and finished
with 28 points and five assists.
Durant also had three steals, three
blocks and a gorgeous give-and-go
to Green. Houston had an answer
each time and the Warriors couldn’t
hit the big shots the way they usually do. Klay Thompson was 4 for 20,
3 of 13 on 3s, on the way to 15
points.
Houston snapped Golden State’s
seven-game home winning streak in
an entertaining rematch of the first
round of the playoffs, won in five
games by the Warriors, who also
beat the Rockets in a five-game

2015 Western Conference finals on
the way to their first championship
in 40 years.
The Warriors hadn’t lost in Oracle
Arena since a 129-100 seasonopening rout by San Antonio on
Oct. 25 — and Golden State has
only lost two regular-season games
at home in each of the past two seasons.
Harden shot 8 for 23, 2 of 11 on
3s and 11 for 14 from the free throw
line.
“If you send him to the line 15-18
times you probably deserve to
lose,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr
said beforehand, actually imitating a
reach in with his hand as what not to
do.
Anderson shined in his first game
with the Rockets back in the Bay
Area where he starred collegiately
for California, hitting the go-ahead
free throws with 22.7 seconds left
after beating the shot clock buzzer
with a baseline 3-pointer and another late field goal
Durant blocked a shot by Harden
midway through the opening period
and the ball came out well past the
free throw line, leading to Andre
Iguodala’s driving, one-handed slam
moments later. Iguodala, the 2015
NBA Finals MVP, had another productive night off the bench with 10
points, five assists and four boards.

Tip-ins
Warri o rs : Since coming West in
1962-63, the Warriors are 10-14 in
double overtime. ... It was Golden
State’s first double-OT game since
Dec. 11 last year at Boston and first
at home since Nov. 10, 2012, vs.
Denver. ... Golden State had 31
assists for its NBA-leading 13th
game with 30 or more.

By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — Reggie McKenzie
took a methodical approach to
rebuilding the Oakland Raiders
when he was hired as general manager in 2012.
He spent most of his first two seasons dismantling the roster to get
the salary cap in order after years of
mismanagement by late owner Al
Davis before building the team back
up again starting with the 2014 draft
that netted franchise quarterback
Derek Carr, elite pass rusher Khalil
Mack and other key pieces.
The process has paid off handsomely. McKenzie’s Raiders are off
to a 9-2 start this season and stand
in first place in the AFC West and
tied for the top record in the conference with New England. Oakland is
assured of its first winning record
since 2002 and is closing in on
clinching a playoff berth for the
first time since that season, when
the team went to the Super Bowl.
“We feel good about where we
are,” McKenzie said Thursday. “We
think we built this thing to last.”
But the speed of the turnaround
from an 0-10 start in 2014 to possible Super Bowl contender two years
later is somewhat staggering and a
credit to the job McKenzie did building a roster and hiring Jack Del Rio
as coach in 2015.
All but three of the team’s starters
were added since 2014 with
McKenzie using successful high
draft picks like Carr, Mack and
Amari Cooper, key free agents like
Michael Crabtree, Donald Penn,
Rodney Hudson, Kelechi Osemele,
Bruce Irvin and Sean Smith, and
numerous finds late in the draft and
off the street like David Amerson,
Seth Roberts, Jalen Richard and
Perry Riley Jr., to build a team able

KIRBY LEE/USA TODAY SPORTS

Raiders fans were ready to run GM
Reggie McKenzie out of town
following a string of free-agent
busts and a wrong coaching choice,
but McKenzie is getting the last
laugh: the Raiders’ 9-2 record is tied
for best in the AFC.
to compete with just about anybody.
“We knew we had some pieces to
develop and if we could just add on
that, we felt like we’d win some
ballgames,” McKenzie said. “We
had those guys in 2014, they were
young, being 0-10 is no fun, but we
were 3-3 at the end of that stretch
and we were moving in the right
direction.”
It has all paid off this season as a
franchise that seemed to always find
a way to lose is pulling out close
games. Carr has led five fourth-quarter comebacks already this season
as the players and management are
confident each week that they will
find a way to win.
McKenzie said that started when
Del Rio decided to go for a 2-point
conversion and a win instead of
playing for overtime in a seasonopening 35-34 win at New Orleans.
“As many heart attacks as I’ve
had, absolutely,” McKenzie said. “It
goes without saying, the players,
you can feel it. They have an air
about them that they know they’re

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going to win and it’s good to be
around.”
The next step for McKenzie will
be figuring out a way to keep all his
young stars. He has structured most
of his free-agent contracts with a
pay-as-you-go philosophy meaning that the salary cap shouldn’t
hinder the team’s chances of retaining Carr, Mack and Cooper. Carr can
negotiate an extension this offseason and become a free agent in
2018, while Mack won’t hit free
agency until the following year and
Cooper in 2020.
“The premiere players will get
paid and we try to keep everything
intact as much as we can,”
McKenzie said. “But that’s what
happens when you’re talented players, play well and their contract
comes up a certain time to where
they can benefit from it, that’s what
free agency is all about.”
In other topics, McKenzie said
defensive lineman Mario Edwards
Jr. resumed workouts on the field
Thursday for the first time since
injuring his hip in the preseason
opener on Aug. 12.
Edwards was placed on injured
reserve with hopes that he would be
able to come back after about eight
weeks but the injury has taken
longer to heal than originally
thought. The next step will be to see
how Edwards responds to the workout before deciding whether to allow
him back to practice.
“It’s a day to day thing for him
now,” McKenzie said. “See how he
comes in in the morning after he did
some work today. He’s been working out. He’s had a good week.”
McKenzie also had no update on
the status of suspended pass rusher
Aldon Smith, who is waiting to be
reinstated by the league after serving a one-year suspension for violating the substance-abuse policy.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

DT Chris Jones earning more
playing time with the 49ers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, Fla. — San Francisco 49ers
defensive tackle Chris Jones provided a nice
boost to the defense last week and coach
Chip Kelly said the third-year player has
earned more playing time.
Jones helped the 49ers hold Miami
Dolphins running back Jay Ajayi to just 45
yards on 18 carries in Jones’ first start and
first game being active since being signed
on Nov. 8 to replace injured defensive lineman Arik Armstead.
San Francisco allowed 100-yard rushers
for seven consecutive games prior to
Sunday’s game, a 31-24 loss.
“I thought he did a really nice job,” Kelly
said. “He played 27 snaps, was positive on
24 of the 27. I think his background playing with the Patriots, being in Miami, he’s
obviously well-coached. So, to get a player
of that caliber when we lost Armstead, it was
kind of a surprise to us but we were really
pleasantly surprised with what he had done
and he’s earned playing time.”
Jones said the defense has continued to
get better over the last few games as they
have focused on stopping the run.
“We’re doing some things different and I
think it’s really helping out,” Jones said.
“As you can see the defense, we’re getting
better each week.”
The 49ers will face another tough running
back Sunday in the Chicago Bears’ Jordan
Howard. The rookie has rushed for 766 yards
this season and is averaging 5.1 yards a

carry. Jones said he’s
impressed with what he’s
seen from Howard and the
Bears offensive line so
far.
“For just being a rookie (Howard) definitely
runs the ball really hard,”
Jones said. “On their
offensive line they have
Chris Jones
a lot of really wellcoached guys, I know they have some guys
that are down, but they have a lot of really
well-coached guys up front and they know
the scheme well.”
Jones, who started the season with the
Dolphins, said he is excited to get another
opportunity to play and hopes an improved
run defense can lead the 49ers to some wins
during the final stretch of the season.
“I love playing the game,” Jones said. “It
was great to get out there Sunday for the first
time in a few weeks and I’m hoping that they
keep me going. But I’m going to do whatever I can to help the team prepare to win.”
Offensive lineman Joe Staley was
impressed with Jones’ effort in practice leading up to his first start. He said that it should
be a message to others on the team to continue to work hard and close the season
strong.
“You can see that he wants it,” Staley said.
“It wasn’t a surprise that he went out there
and played well. The way he practiced and
prepared, he was ready for his opportunity
when it came.”

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

13

Washington hopes to ride
Pac-12 title to playoff berth
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — Washington coach Chris
Petersen is happy to let others do the politicking and lobbying when it comes to the College
Football Playoff.
He believes what the fourth-ranked Huskies
do on the field will speak loud enough.
Washington has its final chance to state its case
Friday night in the Pac-12 championship game
against No. 9 Colorado.
“I have confidence that the powers that be
will get these things right,” Petersen said. “I
felt that way when I was at Boise and they usually did. We’ll see how this plays out.”
Things are looking good for the Huskies (111, No. 4 CFP) after they moved up a spot in the
playoff rankings this week. One more win and
they will likely make the semifinals in
Petersen’s third season at the helm.
Washington had not reached double figures in
wins for a season in the 13 years before
Petersen’s arrival.
But Petersen has built Washington into a
power just like he did at Boise State when he led
the Broncos to seven straight double-digit win
seasons and two BCS bowl games.
“I expected to be good from the second we got
here,” he said. “I think that’s what players
expect, I think that’s what coaches expect, and
when it’s not like that, you’re frustrated as all
get-out and trying to figure out why it’s not
right. With that being said, we all know it takes
some time to develop a program and how you’re
going to do things.”
Mike MacIntyre had a much tougher turnaround task with the Buffaloes (10-2, No. 8
CFP). Colorado was 25-61 in seven seasons
before MacIntyre arrived from San Jose State.
But he methodically rebuilt the program to
where it is now a surprise participant in the Pac12 title game with an outside chance of making
it to the playoff with a win over the Huskies and
some help elsewhere.

“I just think a lot of people on the outside didn’t expect us to be here,” quarterback Sefo
Liufau said. “They want UW for playoff implications or anything like that. Basically the most
important thing is what we want in the locker
room and we want to win.”
Here are some other things to watch:

Big-time QBs
Both teams rely heavily on their quarterbacks. Washington’s Jake Browning was
selected as the top offensive player in the conference after throwing for a school-record 40
TDs and only seven INTs. Browning ranks
fourth in the FBS in passing efficiency (181.6).
Colorado’s Liufau wasn’t quite as efficient but
was almost as effective despite missing time
with an ankle injury. He threw for 2,150 yards
and 11 TDs and ran for 481 yards and seven
scores.

Dominant defense
The game features the top two defenses in the
conference with both the Huskies and Buffaloes
allowing just 4.7 yards per play. They are both
led by their secondaries with Washington’s
Budda Baker and Sidney Jones making firstteam all-conference and Colorado’s Chidobe
Awuzie and Tedric Thompson earning secondteam selections.

Take it away
Both teams have thrived on turnovers this
season. Washington led the nation with 30
takeaways and a plus-18 turnover margin.
Colorado was second in the Pac-12 at plus-10 in
turnovers.

On the grass
The Huskies will play their first game of the
year on natural grass. The playing surface at
Levi’s Stadium has had issues with footing over
the years but has been better this season. With
the 49ers having been on the road last week, the
field should be in good shape.

14

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

All-Star Game no longer counts
World Series home-field advantage will no longer hang on result of exhibition game
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The league that wins baseball’s All-Star Game no longer will get
home-field advantage in the World Series,
which instead will go to the pennant winner
with the better regular-season record.
The change was included in Major League
Baseball’s tentative new collective bargaining agreement and disclosed early Thursday
to the Associated Press by a person familiar
with the agreement. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity because details of
the deal, reached Wednesday evening in
Irving, Texas, had not been announced.

In addition, players and management
agreed the minimum stay on the disabled list
will be reduced from 15 days to 10.
Home-field advantage in the World Series
generally rotated between the leagues
through 2002. Baseball, led by thenCommissioner Bud Selig, and Fox television promoted the “This Time It Counts”
innovation after the 2002 All-Star Game in
Milwaukee ended in a 7-7, 11-inning tie
when both teams ran out of pitchers. Selig
was booed in his own Milwaukee backyard.
“This energizes it. This gives them something to really play for,” Selig said after
owners approved the change by a 30-0 vote
in January 2003. “People pay a lot of money

to see that game. They deserve to see the
same intensity they see all year long.
Television people pay a lot of money for the
game. It was not and should not be a meaningless exhibition game.”
What began as a two-year experiment was
extended. The American League won 11 of 14
All-Star Games played under the rule, and the
AL representative won eight World Series in
those years.
“It will put back a little of the sizzle,” San
Francisco Giants executive Larry Baer said
in 2003.
Under the new rule, a wild-card team could
have home-field advantage against a division winner.

As part of the changes for next year, players in the All-Star Game will have the incentive to play for a pool of money.
The DL change will allow teams to make
quicker decisions on whether to bring up a
roster replacement rather than wait to see
whether the injured player would be ready to
return to action in less than two weeks.
An international play plan is part of the
new agreement that includes a payment
schedule for potential games in Asia,
Mexico (and elsewhere in Latin America) and
Britain, plus U.S.-based special events such
as this year’s July 3 game between Atlanta
and Miami in a specially built ballpark on a
military base in Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Tiger Woods returns with mixed bag and a 73
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASSAU, Bahamas — Not only did Tiger
Woods return to golf Thursday, he returned to
being Tiger.
Just not for long.
Hardly looking like a player who had not
competed in 466 days, Woods ran off three
straight birdies with a variety of shots and was
tied for the lead in the Hero World Challenge as
he approached the turn.
Three shots in the bushes, one shot in the
water and a few fits of anger sent him toward the
bottom of the pack. A pair of double bogeys
over the final three holes ruined an otherwise
impressive return, and Woods shot 40 on the
back nine at Albany Golf Club and had to settle
for a 1-over 73.
He was in 17th place in the 18-man field.

