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for Personnel Protection -

LockoutlTagout
of Energy Sources Minimum Safety Requirements

American National Standards Institute


I I West42nd Street
New York, New York 1
10036
I

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ANSI @
2244.1-1982

American National Standard


for Personnel Protection Lockout/Tagout
of Energy Sources Minimum Safety Requirements

Secretariat

National

Safety Council

Approved

March 8, 1982

American

National

Standards

Institute,

I nc

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American

National
Standard

Approval of an American National Standard requires verification


by ANSI
that the requirements
for due process, consensus,
and other criteria for
approval have been met by the standards developer.
onsensus
cStandards

is established
when, in the judgment
of the ANSI Board of
Review, substantial agreement has been reached by directly and
materially
affected interests.
Substantial
agreement
means much more
than a simple majority, but not necessarily
unanimity.
Consensus
requires
that all views and objections be considered,
and that a concerted effort be
made toward their resolution.
The use of American
National Standards
is completely
voluntary;
their
existence does not in any respect preclude anyone, whether he has approved
the standards or not, from manufacturing,
marketing, purchasing,
or using
products, processes,
or procedures
not conforming
to the standards.
The American National Standards Institute does not develop standards and
will in no circumstances
give an interpretation
of any American National
Standard.
Moreover, no person shall have the right or authority to issue an
interpretation
of an American National Standard in the name of the American
National Standards
Institute.
Requests for interpretations
should be addressed to the secretariat or sponsor whose name appears on the title page
of this standard.
CAUTION NOTICE:
This American National Standard may be revised or
withdrawn at any time. The procedures of the American National Standards
Institute require that action be taken periodically
to reaffirm,
revise, or
withdraw this standard.
Purchasers
of American National Standards
may
receive current information on all standards by calling orwriting the American
National Standards Institute.

Published by

American National Standards Institute


11 West 42nd Street, New York, New York 10036

Copyright 0 1982 by American National Standards Institute, Inc.


All rights reserved.
No part of this publication
may be reproduced
in any
form, in an electronic
retrieval system or otherwise,
without prior written permission
of the publisher.
Printed in the United States of America

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Foreword

(This Foreword 1snot a part of American National Standard 2244.1-1982.)

Tlus standard was developed by an American National Standards Committee. national in scope.
functioning under the procedure of the American National Standards Instrtute with the Natlonal
Safety Council as Secretariat. This standard establishes mmimum requirements for the lockout/
tagout of energy sources that could cause injury to personnel.
It is hoped that the procedures and performance requirements detarled herem will be adopted
by every employer whose operations fall wlthin the scope and purpose of the standard.
Neither the standards committee. nor the sponsor. feel that this standard 1sperfect or in its
ultimate form. It is recognized that new developments are to be expected. and that revlslons of
the standard will be necessary as the art progressesand further experience 1sgamed. It is felt.
however. that uniform requirements are very much needed and that the standard in Its present
form provides for the mmimum performance requirements necessary in developing and lmplementing a lockout/tagout procedure for the protection of employees.
Suggestions for improvement of this standard will be welcome. They should be sent to the
American National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York. N.Y. 10018.
This standard was processed and approved for submittal to ANSI by Amencan Natlonal Standards Committee on Lockout Protection 2244. Committee approval of the standard does not
necessarily imply that committee members voted for its approval. At the time it approved this
standard. the 2244 Committee had the following members:
Frank J. Rapp, Chairman
G. P. Lang, Vice-Chairman
Allen W. Carpenter, Secretary
Organnation

Name of Represennltrve

Represented

Aerospace Industries Association of America ................


Alliance of American Insurers. ........................
The Alurmnum Association ..........................
American Institute of Chemical Engineers. .................
American Insurance Association .......................

..
.
.
..

Amencan Iron and Steel Institute. ......................


American Petroleum Institute. ........................

. .
.....

Eastman Kodak Company.

.....

Edison Electric Institute

..........................

... .

............................

....
....

General Electric Company. ..........................


Industrial Union, Unrted Auto Workers ...................

..

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. ...........


International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, AFLCIO.
. . . .
Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association . . . . . . . .
. . . .
National Electrical Manufacturers Association

. .

