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www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!
www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore!

www.MiddletonTimes.com

www.MiddletonTimes.com VOL. 124, NO. 51 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25 Games galore! I’m

VOL. 124, NO. 51

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25

Games galore!

I’m Board offers a dizzying array of games

Games galore! I’m Board offers a dizzying array of games Photo contributed Located in the same

Photo contributed

Located in the same shopping plaza as Willy West Co-op, I’m Board offers tabletop games for casual gamer, the zealot and everyone in between.

by MAtt GEiGER

Times-Tribune

The Cuban revolution. Mid- dle Earth. Ancient Egypt. A haunted mansion. Edo at the height of a Samurai age. A galaxy far, far away. The dis-

tant future. You can visit them all with- out ever leaving Middleton, and you don’t even need elec- tricity to power this particular time machine. All you have to do is walk through a door, lo- cated at 6917 University Av-

enue, with a massive pun over it.

“I’m Board,” which first opened in the Good Neighbor City in 2011, is a thriving hub for all things game-related. Board games, role-playing games, card games and more

are all for sale, each offering to transport players to some a fas- cinating place and time. You can become a Cold War Spy, a warlock, a Time Lord, a space- ship pilot or a Victorian sleuth.

GAMES, page 6

Recycling center closed Friday

The Middleton Recycling Center will be closed on December 23 and December 30. You may still bring items to the Middleton Re- cycling Center this Saturday, December 17 from 8am - noon. For more information on the Middleton Recycling Center, visit www.cityofmiddleton.us/recyclingcenter.

Community solar projects sell out

by CAMEROn BREn

Times-Tribune

The first of its kind commu- nity solar project on top of the recently constructed municipal operations center completely

sold out of shares. The solar array installation is underway and is expected to go live early next year. In an effort increase the city’s use of renewable energy and

SOLAR, page 5

School district looks at grades, demographic data

by CAMEROn BREn

Times-Tribune

The Middleton-Cross Plains area school board was recently presented with the results of the district’s state report card and the latest demographic data of students. More than half of the schools in the district were rated as significantly exceeded ex- pectations. Elm Lawn, Northside, Sunset Ridge, Glacier Creek and Kromrey were placed in the highest category, significantly exceeded expectations. Sauk Trail, West Middleton and MHS

exceeded expectations. Sauk Trail, West Middleton and MHS were placed in the second-high- est category, exceeded

were placed in the second-high- est category, exceeded expecta- tions. Of the more than 2,100 schools rated statewide, 329 significantly exceeded expecta- tions, while 624 exceeded ex- pectations. Sunset Ridge was the third- highest rated elementary school in Dane County, while Glacier Creek and Kromrey were the top two middle schools and MHS was the second-highest

SCHOOL BOARD, page 5

RRooaadd ttoo ssttaattee bbeeggiinnss nnooww At left, senior and co-captain Olivia Krigbaum. Photo contributed.
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PAGE 2

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

OOPPIINNIIOONN

GEIGER

DECEMBER 22, 2016 O O P P I I N N I I O O N

Counter

by Matt Geiger

O O P P I I N N I I O O N N G EIGER

THE AXE MAN

My pink, glittering wings were fluttering in the midday breeze as I hurled the axes.

Blade after blade bit into the wooden target, and with every atavistic “thunk” I felt my beard growing longer and my shoul- ders broadening. I was, for the first time in nearly 30 years, winning a competition that did not involve hunching over a desk and using my fingertips to daintily tap on little plastic squares. It had started as a normal day. But by the time the sun went down, I was a champion. Over the course of only a few hours,

I had gone from a man who had

never won any contest for throwing anything dangerous -

a nobody, essentially - to a man

who sank the blades of 13 tom- ahawks deep into a round slab of wood. It happened at a festival in a crisp, bright clearing in the Wis- consin woods. The kind where everyone pretends they are vis- iting some bygone era.

The time and place can change: Some people set up camp at my friend’s bison

ranch, for instance, and pretend they are on the Lewis and Clark expedition. Others dress as knights and knaves and gently swing swords at one another. Still others set up permanent “historical villages” where peo- ple make cheese and shirts the hard way and explain to young schoolchildren that the median life expectancy used to 13.

I was wearing jeans and a

sweater. The modern kind – the kind made by a machine in a matter of seconds rather than a man or a woman in a hut over the course of three weeks. But

also the aforementioned pair of pink, bedazzled fairy wings that shimmered in the sun as I flung the ancient weapons at the tar- get again and again. The wings weren’t supposed to be for me. They were for my

two-year-old daughter. But she had abandoned them, the way people who have not yet learned about capitalism tend to discard things when they are done with them or their interest strays elsewhere.

I carried the wings for a

while, but it was easier to strap them to my back and free-up my hands for more important things like ale, axes and my lit- tle girl. As I threw, the target grew thick with axe handles. There was little room in which to squeeze another one, even with my apparently deadly aim. So I sank my next blade deep into the handle of one of the prior weapons, much like Robin Hood did when he split the arrow that was embedded in the bull’s-eye. For the next few hours, I was

a hero. My friends, unable to hide their admiration no matter how hard they tried, bought me beer and slapped me on the back. “If the zombies come,” ob- served one, “we know which

useful skill you’ll have.” I was like Beowulf, traveling from a distant land to slay a dreadful piece of inanimate wood that had been terrorizing the local population. Eventually, perspective re- turned. Most of the competitors

I had bested, I realized but did

not say when retelling the story later that evening, had been small children. But for a few hours that day it felt like I lived in another time, and I felt like

the hero of some Viking saga, even though I don’t and I’m not. Yet the question remained:

From whence did my impres- sive strength and stamina spring? How did I, someone

who is getting winded writing this story, manage to accom-

plish an ancient feat of strength? Modernity is an interesting place to live. But there is noth- ing particularly special about it. After all, everyone who has ever lived, lived in what were then considered “modern” times. No one ever walked out of their mud hut or cave or cas- tle one fine morning, stretched their arms out wide and ex- claimed, “It’s good to live in the

past!”

But the future, when it gets here, is never quite as sleek as we expected it to be. When I first obtained an

Xbox One - a fancy living room video game console that is sup- posed to allow me to throw imaginary touchdown passes and shoot imaginary alien in- vaders, as well as change the channel or pause a movie when

I tell it to with my voice - I

never fantasized about the way

it would really be used.

“Oh cool,” I thought in the store, fishing a thick slab of money from my pocket. “I can instruct it to turn the volume down with my voice, even if I

lose the remote control!” Of course in real life, the fol- lowing scene has played out a thousand times: My daughter is sleeping. The house is finally still. My wife and I are sitting together, quietly watching the latest Ken Burns documentary about the history of whispering or the evolution of teacups, or some such thing. Then, without warning, an in- sanely loud commercial for a movie full of explosions comes

blasting into the television. The raucous noise shakes the very foundation of our house. I lost the remote control ages ago, confident that I could always command everything with my voice.

I find myself quickly, ur-

gently pleading with the voice recognition software: “Xbox,

volume down! Xbox, volume down!” It can’t hear me over the sound of airplanes exploding and machineguns firing, so I

start to plead more urgently - “please, Xbox, volume down!” Nothing happens, so I find myself screaming “VOLUME DOWN!!” at the top of my lungs in an effort to keep the house silent and prevent my daughter from waking up and demanding ice cream or a noc-

turnal trip to the zoo.

It always ends the same way.

I am flustered and horse, pale

and perspiring quite a bit for someone who has not actually risen from the couch. My daughter is wide awake, won- dering what dad is yelling about, and the movie trailer has come to an abrupt end a few seconds before I realize I can stop screeching at a small plas- tic box. This, I realize, is what it’s like to live in the future. Yet the time we live in right now is always dynamic. It is al- ready the present, it was re- cently the future, and it will soon be the past. It is a time in which I sometimes win axe- throwing competitions, when

I’m not busy yelling at my tele- vision. As I left the fair with my prize, I picked up my daughter and effortlessly tossed her high into the air and onto my shoul- ders. There she sat, perched

above the petite wings of a bulky man who is good at throwing axes. While I lifted her from the ground, I suddenly realized why my arm was so strong in the first place. It was her. Someone who knew a little bit about physics but absolutely nothing about parenting sized me up. “Look at the size of those wings compared to his body,” he commented to a friend who fell in stride beside him. “I seriously doubt he’s

going to fly away anytime soon.” My daughter balanced atop

my shoulders and looked out

across the clearing in the woods, which was drenched in the rich highlights of late after- noon sun as people streamed to the parking lot. I clutched her ankle firmly in my hand.