Only Justin Rose had a
higher score.
Even so, Woods has reason to be encouraged. After
taking off 15 months to
recover from two back surgeries, he felt no pain or
limitations. His misses
were not big, just costly.
Tiger Woods And he was playing again.
“It could have been
something really good,” Woods said. “I got off
to a nice, solid start and made a few mistakes
there. I didn’t play the par 5s very well in the
middle part of the round and consequently, got it
going the wrong way. ... But all in all, I feel
pretty good. I’m looking forward to another
three more days.”
He was nine shots behind J.B. Holmes, who
opened with an 8-under 64 and had a one-shot

lead over Hideki Matsuyama, with U.S. Open
champion Dustin Johnson at 66.
Curiosity was greater than expectations for
Woods, who was coming off the longest hiatus
of his golfing life. Plagued by back problems
since 2013 when he was No. 1 in the world, he
finally shut it down after tying for 10th in the
Wyndham Championship on Aug. 23, 2015,
and then going through two back surgeries.
With high anticipation, he tugged his opening tee shot into the rough on the left edge of a
bunker and gouged that out to 15 feet for par.
Just like that, it all started to feel as though he
had never been away.
He also knew that with only a stiff tropical
wind behind him on three of the par 5s, scores
would be low.
For a short time, Woods seemed up to the
task. He hit a 5-iron from 231 yards just over
the green and passed his first test, a 30-yard

pitch-and-run and that checked slightly and
rolled out to a few feet from the hole for a birdie
. He faced a more difficult pitch up the slope on
the next hole and hit a chunk-and-run to 3 feet.
His confidence kept building — the flop shot
from 40 yards to 5 feet for birdie on the par-5
sixth, the wedge to 5 feet for birdie on the seventh, and a 6-iron he struck so well on the par-3
eighth that he was asking for perfection. “One
yard! One yard!” he said as the ball was in the air,
and then settled 2 feet away.
At that point he was tied with Holmes.
But he flubbed a pitch on the par-5 ninth and
made bogey. Two holes later, he flared an iron
from the sandy waste area into a bush and had to
take a penalty shot, making another bogey on a
par 5. Woods was still hanging around in the
middle of the pack when he hit 7-iron to 12 feet
on the par-5 15th and two-putted for birdie.
And then it all fell apart.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NFL briefs

Gronkowski is a three-time AllPro.

Patriots’ Rob Gronkowski to
undergo back surgery Friday

Cowboys hold on against
Vikings for 11th straight win

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Rob
Gronkowski’s season is likely over.
The New England Patriots tight
end was scheduled to have surgery
Friday for a herniated disk in his
lower back, the team said in a statement Thursday
night.
The team said
it doesn’t expect
Gronkowski to
be able to return
this season, but
will await the
results of the
surgery before
making a final
Rob
Gronkowski determination.
The Super Bowl
is Feb. 5, should the Patriots get
that far.
Gronkowski sat out practice
Wednesday with what listed as a
back injury. He was absent from
practice again Thursday.
The Patriots said Gronkowski sustained a hit to the chest Nov. 13
against Seattle that resulted in a pulmonary contusion to his lung. He
received medical clearance to return
last week against the New York Jets
and experienced significant back
and leg pain.
Gronkowski has missed three
games this season. He has 25 catches for 540 yards and three touchdowns. He also dealt with a hamstring injury in 2016.
The 2014 Comeback Player of the
Year, Gronkowski’s career has been
plagued by injuries. A second-round
draft pick in 2010, he has had ankle
and knee surgery once, and three
operations on his forearm.
He has missed 20 games in his
career and played many others while
not 100 percent.

MINNEAPOLIS — Dez Bryant
caught four passes for 84 yards and
the go-ahead touchdown in the
fourth quarter, helping the Dallas
Cowboys win their 11th straight
game with a 17-15 victory over the
Minnesota Vikings on Thursday
night.
Bryant’s 56-yard catch in the first
half set up Ezekiel Elliott’s 1-yard
plunge. The receiver caught an 8yard scoring pass in the fourth quarter after a fumbled punt by
Minnesota’s Adam Thielen.
Elliott rushed for 86 yards on 20
carries for the Cowboys (11-1).
They have the longest single-season winning streak in franchise history.
Sam Bradford threw a 3-yard
touchdown
pass
to
Jerick
McKinnon with 25 seconds to play,
but the 2-point conversion pass
failed. Bradford argued for a penalty
after he was hit in the face by a
defender, but there was no call for
the Vikings (6-6). Minnesota
played without coach Mike Zimmer
after he had emergency eye surgery
Wednesday night.
Dak Prescott was 12 for 18 for
139 yards passing for Dallas.
Bradford completed 32 of 45 passes for 247 yards, Danielle Hunter
had two sacks and Kai Forbath
kicked three field goals for
Minnesota, which has last six of the
last seven games after a 5-0 start.
Vikings special teams coordinator
Mike Priefer was elevated to head
coach for the game and it remains
unclear how long Zimmer will be
out. Minnesota’s third-ranked
defense did their fiery leader proud,
holding the explosive Cowboys
offense to season lows in points,
yards (264) and first downs (13).

STATE
Continued from page 11
standard 5-1 offense with Knapp running
the attack. In Saturday’s four-set victory
over Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills in the CIF
Nor Cal Division I finals, Knapp chalked up
41 assists.
Edison’s third-year setter Lindsey Sparks
is also a veteran presence. While Edison’s
Sunset League has yet to announce its allleague honorees for this season, Sparks — a
third-year starter as a junior — was one of
three Edison players to earn first-team allleague honors last year, along with senior
outside hitters Cassidy Dennison and
Hannah Phair.
Edison enters the state title game on quite
a tear having won 14 of its last 15 matches.
That loss came when the Chargers fell in the
Southern Section Division I quarterfinals to
Mira Costa-Manhattan Beach. Having
shared the Sunset League title with
Huntington Beach, each with 9-1 league
records, Edison downed the league rival in
the So Cal Division I finals in the third
meeting of the year between the teams.
“We’ve been playing some really good
volleyball so far,” Skolnik said. “We’ve had
a good run.”
M-A has been on an even more prolific
tear, winning 29 of its last 30 matches.
Getting bumped up to the CIF Nor Cal Open
Division playoffs — by virtue of running
the table through PAL Bay Division play
with an undefeated 14-0 record for a thirdstraight league title — the Bears only loss
since Sept. 8 came in its Nor Cal opener
against Notre Dame-Belmont, a team it had
defeated in tournament play two weeks
prior.
The Bears run such a balanced attack, both
outside hitter Jacqueline DiSanto and opposite hitter Eliza Grover were recognized as
co-PAL Most Valuable Players this year.
That balance has been on display throughout the postseason. In the Nor Cal Division
I finals against Oak Ridge, DiSanto totaled

NFL GLANCE
PF
293
249
281
196

PA
197
240
236
266

South
Houston
Tennessee
Indianapolis
Jacksonville

6
6
5
2

5
6
6
9

0
0
0
0

.545
.500
.455
.182

194
308
270
214

236
296
301
293

North
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland

6
6
3
0

5 0
5 0
7 1
12 0

.545
.545
.318
.000

218
266
213
197

201
222
245
352

West
Raiders
Kansas City
Denver
San Diego

9
8
7
5

2
3
4
6

.818
.727
.636
.455

307
252
266
313

275
214
219
291

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
Dallas
11 1 0 .917
N.Y. Giants
8 3 0 .727
Washington
6 4 1 .591
Philadelphia 5 6 0 .455

333
231
280
254

228
213
264
213

South
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Carolina

7
6
5
4

4
5
6
7

0
0
0
0

.636
.545
.455
.364

358
249
334
276

302
264
307
281

North
Detroit
Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago

7
6
5
2

4
6
6
9

0
0
0
0

.636
.500
.455
.182

247
233
274
178

238
209
289
264

West
Seattle
Arizona
Los Angeles
49ers

7
4
4
1

3 1
6 1
7 0
10 0

.682
.409
.364
.091

224
245
170
228

187
228
236
344

Thursday Game
Dallas 17, Minnesota 15
Sunday’s Games
Kansas City at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Los Angeles at New England, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Miami at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Denver at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Houston at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Carolina at Seattle, 5:30 p.m.
Monday’s Game
Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m.

NBA GLANCE

NHL GLANCE

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct
New England 9 2 0 .818
Miami
7 4 0 .636
Buffalo
6 5 0 .545
N.Y. Jets
3 8 0 .273

0
0
0
0

15

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Montreal
23 16
Ottawa
24 14
Boston
24 13
Tampa Bay
25 13
Florida
24 12
Detroit
24 11
Toronto
23 10
Buffalo
23 9

L
5
8
10
11
10
10
9
9

OT
2
2
1
1
2
3
4
5

Pts
34
30
27
27
26
25
24
23

GF
68
57
57
75
60
58
70
48

GA
50
59
54
70
61
61
74
60

Metropolitan Division
N.Y. Rangers 25 16
Pittsburgh
24 14
Columbus
22 13
Washington 22 13
Philadelphia 25 12
New Jersey
23 10
Carolina
23 9
N.Y. Islanders 23 9

8
7
5
7
10
7
9
10

1
3
4
2
3
6
5
4

33
31
30
28
27
26
23
22

91
75
70
57
80
58
55
59

63
72
50
51
82
62
61
67

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Chicago
25 16 6
St. Louis
24 14 7
Nashville
22 11 8
Minnesota
22 11 8
Dallas
25 9 10
Winnipeg
26 11 13
Colorado
22 9 12

3
3
3
3
6
2
1

35
31
25
25
24
24
19

72
67
65
62
63
69
49

63
67
57
47
85
78
66

Pacific Division
Sharks
24
Anaheim
24
Edmonton
25
Los Angeles 24
Calgary
26
Vancouver
24
Arizona
22

1
4
2
1
2
2
3

29
28
28
27
24
22
19

58
62
76
62
60
55
54

50
56
66
61
77
73
69

14
12
13
13
11
10
8

9
8
10
10
13
12
11

Thursday’s Games
Boston 2, Carolina 1, SO
Buffalo 4, N.Y. Rangers 3
Pittsburgh 6, Dallas 2
N.Y. Islanders 3, Washington 0
Florida 2, Detroit 1, OT
Philadelphia 3, Ottawa 2, OT
St. Louis 5, Tampa Bay 4
Edmonton 6, Winnipeg 3
Chicago 4, New Jersey 3, OT
Columbus 3, Colorado 2
Los Angeles 4, Arizona 3
Anaheim 3, Vancouver 1
Friday’s Games
Minnesota at Calgary, 6 p.m.
Montreal at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Chicago at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Boston at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 10 a.m.
New Jersey at Nashville, 11 a.m.
Washington at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Arizona, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 7 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Toronto
12
6
Boston
10
8
New York
9
9
Brooklyn
5
13
Philadelphia
4
14
Southeast Division
Charlotte
11
8
Atlanta
10
9
Miami
7
12
Orlando
7
12
Washington
6
11
Central Division
Cleveland
13
4
Chicago
10
7
Milwaukee
9
8
Detroit
10
10
Indiana
9
10
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
14
4
Memphis
12
7
Houston
12
7
New Orleans
7
12
Dallas
3
13
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
12
8
Utah
11
9
Portland
10
10
Denver
7
11
Minnesota
5
13
Pacific Division
Warriors
16
3
L.A. Clippers
15
5
L.A. Lakers
9
10
Sacramento
7
11
Phoenix
5
13

Pct
.667
.556
.500
.278
.222

GB

2
3
7
8

.579
.526
.368
.368
.353


1
4
4
4

.765
.588
.529
.500
.474


3
4
4 1/2
5

.778
.632
.632
.368
.188


2 1/2
2 1/2
7 1/2
10

.600
.550
.500
.389
.278


1
2
4
6

.842
.750
.474
.389
.278


1 1/2
7 1/2
9
11

Thursday’s Games
Charlotte 97, Dallas 87
Milwaukee 111, Brooklyn 93
L.A. Clippers 113, Cleveland 94
Memphis 95, Orlando 94
Miami 111, Utah 110
Houston 132, Golden State 127, 2 OT
Friday’s Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Washington at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Brooklyn at Milwaukee, 2 p.m.
Minnesota at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 6 p.m.
Miami at Portland, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Orlando at Detroit, 3 p.m.

a team-high 15 kills with Grover right
behind at 14.
DiSanto is anything but a typical outside
hitter. At 5-6, the senior is committed to
play Division I volleyball at University of
Michigan next season as a back-row specialist. She is a multi-faceted attacker, though,
who among PAL hitters struck the ball as
hard as anyone on back-row attacks this season.
Grover is in her first year playing right
side after dominating as a middle blocker in
previous seasons. The senior owns a powerful downhill-style swing and uses various
attacking angles to terminate. While she has
developed a wicked slide step, she’s at her
most dangerous in putting the ball straight
down.
“She’s definitely so reliable,” Knapp said
of Grover. “I’m so happy to have her on the
team.”