. .

National Fire Protection Association. ....................


National FluId Power Association. ......................
National Machine Tool Builders Association.

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...

................

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.....
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J. L. Henley
Daniel Nauer (Ah)
T. F. Bresnahan
J. B. Stewart
J. A. Vaillancourt
Edward Charkey
Joseph Gillian (AIt)
R. L. Brannaman
Robert J. Cordes
F. B. Killmar (Ah)
Gray Powell
Leonard S. Corey (Alt)
E. D. Henschell
C. R. Chapm (Alt)
W. J. Hanes (Alt)
R. B. Staib (Alt)
Eugene J. Komlosi
Frank J. Rapp
Barrie E. Brooks (Alt)
James H. Beall
Walter H. McKinnon (Alt)
W. James Weston (Ah)
Paul R. Schoop
W. L. VanTifflin
E. W. Entwhistle (Alt)
Lawrence E. Slimak (Alt)
R. E. Smith
J. Rice (Ah)
S. H. Telander (Ah)
(Representation Vacant)
James C. White
John F. Berninger (Alt)
George E. Hecox
William Atkinson, Jr (Alt)

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Organization

Represented

National Safety Council

Name

..

.............

Osbom Manufacturing Corporation.


Printing Industries of Amerrca, Inc.

Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Company


Ross Operating Valve Company. ........
U.S. Department of Labor - OSHA ......
Western Wood Products Association
Independent

..
...

......
......

......

..
...

. .
..

...
. ..

. ..
....

of Representative

Theodore M. Wire
Allen W. Carpenter (Ah)
Steve LeCount
W. H. Rouse
J. E. Vandeman (Ah)
Quinton W. Goode
Ted Kokubo
J. E. Pipkin (nonvoting observer)
J. L. Scully (nonvoting observer) (A
Jerry Fields
K. L. Patrick (AJt)

Experts

John H. Capps
J. J. Geddings
D. S. Gibson
Edward V. Grund
c. P. Lang

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Contents

PAGE

SECTION

.
.

7
7
7
7

2. Definitions. .............................................

....,

3. Lockout/Tagout Policy and Procedure ........................


3.1 General. .........................................
3.2 Responsibilities. ....................................
3.3 Communication and Training ...........................
3.4 Minimum Requirements for Lockout/Tagout Devices ...........

.
.
.
.
.

1. Scope, Purpose, and Application ..........................


1.1 Scope .........................................
1.2 Purpose. .......................................
1.3 Application .....................................

4. Minimum Requirements for Lockout/Tagout Procedure - Preplanning


4.1 Survey of Energy Sources and Related Exposures ...........
4.2 Identification of Energy Isolating Devices ................
4.3 Selection and Procurement of Protective Materials and Hardware .
4.4 Assignment of Duties and Responsibilities ................
4.5 Preparation of Deenergization and Start-Up Sequence(s) ......
5. Implementation of Lockout/Tagout Procedure. ...............
5.1 Preparation for Lockout/Tagout ......................
5.2 Application of Lockout/Tagout .......................
5.3 Release from Lockout/Tagout. .......................
6. Special Lockout/Tagout Considerations. ....................
6.1 Lockout/Tagout Interruption (Testing of Energized Equipment) .
6.2 Equipment Design and Performance Limitations. ...........
6.3 Exposure of Outside Personnel .......................
6.4 Multiple Personnel Protection (Group Lockout/Tagout) .......
6.5 Coordination (Shift/Schedule Change) ..................
6.6 Authorization for Lockout/Tagout Application and Removal ...
6.7 Work on Energized Equipment .......................
6.8 Production Operations. ............................
Illustrations
Illustration 1 Lockout/Tagout Procedure for Electrical Energy Source .
Illustration 2 Lockout/Tagout Procedure for Hydraulic-Pneumatic
Energy Source. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix Sample Lockout Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Explanation
of Standard
Format

American National Standard 2244.1-1982 uses a two-column format to provide both specific
requirements and supportmg informatlon.
The left column. designated Standard Requirements. is confined solely to these requirements
and is printed in bold type. Where supportmg photographs or sketches are required. the) are
designated as figures.
The right column. designated Explanatory Information. contains only information that is
intended to clarify the standard. This column is rzol a part of the standard. Where supplementary photographs or sketches are required. they are designated as illustrations
Operating rules (safe practices) are not included 111 either column unless they are of such a
nature as to be vital safety requirements. equal m weight to other requirements. or guides to
assist in compliance with the standard.