I wondered if the stranger

had any idea just how wrong he was.

Geiger

Counter book now

through major

sellers, at Amazon.com,

in

at The Regal Find

book-

Buy

the

Middleton, or

visit

GeigerBooks.com.

Buy the Middleton, or visit GeigerBooks.com. END OF YEAR REVERIES As I drove North on Decem-

END OF YEAR REVERIES

As I drove North on Decem- ber 8, there was a confusion of cranes above me. Hundreds of birds were flying in every direc-

tion. Hundreds more were in the plowed fields, looking to glean whatever they could to sustain them on their way. They are late travelers this year. Fall extended her stay in Wisconsin far longer than usual. It confused wildlife and it gave folks plenty of fodder for small talk about the weather. My own contribution to those

conversations always revolved around my tomato plants. They were still offering sweet cher- ries and heirloom delights be- yond Thanksgiving. In fact, we ate the last of them on Decem- ber 1. If the bats hadn’t already hi- bernated, they could have kept on harvesting mosquitoes until Thanksgiving, too. The insects

were gone for awhile, but the unseasonably warm weather in- vited another hatch, at least in my neck of the woods. I’m wondering if there’ll be enough

to feed the bats come spring.

if there’ll be enough to feed the bats come spring. And, I’m wondering if there was

And, I’m wondering if there was enough fallen corn to feed the cranes that my mind keeps returning to. Those birds are usually long gone before wind chills drop to a mere seven de- grees which was the temp on December 8. If they landed at an airport instead of in some farmers’ fields that day, ground crews would have rushed out to de-ice their wings. All of us, humans, birds, bats, mosquitoes and tomatoes, are having to adjust to a “new nor- mal” when it comes to weather

patterns. For humans, there is a change in the political weather too. Editor Matt Geiger asked if I’d write something uplifting for this issue that comes right before Christmas and the year’s end. Mentioning politics may make you wonder if I’m stick- ing to my assignment! Change is inevitable. Whether change is for the good or for the bad depends on per- spective rather than ultimate truth. One woman’s or man’s celebration is another woman’s or man’s grief. Transition times are tender times, even when change is for the better. They are wrenching times when the changes appear to be for the worse. How we navigate those times

is what matters the most. One post-election day about

a month ago, the words live and

love came into my mind. I wrote them, side by side, on a piece of paper and considered them for awhile. I saw that the words evil and vile were contained in the word live and wrote them below. I saw that the word vole was con- tained in the word love and

laughed because I knew that it didn’t matter in this moment. I did not write that one down. Why do some lives become evil and choose vile acts? I wondered. I truly believe that no one is born with those nega- tive tendencies. As I continued to study the words, the vowels became prominent. I saw the narrow i as the symbol for the ego-cen- tric I. That’s it!, I thought. When life is lived from an exag- gerated, ego-based, self-cen- tered, perspective, vileness and evil can easily grow. By contrast, the letter o in the word love presented itself to me as the circle of inclusion. I saw it as the planet earth, and as arms in an embracing hug. How can lives be moved be- yond a narrow, self-important “I” state? The answer to that came when my eye rested on the little round dot above the lower case i.

It starts when the “I” turns

it’s gaze to something higher than personal gain and power. So many Christmas stories re- mind us of that; when the Grinch saw everyone holding hands on Christmas morning, when Scrooge witnessed the

Cratchet’s love for one another despite poverty; and when everyone pitched in and rescued the Savings and Loan in It’s a

Wonderful Life.

Rather than staying a dot out- side of the i, Scrooge and the Grinch were able to incorporate

it into their own beings to trans-

form their own lives into love. Of course some people resist it and never get beyond observa- tion like Mr. Potter, the banker in It’s a Wonderful Life.

No matter what the times, we are presented with opportunities to choose love. Like “the Who’s down in Whoville, from the big to the small,” we can choose to meet surprises and difficulties with equanimity and grace. When all of the gifts were stolen, their traditions muddled and their sense of security was violated they didn’t react with vengeful rage. Instead, they joined hands and raised their voices together in song. Love was their priority. It was real love extended through smiles and touch and cama- raderie built on shared experi- ence. Sure, giving gifts and sharing fancy meals are another exten- sion of love. But, if we put purest love in the center of a paper and drew rings around it, gift giving would be in the outer rings of expression.

Like the people of Whoville, and like the cranes that I saw when traveling north, we can choose to flock together, ex- tending warmth and compan- ionship as we move through difficult times. There are so many analogies and stories to encourage us through times of transition in every arena be it the weather, political leadership, losses or additions to family, job changes, the aging process, etc.

It might sound cliché to say

“Let there be peace on earth and

let it begin with me,” but that’s

the only place that it can really take root and grow. Here’s wishing you all holi- days and a New Year filled with peace and love.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 3

OOBBIITTUUAARRIIEESS

Valeria Clara Acker

Wauna-

-

An

Chil-

Clara

R R I I E E S S Valeria Clara Acker Wauna- - An Chil- Clara

kee/Ash-

ton

Amazing

Mother of

13

dren, Vale-

ria

Acker, age 91, passed away on December 14, 2016 surrounded by her lov- ing children and grandchildren singing her favorite Christmas Carol, “Silent Night,” and pray- ing the rosary. Our Mom, through life’s journey, was the backbone & inspiration that ig- nited her husband’s visions & accomplished dreams of our family’s success in business. Valeria was a religious woman and truly believed in the power of prayer and joys raising 13 children and running a family business. She instilled in her children and the philosophy that she lived by was if you work hard and treat people fairly, your dreams will come true. Valeria was born in Cross Plains on April 1, 1925 to Mar- tin and Julia (Zander) Hollen- beck. She was the oldest of three children and graduated

beck. She was the oldest of three children and graduated from Edgewood High School. OnApril 23

from Edgewood High School. OnApril 23 rd , 1946 Valeria mar- ried Clarence Acker. Together for the next 56 years, with their 13 children, they farmed in Middleton and ran a successful land development business. Va- leria was affectionately known as “Ma Acker” over the years to many of her children’s friends. She loved to share laughs and joke with them. Valeria is survived by her 12 children, Marvin (Christine) Acker of Madison, Martin (Kay) Acker of Florida, Wayne (Barbara) Acker of Waunakee, Susan (Stephen) Eastwood of Waunakee, Eileen Acker of Middleton, Dennis (Marlene) Acker of Waunakee, Randy (Judy) Acker of Middleton, Rita (Rod) Voss of Waunakee, Kevin (Jeanette) Acker of Waunakee, Karen Acker of Waunakee, Peggy (Bob) Acker-Farber of Waunakee, Judy (Dale) Maly of Waunakee; 26 Grandchil- dren; 3 great-grandchildren; sis- ters-in-law, Clara (Tom) Church, Beatrice (the late Sylvester) Hellenbrand of Wau- nakee, Josephine (the late Wen- dell) Pederson of Portage and Annabelle (the late Edward) Acker of Waunakee; brothers- in-law, Jerome Wagner of Mid- dleton and Theron Miller of Arizona. Valeria was preceded in death by her husband, Clarence; daughter, Patricia; parents, Mar- tin & Julia Bollenbeck; sister, Teresa (Jerome) Wagner; brother, Kenneth Bollenbeck; sisters-in-law, Verena (Theron) Miller and Margaret (the late Ronald) Pierce. Family and friends are in- vited to visit at Winn-Cress Fu- neral Home, 5785 Hwy Q, Waunakee, on Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016 from 4pm – 8pm. Ad- ditional visitation will take place at St. Peter Catholic Church, 7121 County Hwy K, Middleton, on Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016 from 10am – 11am. The Mass of Christian Burial will follow at 11am with Fr. Tait

Mass of Christian Burial will follow at 11am with Fr. Tait Schroeder presiding. Valeria will be
Mass of Christian Burial will follow at 11am with Fr. Tait Schroeder presiding. Valeria will be

Schroeder presiding. Valeria will be laid to rest in the church cemetery. A reception will take place at Rex’s Innkeeper fol- lowing the committal service at

the cemetery.