Menlo makes return to
state finals for first time since 2013
With the addition of the CIF Open
Division this season, the extra bracket has
caused the state championship format to be
extended to two days of matches. While M-A
plays for the Division I title Friday, Menlo
School returns to the Division IV championship stage for the first time since 2013 at
11 a.m. Saturday
The Knights — who fell in the 2013 state
title match to Francis Parker-San Diego —
will take the court against a similar opponent Saturday at Santiago Canyon College,
clashing with Point Loma-San Diego. Both
teams settled for second place in their respective private-school leagues. And both have
unconventional roster makeups for teams
competing for a state title.
Menlo is unconventional in the sense it
doesn’t own a true outside hitter. With the
graduation of left-side hitter Maddie Stewart
in 2015, and the transition of current sophomore Sianna Houghton from solid attacker to
shining in a more defense-oriented role, the
Knights have run their attack more through
the middle and right side.
Menlo junior opposite hitter Ashley

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

Menlo senior middle blocker Mia Vandermeer, left, is a force on both sides of the net. Not
only does she lead the team in blocks, she is second on the team in kills.
Dreyer leads the team with 228 kills. Senior
middle Mia Vandermeer ranks second with
188. But a trio of sophomore left-side attackers have teamed to solidify Menlo across the
net with Grace King (186 kills), Selina Xu
(186 kills) and Houghton (177 kills) each
contributing.
Point Loma is unconventional in the sense

it has zero seniors on roster. Junior outside
hitter Charlie Eckstrom leads the Pointers
with 426 kills, junior Sophia Altobelli is the
serving leader with 70 aces, junior Rebecca
Nuanez leads with 99 total blocks and 416
digs, and junior setter Reese Turner leads the
6-2 offense with 569 assists, while freshman
setter Maggie Wolf has totaled 466 assists.

SPORTS

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

MILLS
Continued from page 11
behind the 3-point line. Overall, Mills shot
just 28 percent from the field ( 13 for 45).
St. Francis, after a bit of slow start, heated
up over the final four minutes of the opening
quarter. A Lydia Foust 3 gave the Lancers an
11-9 lead with 4:10 to play in the quarter — an
advantage they would not give up. Foust’s 3pointer was the first of three in row for St.
Francis, which got back-to-back treys from
Paige Uyehara.
St. Francis closed the first quarter on a 15-2
run to lead 22-11 at the end. The Lancers then
opened the second with 14 straight points to
take a commanding 36-11 lead with 3:41 to
play in the half.
Mills went nearly 10 minutes without a field
goal during than span and trailed 43-16 at
half.
In the second half, Matsu wanted his team to
work on its execution and it paid off. St.
Francis opened the third on a 6-0 run to
increase its lead to 49-16, but Mills finally
responded a 6-0 run of its own. Zshronack hit
a pair of free throws, Businger knocked down
a long jumper from the left corner and

Zshronack added a fast-break layup. When
Businger completed a coast-to-coast layup
with 3:31 left in the third, the Vikings were
actually outscoring the Lancers, 10-9.
But St. Francis closed the period by outscoring Mills 6-3.
In the fourth, things kind of fell apart for
Mills, as the Vikings struggled to even get
into their offensive sets. The Vikings turned
the ball over their first three possessions of
the quarter and finished with five over the final
eight minutes.
St. Francis also appeared to turn up the heat
defensively, coming up with eight steals in
the fourth as the Lancers outscored Mills 19-5
in the final period.
St. Francis had five players score in double
figures, with both Mia Grizelj and Adriana
Frazier each scoring 17 points apiece to lead
the Lancers.
While Matsu knows his players — and
maybe even some parents —  may not truly
realize the worth of playing a team like St.
Francis, he does.
“It’s going to help us. It does no good to
play cupcakes,” Matsu said. “It’s our first
loss. We’re 2-1. It’s not like we’re 0-3. …
Better (to get blown out) in Game 3 than Game
23. We’re playing (tough teams) to get ready
for CCS.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local sports roundup
Boys’ soccer
Pioneer 3, Sacred Heart Prep 2
The Mustangs handed the Gators their
first loss of the season with a pair of firsthalf goals.
SHP (1-1) trailed 2-1 at halftime after
Alexi Stavropolous found the back of the
net off a feed from Stefan Schlotter.
Pioneer added its third goal in second half
and the Gators got within a goal off a strike
from Juan Rascon. Kirian Mischke Reeds
recorded the assist.

Girls’ basketball
Menlo School 61, Petaluma 23

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Mills’ Aubrie Businger shoots a 3 during the
Vikings’ blowout loss to St. Francis.

The Knights opened their 2016-17 campaign with a rout of Petaluma Thursday
evening.
Menlo built a 14-4 lead after one period
and limited Petaluma to just eight first-half
points, to lead 37-8 at halftime. Petaluma
managed only 15 points in the second half.
Sam Erisman led Menlo with a game-high
17 points. Mohini Gupta added 12, while
Maeia Makoni had nine. De’Jeane Stine and
Mallory North each finished with eight
points for the Knights.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sports brief
LeBron James chosen
Sports Illustrated
Sportsperson of Year
INDEPENDENCE,
Ohio

LeBron James delivered on a promise and ended decades of Cleveland
sports misery in 2016.
For leading the Cavaliers to an
NBA title and ending the city’s 52year title drought, James was chosen
Sports
Illustrated’s
Sportsperson of the Year on
Thursday, joining Tiger Woods as
the award’s only two-time winners
since its inception in 1954.
“I’m honored,” James said following shootaround before the
Cavs hosted the Los Angeles
Clippers. “I’m more happy for my

family, my kids,
for my wife, my
mom, and for
my foundation,
for the kids that
I represent and
the kids that use
me as a role
model and an
LeBron James inspiration.”
Appearing in
his sixth straight NBA Finals in
June, James rallied the Cavs from a
3-1 deficit to defeat the favored
Golden State Warriors, who won 73
games during the regular season but
couldn’t put Cleveland away. James
scored 41 points in Games 5 and 6
and made a key block in the final
minutes of an epic Game 7, making
the Cavs the first Cleveland major
sports franchise to win a title since
the Browns in 1964.

NASCAR
Continued from page 11
NASCAR’s All-Star race.
Monster’s caffeine-filled energy
drinks, known for its green
clawed-M logo, are targeted to
young consumers and NASCAR
has stressed the importance of
finding younger fans.
Monster Energy was been
involved in NASCAR, serving as
primary sponsor of Kurt Busch’s
No. 41 Cup car at Stewart-Haas
Racing. It has also sponsored
Kyle Busch in the Xfinity Series.
Kurt Busch said his individual
sponsorship deal and long-term
personal services contract with
Monster will continue.

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Friday • Dec. 2, 2016
Monster created publicity this
week with its logo splashed on
Tiger Woods’ golf bag as he makes
his return from injury in a tournament in the Bahamas. It has also
been a motocross sponsor.
Monster Beverage announced
last month that third quarter net
sales increased 4. 1 percent to
$788 million from the same period a year ago. It announced a
strategic partnership in 2015 that
gave the Coca-Cola Company a
16.7 percent stake in Monster.
The two companies share distribution networks.
Monster takes over for Sprint,
which inherited the NASCAR deal
when it merged with Nextel in
2008. Sprint announced in
December 2014 that it would not
extend the deal.
Nextel has replaced cigarette

17

maker R. J. Reynolds Tobacco
Co. , which had sponsored
NASCAR’s top circuit since 1971
under its Winston brand. That deal
ended in 2003 in part because of
the tobacco settlement with the
federal government that reduced
the industry’s ability to advertise.
Thursday’s announcement gives
NASCAR and Monster a little
more than two months to prepare
for the start of 2017 season,
which begins with the Daytona
500 on Feb. 26. Previous title
sponsors have spent tens of millions of dollars promoting the
sport.
NASCAR’s deal with Xfinity to
sponsor its second-tier series runs
through 2024. Camping World is
on board to sponsor the third-tier
trucks series through 2022.

18

LOCAL/WORLD

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

French president rules out 2017 run to help boost Socialists
By Thomas Adamson and Sylvie Corbet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — France’s President Francois
Hollande announced in a surprise televised
address Thursday that he would not seek a
second term in next year’s presidential election, acknowledging that his personal
unpopularity might cost his Socialist party
the Elysee.
“I have decided not to be a candidate in the
presidential election,” Hollande said in the
prime time slot, adding that he hoped by
stepping aside to give the Socialists a
chance to win “against conservatism and,
worse still, extremism.”
The 62-year-old president — the country’s least popular leader since World War II
— said he was “conscious of the risks” his

MARINA
Continued from page 1
the district-run marina on city land.
But with no experience in managing the
site offering a 455-boat slip marina, yacht
club, boutique hotel, 33-acre park and terminal for a commuter ferry, Vice Mayor
Pradeep Gupta said councilmembers favored
keeping the deal in place.
“We are not in the business of running
marinas. The city has no appetite to take
over the operations of the marina,” said
Gupta. “So we want to evaluate extending
the date of the JPA termination.”
A San Mateo County Civil Grand Jury
report previously called for dissolution of
the district, citing dysfunction among officials leading to frequent personnel turnover
as well as a historic inability to hit performance benchmarks. Harbor District officials have taken issue with the report and
said there has been significant progress in
recent years.
But Gupta said South San Francisco offi-

Francois
Hollande

lack of support posed to a
successful candidacy.
“What’s at stake is not
a person, it’s the country’s future,” he said.
The
announcement
Thursday came just a few
days after Hollande’s No.
2,
Prime
Minister
Manuel Valls, said he was
“ready” to compete in
next month’s Socialist

primary.
In a written statement on Thursday night,
Valls praised Hollande’s “tough, mature,
serious choice.”
“That’s the choice of a statesman,” he
said, without confirming if he plans to seek
the presidency himself.
cials did not agree with the grand jury’s
position that the district should be disbanded and instead favored more partnership
going forward.
“This flies in the face of the grand jury
report. We are not really agreeing with that.
But we want to talk to the Harbor District
about what they would like to do,” he said.
The joint powers agreement could only be
terminated with mutual consensus. Should
the life of the agreement expire naturally,
operations of the marina would fall back on
the shoulders of the city. Gupta said
improvements could be made to the existing
agreement, but he would support the district
staying on board to run the marina.
No binding decision was made during the
most recent council meeting, but a subcommittee of councilmembers are slated to soon
convene with Harbor District representatives and further discuss future plans, said
Gupta.
Harbor District General Manager Steve
McGrath said he appreciated some of the
sentiments expressed by the council during
the discussion, but noted he believed it was
too early to tell what the discussion could

In his address Hollande avoided saying if
he would support Valls — or any other candidate.
Hollande’s popularity plunged soon after
he took power in 2012, and polls show
most voters don’t want to see him stay in
office.
Voters expressed disappointment over
the lagging economy, higher taxes and the
pro-business shift Hollande adopted
midterm after first claiming as a candidate
his “real adversary” would be the “world of
finance.”
His image also suffered from personal
scandals. He broke up with ex-partner
Valerie Trierweiler amid reports that he was
having an affair with French actress Julie
Gayet, an episode later exposed in a stinging book by the former first lady.

Not only did Trierweiler reveal intimate
details of Hollande’s infidelities, but she
also depicted the Socialist leader as someone who dislikes the poor — a grave political sin for a left-wing leader.
The Socialist party has also been deeply
divided over Hollande’s leadership from
within, with rebels within the party openly
criticizing his pro-business strategy and
calling for more left-leaning policies.
Two of his ex-colleagues, former
Economy Minister Arnaud Montebourg and
former Education Minister Benoit Hamon,
have already announced they will run next
month.
Hollande faced the Dec. 15 party deadline
for entering the primary contest — and was
expected to say in the coming weeks
whether he would run again.

portend for the future of the agreement.
“I think it was a good, constructive session,” he said. “I think there is a long way
to go before we figure out really what the
next actions are.”
Harbor District officials are slated to further discuss marina operations and the
agreement with South San Francisco during
an upcoming meeting, said McGrath.
The future of Oyster Point and the adjacent
marina came into focus following the
Greenland Group acquiring earlier this year
development entitlements to build a massive campus housing office along with
research and development space for life sciences companies.
Oyster Point Development, LLC has
pledged a willingness to pour $1.5 billion
into rejuvenating more than 80 acres or
property along the Bayshore east of
Highway 101, only a few miles north of San
Francisco International Airport.
As the private developer considers such a
sizable undertaking, South San Francisco
officials are also beginning to look for
opportunities to build on nearby city land,
said Gupta, who noted infrastructure work

must be completed to prepare the area.
With the developer’s interest in breaking
ground on the first phase of construction
soon, Gupta said he believed city officials
should begin preparing their own plans
quickly.
“We have to pull up our socks and get
going on whatever we want to do,” he said.
The city set aside $30 million in money
generated by the former redevelopment
agency dedicated to be paid in collaboration
with the builder toward infrastructure
improvements.
Gupta said the city is also interested in
building a hotel nearby housing between
150 and 160 rooms as well as potentially a
conference center to host community
events.
With the variety of projects coming down
the pipeline soon, Gupta said officials felt
it was imperative to touch base with their
partners operating the marina to assure all
parties are on the same page.
“We have to talk to them and work with
them hand in hand so our progress and programs are not conflicting with their plans,”
he said.

