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Yemen is facing one of the worst humanitarian

crises in the world. The conflict between Al Houthi


and the Saudi-led coalition that started in March
2015 is severely affecting the poorest country in
the Middle East. The last 19 months of conflict have
seen Yemen slide further towards catastrophe.
Airstrikes, embargo, high prices have caused a
profound deterioration of the nutritional situation
and hundreds of thousands lives are at heavy risk.

18.8 MILLION

YEMENIS ARE IN NEED OF HUMANITARIAN AID

3.2 MILLION

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN DISPLACED BY THE WAR

4.5 MILLION

PEOPLE IN NEED OF NUTRITIONAL ASSISTANCE,


INCLUDING 3.3 MILLION ACUTELY MALNOURISHED

462,000
CHILDREN UNDER 5 SUFFERING FROM THE
LIFE-THREATENING SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION

+600 & 1600


HEALTH FACILITIE

SCHOOLS

HAVE BEEN DAMAGED IN THE CONFLICT, PUTTING


AT RISK THE FUTURE OF YEMENS NEXT GENERATION

Action Against Hunger has deployed mobile


nutritional teams to the field and supports
stabilization centres in 4 governorates.

IMPLEMENTING
STABILIZATION
CENTRES
We treat children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) with complications in
stabilisation centres until their medical condition is stabilized and the complication is
resolved (usually 4-7 days). Treatment then continues in outpatient care until the child
recovers. Inpatient care for severely malnourished children with medical complications is
provided in a hospital or health facility with 24 hour care capacity.

Month after month, our nutrition experts have witnessed a deterioration in the humanitarian situation with an increase
of admissions in the Stabilization Centres and a total of SAM and MAM (Moderate Acute Malnutrition) cases significantly
above the emergency the emergency threshold.
Compared to 2014, there has been a 65% rise in the number of people seeking nutrition support. More than 2.8 million
of children and pregnant or lactating women are at greater risk of complication from malnutrition, including death.

NATIONAL LEVEL SAM ADMISSIONS


3000
25000
20000
15000
10000
5000
0

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Monthly SAM admissions 2015

Monthly SAM admissions 2016

Linear (Monthly SAM admissions 2015)

Linear (Monthly SAM admissions 2016)

GLOBAL ACUTE MALNUTRITION


(pre and post crisis)

SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION


(pre and post crisis)
10%

40%

8%

30%

6%

20%

4%

10%

2%

0
Al Hodeidah
Lowland

Lahij Lowland

Pre-crisis (March to May-14)

Taiz Lowland

Post crisis (Oct-15 to May-16)

Al Hodeidah
Lowland

Lahij Lowland

Pre-crisis (March to May-14)

Taiz Lowland

Post crisis (Oct-15 to May-16)


source: UNICEF/MoPHP

HEALTH
& NUTRITION
WATER, SANITATION
& HYGIENE
FOOD
SECURITY

HAJJAH

AL HODEIDAH

ABYAN

LAHIJ

OUR KEY
RECOMMENDATIONS
1

PRIORITIZE THE SCALE-UP OF LIFESAVING NUTRITION


AND HEALTH SERVICES
The scale-up of treatment for acute malnutrition and provision of critical
health services must be prioritized by the humanitarian community through
increased funding, human resources, and technical expertise.
In order to ensure the uninterrupted provision of health and nutrition
services, donors and governments must help prevent the failure of the
Central Bank of Yemen and find solutions to resume payments of health
workers and supply of medical drugs and food.

FACILITATE ACCESS AND DELIVERY OF


HUMANITARIAN AID
All parties to the conflict should facilitate delivery of humanitarian
assistance.
The coalition must respect humanitarian facilities: a 500m safe zone
around all premises on the no-strike list should be respected.
Restrictions on commercial trade must be lifted to ensure the continual
supply of essential commodities, such as food and medicine.

A ceasefire must be implemented immediately and respected by all parties


to the conflict.
Attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure, including health facilities,
must immediately stop and those responsible must be held to account.
Governments must end the transfer of arms and military equipment to any
party to the conflict where a clear risk exists that they might be used in
breach of IHL.

We began to feel fearful. We had felt a massive blast following


the whistle of a rocket. It was 7pm and we had spent the whole
day hearing the sound of distant fighting.
We were in Hayis, at Action Against Hungers stabilization
centre (a hospital facility where the organisation treats severely
malnourished children). We were just mothers with our children
undergoing treatment - scared and helpless. Later, someone
came to the dormitory and told us we had to leave immediately.
There were cars arriving with people carrying weapons. There
were 10 mothers in the centre; six of us decided to leave.
I ran with my five children. Fortunately, my sister lives in the
city but we had to walk to her as we didnt have money to pay
for transportation. The next morning, I borrowed some money
and we went back to our village. My daughter had treatment
for just two days: it wasnt enough and she continues to suffer
from fever and diarrhoea.

Crdit photo : Florian Seriex | Conception : Youval TAYAR - youvaltayar.com

PROTECT CIVILIANS BY RESPECTING INTERNATIONAL


HUMANITARIAN LAW (IHL)