The family would like to ex- tend a special thanks to the CNA and nursing staff at the Waunakee Manor for their car- ing and support of our mother over the years, her daughter, Rita, for being Mom’s Guardian Angel, Paulyn Ripp for her prayer sessions, Aunt Annabelle Acker for her friendship, and Ron Wagner for his helpfulness when needed. We can honor her by keeping Valeria in our hearts and

prayers. In lieu of flowers me- morials would be appreciated to

the MARC Center for the Hand-

icapped of Madison (in memory

of Patricia) and St. Peter’s Ash-

ton and St. John’s Waunakee Endowment funds. Winn-Cress Funeral and Cremation Service 5785 Highway Q, Waunakee

608-849-4513

Please share your memories at CressFuneralService.com

Laurine E.

Hildebrandt

MER-

,

Wis.- Lau-

rine

H i l d e -

brandt, 99,

Mercer,

e

of

E.

C

E

i

R

d

d

rine H i l d e - brandt, 99, Mercer, e of E. C E i

peacefully Friday evening, Dec.

9, 2016, in her home, with her

son, Earl, by her side. The former Laurine E. Frey was born June 15, 1917, in Rox- bury, Wis., daughter of the late William and Mary (Bongard)

Frey, and was raised on a small dairy farm. Being the second oldest, she helped work the farm as well as help raise her younger brothers and sister, along with various part time jobs during the Great Depres- sion, just to make ends meet. She married Frank A. Hilde- brandt on July 15, 1939. She and Frank owned and operated Hildebrandt Sheet Metal Co. in Middleton until 1976, when they moved the business and home to Mercer. It was there that she loved her house on Echo Lake and regularly fished with her husband or anyone who showed interest in soaking a bobber. Frank preceded her in death in 1981. Laurine was a member of St. Isaac Jogues Catholic Parish in Mercer. She enjoyed cooking,

baking, sewing, quilting and feeding the birds and deer that graced her yard, but her greatest love was raising her children and making the home a most ef- ficient and enjoyable environ- ment. She always cherished the “old days” and stories of farm life and the Great Depression. Although frugal, she tried to give her family the very best and her love was unsurpassed. We know that you now share

eternity with the Lord and your

love and His will shine in us forever. Surviving are her children,

Russell (Diane), Middleton, Ruth Marino, Lincoln, Calif.,

and Earl, Mercer; five grand-

children, Dawn (John) Ed- wards, Byron Center, Mich., Lynn (Brad) Richardson, Wau-

nakee, Mark (Amber) Hilde- brandt, Colgate, Frank (Lori) Marino, Yuba City, Calif., and Erika (Mathew) Roeder, Park Falls; eight great-grandchildren; brother, Clifford Frey, Wauna-

eight great-grandchildren; brother, Clifford Frey, Wauna- kee; sister, Joan Peterson, Law- ton, Okla., son-in-law,

kee; sister, Joan Peterson, Law- ton, Okla., son-in-law, Gary Gibbs, Mercer; and many nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents and husband, Laurine was preceded in death by a daughter, Susan Gibbs, on May 2, 2007; broth- ers, Werner, Sylvester and Earl Frey; sister, Dolores Usher; and son-in-law, Frank Marino Sr. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Friday, Dec. 16, at 11:30 a.m., preceded by visi- tation at 10:30 a.m., at St. Isaac Jogues Catholic Church in Mer- cer, with the Rev. Ronald Ser- rao, celebrant. Luncheon followed. Rite of Committal and spring interment were in the Mercer Cemetery.

If desired, memorial contri- butions may be made to Wis- consin Regional Library for the Blind, 813 W. Wells St., Mil- waukee, WI 53233, or selected charitable organization. Arrangements have been en- trusted to McKevitt-Patrick Fu- neral Home Inc., Ironwood, Mich. Condolences may be ex- pressed online at mcke- vittpatrickfuneralhome.com. The family would like to thank Ministry Home Health and Hospice for all their special care, Norb Brossmer for his words of faith, and mother’s neighbors for all their visits and assistance when she needed help. Bless you all!

for his words of faith, and mother’s neighbors for all their visits and assistance when she
for his words of faith, and mother’s neighbors for all their visits and assistance when she
for his words of faith, and mother’s neighbors for all their visits and assistance when she
for his words of faith, and mother’s neighbors for all their visits and assistance when she

PAGE 4

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

Former mayor okay after fire

Doug Zwank thanks fast-acting firefighters for containing blaze

by MAtt GEiGER

Times-Tribune

The City of Middleton’s for- mer mayor is thanking local first responders after a serious fire occurred at his local home. On November 29, Doug Zwank’s family experienced a major fire in their house, appar- ently caused by a dehumidifier

in the basement. “When the fire alarm went off, I initially thought it was a malfunction because I couldn’t smell any smoke and saw no fire,” recalled Zwank. “I then checked the basement and fire was climbing a wall. I immedi- ately ran back to the main floor to evacuate my wife, 90 year old mother-in-law and infant

granddaughter.” Zwank, a veteran who has been active with the local VFW Post for many years, also quickly dialed 911. “Within five minutes Fire Chief Aaron Harris and another firefighter arrived with their high pressure water truck,” Zwank said. “Their quick action probably saved my house even

though we did suffer major damage in the basement.” “Almost all” of the family’s personal items were saved, ac- cording to Zwank. Zwank went on to say that within several minutes of Har- ris’ arrival two other fire trucks arrived with a full complement of firefighters. With their pro- tective gear and oxygen tanks

they entered the smoke-filled house. “To say that I was impressed and grateful for their quick re- sponse and professionalism would be an understatement,” Zwank said. “We are very for- tunate to have such a great fire company and its volunteers.” “Although it is a very trau- matic experience to be routed

out of your home by a fire, I am very grateful that all of my fam- ily escaped safely and the Mid- dleton Fire Department saved most of our home and important possessions,” the former mayor concluded. “Thanks again to the Middleton Fire Department and all of its men and women vol- unteers.”

Middleton Ski and Board teams prepare for a new season

\The Middleton High School Ski and Snowboard teams anticipate an- other exciting season ahead with nearly seventy student-athletes on the roster, supported by a large freshman class adding to the teams’ depth. Coming off a school-best 5 th place finish at State last year, the boys ski team is led by seniors Austin Krantz and Eric Andersen, junior Alec Riddle and sophomore Nick Ronnie. For the

girls, senior Olivia Krigbaum returns for another likely trip to State. Ski team Head Coach Ray Riddle and Assistant Coach Midori Shaw are excited about their second year coach- ing the teams and the prospects of a re- turn trip to State, despite losing three key seniors to graduation. “Develop- ing this diverse group of girls and get- ting both teams to State is the focus for the year,” said Shaw.

Not to be outdone, snowboard re- turns two teams loaded with thirteen out of the fourteen State representa- tives from the previous year. The boys’ team earned a school-best 2 nd place at State in 2016, with the girls taking 3 rd . The boy boarders are led by returning seniors Maxwell Lawrence, Sam Anderson, Campbell Esbeck, Charlie Angevine, Alec Johnson and Edwin Stajkovic and junior John

Jones. Leading the girls are senior Abigail Drake, juniors Paige Wirth and Kaden Mettel, and sophomores Samantha Williams, Megan Chandler and Hannah Laufenberg. For third-year snowboard team coach Darrin Kolka, this could be the year for a first-ever State championship for the snowboarders. “Have fun and a State title are our winter goals this year,” said Kolka.