Jessica Chastain enlivens new
political thriller ‘Miss Sloane’
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

There’s never a hair out of place in “Miss
Sloane,” a painstakingly slick political
thriller from director John Madden about a
brilliant lone wolf lobbyist consumed with
the win. It’s a wannabe Aaron Sorkinmeets-Shonda Rhimes glimpse into the
hollow and cynical world of inside the beltway dealings from first-time screenwriter
Jonathan Perera that’s never quite snappy,
insightful or salacious enough to be as fun
or damning as it should be.
All the pieces are there, especially in the

film’s subject — the steely Elizabeth
Sloane (Jessica Chastain), a pill-popping
master manipulator who is always at the
ready with a perfect quip, biblical verse or
history lesson for the moment. She’s the
kind of do-it-all wonder woman who is just
as comfortable working a room of scuzzy
Washington insiders or pleading the fifth at
an intimidating congressional hearing as
she is directing a team of spooks to illegally surveil someone with a camera-equipped
cockroach.
Elizabeth Slone’s mantra is that lobbying
is all about foresight and making sure you
play your trump card after the other guys

play theirs. Our first glimpse of her in
action shows her willfully neglecting
Senate ethics rules by arranging some luxury travel for a congressman and his family
to try to sway him on a palm oil tax initiative. She’s a mercenary who is out for the
win at all costs, and she’s the best at it.
But she also has principles, and leaves
her top firm for the opposition when a powerful gun group asks her to devise messaging to turn women against universal background checks for gun ownership. Her cavalier dismissal of a massive new client for
her firm enrages her boss, a scenery chewing Sam Waterston, and makes the audience

a little more intrigued about why this
woman does what she does.
Now fighting for the underdogs, an
increasingly obsessed, Elizabeth uses
everything at her disposal to try to ensure
that the background check bill passes, testing the loyalty and limits of those around
her (including the firm’s head played by
Mark Strong, and an ambitious protégé in
Gugu Mbatha-Raw) with her sliding morality and deep distrust of others.
Relationships are nothing but arsenal (and
thus disposable) and she’s the only one who

See SLOANE, Page 22

20

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Latest rage in avocado
toast trend adds sweet
potato slices to the mix
By Melissa d’Arabian
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sweet potato slices are the latest rage in
the avocado toast trend. If you are at all
involved with Pinterest, you know this
already. Pop slices of unpeeled sweet potato
in a regular old toaster and then top it with
healthy goodies — like the very popular
avocado — for a breakfast or snack filled
with slower carbs and healthy fats.
I’ll admit, I was skeptical. But I decided to
take one for the team, and get to the bottom
of this sweet potato toast craze for the benefit of us all. I love the idea of getting some
extra vitamins (mostly A and B6) and minerals (mostly potassium and magnesium)
with my morning meal, so why not?
Here is what I found: I discovered that the
sweet potato really will cook in the toaster,
if you let it go through enough cycles.
However, a few of my slices got dried out
with all that toasting, and sides turned an
unpleasant shade of dull brown in some
cases.
I tried thinner slices, but they just
turned hard or fell apart. My solution?
Slice potato into 1/4-inch toasts and give
them a quick turn (30-60 seconds) in the
microwave wrapped in a damp towel. This
process barely started cooking the slices
while also infusing them with the
smidgen of moisture that made all the difference. The toasts still took 3-4 toasting cycles to cook, but retained their

color and pleasant texture.
On a purely subjective front, our household preferred using these little toasts to
hold sweet items like pear or banana slices
with yogurt or almond butter — like little
handheld fruit pies.
Savory versions worked best when they
were combined with spice and acid to offset
the sweetness of the potato — eggs with
hot sauce, avocado with chili oil and lime,
shredded pork curry, for instance were extra
tasty. But once we left the hot zone, we
found ourselves noticing the sweet potato
flavor too much to not regret the absence of
bread.
Dip your toe into this sweet potato toast
craze using our family’s favorite — a supersimple pear and yogurt combination that
reminded us all of a heavenly sour cream
apple pie. Feel free to swap out toppings,
or even toast up a bunch of toasts and serve
with a (spicy?) dip at your next party.

SWEET POTATO TOAST
WITH PEAR SLICES AND YOGURT
Start to finish: 10 minutes
Servings: 8 toasts
1 long orange-fleshed sweet potato, clean
and unpeeled, sliced into eight 1/4-inch
slices
1/2 cup reduced fat plain Greek yogurt
1/2 pear, thinly sliced
ground cinnamon, for sprinkling
1 tablespoon real maple syrup

Sweet potato really will cook in the toaster, if you let it go through enough cycles.
pinch salt
Lay a damp paper towel on a microwavesafe plate and lay out the sweet potato
slices. Cover with a second damp paper
towel. Microwave until slices barely begin
to soften and turn brighter orange, about
one minute. Blot with paper towel to
remove any extra moisture. Run the slices
through the toaster cycle until the potato is
softened, but not flimsy, about 3-4 cycles.
Let the slices cool a few minutes. Top with
yogurt, pear slices, a sprinkling of cinnamon, a drizzle of maple syrup and a tiny
pinch of salt. Pick up a mini-pie or two with
your hands and enjoy for breakfast, snack or

even dessert.
Other topping options: almond butter,
banana slices and chia seed; peanut butter
and honey; avocado, lime juice, hot sauce
and cilantro; hardboiled egg, tomato slices
and chopped cooked turkey bacon.
Cook’s note: Orange-fleshed sweet potatoes are often called “garnet” sweet potatoes or “yams” in American grocery stores.
Nutrition information per serving: 40
calories; 1 calories from fat; 0 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 1 mg cholesterol; 58
mg sodium; 8 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 4 g
sugar; 2 g protein.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

21

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

THE SOCIETY OF WESTERN
ARTISTS HOSTS EXHIBIT,
SALE AND BOUTIQUE IN SAN
BRUNO. Awards in The Society of
Western Artists’ current exhibit
went to Tomiko Bailey for her first
place oil “Eucalyptus Grove,
Carmel Beach,” to Eva Klinger for
her second place oil “Amelia Island
Creek,” and to Leona Moriarty for
her third place watercolor “Coit
Tower.” Other show participants
are Barbara Alger, Sing Chang, Joe
Crosetti, Carrie Drilling, Diana
Day Glynn, Sharon Harris, Berni
Jahnke, Deepali Kapatkar, Sally
Patten, Susan Pizzi, Eduardo Setti,
Maria Sky, Barbara Todd and Nancy
Call Torres. The show, which was
judged by Victoria Chiofalo, Sherry
Vockel and Suzanne Welch, runs
through Dec. 9. The society also
hosts its first Art Sale and
Boutique, beginning with a silent
auction and reception 5 p.m. to 7
p.m. Friday, Dec. 9. On Saturday,
Dec. 10, and Sunday, Dec. 11, the
sale continues from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Holiday shoppers can see
original art created by fourteen
local artists, along with jewelry
creations by Off the Plaza Designs.
The Society of Western Artists Fine
Art Center is located at 527 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. For further
information contact Judith Puccini
at 737-6084 or visit www.societyofwesterenartists.com.
***
PENINSULA AT WAR! SAN
MATEO COUNTY’S WORLD
WAR
II
LEGACY.
On

Wednesday, Dec. 7, 75 years after
the bombing of Pearl Harbor and
America’s entry into World War II,
The San Mateo County History
Museum opens Peninsula at War!
San Mateo County’s World War II
Legacy, focusing on happenings
on the San Francisco Peninsula during that devastating conflict.
Although armed attack never
touched San Mateo County, the
importance of the Peninsula in
terms of wartime preparation,
training, industry and logistical
support was immense. Among the
topics considered in the exhibit are
the Shock of the coming of the War
— including local newspaper
accounts of the bombing at Pearl
Harbor, an original painting of the
disaster by Burlingame artist Fred
Sinclair and oral histories;
Training centers — including maps
and photos of the anti-aircraft
training base at Montara and the
Coyote Point Merchant Marine
Cadet Basic Training School;
Assembly and detention camps at
Tanforan and Sharp Park built to
hold
primarily
JapaneseAmericans — including camp art,
furniture, oral histories and photographs; Homefront activities —
including Civil Defense hard hats,
scrap drive photos and posters, and
oral histories and film dedicated to
the control of fire bombs; Wartime
heroes — including cockpit controls from a B-25, weapons, uniforms, photographs and various
other types of memorabilia from
Tuskegee Air Force pilot Les
Williams, Air Force navigator and
P.O.W. Alan R. Brown and
Guadalcanal Congressional Medal
of Honor winner Jim Swett;

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Industry — including tools, films,
photographs and newsletters concerning ship building at South San
Francisco and EIMAC at San Bruno
— the largest maker of vacuum
tubes for radios and radars in the
world during the war; and San
Francisco Airport — including
photos and models documenting its
tremendous build-up during the war.
For more information the go to
www.historysmc.org or call 2990104. Admission is $6 for adults
and $4 for seniors and students.
Children 5 and under are free. The
San Mateo County History
Museum is located at 2200
Broadway within the 106-year-old
“Old Courthouse” in Redwood City.
The Museum is open every day
except Monday, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. The Peninsula at War! San
Mateo County’s World War II
Legacy, sponsored in part by the
Redwood City Civic Cultural
Commission, may be viewed until
Feb. 4, 2019.
***
GO
FULL
S . T. E. A. M.
AHEAD AT CURIODYS S EY
ON DEC. 9 . CuriOdyssey, the
San Mateo-based experiential science and wildlife center for children and families, invites you to a
Friday night out. Experiment with
laser lights, sculpt with foil and
view the micro-world with a
“scope-on-a-rope.” Make polyhedra with Stacy Speyer, author of
“Cubes and Things. ” Discover
Chigiri-e, a Japanese art form
using torn paper, with Bay Area
artist Joyce Nojima. Explore
weaving on a loom with local yarn
bombers from Knits for Life. Meld
science and art with the Museum of

Artist Tomiko Bailey’s oil painting ‘Eucalyptus Grove, Carmel Beach’ was
awarded first place in The Society of Western Artists’ current exhibit, on
view through Dec. 9.
Craft + Design, observe live
demos from the Bay Area Garden
Railway Society, form tiny foil
sculptures + more. Purchase dinner
from Capelo’s Hill Country
Barbecue food truck. 6 p.m. - 9
p.m. Friday, Dec. 9. 1651 Coyote
Point Drive in San Mateo.

Members: $12 per person. Nonmembers: $17 per person. For
more
information
visit
http://www.curiodyssey.org.
Susan Cohn can be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com
or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Selena Gomez rules Instagram with most followers, likes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Selena Gomez rules
Instagram.
The photo-sharing site released its yearend data Thursday showing the 24-year-old
pop star has the most followers of any
celebrity (103 million) and was responsible
for nearly all of the most-liked celebrity
posts in 2016.
Gomez beat out bestie Taylor Swift (93.6
million followers), Beyonce (88.9 million
followers) and Kylie and Kendall Jenner
(79.5 million and 68.9 million followers,
respectively) to top the site’s list of most
popular celebs. The only men among the
top 10 were soccer star Cristiano Ronaldo
(82. 3 million followers) and Dwayne
Johnson (71 million followers).
Gomez also had eight of the 10 most popular celebrity photos and seven of the top
10 celebrity videos.
Her most popular picture, with 5.2 million likes, is an ad for Coke. It shows the
singer in a red dress, her lips around a red-

SLOANE
Continued from page 19
will ever know the grand plan.
The only person who manages to get
close to Elizabeth is an inquisitive male
escort with a heart of gold (Jake Lacy) who
gets her to say that she chose to forgo a

striped straw in a bottle she holds with long
red fingernails. Other popular snaps show
her performing onstage and posing with a
fan. Ronaldo posted the other two photos
on the list: both of him with the Euro 2016
trophy.
Gomez’s top video, with 20.1 million
views, shows her dancing and singing with
a young fan.
Swift, Kim Kardashian and soccer star Leo
Messi claimed the other three spots on the
list of top celebrity videos. Swift’s video is
of her cat. Kardashian’s and Messi’s are of
their children.
Apart from the celebrity stats, the site
also said that Disney and Universal theme
parks were the most popular places among
its 500 million active users over the past
year. Other oft-Instagrammed spots include
New York’s Times Square and Central Park
and the Eiffel Tower and Louvre museum in
Paris.
The site said the most popular emoji in
2016 was the heart and the top hashtag was
#love.
simpler life with kids and family and whatnot for her job. That life wasn’t for her in
her early 20s and isn’t for her now, in her
late 30s, either. It’s not the most revealing
conversation, but we’ve let many a male
character get away with far less.
While it is fun to see Chastain as a powerful boss lady, raising a martini glass to her
competitors (including a sniveling Michael
Stuhlbarg) who she’s just publicly embar-

Selena Gomez’s most popular picture, with 5.2 million likes, is an ad for Coke.
rassed with another move of political cunning, the story itself just skates along an
already well-established surface of corrupt
Washington narratives. It fails to add any
distinctive flair to the genre, and, despite
its sleek composition and top-notch talent
(including John Lithgow as a congressman), seems more like prestige television
than anything else.
Then there’s the matter of timing. “Miss

December 4, 10am - 2pm
Meet Council Member Mark Olbert
Music by Fractured Hans
Register for 12/11 Wine Stroll