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American National Standard


for Personnel Protection Lockout/Tagout
of Energy Sources
Minimum Safety Requirements

STANDARD REQUIREMENTS

EXPLANATORY

INFORMATION

(Not part of American National Standard 2244.1.


1982.)

1. Scope, Purpose, and Application


I. I Scope. This standard establishes minimum requirements for lockout/tagout of energy sources that could
cause injury to personnel.
1.2 Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to establish performance objectives for procedures for the protection of personnel in, on, or around machines or
equipment during repair, maintenance, operation, and
associated activities, from injury due to unexpected
energization, start-up, or release of stored energy from
the equipment/process. The purpose is accomplished
by affuring appropriate lockout/tagout devices to the
energy isoiating devices of the machine or equipment/
process according to specific procedures.
This standard acknowledges that there are existing
standards and procedures that address specific aspects
of lockout/tagout for particular industries and areas of
operation. This standard is a performance standard and,
as such, is not intended to replace existing specific
standards and procedures, but rather to support those
that meet the performance objectives defined in this
standard.
1.3 Application. The requirements of this standard
apply to all situations where the unexpected energization, start up, or release of stored energy of the equipment/process, would be likely to endanger personnel.

El.3 Application. This standard is intended to apply


to activities such as, but not limited to: erecting, installing, constructing, repairing, adjusting, inspecting,
operating, and maintaining the equipment/process.
(See 6.8 for clarrfication of operating condrtrons.) This
standard is intended to apply to energy sources such as.
but not limited to: electrical, mechamcal, hydraulic,
pneumatic, chemical, nuclear, and thermal.

2. Definitions
lockout/tagout. The placement of a lock/tag on the
energy isolating device in accordance with an estab-

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AMERICAN

NATIONAL

STANDARD

2244.1-1982

lished procedure, indicating that the energy isolating


device shall not be operated until removal of the lock/
tag in accordance with an established procedure. (The
term lockout/tagout allows the use of a lockout device, a tagout device, or a combination of both.)
lockout device. A device that utilizes a lock and key
to hold an energy isolating device in the safe position
for the purpose of protecting personnel.
togout device. A prominent warning device that is
capable of being securely attached and that, for the
purpose of protecting personnel, forbids the operation
of an energy isolating device and identifies the applier
or authority who has control of the procedure.
energy source. Any electrical, mechanical, hydraulic,
pneumatic, chemical, nuclear, thermal, or other energy
source that could cause injury to personnel.
energy isoloting device. A physical device that prevents
the transmission or release of energy, including, but not
limited to, the following: a manually operated electrical
circuit breaker, a disconnect switch, a manually operated switch, a slide gate, a slip blind, a line valve, blocks,
and similar devices with a visible indication of the position of the device. (Push buttons, selector switches, and
other control-circuit type devices are not energy isolating devices.)
knowledgeable individuol. One who knows the effect of
operating the controls or equipment.
authorized individuol. A knowledgeable individual to
whom the authority and responsibility to perform a
specific assignment has been given by an employer.
affected employee. A person whose job includes activities such as erecting, installing, constructing, repairing,
adjusting, inspecting, operating, or maintaining the
equipment/process.
slosh (1). A slash (/) denotes and/or and indicates that
two words or expressions, such as lockout/tagout or
equipment/process, are to be taken together or individually.
shall. The word shall denotes a mandatory requirement.
should. The word should denotes an advisory recommendation.

3. L.ockout/Tagout

Policy and Procedure

3.1 General. It shall be the responsibility of each employer whose employees are engaged in erecting, installing, constructing, repairing, adjusting, inspecting,

E3.1 General. The preferred use of locks or tags vanes


considerably from industry to industry and location to
location. Where a specific facility for apphcatlon of a

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AMERICAN

operating, or maintaining the equipment/process, to


develop, document, and implement a policy and procedure for lockout/tagout. The policy and procedure
shall clearly and specifically outline purpose, responsibility, scope, authorization, rules, definitions, and
measures to enforce compliance.