Ski and snowboard racing is a var- sity sport at Middleton High School, with the teams competing in the South- ern Conference of the WI High School Alpine Racing Association. Last sea- son, the boys board team, girls board team and boys ski team each won con-

ference, with the girls ski team taking

6 th .

The first meet

is Mondayevening, January 2, 2017 at Tyrol Basin Ski Area.

Local deputy, dog retire from sheriff’s office

Jay O’Neil and K9 Hunter worked out of Middleton precinct

After over 26 years of dedi- cated service, Deputy Jay O’Neil and his faithful K9 Hunter retired on Friday of last week. Deputy O’Neil and Hunter patroled on 1 st shift from the Sheriff’s Office West Precinct in the Town of Middleton. They were both the subject of a fea- ture story about dogs in law en- forcement in the Middleton Times-Tibune several years ago. According to the sheriff’s of- fice, their retirement will leave big shoes to fill, both in experi-

ence and expenses. O’Neil has been on the Dane County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team since 1996 and his past partners include Dino (1996- 2006), Thor (2006-2009), and now Hunter (2010-present). Hunter is a German Shepherd and was born in the Czech Re- public. He is a dual-purpose K9 trained in apprehension, area search, article search, building search, narcotics detection and tracking. O’Neil and Hunter have had an active and diverse career; they have assisted other

had an active and diverse career; they have assisted other agencies, worked special events, performed many
had an active and diverse career; they have assisted other agencies, worked special events, performed many

agencies, worked special events, performed many public demonstrations, apprehended suspects, located illegal drugs, and have responded to countless calls for service. Deputy O’Neil and Hunter have also successfully assisted in the seizure of weapons and drug money, including one find where they were responsible for the seizure of $25,000. During a stop in 2015, Hunter alerted on a suitcase containing over $38,000 worth of drugs and a loaded handgun. K9 Deputies with the Dane County Sheriff’s Office attend annual training and have to pass rigorous certifications. But the training goes well beyond the classroom; continuing to their home, where the K9s live with the deputies and their families. The cost of acquiring or replac- ing a K9 partner is approxi- mately $15,000, and within one year, the Sheriff’s Office will need to replace 4 out of 5 of our K9s. Thankfully, Dane County

to replace 4 out of 5 of our K9s. Thankfully, Dane County Photo contributed Deputy Jay

Photo contributed

Deputy Jay O’Neil and Hunter, seen here with a group of local Daisy Scouts, retired last week. They worked out of the Sheriff’s Office West Precinct that shares a building with the Middleton Town Hall.

leave serving as an example to future K9 deputies as to the ex- cellence and dedication they should strive for,” said Elise Schaffer, public information of- ficer for the sheriff’s office. “We wish them both a happy re-

www.danecountyk9.org.

tirement and are indebted to the services they have provided to the citizens of Dane County. For information on how to support the Dane County K9 Team, visit

K9 Inc., a non-profit organiza- tion dedicated to supporting the Dane County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team, assists with these ex- penses. “Deputy O’Neil and Hunter

to supporting the Dane County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team, assists with these ex- penses. “Deputy O’Neil
to supporting the Dane County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team, assists with these ex- penses. “Deputy O’Neil
to supporting the Dane County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team, assists with these ex- penses. “Deputy O’Neil

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 5

One artist’s journey

by DEB BiECHLER

Times-Tribune

As a child, Joni Goldman al- ways wanted to be an artist. But when her third grade teacher said, “You can’t draw,” Gold- man thought she couldn’t be one. In spite of that setback, Gold- man was drawn to creating things. “I made paper flowers, which were a big thing in the ’60s, and

sold them to my neighbors.” She made lanyards, tied macrame’ knots, and at the age of 13, learned to knit. It wasn’t until Goldman was about 30 years old that she dis- covered “outsider” art and began to collect it. The most fa- mous outsider artist of the time was Norman Finster. “I thought, these people are just doing what they want,” Goldman remembers. “They were painting from their souls.

I knew that I could do that. So I went to an art store and told the person working that I wanted to start painting on wood. I asked, ‘What do I need?’” Goldman was sold a box of acrylic paints. There were both primary and secondary colors in the kit. She also bought a piece of 4 x 6 wood. The spare room in her home became her studio. She experi- mented and played with color and texture, continuing to be in- spired by the outsider artists of the time. When a friend from Milwau-

S O L A R SOLAR

kee visited her home - then in Indianapolis - he walked into the studio and asked, “Is this stuff for sale?” He commissioned her to paint a 2 x 2 foot square paint- ing, which she sold to him for

$30.

“That sale gave me the confi- dence to go forward,” said Goldman. Not long after that, Goldman began to paint on wooden furni- ture and boxes. She showed the owner of an art gallery in Indi- anapolis what she was doing. That gallery, Artsy Fartsy, in- vited her to be their guest artist at the Broadripple Art Fair, a ju- ried show, that attracts artists from around the country. “A gallery owner named Joy, from Louisville, Kentucky, came into the fair booth and in- vited me to do a one woman show at her gallery, Sister Drag- onfly. I was a sales rep at the time so it took me a while to create enough for a show.” The show’s theme was Call- ing All Angels. Every piece in- cluded an angel. Every piece sold in the first night. Goldman continued to ex- hibit her work at the Sister Dragonfly Gallery in Louisville. She also started applying to ju- ried art fairs. Sales at these events were good. The fairs took her all over the Midwest; Chicago, Min- neapolis, Cleveland; Lexington and Louisville in Kentucky; South Haven and Kalamazoo, Michigan; and in Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Spring Green, She- boygan, Appleton and Madi-

- Milwaukee, Spring Green, She- boygan, Appleton and Madi- Photo contributed “Outsider” artist and Mid- dleton

Photo contributed

“Outsider” artist and Mid- dleton resident Joni Gold- man.

son’s Art Fair On The Square. “In 2003, I felt that I was los- ing my edge as a painter and was ready to quit the art fairs. For me, it was about evolution.

I felt finished in the way that I

had been doing art and was ready for something new.” As one chapter in her life as an artist closed, another opened. Goldman was introduced to Very Special Arts (VSA) in In- dianapolis. VSAwas founded byAmbas- sador Jean Kennedy Smith in 1974. It was first named the National Committee - Arts for the Handicapped. That name changed to VSA in 2010. The goal of the non-profit organiza- tion is to provide arts and edu- cation opportunities for people with disabilities and increase access to the arts for all. “To this day, working for VSA in Indianapolis is my fa- vorite working experience,” said Goldman. “I got to co-teach with people

from all different artistic disci- plines. There were potters, mu- sicians, storytellers, dramatists, and all kinds of painters. We often collaborated on projects. That enhanced the experience for the students and for me.” Through VSA and also as a volunteer, Goldman worked with patients at Riley’s Chil- dren’s Hospital. Working on art helped to distract the children, at least for a while, from why they were there. One of her most powerful ex- periences happened at a resi- dential psychiatric treatment center. It was a locked facility. “Several artists were collab- orating with the kiddos to create a play. There were two dimen- sional and three dimensional artists creating sets, a storyteller

who helped the patients write the play, and a yoga teacher helping with movement. The kids were between ages seven and seventeen. There was one young lady, around 14 or 15 years old who didn’t talk. She physically could speak, but because of the trauma in her life, chose not to. She hadn’t talked for a very long time. Her role was to create back- ground posters. I kept praising her. She was doing great work, but never spoke. The production was very up- lifting. Families and staff came to it and celebrated with a cake and party afterward. At the end, I went to this girl and said, ‘It was such a pleasure to work with you.’ She looked right at me and said, ‘Thank you.’ I still think about that girl

Earlier this month Middleton Outreach Ministry’s “Create For A Cause Holiday Art Fair featured keychain beading kits made by the Boys and Girls Club After School Beaders. Sales from the event benefit both MOM and the Club. Some of the teacher’s jewelry will be donated for the sale as well. Goldman can be reached at 608-957-4788 to make an ap- pointment to view her work. She is also interested in selling her jewelry at a local business and welcomes invitations to that end. Anyone interested in volunteering with the beading club at the Boys and Girls Club can contact Jan Fulfiller at 608-347-3195.