Rain or Shine

- A Touch of Europe -

Sloane” has the misfortune of coming out in
this political moment. Crafted in a different
climate about a still-relevant issue, it
should have been more resonant. Instead,
through no fault of its own, it already feels
woefully out of date.
“Miss Sloane,” a EuropaCorp release, is
rated R by the Motion Picture Association
of America for “language and some sexuality.” Running time: 132 minutes. Two stars
out of four.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
FRIDAY, DEC. 2
Protect Yourself, Current Crime
Trends in San Mateo. 7:30 a.m. 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame. $15
with breakfast. For more information
contact 787-5595.
Free First Fridays History Museum.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. For more information
visit www.historysmc.org.
Millbrae Friends Book Sale. 2 p.m.
to 5 p.m. 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. $5
admission. For more information contact 697-7607.
First Annual Giving Tree Art Show
and Sale. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Enjoy
refreshments, live music and local artwork. 20 percent of proceeds go to
local recovery programs. For more
information
visit
newleaf.com/events.
Holiday First Friday. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
307-309 Seventh Ave., San Mateo.
This week’s First Friday will be an
event to remember filled with local
artist and vendors, music and two
food trucks. Free. For more information
contact
hello@flywheelpress.com.
Art Guild of Pacifica’s annual holiday Galleria. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sanchez
Art Center, 1220 Linda Mar Blvd.,
Pacifica. Featuring music by Lara
Garner on harp and Mark Sessler on
guitar. Continues Dec. 3 to 11, 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m., on Saturdays and Sundays
only. For more information visit artguildofpacifica.org.
Community Outreach Program
Fundraiser. 7:15 p.m. 1200 Airport
Blvd., South San Francisco. Enjoy a
night of live jazz featured by The
Dave Miller Trio and vocalist Rebecca
DuMaine. $35 per person, $60 per
couple. To RSVP or for more information contact 872-1143.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Drop Dead!’ 8 p.m. 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. A comedic murder
mystery set within a dramatic murder
mystery play. $10 general admission;
$8 for students and seniors. For more
information call 558-2799.
‘Fiction.’ 8 p.m. 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Dragon Theatre closes
its 2016 season with Steven Dietz’s
‘Fiction.’
Thursdays
through
Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m.
Shows run until Dec. 18. $30 for general admission seats. $25 for student/senior tickets. For more information visit dragonproductions.net.
‘Greetings.’ 8 p.m. 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Also on Dec. 3, Dec. 9, Dec. 10,
Dec. 16 and Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. and on
Dec. 4, Dec. 11 and Dec. 18 at 2 p.m.
For more information or tickets visit
pacificaspindriftplayers.org.
SATURDAY, DEC. 3
Breakfast With Santa. 8 a.m. to 9
a.m. or 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 60 E.
31st Ave., San Mateo. Guests can
enjoy kid-friendly pizzas, fresh fruit
and morning-time beverages prepared by California Pizza Kitchen. Kids
will enjoy a special appearance by
Santa, balloon figures made to order,
a holiday puppet show, crafts and festive gifts to take home. Immediately
following the event, Santa will be
available to hear wish lists and take
photos. Tickets are $10.99 per person,
general admission. For more information visit hillsdale.com.
Millbrae Friends Book Sale. 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Free
admission. For more information contact 697-7607.
Author Signings. 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 11
W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Local
authors will sign books all day
Saturday at the Barnes and Noble
Book Fair. For more information visit
bn.com.
Make your own snow globe. 9 a.m.
to noon. 1010 Metro Center Blvd.,
Foster City. Kids ages 3 to 12 are invited to create a holiday snow globe. For
more information email mrodrigues@shiftcomm.com.
Holiday Traditions from Around
the World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Will feature
children’s craft activities such as such
as making an Italian La Befana (doll)
and a Mexican rattle (New Year’s
noise maker). For more information
visit historysmc.org.
Friend’s Annual Holiday Book Sale.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
All books, CDs, DVDs and tapes are 20
percent to 50 percent off. For more
information call 593-5650.
Winter Open Studio. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. 16 Coalmine View, Portola Valley.
Featuring new Asian-inspired works.
For more information visit leemiddleman.com.
PENPEX 2016 Stamp Show. 10 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Community Activities
Building, 1400 Roosevelt Ave.,
Redwood City. For more information
visit www.penpex.org.

RINK
Continued from page 1

Holiday Marketplace. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. 1140 Cooper St., Palo Alto.
Includes homemade food items, gifts,
crafts and wreaths. For more information visit gardenclubofpaloalto.org.
Holiday Traditions from Around
the World. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. The event
will include children’s craft activities
such as making an Italian La Befana
doll and a Mexican New Year’s rattle.
Children can meet Santa Claus and
receive free photographs. For more
information visit historysmc.org.
Holiday Open House and Book
Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas.
For more information email belmont@smcl.org.
Hometown Holidays in Downtown
Redwood City. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free event for all ages.
For more information email courtney@oliverprsolutions.com.
Holiday Open House. 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Antiques and More, 1148 El
Camino Real, San Carlos. Come for
food and drinks including apple
cider, a drawing for gift certificates
and special sales during the open
house. For more information call 5931152.
F45 Training Grand Opening. Noon
to 2 p.m. F45 Training, 24 42nd Ave.,
San Mateo. Owners, Ami Jampolis
and Kristen Morcos, will be co-hosting the grand opening party and
encourage locals of all fitness levels
to experience first-hand the training
network. There will be some training
exercises videos, a raffle and food. For
more information visit www.f45sanmateo.com.
First Annual Giving Tree Art Show
and Sale. Noon to 6 p.m. 150 San
Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Enjoy
refreshments, live music and local artwork. 20 percent of proceeds go to
local recovery programs. For more
information
visit
newleaf.com/events.
Free Handbell Holiday Concert. 1
p.m. 2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
The San Mateo County Historical
Museum will host the S.F. State
University Handbell Choir for a performance with holiday tunes and
interactive singing experience.
Admission is free. For more information email sarah@historysmc.org.
Model Railroad Show. 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. 1090 Merrill St., Menlo Park.
Admission is free. For more information call 322-0685.
Hour of Code. 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. ‘The Hour of
Code’ is a nationwide initiative by
Computer Science Education Week
and Code.org to introduce millions of
students to one hour of computer
science and computer programming.
Children under 11 must be accompanied by an adult. For more information call 522-7818.
Holiday
Concert:
Gabriel’s
Trumpets. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas. For more
information
email
belmont@smcl.org.
City of Millbrae 25th Annual
Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. 5
p.m. to 7 p.m. Millbrae City Hall, 621
Magnolia Ave., Millbrae.
Christmas Crèche Exhibit. Noon to 9
p.m. 3885 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.
Celebrate the birth of the Christ child
with more than 350 nativities from
around the world in artistic settings,
hands-on activities and live holiday
music. For more information call 8003865.
San Francisco Banjo Band. 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Molloy’s Tavern, 1655 Mission
Road, South San Francisco, Colma.
Come for a live concert and singalong. The band plays music of all
eras and genres. Admission is free. For
more information call 544-3623.
Christmas Village to Fight Cancer. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. 1317 South Norfolk St.,
San Mateo. The Christmas Village this
year is to help find a Cure for Breast
Cancer and All Cancers. Open every
Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Jan.
1. For more information contact
charleswright54@gmail.com.
Capuchino High School presents
‘Drop Dead!’ 8 p.m. 1501 Magnolia
Ave., San Bruno. A comedic murder
mystery set within a dramatic murder
mystery play. $10 general admission;
$8 for students and seniors. For more
information call 558-2799.
SUNDAY, DEC. 4
Christmas Bazaar. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
1515 Dolan Ave., San Mateo. The
event will include a pancake breakfast, photos with Santa and a silent
auction, among other activities.
Admission is $7. For more information email nyoro58@yahoo.com.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com

Glomstead.
Since the Bridgepointe Shopping
Center rink was shuttered in 2013 and
Belmont Iceland closed earlier this
year, skating advocates and local
politicians have begun collaborating
on ways to keep ice on the Peninsula.
Officials with various cities and the
county have had preliminary discussions about potential opportunities to
collaborate with many noting it would
be ideal to find municipally-owned
land. Several acres are sought for at
least two sheets of ice to ensure it is
financially viable.
Burlingame Mayor Ann Kieghran
did not respond to requests for comment.
Councilman
Michael
Brownrigg said that he’s looking forward to learning more about the
options for the site.
“Speaking personally, I think that
we are a growing community, that we
have a lot of kids and young people
and people who want an active
lifestyle and that there’s the opportunity, as the [request for proposal] suggests, for a terrific recreational use,”
Brownrigg said. He added while the
city must be mindful of its budget, “in
my opinion we should not let the revenue be the most important piece. I
think we should make the character and
quality of the service offering and what
brings the most value to Burlingame
residents the priority.”
Constructing a new facility has been
estimated to cost between $12 million

and $16 million and Strambi said will
ideally involve a public-private partnership.
Strambi, along with Ray Miolla and
Tim Hennessey, have been working
behind the scenes for the last four
years in the wake of the Bridgepointe
rink closing. The city of San Mateo
has been wrestling with the center’s
owner SPI Holdings, which seeks to
demolish the shuttered rink and create
more lucrative retail space instead.
After the city denied SPI’s request, the
wealthy property owner returned with
an offer of $8 million in exchange for
being allowed to amend the site’s master plan.
San Mateo Mayor Joe Goethals has
sought to work collaboratively with
neighboring cities, the county and
anyone interested in promoting recreation.
“Ever since Bridgepointe closed,
there’s been a huge demand for an ice
rink on the Peninsula. Belmont
Iceland also closed which increases the
demand,” Goethals said. “Ice rinks are
open 365 days a year, 21 hours a day.
… Just like Bridgepointe was an
amenity that was enjoyed by the larger
region, I hope that this effort is successful because it will benefit thousands and thousands of kids and adults
and seniors.”
San Mateo has yet to weigh in on
SPI’s recent $8 million offer or formally discuss how the funds should be
spent. Advocates with the Save the

PLAY

Nevertheless, it’s McGinty as Mary
who holds the stage with her regal
presence and her character’s seemingly
endless patience and wisdom.
Ambler as Bert is an amiable, reliable friend to all. And the two children,
Maupin as Jane and Marheineke as
Michael, are both adorable and
assured.
The show is filled with memorable
music and lyrics by Richard M.
Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. They
include, among others, “A Spoonful of
Sugar, ”
“Feed
the
Birds, ”
“Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”
and “Chim Chim Cher-ee.”
Several songs are enlivened with terrific dances choreographed by
Michelle Shannon.
Hats off to scenic designer Don
Coluzzi and his crew, who designed and
painted the colorful, versatile sets.
Kudos, too, to costume designers Mary
Cravens and Shannon Maxham, lighting designer Carson Duper, properties
and special effects designers Eric
Olson and Adria Olson, and hair and
wig designer Dee Morrissey.

Continued from page 1
arrives, seemingly unbidden.
She soon leads the children on a
series of adventures that change their
behavior and, in turn, change their
father. He needs to change because he’s
so obsessed with making money in his
bank job that he treats his family with
neglect or unreasonable strictness.
Although the main characters, which
also include Jim Ambler as Bert,
Mary’s chimney sweep friend, do well,
everyone in the 26-member cast of all
ages is energetic and involved.
Numerous smaller parts are memorable, such as Darlene Batchelder as
the Bird Woman, Queen Victoria and
Miss Andrew, George’s tyrannical former nanny.
Then there are Ron Lopez Jr. as
Robertson Ay, a family employee; and
Jennifer Martinelli as Mrs. Brill, the
cook and housekeeper.

23

Bridgepointe Ice Rink group were
staunchly opposed to the city caving
to SPI’s demands. However, their ultimate goal is to promote ice on the
Peninsula and appear willing to loosen
their grip should SPI’s contribution
support a new facility.
“We’re excited and supportive of any
project that can be adequately financed
and funded that results in a replacement
for the Bridgepointe ice rink in the
community,” said group cofounder Len
Rosenduft. “If the city of San Mateo
takes the money from SPI in exchange
for closing and rezoning of the
Bridgepointe ice rink, we’d certainly
like to see those funds go to a replacement rink in the region.”
Strambi and rink supporters remain
confident that a new facility would be
financially viable, even profitable.
After financing construction, Strambi
said they intentionally set up a nonprofit so that any profits would be
reinvested into other recreational programs for the community.
While there’s still a long ways to
go, Strambi said they’re hopeful the
regional push for ice will encourage
the community to recognize the value
of promoting a new facility.
“Our proposal is designed as a private, public partnership that will
ensure the unique social and recreational benefits of a community ice rink are
perpetuated on the Peninsula,” Strambi
said. “Ice-related sports are so unique
in its ability to attract all age groups
form ages 5 to 95 in an unrivaled safe,
social and recreational environment
where participation can exist for all
skill levels, operate under all weather
conditions and from 5 a.m. to 1 a.m.,
365 days a year.”
Musical director Gregory Cheng and
11 musicians sit above the stage.
However, this orchestra may be too
large. It often overpowers the singers,
exacerbating problems with the sound
design by Larry Tasse. Not only can
lyrics be hard to understand, but dialogue sometimes seems distorted, as if
the actors were in an echo chamber.
Given those problems, it’s not
always easy to discern what’s happening in a given moment, but the general effect comes across thanks in large
part to the excellent acting and the relative simplicity of the book by Julian
Fellowes, which is based on the stories of P.L. Travers and the Disney
film.
The show runs about two hours and
45 minutes with one intermission, but
it moves along well, making it a good
holiday bet for all ages.
“Mary Poppins” will continue
through Dec. 18 at Hillbarn Theatre,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blv d., Foster City.
For tick ets and information call (650)
349-6411 or v isit hillbarntheatre.org.