3.1. I Policy. The lockout/tagout policy shall require all personnel to comply with the lockout/tagout
procedure.
3.1.2 Procedure. The lockout/tagout procedure
shall specify that prior to the performance of any of
the activities listed in 3.1 where unexpected energization, start up, or release of stored energy could occur
and cause injury, all potentially hazardous energy
sources shall be isolated and locked/tagged out. The
procedure shall also specify the requirements for removal of such devices, transfer of locks/tags or responsibility for them, and testing for determination of lockout/tagout effectiveness.
3.1.3 Wse,Locks/tags shall be provided by the employer and shall be the only authorized device(s) used
for the lockout/tagout of energy sources. They shall be
singularly identified and specifically approved for lockout/tagout.
3.2 Responsibilities
3.2. I Authority. Compliance with this standard
shall be the responsibility of the employer and the individual(s) to whom the employer delegates accountability for compliance and authority to enforce compliance.
3.2.2 Periodic Inspections. It shall be the responsibility of the employer to verify, through periodic inspections, the organizations compliance with this standard.
3.2.3 Joint Responsibility. The responsibility for
obtaining performance in the lockout/tagout procedures
shall be joint between the employer and the employee.
The responsibility for compliance is that of the employer, who shall establish, communicate, train in use,
and enforce procedures. The employee shall be responsible for knowing and following the established procedures.

NATIONAL

STANDARD

2244.1-1982

lock is available and the lock can be readily applied,


many industries choose to use a lockout procedure as
the acceptable means for protection of the employee.
On the other hand, in industries where the use of tags
has been well established and accepted as a recognized
prohibitive to the operation of energy isolating devices,
a tagout procedure has proven by experience to be
equal in protection to a lockout procedure. This is particularly the case in industries where complex, integrated systems are the norm. Careful consideration
should be given to the selection of a lockout or a tagout procedure or a combination of both in caseswhere
existing procedures are not already in existence and
well accepted as recognized prohibltives to the operation of energy isolating devices.

E3.1.2 Procedure. Potentially hazardous energy


sources are those that could affect personnel in, on. or
around a process/equipment that is to be locked/tagged
out. A sample lockout procedure is given in the Appendix of this standard. It may be used as a guide for developing a specific lockout/tagout procedure for compliance with this standard. Where complexity so indicates,
a more comprehensive procedure should be developed
and implemented. Illustrations 1 and 2, respectively,
show lockout/tagout procedures for electrical and hydraulic-pneumatic energy sources.
E3.1.3 Use. Where a tag is attached to the energy
isolating device for compliance with the standard, a
universal company lock may also be used when required for security or any other purpose.

E3.2.2 Periodic Inspections. These inspections


should include random audit and planned visual observation of compliance with lockout/tagout procedures.

3.3 Communication ond Training


3.3.1 All Employees. All employees shall be specifically notified of the requirements for compliance with
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DISCONNECT SWITCH
LOCK OUT IF
WORKING ON
CONTROL PANEL
OR ON ELECTRICAL
CONTROL CIRCUIT