and hope that things turned out all right for her.” Now that Goldman lives in Middleton, she occasionally works as a teaching artist for VSA in Madison. Her latest class is a 10 week session for seniors on jewelry-making. Jewelry-making is Gold- man’s latest incarnation as an artist. This phase started a year ago when her neighbor, Jan Ful- wiler invited Goldman to assist with an after school beading class at the Boys and Girls club in Fitchburg. With her experience as a teaching artist, and always lov- ing to learn new modes of art, Goldman jumped at the chance. At first she learned along with the students from the many other women who were volun- teering. One day, the teachers drove to Diakonos Designs, a bead shop in Stoughton. The owner, Becky, showed the group how to make a particular kind of bracelet. “I was hooked in that moment.” As a self-taught painter, Goldman had to be a problem solver. By solving the problems

of a piece, she made it her own, even if the inspiration came from elsewhere. It’s the same with jewelry-making. Some of Goldman’s beads come from Japan, the Czech Republic, India, Russia, and Thailand. There’s a whole fam- ily of beads known as an African Trade Beads. “African trade beads are from all over the world, but were traded in African countries for other goods. They can be from 100 to 600 years old. Just think of all of the places that these beads have been and the people who have handled them,” Gold- man invites. Right now, Goldman is sell- ing her jewelry through a gallery in Indianapolis, and to friends and family. She consid- ers herself to still be in the in- fancy of this process and is constantly experimenting. “That said, she jokes, “I’m still open to phone calls and and glad to sell what I’ve made so far. I’ve had a friend help to de- sign hang-tags and cards, but I don’t have an online presence yet.”

continued from page 1

meet the demand of utility cus- tomers the city partnered with Madison Gas & Electric to install solar panels on the roof of the police station and municipal operations center. The solar array at the police station will be used generate about 25 percent of the buildings annual energy use while the solar array atop the municipal operations building provides solar en- ergy to shareholders. “I’m so pleased and proud to see MGE’s and the city’s shared solar proj- ect has sold all its shares,” said city ad- ministrator Mike Davis. “This will be the largest municipally-hosted solar array in Wisconsin with 500 kWh gen- erated. It’s cost-effective and environ- mentally-friendly to be a sustainable city.” The cost for those who bought shares in the community solar project included a one-time participation fee of

$47.25 per solar blocks(1 block = 250 watts). Shareholders will pay a fixed solar rate of $0.12 per kWh plus a re- duced transmission charge of $0.008/kWh for 25 years. MG&E esti- mates shareholders will see reduced bills in 10 year and payback in 17. Cus- tomers can also exit at anytime. The 500 kW solar array on the mu- nicipal operations center cost MG&E about $945,000 and will generate 648,240 kWh per year. For the police station array the city signed a 25 year lease on the solar pan- els owned by MG&E. MG&E invested about $230,000 purchasing and in- stalling the solar array. The city will pay $12,579 annually to lease the pan- els and have an option to buy after five years. The solar panels will not reduce the amount the city spends on electricity. Rates will be roughly the same as

S C H O O L   B O A R D SCHOOLBOARD

being on the grid. Abby Attoun-Tucker, Director of Community Development, led the ini- tiative on the project. She says the de- mand was so high for shares in he project that about a fifth of the appli- cants had to be turned away. The community solar project allows more people the choice to use solar en- ergy who might not be able to set up their own array, Attoun says. “Alot of people can’t do a project on their own roof because they have a lot

of large trees or the slope of their roof

is angled appropriately for solar and if

you go to a small project like a 5 kW

on your own roof you are going to pay

a lot more per kW than you would if

you are going and doing a very large 600 kW installation like MG&E is doing,” Attoun said. “They are able to get much better pricing because just setup of getting contractors there to in-

stall a project as well as purchasing the panels in bulk you get a much reduced cost by doing it that way.” Attoun says the project is a great model and can serve as an example to other communities that want renewable energy. “There are other communities now, as well as Dane County, kind of reach- ing out to MG&E in the hopes that they can get a similar project in their com- munity,” Attoun said. “We think it is great because the more people that are doing solar the better as far as sustain-

ability efforts for the city. We’re glad to see it is reaching other communities as well.”

Attoun says she’s spoke with Dane County and Green Tier Legacy Com- munities group, both of which are try- ing to come up with similar projects. The shared solar project is a re- sponse to the public input sessions held

by MG&E last year, Attoun says. Hun- dreds of customers said they wanted to see more solar and renewable energy being implemented, she explains, “It is good that they are listening to people.” Attoun says the array on the police station will meet the goal of the city’s 25 by 25 resolution to have 25% of its energy from renewable by 2025 for that building. And for a reasonable cost. “We’re going to get that project at a much reduced cost than what it would have cost us to go at it alone,” Attoun noted. Already there have been discussions between MG&E and the city about an- other large community solar project, Attoun says: “We are hopeful that [MG&E] will do another project now in Middleton now that they’ve seen there is quite a bit of demand for this kind of project.”

continued from page 1

rated high school. Director of curriculum and assessment MaryBeth Paulisse explained to the board recent changes to the state’s rating sys- tem and what the numbers mean for the district. Paulisse said the district’s re-

port card is similar to a student’s report card. It evaluates student achievement, student growth,

closing

and

graduation/post-secondary readiness, but because of the

state implementing a new exam

it was difficult to compare prior

years to this year. Paulisse said this years re-

gaps

sults were compiled using scores from the badger exam taken two years ago and com- pares to forward exam taken last year by students in 3-4 grades and 5-8 grades. She notes that growth or achieve- ment is weighted by demo- graphics and socio-economic status. “Students did not do as well on forward exam,” Paulisse pointed out. “That was a trend statewide.” Superintendent George

Mavroulis added that the tests were very different. He said the badger exam was much more

similar to the assessment tests used by the district. Board member Todd Smith said he wanted to hear more about why the districts gradua- tion rate was lower than the state average. “The one place that our score is below the state average is in the graduation [rate],” Smith said. “That is a place I would like to hear more about because it directly relates to the district goals we spent so much time developing.” Mavroulis said there will be

a presentation coming up that will address strategies the dis-

trict is using to address the low graduation rate. He also re- minded Smith the data the re- port card was using was already two years old an doesn’t ac- count for recent changes includ- ing district policies to create more paths to graduation. Board member Kurt Karbu- sicky said considering that tests have changed in the last few years and its hard to draw con- clusions why should board members care about the results. Mavroulis said it does not so much impact Middleton but can

hugely impact property values and open enrollment in smaller

rural communities throughout the state. Community and media rela- tions person Perry Hibner said on one hand you don’t want to focus on the test, rather focus on the education and good test re- sults will just happen. But he added, “Let’s not be naive, when people are shopping in Dane County they are looking at the destination districts.” Assistant Superintendent Sherri Cyra presented the latest data to the board on enrollment based on gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, special

education and limited English proficiency from 2011-12 to the present. Students who are eligible for free-or-reduced lunch dropped by one percent and there were fewer new students last year, which means fewer students were leaving the district. There are fewer white students in 2015-16 than there were in 2011-12 which indicates growth among sub-groups. Cyra said shift occurred primarily at the elementary schools and hasn’t aged into the middle or high school level yet.