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLs BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Not post 4 Econ. measure
7 Maude of TV
10 Oxygen source
11 Burglar’s “key”
13 Marshal Dillon
14 201, to Claudius
15 Nobel Prize city
16 Yodeler’s answer
17 Fast-food franchise
(2 wds.)
19 Space
20 Society newbie
21 Waters down
23 Happy
26 Firebug’s crime
28 La-la lead-in
29 “I” trouble
30 Bird that honks
34 Bouquet holders
36 DJ’s platters
38 Wretched
39 IBM rival
41 Frog’s pad?

GET FUZZY®

42 Carried
44 Jeans go-with
46 Grassy area
47 Ran contraband
52 Fashion magazine
53 Wee
54 Dazzle
55 Must-have
56 Lingerie item
57 Mammoth Cave loc.
58 Paintings
59 Took a chair
60 Hosp. areas
DOWN
1 Treaty
2 Costa —
3 Clapton of “Layla”
4 Sphere
5 Oats holder
6 Capsule
7 Breakfast strip
8 Social mores
9 Molecule part
12 Blockheads

13 Soft wool
18 Unmatched
22 Keeps it all
23 State VIP
24 Hawaii’s Mauna —
25 Sighs of relief
27 Croissant
29 NFL broadcaster
31 Kyoto sash
32 Pitcher — Maglie
33 Ben & Jerry rival
35 Pulled down
37 Bedding plant
40 Nosy neighbors
41 Gam
42 Harvest machine
43 Young screecher
45 Pyramid site
46 Jazzy — Horne
48 Wire thicknesses
49 Body of water
50 Basin companion
51 Hibernates

12-2-16

Previous
Sudoku
answers



FRIDAY, December 2, 2016
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Design a blueprint
that you know will work, and present what you have
to offer with confidence. Stick to your plans to stop
others from taking advantage of you.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Emotions will
flare up if you get into conversations with people in
positions of authority. Don’t burn bridges, or you will
end up getting stuck with a messy cleanup job.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Keep your plans
simple and your goals realistic. There is plenty to gain
by being prepared and taking your time to go over the
small but important details.

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

thursday PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — If you want to get
ahead, stop being so accommodating and stay focused
on your own passion. Develop an idea and call in
favors that will lead to your success.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — The unpredictable
nature of what’s going on around you will be
unnerving. Do your best, take a disciplined approach to
your responsibilities and don’t lose sight of your goals.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Keep life simple.
Hanging out with the wrong people will lead to
loss, injury or emotional stress. Making personal
improvements and investing in your future will be in
your best interest.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — A change of attitude or
mood will develop if an unexpected loss occurs due

12-2-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

to a lack of reserve or insight. Make sure you do your
homework before you take on an impossible task.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Take it easy when
it comes to your health and physical wellness. Too
much of anything will lead to trouble. Focus on love,
nurturing important relationships and making travel or
educational plans.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Bring about positive change
at work and home by pursuing what makes you happy.
Have faith in your ability to get things done. An unusual
offer will spark interest.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Set aside a space at
home to develop or expand a project you want to
pursue, or attend a networking event. Romance is
highlighted, and sharing your feelings will encourage a

commitment.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Emotions will surface
when you deal with personal or domestic matters.
Don’t let anyone use manipulative tactics to guilt you
into something you don’t agree with or want to do.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Plan an adventure or
sign up for something that will help you develop skills,
experience and knowledge. Doing your own thing will
lead to discord with someone who feels left out.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

DISHWASHER
NEEDED
Tues, Sat, Sun 8am-4pm

110 Employment

ATTENTION CAREGIVERS!
Immediate need for Full Time/Part Time
Home Care Providers
$250 Sign on Bonus*
Paid Training & Benefits
Must have valid DL and reliable transportation
Call or stop by TODAY!

CAREGIVERS
NOW HIRING
3 Shifts Available!
Assisted Living Community
for Seniors in Burlingame
(Close to Broadway).
Near Public Transportation.

Call Ana
650-771-1127

Don’t wait, call or stop by TODAY! – Ask for Carol

(650) 458-2200

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.

HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED

Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
90 Glenn Way #2, SAN CARLOS

110 Employment

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required. Starting at $15 per hour.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TECHNOLOGY
SUPPORT.COM is a global provider of
software and services that automate the
resolution of technology problems. We
have an opening in our Redwood City,
CA office for a Database Administrator to
plan, design, execute & configure databases.
Pls mail your resume to 900 Chesapeake
Dr., 2nd Fl, Redwood City, CA 94063,
Attn: HR.
SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales
Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, please call
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

PIAZZA’S FINE FOODS
LOOKING FOR ENERGETIC PEOPLE WITH
A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE
DELI CLERKS – CHECKERS – MEAT CLERKS

The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...

Seeking Delivery drivers to manage newspaper routes on the
Peninsula.

Contact us for a free consultation

Requires early morning work six days per week Mon-Sat.
Papers are picked up early morning between 3am and 4:30am

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Call 650-344-5200

is actually right here in the present, as it has been for centuries – The local community
newspaper. We ignore the naysayers and shun the "experts" when it comes to the "demise" of
the newspaper industry.
The leading local daily news resource for the
SF Peninsula seeks an entreprenuerial
Advertising Account Exec to sell advertising
and marketing solutions to local businesses.
We are looking for a special person to join our
team for an immediate opening.
You must be community-minded, actionoriented, customer-focused, and without fail, a
self starter. You will be responsible for sales
and account management activities associated
with either a territory or vertical category.

You will be offering a wide variety of
marketing solutions including print advertising,
inserts, graphic design, niche publications,
online advertising, event marketing, social media
and whatever else we come up with if as the
industry continues its evolution and our paper
continues its upward trajectory.
Experience with print advertising and online
marketing a plus. But we will consider a
candidate with little or no sales experience as
long as you have these traits:

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t1SPmDJFODZXJUIDPNQVUFSTBOEDPNGPSUXJUIOVNCFST
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Join us, if you check off on these qualities and also believe in the future of newspapers.
Please email your resume to ads@smdailyjournal.com
A cover letter with your views on the newspaper industry would also be helpful.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

SOFTWARE ENGINEER: implement
website features, develop back end services. Personalized Beauty Discovery,
Inc., Attn: Angelica/Recruiting Job
ME008, 201 Baldwin Ave., 2nd Fl., San
Mateo, CA 9440

RESTAURANT - Need Cook/Kitchen
help. Fletch’s catering business is taking
off. We need help! Call (650)685-8301

NEWSPAPER
DELIVERY
ROUTE

The
Future
of local news content

110 Employment

Apply in Person or call
Chef 1 541 848 0038
Sean 1 650 592 7258
1696 Laurel Street,
San Carlos

IMMEDIATE OPENING
San Mateo
Burlingame

We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

25

FAX RESUME TO:
(650) 367-7341 OR EMAIL:
JOBS@PIAZZASFINEFOODS.COM
San Mateo / Palo Alto Store Locations
Part Time / Full Time
We offer union benefits and union-scale wage
progression. We have advancement opportunities.

Exciting Opportunities at

Candy Maker Training Program
Applicants who are committed to Quality and Excellence
welcome to apply.
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4PVUI4BO'SBODJTDP

If interested, please call Eugenia or Ava at
(650) 827-3210 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. EOE

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016
110 Employment

203 Public Notices

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

BOARD OF
SUPERVISORS
COUNTY OF SAN
MATEO

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

TECHNOLOGY
APTTUS Corporation has openings for
the following positions in San Mateo, CA:
Software Engineer
(Ref # APT1101): Develop, maintain and
update Apttus Quote-to-Cash cloud
based applications built on the Salesforce.com cloud platform.
Lead Software Engineer
(Ref # APT1102): Research, design, develop, and/or test software for enterprise
cloud computing applications.
Senior Business Analyst
(Ref # APT1103): Work as a part of an
implementation team on customer projects. Provide business analysis and CPQ
domain knowledge on company projects
in collaboration with our solutions and
technical architects. May require travel to
various unanticipated locations throughout the U.S.
Logistician– Product Management
(Ref # APT1104): Analyze and coordinate the logistical functions of company's
enterprise cloud computing product(s).
Must be available to work on projects at
various, unanticipated sites throughout
the United States.
PrincipalSoftware Engineer
(Ref# APT1105): Innovate and drive development of technical knowledge
around the Salesforce.com technologies.
Submit your Resume through the Apttus
website by using the Submit a General
Application tool: http://apttus.com/company/careers/job-listings/. Please include
the reference number for the position on
your Resume.

203 Public Notices
CASE# 16CIV02051
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka Nancy Ann
Masunaga
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka
Nancy Ann Masunaga filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Nancy Ann Miyanaga aka
Nancy Ann Masunaga
Proposed Name: Nancy Ann Stoll
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A hearing on the
petition shall be held on 12/14/16 at 9
a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation:
San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 10/28/16
/s/ Susan Irene Etezadi/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/27/2016
(Published 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16,
12/9/16).

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Garbage and Recyclables Collection Rates in the
County Franchised Area
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the County of San
Mateo Board of Supervisors will hold a public
hearing on the adoption of
the rates for Garbage and
Recyclables Collection in
the Unincorporated Franchised Area of the South
Bayside Waste Management Authority (excluding
County Service Area No. 8
and West Bay Sanitary
District) effective February
1, 2017.
The Garbage and Recyclables Collection Rates will result in these charges being
billed directly to the property
owner or customer by the
contractor, Recology San
Mateo County. Information
concerning these rates may
be obtained from the office
of the Director of the Office
of Sustainability, 455 County
Center, 4 th Floor, Redwood
City, California, telephone
(650) 363-4189, during the
hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday,
or by visiting the RecycleWorks
website
at:
http://www.recycleworks.org/
sbwma_unincorporated_franchised_areas.html.
The public hearing will be
held:
DATE: Tuesday, January
10, 2017, TIME: 9:15 A.M.
PLACE: Board of Supervisors Chambers Hall of Justice and Records 400 County Center Redwood City,
California The meeting will
be open to the public and
anyone interested may appear and be heard on this
matter or submit a written
statement.
DATE: November 15, 2016
John L. Maltbie
County Manager / Clerk of
the Board
11/25, 12/2/16
CNS-2949761#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271495
The following person is doing business
as: Allergy and Asthma Consultants,
369 Main Street Ste 200, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94063. Registered Owner:
Brian Steven Lipson MD, 20 LaBarthe
Lane, San Carlos, CA 94070. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Brian S. Lipson MD/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/17/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271601
The following person is doing business
as: MyAegean Innovations, 363 Waverley St, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owners: 1) Bahadir Bolukbasi,
same address 2) Hande Bolukbasi, same
address. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/Bahadir Bolukbasi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

203 Public Notices

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
The CITY OF BURLINGAME PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a public
hearing to consider adoption
of amendments to Chapter
25.59 (Secondary Dwelling
Units), Chapter 25.08 (Definitions), Chapter 25.26 (R-1
district regulations), Chapter
25.50 (Non-conforming uses
and
structures),Chapter
25.60 (Accessory Structures
in R-1 and R-2 districts) and
Chapter 25.70 (Off-street
parking) of the Burlingame
Municipal Code related to
Accessory Dwelling Units
(Secondary Dwelling Units)
and Junior Accessory Dwelling Units.
The hearing will be held on
Monday, December 12,
2016, at 7:00 p.m. in the
City Hall Council Chambers,
501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California.
The staff report for this item
may be reviewed prior to the
meeting at the Community
Development Department,
Planning Division, Burlingame City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame; and
on the City's website at
www.burlingame.org.
For
additional information please
call the Planning Division at
(650) 558-7250.
12/2/16
CNS-2951822#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271322
The following person is doing business
as: The Zell Law Firm, 533 Airport Boulevard, Fourth Floor, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Dennis Zell,
1800 Ashton Ave, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Dennis Zell/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/1/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/16, 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271378
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Realty Inspections, 1681
Alameda de las Pulgas REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061. Registered Owner:
Charles Oey, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 11/8/16
/s/Charles Oey/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/8/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/16, 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271412
The following person is doing business
as: 32 Fahrenheit Japanese Bistro, 604
Santa Cruz Ave, MENLO PARK, CA
94025. Registered Owner: B&AJJ INC.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
9/11/2016.
/s/Barry Hung/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/9/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/16, 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271410
The following person is doing business
as: Silicon Valley Music Design LLC,
1295 Tuolomne Rd., MILLBRAE, CA
94030. Registered Owner: Silicon Valley
Music Design LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Wayne Cheng/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/9/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/11/16, 11/18/16, 11/25/16, 12/2/16).