PAGE 6

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

6 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 G A M E S continued from page 1

GAMES

continued from page 1

DECEMBER 22, 2016 G A M E S continued from page 1 With all these options,

With all these options, there is a good chance you’ll leave converted to the world of gam- ing. “We’re like game evangel- ist,” jokes Bryan Winter, the shop’s good-natured owner. “Don’t be surprised if you walk through the door and say, ‘I never knew there were so many board games!’ he ex-

plains. “We hear that a lot. And don’t be afraid to ask for our ad- vice.” Winter is not a Luddite, but he does embrace the pleasure and edification that can be de- rived from tabletop games and the real-world social interac- tions they help facilitate. “While I have no issues with online interaction and gaming,

I have no issues with online interaction and gaming, Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger Want to
I have no issues with online interaction and gaming, Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger Want to
I have no issues with online interaction and gaming, Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger Want to
I have no issues with online interaction and gaming, Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger Want to

Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger

Want to unplug and have a great time with your friends? I’m Board has the perfect answer, according to shop owner Bryan Winter (above).

indicators pointed to Middleton as the best place to start,” he says. “So far that’s seemed like the correct decision!” Sharing a strip mall with pop- ular destinations including Willy West co-operative and Amber Indian Cuisine, foot traf- fic inside the store gives it a bustling vibe. It must be nice for Winter, who has enjoyed games as long as he can remember. “Some of my earliest memo- ries are playing board games with my family and friends,” he says. “This niche industry was born in the ‘70s, when I was a youngster, and I’ve grown up right along with it.” And while seasoned gamers will find plenty to like at I’m Board, newcomers won’t feel intimidated. There are game that range from fun, brief and casual to serious, lengthy and laden with lore. “We really do hit every mar- ket,” says Winter. “Little kids looking for Pokemon cards, parents looking for ways to get everyone - even themselves - off the screens for a bit, home- schoolers, young adults looking for fun ways to spend the evening, couples looking to play a game after the kids go to sleep, players of all types gath- ering to play in one of our events.” “We do have a big game room in the back and a library of games to try out, and even if we have an event going on there is usually space to come in and

sometimes you need to unplug, interact and reconnect,” Winter explains. “The games we sell embrace that philosophy. From silly party games to deep think- ing strategy games, we like to think we have something for every table and every group of players.” “Sometimes I hear people saying that they don’t like to play games,” he continues. “What they are probably actu- ally saying is they don’t like to play Monopoly. What a lot of people do not realize is that there is a huge assortment of these ‘specialty’ games for all

is a huge assortment of these ‘specialty’ games for all ages and interested, things that you

ages and interested, things that you generally don’t find at the big box stores, that provide a much more rewarding and fun experience than the types of board games many of us grew up with.” I’m Board originally opened on the other side of Middleton Sport Bowl in a smaller loca- tion, and after three years moved to its currently location with double the space. Winter has been involved “in just about every aspect of the specialty games industry over the years” - from working as the game specialist in a hobby shop

during college, to manufactur- ing and distribution. “I was even a full time game designer for several years in the ‘90s,” Winter says. “During the late ‘90s I moved to a more ‘regular’ career in web market- ing, but always wanted to get back to what I love. So I took the chance and gave up the cor- porate job security and went back to retail with my own shop.” Winter said ample research went into choosing the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business plan, and all the

the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business
the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business

CHURCH NOTES

the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business
the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business
the Good Neighbor City for I’m Board. “I spent about a year working on my business

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 7

Follow Rob Reischel on Twitter at @robreischel
Follow Rob
Reischel on
Twitter at
@robreischel
PAGE 7 Follow Rob Reischel on Twitter at @robreischel Times-Tribune photos by Mary Langenfeld Hannah Flottmeyer

Times-Tribune photos by Mary Langenfeld

Hannah Flottmeyer (above) and Bria Lemirande (right) helped Middleton’s girls basketball team roll past Verona Tuesday night.

Middleton KO’s Verona

Cardinals notch big early season win

by ROB REiSCHEL

Times-Tribune

Angie Murphy knows a thing or two about champi- onship teams. Murphy led Verona to the 2016 WIAA Division 1 girls basketball title in March. And as Murphy left Middleton High School Tuesday evening, she realized her Wildcats might have just faced their eventual successors. Middleton, ranked fourth in the latest wissports.net poll, dominated the defending champs from start to finish and posted an impressive 58-38 win. The Cardinals improved to 5-0 both overall and in the Big Eight Conference, while eighth-ranked Verona fell to 4- 1, 5-2. “I think they do,” Murphy said when asked if the Cardinals have the look of a championship team. “They have a target on their back and that was us last year.” There’s no doubt, 2015-’16 was the year of the Wildcats. Verona used its rare blend of size, skill and experience to become the Big Eight’s first

state champion since Janesville Parker in 2001. Perhaps the 2016-’17 Cardinals will make it two in a row for the league. Middleton certainly gave a championship performance in dismantling the Wildcats. The Cardinals used a 36-9 run during the middle portion of the game to turn a 14-all tie into a 50-23 bludgeoning. Senior guard Bria Lemirande had 19 points and eight rebounds, while senior forward Alexis Thomas and senior guard Alyssa Lemirande both added 10 points. Middleton also forced 26 Verona turnovers and outre- bounded the Wildcats, 30-24. “This was really big,” Bria Lemirande said of beating Verona. “Every Verona game is really big for us, but this one was really big. It’s a really good win.” Since Verona joined the Big Eight in 2008, there has been just one season where the Cardinals or Wildcats didn't win the league. Instead, the two have dominated the conference and typically battle each other for league supremacy. This year was expected to

be much of the same. But Middleton might have shown Tuesday there’s a gap between it and the rest of the confer- ence. “They definitely showed that they’re an experienced team and our newbies strug- gled with that,” Murphy said. “They really took control of the game. They’re a very good team and they just get in those runs.” The teams were tied, 14-14, when Middleton went on a 10- 0 run over a 5 ½ minute stretch midway through the first half. Bria Lemirande started the fun with a three-pointer, then Alyssa Lemirande attacked the lane and scored. Bria Lemirande had a steal and went coast-to-coast for a lay-up, then Alexis Thomas buried a three- pointer. During the Cardinals’ burst, they held Verona scoreless on eight straight possessions and forced five Wildcats’turnovers. “We had some spurts in there,” Middleton coach Jeff Kind said. “In the course of the game, we’ll usually get a cou- ple of those. As long as we take

GiRLS BB, page 15

Kind said. “In the course of the game, we’ll usually get a cou- ple of those.
Kind said. “In the course of the game, we’ll usually get a cou- ple of those.

PAGE 8

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

2016 was one to remember

Sensational sports seasons have become the norm inside Middleton’s athletic department. The Cardinals have reached new heights in several sports. And in those where Middleton has been successful, it’s now dominant. Things weren’t any different in 2016, as the Cardinals shined in countless sports once again. Here’s one person’s look at the top-10 Middleton sports sto- ries of the year. The second half of the list is published here. The first half will be in the Dec. 29 edition of the Middleton Times-Tribune.

Rob Reischel
Rob
Reischel

6. Boys cross country team runs down dreams

The last time Middleton’s boys cross country team had a top-three finish at state was in 1992. The Cardinals changed that this fall. Middleton finished third at the state meet behind only Madison West and Hartland Ar- rowhead. Based on sectional

times, the Cardinals were tabbed to finish fifth in the team stand- ings. “I was really proud of the team,” Middleton coach Brian Finnel said. “They battled out there and gave it their best ef- fort. Third place is pretty darn impressive. “We were coming in ranked fifth, so for the fourth straight year we improved our ranking at the state meet. We set some lofty goals to start the season, but ended up just a bit short. The important thing is they were de- termined to give it their all and they did.” Cardinals senior standout Gus

2016, page 10

and they did.” Cardinals senior standout Gus 2016, page 10 File photo M i d d

File photo

M i d d l e t o n ’s

cross

team

third

the

boys

country

finished

at

school’s highest

finish

1992.

since

state,

photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys
photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys
photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys
photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys
photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys
photo M i d d l e t o n ’s cross team third the boys

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 9

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 9

PAGE 10

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

n

2016

continued from page 8

Newcomb agreed. “Coming into the weekend, people thought of us as more of a fifth place team, but having beaten the No. 1 team (Madison West) earlier and only lost to them by three points the week before we thought we were far better,” Newcomb said. “We were disappointed with third, but most of all happy to be able to come out of our sectional alive and run at state.” Newcomb led the way with a

fifth place finish. Middleton junior Jack Rader was 11th, jun- ior Sam Jaeger was 25th, soph- omore Caleb Easton was 28th and freshman Braedon Gilles was 97th. “State was a great experience for this team and I hope it gets the younger guys hungry to be here in the future,” Finnel said. “I don’t think there's going to be too many teams returning five guys who ran at the state meet and eight of (their) top 10.

“I want to keep things rolling here as best as possible. Win- ning is contagious and I think putting high expectations rubs off on the guys on the whole team.”

7. Meicher hoists gold

They call him “Ice.” Calm. Composed. Cool. Col- lected.

2016, page 11

“Ice.” Calm. Composed. Cool. Col- lected. 2016, page 11 File photo M i d d l

File photo

M i d d l e t o n

f r e s h m a n K

n Meicher won

a state title at 126 pounds.

e

v

i

Col- lected. 2016, page 11 File photo M i d d l e t o n

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 11

DECEMBER 22, 2016 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 11 File photos Middleton’s baseball team (top) and boys
DECEMBER 22, 2016 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 11 File photos Middleton’s baseball team (top) and boys

File photos

Middleton’s baseball team (top) and boys volleyball team (above) both qualified for the state tournament in 2016.

n

2016 continued from page 10

You’d never know that Mid- dleton wrestler Kevin Meicher was a freshman. Meicher certainly didn’t act his age at the WIAA Division 1 state tournament. Instead, the poised and unruffled Meicher acted several years older. Meicher stunned the field and won a state championship at 126 pounds. Meicher defeated top- ranked and defending state champion Justin Folley of Wauwatosa West/East, 9-8, in Saturday’s finals at the UW Kohl Center. On the state’s biggest stage,

“Ice” refused to melt. “I’m surprised,” said Me- icher, who finished the season with a 43-3 record. “My goal has always been to win four state championships since I don’t even know when, kinder-

garten. “When I came here and wres- tled the older guys here, I just knew I wanted to be here one day and win as many as I could. Being my freshman year, it’s pretty good.” Pretty good is a major under- statement. Middleton has had just one state champion in its lengthy history. That was Ben Brummel, who won a title at 171 pounds in

2009.

Meicher notched No. 2 in what became a remarkable freshman season. “He said he wanted to be a four-time champ and you can’t do it if you don’t win the first one,” Middleton coach Kent Weiler said. “Good for him. He worked hard. He came from a young boy in eighth grade last year in the summer and you saw him turn into a man.” Meicher entered the tourna- ment as the No. 6 seed, while Folley was a prohibitive favorite in the finals. But Meicher sur- prised many by upending Fol- ley. “It feels great,” Meicher said. “To knock off the defending state champion feels pretty good. “I didn’t think about him being a defending state champ. I just thought of him as another wrestler. It was just another match, the same as wrestling in the wrestling room. So I just fo- cused on what I’m good at on the mat and controlled him throughout the whole match.”

8. Baseball Cards bounce back

Losing isn’t the norm inside Middleton’s baseball program. And the Cardinals certainly weren’t going to let it become the new standard. Middleton, one of the state’s

2016, page 12

the Cardinals certainly weren’t going to let it become the new standard. Middleton, one of the

PAGE 12

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

n

2016 continued from page 11

elite programs for more than two decades, struggled through an uncharacteristic 10-16 season in 2015. But the Cardinals bounced back in 2016, went 22- 6 overall, and reached the WIAA Division 1 state tourna- ment for the 10th time since

1995.

Middleton eventually fell to Green Bay Preble in the state quarterfinals — a game in which ace pitcher Alec Morri- son left the game after just six pitches after he was struck in the head with a line drive. Still, it was a memorable year for all of the Cardinals. “For them to lose and have a losing record (in 2015) and then be able to turn it around, that’s a lot of determination and hard work,” Middleton manager Tom Schmitt said. “Only eight teams out of 96 get here and we were one of them. There’s only going to be one team that’s truly happy.” After slumping to eighth place in the Big Eight in 2015, the Cardinals finished third in 2016 and went 13-5 in the con- ference. “It was a great year and I’m really proud of all these guys,” Cardinals senior standout Drew Finley Haag said. “It was a real struggle (in 2015), and I’m just really happy that we were able to make it here with all these guys.”

9. Boys spikers keep on rolling

The names and faces change each August. The results rarely do. Middleton’s boys volleyball team continued its dominance of the Big Eight Conference — and the area. The Cardinals won the conference title for the 10th time in 11 years and reached the state tournament for a fourth consecutive year. Middleton’s memorable sea- son ended in the state semifinals with a four-set loss to Waukesha Catholic Memorial. “For me to complain or whine, there are going to be teams saying, ‘We'd love to go four years in a row,’” Middleton coach Ben White said. “It's great we've created a culture and ex- pectation that we're going to state.” Middleton has reached the state tournament nine times since 2002. The Cardinals are also 115-4 in Big Eight Confer- ence dual meets since the start of 2006.

“We're a pretty young team and have a lot of pieces that can bring this team back next year,” White said. “Their goal this year and next year is to play on that last day. We've said that all year we wanted to start on the first day and play on the last day. As

I get older and have coached

long enough, I know you don't take (getting to state) for granted and just enjoy the moment, be- cause you don't know when you'll be back.”

10. Boys basketball team nabs title

Middleton’s boys basketball team had gone 15 years without winning at least a share of the Big Eight Conference title. The Cardinals put an end to that drought in 2015-‘16. Middleton, Sun Prairie and Madison Memorial all tied for the league’s top spot with 14-4

conference records. Madison Memorial claimed a share of its 13th straight conference title, Sun Prairie shared the league title for the second time in four years and Middleton ended the longest drought of the trio. Middleton had a chance to win an outright conference title, but lost to Janesville Craig in the regular season finale. “It’s bittersweet,” said Mid- dleton junior forward Tyree Eady. “We should have won tonight and we wouldn’t have had to share conference. I’m frustrated, certainly not satis- fied. There are two teams we have to share it with now, but I still think we’re the best team.” Cardinals guard C.J. Fer- manich agreed. “You go back to the start of the year and I don’t think any- one thought we’d do this,” Fer- manich said. “But as the year went along, it became clear that we could win it. “It doesn’t feel great right now, but this is the best league in the state. So someday I’m sure we’ll appreciate it more than we do right now.” Two weeks later, the Cardi- nals fell to Madison West in a regional final. Still, it was a memorable year for the pro- gram. “We feel good but not satis- fied,” Eady said of the season. “I’ve played with these guys for three years ever since my fresh- man year here and next year I’m coming back with a mindset that

I don’t want to lose any more games and just grind.”

I don’t want to lose any more games and just grind.” File photo C.J. Fermanich and
I don’t want to lose any more games and just grind.” File photo C.J. Fermanich and

File photo

C.J. Fermanich and Middleton’s boys basketball team won a share of the Big Eight Conference title last season for the first time in 15 years.

S P O R t S

B R i E F S

MBSC registration

The Middleton Baseball and Softball Commission (MBSC) will begin online registration for the 2017 season on Jan. 1, 2017. Youth baseball and soft- ball players who wish to play in any of the MBSC recreational or competitive programs in 2017 may register on the MBSC website at www.mbscwi.com.

Program descriptions and league director contact infor- mation is available on the MBSC website. Registration will continue through February for competitive programs and through May for recreational programs. Evaluations for competitive baseball teams are scheduled for March 4, 5 and 11, while evaluations for competitive softball programs will be held

evaluations for competitive softball programs will be held on March 12 and 19. Boys spikers honored

on March 12 and 19.

Boys spikers honored

Middleton’s boys volleyball team received the WIAA’s Sportsmanship Award for the 2016 fall state championship. Middleton reached the state tournament for a fourth consec- utive year, before losing in the quarterfinals to Waukesha Catholic Memorial.

Middleton

is

Ben White.

coached

by

Bowling scores

Middleton Ladies Verelene Morris 509, Cindy Hall 505, Frayne Born 481, Cathy Matts 479.