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271445
The following person is doing business
as: Beauty Century, 1419 Burlingame
Ave, Suite B, BURLINGAME, CA 94010.
Registered Owner: Nguyen Vuu, 124
Dwight Rd., Burlingame, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Nguyen Vuu/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271593
The following person is doing business
as: Touch of Beauty, 13 WEST 41ST
AVE, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 Registered Owner: My Ngoc Tra Truong, 1387
Xavier Ave., Hayward, CA 94545. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 12/1/16.
/s/My Truong/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271457
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Legal Discovery Services,
104 Elm Street #39, SAN MATEO, CA
94401.
Registered Owner: Michael
Croaro, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Michael Croaro/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271608
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Angels Maid Services & Marinas, 2001 Whitman Way Apt 1, SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066. Registered Owner:
Joara Elisabeth Faria Guedes, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
12/1/16.
/s/Joara Guedes/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

9052 of the Callifornia Probate
Code.Other California statutes and legal
authority may affect your rights as a
creditor. You may want to consult with an
attorney knowledgable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
James M. Draeger
Attorney at Law
1100 Mar West Street, Suite A
TIBURON, CA 94920
(415) 889-5506
FILED: 11/29/16
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal on 12/02, 12/09, 12/15)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271450
The following person is doing business
as: Luxury Events, 73 Mahogany Dr,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Mahtab Ali, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Mahtab Ali/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/14/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271373
The following person is doing business
as: KS Solutions, 1350 Bayshore Highway Suite 200, BURLINGAME, CA
94010. Registered Owner: Kanden Systems Solutions Co., Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/Junichiro Kitamura/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/7/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/18/16,11/25/16,12/2/16,12/9/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271553
The following person is doing business
as: 1) San Mateo Vape, 2) Koko’s Vape
Shop, 2323 El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Jekelian Enterprises, Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Krikor Jekelian/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/23/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/25/16, 12/2/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271498
The following person is doing business
as: After School Hoops,820 Magellan
Ln., SAN MATEO, CA 94404. Registered Owner: Joseph Kaiser, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/Joseph Kaiser/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/17/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271606
The following person is doing business
as: VH Home Renovation & Preservation, 1309 Sierra St., REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94061. Registered Owner: JVictor
Hugo Amaya, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 11/14/11.
/s/Victor Hugo Amaya/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #271608
The following person is doing business
as: VSL Systems, 1375 Tartan Trail
Road, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. Registered Owner: Carl Limsico, 1009 S. Idaho St., San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 11/3/16.
/s/Carl Limsico/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/30/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/02/16, 12/9/16, 12/16/16, 12/23/16).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Carmelita Finkelstein
Case Number: 16PRO00552
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Carmelita Finkelstein. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Frederick Clarke in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Frederick Clarke be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of
the decedent. The petition requests the
decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be
admitted to probate. The will and any
codicils are available for examination in
the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate
under the Independent Administration of
Estates Act. (This authority will allow the
personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval.
Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an
interested person files an objection to the
petition and shows good cause why the
court should not grant the authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: December 20, 2016
at 9:00 a.m., Department 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the
Calilfornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under sectioin

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS at Westwood Park in
Redwood City, off of Fernside. Call to
claim (650)714-8893
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST CAT. Black and White. Black
patch on right eye. REWARD.
Call (323) 439-7713.
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

294 Baby Stuff
BASSINET $25 (Musical, Rocks, vibrates, has 4 wheels, includes sheets &
mattress) (650)348-2306
FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster
seat - $5 (650)592-5864.
HIGH CHAIR (wooden) excellent condition $35.00 (650)348-2306

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
AIR CONDITIONER, Portable, 14,000
BTU,
Commercial
Cool
model
CPN14XC9, almost like new! All accessories plus remote included.
20” x 16-5/8” x 33-1/2” $345.
(650)345-1835
CHARCOAL GRILL with cover, 24”, almost new $25. (650)368-0748
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
COLEMAN LXE Roadtrip Grill Red Brand New! (still in box) $100
(650)918-9847
JACK LALANE'S power juicer. $40.
Call 650 364-1243. Leave message.
REFRIGERATOR WHITE Full sized 2
door Whirlpool Perfect condition .$98.
650 583-9901 650 678-0221

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Test
6 Law degs.
9 While-__: repair
shop sign words
14 Art critic’s
phrase, literally
15 Calendar pg.
16 NBA’s Jackson
et al.
18 “10” co-star
19 Send out
20 Pamplona’s
municipality
22 Big stain
24 Israeli border
lake
28 “Doubt it”
29 Theme park
near Dallas,
literally
30 “Conan” channel
33 Dayan of Israel
35 Giants manager
before Bochy
37 Like non-oyster
months,
traditionally
39 Ration (out)
40 Changes one’s
ways, literally
42 “The Deep”
director Peter
44 Bottom line
46 Closing
sequence
48 They’re often
numbered
49 Bench
warmers?
53 Loss of speech
55 Drive-__
56 Before, in Brest
59 Tumbles out of
control, literally
61 “In the
Bedroom” Oscar
nominee
62 Passé
63 “Surprise
Symphony”
composer
64 Big tees
65 Matrix, e.g.
DOWN
1 Some jennies
2 Baffle

3 Prophetess
4 Longtime
Dodger
manager
5 Still
6 Whale of a guy?
7 Half of MCDX
8 Most constant
9 Kite aid
10 Cajoled
11 Whistle blower?
12 Key for Fauré?
13 “For shame!”
17 Run at the end
21 “Toy Story”
dinosaur
23 Highland lid
25 Ancient
Germanic
invader
26 Even, in Évian
27 Valuable team
member
29 Field unit
30 Byes
31 Not sharp
32 More ticked
34 Cunning
36 Still breastfeeding
38 __ orientation

41 Ignored the
alarm
43 Civil war site
since 2011:
Abbr.
45 E. African land
47 Dulcimer kin
49 Crushes an altar
ego?
50 Utter
51 Part of a
skipping refrain

52 Like some
heads
54 King anointed
by Samuel
56 Sports fig.
57 U.S. govt.
broadcaster
58 Acker of
“Person of
Interest”
60 Doo-wop
syllable

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

296 Appliances

303 Electronics

TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855

WHIRLPOOL WASHER DRYER, GE
Refrigerator all working and in good condition all for $99.00 650-315-3240.

297 Bicycles
ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

SAMSUNG FLAT TV 20" ex.co.incl.
VCR ,set up $70. (650)992-4544

BILLY DEE Williams autographed Star
Wars action figure: Lando Calrissian,
space smuggler. $35 Steve 650-5186614

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good
$59 call 650-218-6528
POSTERS TRAVEL, airline, art from
1970’s and 1980’s; about 50+; $30 for all
(650)595-2494

299 Computers
KOGI 15 inch computer monitor. Model
L5QX. $25. PH(650)592-5864.
RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142
LARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $3 each
Great for Kids (650) 952-3500
PUZZLES, 20 available, 1000 pcs.
$3.00 each,. (650)596-0513
STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg
THOMAS THE TRAIN; trains, crossing
gate, bridge, track; good condition;
$25/OBO. 650-345-1347.
THOMAS TRAINS; Cranky the Crane
$15/OBO; Tidmouth Shed w/turntable
$50/OBO. 650-345-1347.

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE BUFFET Cabinet, with 2 large
drawers w/skeleton key, needs refinishing. $700/obo.. ANTIQUE CHINA cabinet, with doors and legs, dark wood..
$500/obo. (650)952-5049
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STORE FRONT display cabinet, From
1930, marble base. 72” long x 40” tallx
21” deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

12/02/16

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon
Ball construction **SOLD **
5 FOOT resin folding table, still in the
box $25.00 (650)368-0748

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
ANTIQUE MAHOGANY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

ANTIQUE TIGER Oak Curio, curved
glass and four glass shelves, $700 or
best offer. Solid wood Gothic coffee table, $300 or best offer. Antique sideboard, $300 orbest offer. Faux leather
recliner, couch & loveseat, $400 or
best offer. Brown glass dining table with
four chairs, $300 or best offer.
Call (650)781-2773
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your
mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
COMPUTER TABLE, adjustable height,
chrome legs, 29”x48” like new $30 (650)
697-8481
COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition,
$89, light-weight, compact, sturdy loveseat (415)775-0141
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINETTE TABLE, 3 adjustable leaf.$30.
(650) 756-9516.Daly City.
DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER for $50.
Good shape, blonde, about 5' high.
(650)726-4102

303 Electronics

ENTERTEITMENT CENTER 5'x4' glass
door / shell / drawers / roller ex $25/BO
(650)992-4544

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

60 GIG Ipod, Does not work.
Battery/hard drive not working. $25.
(650)208-5758

FREE: TWO full-size featherbeds. Excellent
condition.
Redwood City
location. 650-503-4170.

BAZOOKA SPEAKER 20, +10W, never
used $95. (650)992-4544

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking
$100. (650)593-4490

KITCHEN TABLE with 4 chairs, Blonde
wood, Farm Style. Apartment sized.
Good condition. $25. (650)359-0213

BULOVA WINDUP Travel clocks.Vintage. Set of eight. $99. gene (650)4215469

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

By Peter Koetters
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

12/02/16

ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393

298 Collectibles

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

xwordeditor@aol.com

27

LEATHER SOFA, black, excellent condition. $100 obo. (650)878-5533

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

IPHONE 5 Morphie Juice Pack with
charger, Originally $100, now $85.
(650)766-2679

MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448

OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

304 Furniture

306 Housewares

310 Misc. For Sale

316 Clothes

MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537

308 Tools

PREMIUM MOVING blankets good condition $10.00 each (650 ) 504 -6057

PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black
nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596

ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296

RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537

MAHOGANY BOOKCASE 40"W x 15"D
x 41"H. Double doors with lock & key.
$35 650-832-1448
NEW DELUXE Twin Folding Bed, Linens, cover, Cost $618. Sale $250. Must
Sell! (650) 875-8159.
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City
NICE WOOD table 36"L x19"W x20"H
$30.(415)231-4825.Daly City
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OFFICE TABLE, 24"x48" HD. folding
legs each end. 500# capacity. Cost
$130. Sell $60, 650-591-4141
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN-SIZED SOFA-BED, beige colored, excellent condition, $99.99 or best
offer. Must Go! (650) 952-3063.

BENCH SAW - 8 INCH includes attached table and accessories $35 (650)3680748
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CLICKER TORQUE wrench, 20-150,
$20, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)8511045
CRAFTSMEN 3 saw blades $20. new.
(650)573-5269
DELTA CABINET SAW with overrun table. $1,500/obo. ((650)342-6993
DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

$40.00

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
SILK SAREE 6 yards new nice color.for
$35 only. C all(650)515-2605 for more information.
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167
WAGON WHEEL Wooden, original from
Colorado farm. 34”x34”
Very good
“aged” condition $200 San Bruno
(650)588-1946

Garage Sales

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
WILSON'S LG Green Suede Jacket
$50.00 (650)367-1508

317 Building Materials
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.
SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment

WATER STORAGE TANK, brand new,
275 gallons. 48" x 46" x 39" $250. 650771-6324

15 SF Giants Posters -- Barry Bonds,
Jeff Kent, JT Snow. 6' x 2.5' Unused. $4
each. $35 all. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

311 Musical Instruments

BACK PACK “Camp Trails-Oasis” $20
(650)595-2494

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

BACK PACK TENT $20 (650)595-2494

ROUTER TABLE ryobi $ 99. like new
650-573-5269

EXCELLENT VIOLIN, previously owned,
first violinist SF Symphony, Mellow
sound. Dated 1894. $5,500/best offer.
(415)751-2416

BUSHNELL NEO XS Golf Watch with
charger. Mint condition. 30,000+ golf
courses. $50. Jeff 650-208-5758

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

FENDER BASS amp 25 watt. electrical
issue box and speaker very good
$45. (650)367-8146

ROCKING CHAIRS solid wood, great
shape asking 30 dollars each. Call
(650)574-4582 Lily

SLEDGE HAMMER & Hand Held Heavy
Duty Hammer & Hand Held AX $3.00
(650)368-0748

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461

RUMMY ROYAL poker table top $30.00
(650)573-5269

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

SHELF RUBBER maid
contract joe 650-573-5269

VINTAGE SHOPSMITH and BAND
SAW, good shape. $1,000/obo. Call
(650)342-6993

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean
good $75 Call 650 583-3515
RECLINING SWIVEL & high-back chair
(Hampton) exc condition $30 (650) 7569516 Daly City.
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

new $20.00

SOFA & Love seat perfect condition $99
Edie 650 345 8981
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344
THOMASVILLE BEVELED mirror 22" x
12" $50. Call 650-834-4833
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

306 Housewares
10 TULIP CHAMPAGNE GLASSES
FOR $12 (415)990-6134
CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026
COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630
GARBAGE CANS: brute 44 gal. Excellent condition $15. 650 504-6057
PORCELAIN JAPANESE Tea set, Unopened, in wood box, great gift $30.
(650)578-9208.
PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

PAINTING TOOLS - hooks, stirrups 110’
ropes, poles, 20’ plank, 440 Graco Spary
Machine, $500, Asking (650)-483-8048

309 Office Equipment
FILE
CABINET
metal
2-drawer
18”Dx15”Wx28”H $10 650-595-2494
IBM SELECTRIC II typewriter with several different font balls. Excellent condition; $40; 650-347-5743
INK CARTRIDGES
$19, 650-595-3933

for

HP

printer,

HARMONICA.
HOHNER Pocket Pal.
Key of C. Original box. Never used.
$10. (650)588-0842
LEXICON LAMBDA cubase LE $60.00
call Patter (650)367-8146
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549
PIANO, UPRIGHT, in excellent condition. Asking $345. (650)366-4769
UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new
in box $79, call 650-324-8416

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

310 Misc. For Sale

312 Pets & Animals

"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.

AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.