White. coached by Bowling scores Middleton Ladies Verelene Morris 509, Cindy Hall 505, Frayne Born 481,
White. coached by Bowling scores Middleton Ladies Verelene Morris 509, Cindy Hall 505, Frayne Born 481,
White. coached by Bowling scores Middleton Ladies Verelene Morris 509, Cindy Hall 505, Frayne Born 481,
White. coached by Bowling scores Middleton Ladies Verelene Morris 509, Cindy Hall 505, Frayne Born 481,

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

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MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

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MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

PAGE 15

n GiRLS BB

continued from page 7

care of the ball, we’ll be OK.” By halftime, Middleton had pushed its lead to 34-21. Bria Lemirande had 14 first half points on 6-of-8 shooting and added seven rebounds, while

Thomas had all 10 of her points on 5-of-6 shooting. “I tend to come out kind of slow in games,” Lemirande said. “But I told myself to come out strong and then you

don’t have to worry about pick- ing it up the rest of the game. “I thought we had really good passing and were really unselfish. And I thought our defense was really good com-

unselfish. And I thought our defense was really good com- pared to some other Verona games.”

pared to some other Verona games.” Middleton’s defense was especially good on Verona sen- ior standout Alex Luehring. While the 6-foot-2 Luehring had 15 points, the UW-Green Bay recruit shot just 7-of-23. “We were really focused on defending Luehring,” Lemirande said. “She still had

a good game, but we shut her down pretty good.”

Middleton continued to pile

it on in the second half, smack-

ing the Wildcats with a 16-2 run in the first 8:20 to pull away. Bria Lemirande and Claire Staples both had five points in that burst, while Alyssa Lemirande had four and

points in that burst, while Alyssa Lemirande had four and Charlotte Dunn added two. Middleton’s defense
points in that burst, while Alyssa Lemirande had four and Charlotte Dunn added two. Middleton’s defense

Charlotte Dunn added two. Middleton’s defense in that stretch was also sublime, as it

held Verona to 1-of-9 shooting and forced eight Wildcats turnovers. And when the Cardinals’ flurry was over, they held a commanding 50-23 lead. “We’ve got a lot to work on,” Murphy said. “But one thing that shouldn’t need work is your focus and your effort. That was some of the things I was disappointed in.” Kind and his Cardinals were on the other end of the spec- trum, though, and headed to the holidays on a high. “Verona’s going to win their share of games for sure,” Kind said. “So I’m pretty happy where we’re at.” • On deck: Middleton hosts Janesville Parker Thursday at 7:30 p.m. The Cardinals then face Franklin in the first round of the Franklin Tournament on Dec. 27 at noon.

Dec. 20 Middleton 58, Verona 38 Verona Middleton

21 17 — 38 34 24 — 58

VERONA — Bainbridge 4 0-0 9, James 1 0-0 2, Kundinger 1 0-0 2, Luehring 7 0-0 15, Mitchell 2 0-2 5, Mueller 1-2 1, Schachte 1 0-0 2, Schraufnagel 2-2 2. Totals 16 3-6 38. MIDDLETON — Anderson 1 0-0 3, Bursac 1 0-0 2, Dunn 2 0-0 4, Flottmeyer 0 0-2 0, A. Lemirande 5 0-0 10, B. Lemirande 8 0-0 19, Staples 3 0- 0 7, Thomas 4 1-2 10, White 1 0-0 3. Totals 25 1-4 58. 3-point goals — MID 7 (Anderson 1, B. Lemirande 3, Staples 1, Thomas 1, White 1), V 3 (Bainbridge 1, Luehring 1, Mitchell 1). Total fouls — MID 6, V 6.

B. Lemirande 3, Staples 1, Thomas 1, White 1), V 3 (Bainbridge 1, Luehring 1, Mitchell

PAGE 16

MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2016

Hockey Cards fall

by ROB REiSCHEL

Times-Tribune

Middleton’s hockey team dropped a 3-2 overtime game at Janesville last Thursday. Janesville’s Tyler Kulas scored the game-winning goal 3 minutes, 27 seconds into overtime. “The season has started off on kind of a rocky note,” said Middleton coach Steffon Walby, whose team fell to 2-2

M i D D L E t O n R O U n D U P

on the year. “Some of the things that we’re working dili- gently to correct are our overall game preparation as well as our willingness to compete and lead at a high level.” Middleton trailed, 1-0, when Troy Reisteck scored on an assist from Justin Engelkes

when Troy Reisteck scored on an assist from Justin Engelkes with just 12 seconds left in

with just 12 seconds left in the first period to even things up. It stayed that way until the third period when Engelkes scored at 7:16 to give Middleton a 2-1 advantage. But Janesville’s Ty Perkins tied things up at 9:44, then Perkins assisted on Kulas’s game-win- ner. “Transferring the informa- tion from practices to the game is part of our headache right now,” Walby said. “Our team knows the systems and the expectations. They’re just hav- ing a hard time putting them into a consistent game effort.”

Janesville 3, Middleton 2 (OT)

Janesville ……

……. First Period: J—Nolan Frederick (Ty Perkins, Baily Aegerter), pp, 9:24. M—Troy Reisteck (Justin Engelkes),

16:48.

Third Period: M—Engelkes, 7:16.

J—Perkins, 9:44. Overtime: J—Tyler Kulas (Perkins), 3:27. Saves—Jack Bostedt (J) 35, David Vodenlich (M) 42.

Middleton ………

1 0 1 1—3 1 0 1 0—2

…………

• Boys basketball:

Middleton rolled past Verona, 79-42, last Thursday. The Cardinals improved to 5-1 overall and 4-1 in the Big Eight Conference. Cardinals senior forward Tyree Eady led all scorers with 20 points. Senior guard C.J. Fermanich and senior wing Myron Ashford Jr. both added 11 points. The Cardinals built a 37-18 halftime lead and cruised

The Cardinals built a 37-18 halftime lead and cruised Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld Ben Jackson

Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld

Ben Jackson and Middleton’s boys basketball team notched two impressive wins last week.

home.

Verona …………

………. VERONA — Buss 1 0-0 2, Clements 1 3-4 5, Fink 2 0-0 4, Golden

2-2 2, Gonzales 1 0-0 3, McClure 3-4 3, Pederson 5 0-0 12, Reiber 2 0-0 4, VanHandel 3 0-2 7. Totals 15 8-14 42. MIDDLETON — Ashford 4 1-2 11, Eady 7 2-4 20, Fermanich 4 1-1 11, Jackson 2 0-0 4, Michaels 1 0-0 2, Roden 2 0-0 4, Roquet 2 0-0 5, Sigmon 2 0-0 6, Smith 2 0-0 4, Ticknor 2 0-0 5, Wipfli 1 1-1 3, Lewis 2-2 2, Francesco 1 0-0 2. Totals 30 7-10 79. 3-point goals — MID 12 (Ashford 2, Eady 4, Fermanich 2, Roquet 1, Sigmon

Middleton ……

……

18 24 — 42 37 42 — 79

2,

Ticknor 1), V 4 (Gonzales 1, Pederson

2,

VanHandel 1). Total fouls — MID 13,

V

11.

swimming:

Middleton cruised in a triple

Boys

dual last Tuesday. The Cardinals defeated Sun Prairie, 245-84, and rolled past Madison East, 279-44. Middleton’s 200-yard med- ley relay team of Archer Parkin, Tommy McGovern, Luke Delaney and Gunnar Kunsch was first. The Cardinals’ foursome of Nate Lamers, Nathan Kim, Archer Parkin and Michael Draves was first. And

Middleton’s quartet of Sam

Young, Erick Grelle, Isaac

Hanson and Michael Draves won the 400-yard freestyle relay. Middleton also got wins

from Draves in the 200-yard IM and 100-yard butterfly, Grelle in the 50-yard freestyle, Lamers in the 200-yard freestyle and the 100-yard backstroke, Nathan Kim in the 100-yard freestyle, Chris George in the 500-yard freestyle, and Jack Mondi in the 100-yard breaststroke. • On deck: Middleton hosts Janesville Parker Thursday at 5:30 p.m., then is off until Jan. 6 when it travels to the Janesville Craig triple dual.

Janesville Parker Thursday at 5:30 p.m., then is off until Jan. 6 when it travels to