500-600 BIG Band-era 78's--most mint,
no sleeves--$99.00 for all--650-574-5459

CANARY BIRD cage 24 x 16 for sale.
$40.00 firm. Used, good condition. Call
650-766-3024

8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
CIAO SMALL Black Duffel Carry-on,
Overnight or Tote bag with shoulder
strap, $15 650-952-3500
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER,
condition $50 (650)878-9542

good

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537
LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084
PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

316 Clothes
BLACK DOUBLE breasted suit size 38
excellent condition $25 650-322-9598
BOY SCOUT canvas belt with Boy Scout
Buckle. Vintage. Fair condition. $5.
(650)588-0842
FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color in excellent condition 3/4
length $50 650-692-8012
FREE SIZE 38 tan gabardine navy officers uniform great condition Perfect for
that costume party.322-9598”
LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648
LADIES SEQUIN dress, blue, size XL,
pure silk lining, $40.00, (650) 578-9208
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708
MAN'S BLACK leather jacket, size 40,
like new. $85.00 (650)593-1780
MEN'S STETSON hat, size large, new,
rim, solid black, large, great gift. $40
(650) 578-9208
NEW JOCKEY Men's Classic Crew
white tshirts (L) 3pk $15/each (5 available) 650.952.3466
NEW WITH tags Wool or cotton Men's
pullover
sweaters
(XL)
$15/each
(650)952-3466
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

BACKPACK THERM-A-REST sleeping
pad $20 (650)595-2494

CHILDS KICK scooter by razor with helmet $25 obo (650)591-6842
EXERCISE STATIONARY Bike - Body
Rider - good condition $50. (650)2663184
FITNESS STEPPER compact
(12"x16") Hardly used! $50. Call
650-766-3024

sized

GOLF CLUBS {13}, Bag, & Pull Cart all-$90.00 (650)341-8342
GOLF CLUBS, new, Warrior woods
3/15 degree 5/21 degree 7/24 degree
$15 ea (650)349-0430
Golf Clubs, used set with Cart for $50.
(650)593-4490
IGLOO BLUE 38-Quart Wheelie Cool
Cooler/Ice Chest $14 650-952-3500
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.
good condition, 650-341-0282.

$95.00,

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

PRINCE TENNIS 2 section nylon black
Bag with Prince Pro Graphite Racket$55.(650)341-8342
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TOTAL GYM XLS, excellent condition.
Paid $2,500. Yours for $900. Call
(650)588-0828
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE NASH Cruisers Mens/ Womens Roller Skates Blue indoor/outdoor sz
6-8. $60 B/O. (650)574-4439
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047
YAMAHA ROOF RACK, 58 inches $75.
(650)458-3255

345 Medical Equipment

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming
garage sale,
moving sale,
estate sale,
yard sale,
rummage sale,
clearance sale, or
whatever sale you
have...
Reach over 83,450 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 83,450
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles

625 Classic Cars
1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.
CORVETTE ‘69 STINGRAY 327, Horsespeed SPS, 50.000 miles. $18,500.
(650)481-5296.
FORD ‘64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

630 Trucks & SUV’s
LINCOLN ‘02 Navigator, excellent condition. Runs great! Must sell! $4,500/obo.
(650)342-4227.

635 Vans
CHEVROLET ‘06 Mini VAN, new radiator, tires and brakes. Needs head gasket.
$1,200. (650)481-5296

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
‘89 GOLD WING. 1500 CC. 39K miles.
Call Joe 650-578-8357
ALPINE STAR motocross boots Tech 8s
size 14 good cond. $75. (650)345-5642
ATV MOTORCYCLE Lift $50.00
Patter (650)367-8146

call

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

645 Boats
16 FT SEA RAY. I/B. $1,200. Needs Upholstery. Call 650-898-5732.
2003 P-15 West Wight Potter sailboat,
excellend
condition.
$7,200.
Call
(650)347-2559

670 Auto Service
LUXURATI AUTO REPAIR
Smog Check
Repair Services
Collision and Body Work

Burlingame & San Mateo Locations

(650) 340-0026

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222

Just $45
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 83,450 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

BMW ‘07 X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats reduced $19,995 obo Call (650)520-4650
CADILLAC ‘02 Deville, 8 cylinder, perfect condition, like new, cashmere outside white inside 4787 miles $13,000.
(415)850-2370

Garage Sales

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

734 Neal Ave, San Carlos

TOYOTA ‘06 Prius, 149K, clean. $6,500
(650)302-5523

SEE OUR AD FOR DISCOUNTS!

CADILLAC ‘99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637

SAT, SUN
9am-5pm

MAZDA ‘12 CX-7 SUV Excellent condition One owner Fully loaded Low
miles reduced $18,995 obo (650)5204650

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

MOVING SALE
Antiques, household items,.
oak rocking chair, dining
room table (seats 10),
clothes, artwork

620 Automobiles

CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, child’s play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

JAGUAR ‘94 XJ6, very clean, 110K
miles, $4,500. (650)302-5523
LEXUS ‘94 GS300 148K miles, very
clean. $2,700. (650)302-5523

670 Auto Parts

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
FIRESTONE TIRES 215/70/R16 good
condition $50. (650) 504-6057
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cabinetry

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Construction

Gardening
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Hauling

Painting

Tree Service

AAA RATED!

MICHAEL’S
PAINTING

Hillside Tree

(650) 574-0203

Family Owned Since 2000

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Housecleaning

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING

Free Estimates

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

(650)341-7482

A+ BBB Rating

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066

Cleaning

Lic#1211534

CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

General
House &
Office
Cleaning

CALEDONIAN
MASONRY INC
Landscape Design!
We can design your
outdoor living
experience.
*BBQ’s *Pizza Ovens
*Patios *Flagstone
*Concrete/Foundation
Call For Free Estimate:

(650) 525-9154

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

Experience s Reasonable
References s Free Estimates
Magda Perez
650.533.8063

TOM (650) 834-2365

(650)296-0568

Licensed Bonded & Insured
License#752250 Since 1985

T.M. CONCRETE

Lic: #1017155
*Foundation*Stamp Concrete
*Exposed Aggragate *Retaining Walls
*Bricks *Pavers *Driveways
*Flagstones
Free Estimates

David: (650) 642-1614

Licensed General and
Painting Contractor
• Int/Ext Painting • Carpentry
• Sheetrock, Dryrot & Stucco Repairs
Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

Lic.#834170

HONEST HANDYMAN

Remodeling, Plumbing,
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance, New Construction.
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

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Notices

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CONTRACTOR

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

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& PLUMBING

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Rambo
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PLUMBING
SUPPLY

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Since 1985

Lic# 947476

Plumbing

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial

Repairs* Remodeling* Painting
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PENINSULA
CLEANING

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lic#628633

Service

Roofing

1-800-344-7771

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since 1989

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Concrete

29

PAINTING

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Lic #514269

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

Caregiver

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Food

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Menlo Park

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1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
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1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
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150 N. San Mateo Drive

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

BECERRA
Continued from page 1
tration after being named to the post
Thursday, promising to defend the state’s
liberal stances on recreational marijuana,
climate change, health care, immigration
and criminal justice.
“If you want to take on a forward-leaning
state that is prepared to defend its rights and
interests, then come at us,” U.S. Rep. Xavier
Becerra said hours after he was appointed by
Gov. Jerry Brown.
Becerra, 58, said he was “stunned” to be
selected by the Democratic governor to succeed newly elected U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris.
But he said he pledged during his telephone
interview with the governor to build on
some of the issues that Brown hopes to preserve as part of his record when he is termed
out of office in two years.
That includes keeping California “the
clean energy superpower of the country,”
protecting otherwise law-abiding immigrants even if they are in the country illegally, and building on Brown’s changes that
reduce mass prison incarceration, Becerra
said. He also will seek to protect the state’s
broad implementation of President Barack
Obama’s health care law that Trump has
pledged to unwind.
“We’re always ahead of the rest of the pack
and we should be prepared to defend that,”
Becerra told reporters on a conference call.
Brown emphasized in appointing Becerra
that he expects him to “help our state
aggressively combat climate change,” an
area where the governor has been critical of
Trump and the Republican-led Congress.
Becerra’s selection reshuffles the Latino
power structure in the nation’s most populous state and nationally. As Democratic caucus chairman, Becerra is the highest ranking
Latino in Congress, where he has served
since 1992.
“Becerra might now be the most prominent Latino politician in the country, particularly when it comes to the debate over
immigration policy,” said Dan Schnur,
director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of
Politics the University of Southern
California.
“Jerry Brown has declared war on
Washington, D.C. and he’s appointed Xavier
Becerra to lead that fight,” Schnur said. But
rather than choose a radical bomb-thrower,
Schnur said Brown wisely chose a
Washington veteran “who’s going to lead a
forceful resistance but not an obnoxious
one.”
Becerra is a rising star in the party who
served as a high-profile Latino surrogate for
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary
Clinton’s campaign this year. He was widely

LOCAL/WORLD
discussed as a potential cabinet appointee if
Clinton won.
He now lives in Los Angeles but recalled
growing up in Sacramento as a son of poor,
hard-working immigrants. He noted he was
the first in his family to graduate from college, obtaining both bachelor of arts and
law degrees from Stanford University, and
said his goal is to offer the same opportunities to others.
But with the election of Trump and a
Republican sweep of both houses of
Congress, his 24-year tenure in the House is
no longer as appealing as becoming the
state’s chief law enforcement officer. In the
attorney general’s position, Becerra could
serve through 2018 and then seek another
eight years after that.
Law enforcement leaders said they look
forward to working with Becerra, who was a
deputy attorney general for three years
before he began his political career in 1990.
But the head of the National Federation of
Independent Business in California panned
Becerra’s “long, dismal voting record on
important small business issues.”
The choice immediately adds Becerra to
the long list of California Democrats who
could be contenders for governor or the U.S.
Senate, said Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, a public
policy professor and political analyst at the
University of Southern California.
The list already includes Lt. Gov. Gavin
Newson, state Controller John Chiang, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio
Villaraigosa, Senate President Pro Tem
Kevin de Leon and wealthy donor Tom
Steyer.
Becerra wouldn’t rule out a bid for higher
office, though he told reporters that he
wouldn’t have agreed to leave Congress if he
didn’t expect to enjoy being attorney general.
Trump’s election upended Becerra’s path to
influence in Washington, said Thad Kousser,
chairman of the political science department
at the University of California, San Diego.
“Washington, D.C., is now red territory,
so if he wants to have an impact on policy,
California’s the place to do it,” Kousser said.
Kousser noted that going to battle in the
courtroom with the Trump administration
over climate change and immigration will
raise his profile for a possible run for governor or to replace Sen. Dianne Feinstein, DCalif., when she decides to retire.
Becerra’s replacement in his solidly
Democratic district in Los Angeles would be
picked via special election, and his expected
departure immediately set off speculation.
Former Assembly Speaker John Perez quickly announced he would seek the seat representing areas including downtown, Boyle
Heights, Chinatown and Highland Park.
Becerra is likely to face easy confirmation
in
the
Democratically
controlled
Legislature.

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

31

Iraq hopes OPEC deal will help
pay for its massive war costs
By Sinan Salaheddin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BAGHDAD — The government of Iraq is
hoping that a new OPEC deal will help the
war-weary country generate enough revenue
to help pay for its costly, 2-year-old fight
against the Islamic State group.
Iraq, whose oil revenues make up nearly
95 percent of its budget, has been reeling
under an economic crisis since late 2014,
when oil prices began their descent from a
high of above $100 a barrel.
The plunge began just months after IS
militants swept across large parts of northern and western Iraq. They seized territory
that prompted a huge effort to rebuild and
rearm large segments of the military and
security forces and to care for a flood of
people displaced from their homes.
On
Wednesday,
the
14-member
Organization of the Petroleum Exporting
Countries sealed a deal to lower its output
for a six-month period by 1.2 million barrels per day. Effective Jan. 1, the group will
produce 32.5 million barrels per day.
Non-OPEC nations are expected to pare

Buzz Aldrin, second man on
moon, evacuated from South Pole
WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Former
American astronaut Buzz Aldrin, one of the
first men to walk on the moon, has been
evacuated by plane from the South Pole for
medical reasons, officials said Thursday.
Aldrin, 86, was visiting the South Pole as
part of a private tourist group when his
health deteriorated, the International
Association of Antarctica Tour Operators
said on its website.
It said he was taken as a precaution on the

an additional 600,000 barrels a day off their
production. That includes Russia, which
committed itself to reducing its output by
300,000 barrels per day.
Oil prices gained an immediate boost
Wednesday with the international benchmark for crude jumping 8.3 percent, or
$3.86, to $50.24. The price of oil dipped as
low as $26 a barrel in February.
“If there was no deal, we would have been
in a very bad situation,” said Iraqi lawmaker Haitham al-Jabouri, a member of parliament’s Financial Committee. “The deal will
have a positive impact on oil prices and
therefor on our precarious economic situation.”
Iraq’s financial crisis has forced the government to introduce austerity measures,
eliminating posts, merging some ministries, halting spending on construction
projects and imposing new taxes. It has
also sought loans from foreign and local
lenders.
In an interview Monday with the
Associated Press, Prime Minister Haider alAbadi described the level of oil prices as
“inadequate.”

Around the world
first available flight to McMurdo Station, a
U.S. research center on the Antarctic coast.
It described his condition as stable.
The National Science Foundation, which
manages the U. S. Antarctic program,
described Aldrin as “ailing” and said he was
being flown on a ski-equipped LC-130 cargo
plane to McMurdo. From there, he would be
flown to New Zealand, it said on its website.
Aldrin became the second man to walk on
the moon in 1969 as part of the U.S. Apollo
11 mission.

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Dec. 2, 2016

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