INCOMING
p CONTROL

INCOMING
POWER
P
I
I

CONTROL PANEL
START AND STOP
SWITCHES, ADJUSTMENT CONTROLS, ETC

CIRCUIT BREAKER AND


MOTOR STARTER
LOCK OUT BEFORE WORKING
ON MOTOR OR EQUIPMENT

.
\

FIG.@
CIRCUIT BREAKER
SWITCH IN
OFF POSITION
SHOWING I.D. TAG,
AND
TONG AND LOCK
q _? SYSTEM WITH

Illustration 1
Lockout/Tagout Procedure for Electrical Energy Source

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\1

PROVISION BY THE
USE OF WIRE CABLE

ISOLATION
VALVE
.uIvIIIvu
FOR ENERGY

TO ISOLATE ENERGY
SOURCE

c______-I

-I

PNEUMATIC VALVE IN OFF POSITION


KED OUT WITH TONG AND LOCK
SYSTEM, I.D. TAG, AND LOCKS
OF THREE EMPLOYEES

AIR POWERED TRIP HAMMER

Illustration 2
LockoutlTagout Procedure for Hydraulic-Pneumatic Energy Source

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AMERICAN

NATIONAL

STANDARD

2244.1-1982

the employers policy and specifically made aware of


the lockout/tagout procedure.
3.3.2 Affected Employees. The employer shah ensure that each affected employee is instructed in the
purpose and use of the lockoutltagout procedure.
3.3.3 Authorized Individuals. All authorized individuals shall receive training in recognition of the applicable hazardous energy sources and in adequate methods and means for their isolation.
3.4 Minimum Requirements for Lockout/Togout Devices. The lockoutftagout devices used for compliance
with this standard shall be:
(1) Durable. Capable of withstanding the environment to which they are exposed for the maximum
period of time that exposure is expected.
(2) Unique. Distinctive, easily recognizable, clearly
visible.
(3) Stundurdized. Standard in one or more of the
following criteria: color, shape, size, types, or format.

E3.4(3) Standardized. Particular attention should


be paid to the determination of the shape and color of
the tag so as to make rt distinct in design. The srze of
the tag should be adequate so that it 1snot easily overlooked or mrsplaced. Many tags rn present use are at
least 3 in X 6 m. Informatron on the tag should be rn
positive direct format leaving no doubt as to mterpretation.

(4) Substantial.
(a) Locks. Of such durability and key code complexity that removal by any means, other than the regular key, would require excessive force or unusual techniques such as metal cutting tools.
(b) Tags and attachment mechanisms. Of such
design that the probability of accidental removal is
minimized.
(5) Identifiable. Including provision for identification of the person or persons authorizing the application of or applying the device.

4. Minimum Requirements for Lockout/Tagout Procedure - Preplanning


The following considerations shall be observed in the
establishment of an effective lockout/tagout procedure:
4. I Survey of Energy Sources and Reloted Exposures.
An initial survey shall be made to identify all energy
sources and related exposures to determine if machines,
equipment and systems can be isolated.

E4.1 Survey of Energy Sources and Related Exposures

A preliminary survey is recommended to determine rf


adequate and practrcally located isolatron devrces are
available for positive protection. Physrcal mspectron
coupled with the use of drawings, prints. and equipment manuals will assrsrin the detection of system
control hmrtatrons and will be necessary for the preparation of detailed de-energrzatron and start-up procedures The survey should locate and identify all energ)

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AMERICAN

NATIONAL

STANDARD

2244.1-1982

(electncal, mechanical, hydraulic. pneumatic, chemical,


nuclear, thermal, etc) input and output sources supplying particular items of equipment/process as well as
latent or residual energy.
of Energy Isolating Devices. The
potential for accidents will be reduced if employees
are not expected to rely on memory as to which isolating devices apply to which machines or to trace the
equipment complexity; the greater the equipment complexity, the greater the potential for error with respect
to unlabeled or inadequately identified energy isolating
devices.
Where conditions such as complexity or security
warrant, coded identification is acceptable.

4.2 Identification of Energy Isolating Devices. All


energy isolating devices shall be adequately labeled or
marked to indicate their function, unless they are located and arranged so their purpose is evident. The
identification shall include the following:
(1) Equipment supplied
(2) Energy type and magnitude

E4.2 Identification

4.3 Selection and Procurement of Protective Materials


and Hardware. The requirements for tags, chains, locks,
adapters, pins, and the like should be ascertained and
an adequate supply be maintained, distributed, or assigned as needs dictate. Lockout/tagout devices shall
be of a distinctive design and appearance and be used
solely for the purpose of providing personnel protection.

E4.3 Selection and Procurement of Protective Materialsand Hardware. Emphasis must be placed on using the

4.4 Assignment of Duties and Responsibilities. Only


knowledgeable individuals shall prescribe the appropriate duties and responsibilities relating to the actual
details of effecting the lockout/tagout. Energy isolating
devices shall be operated only by authorized individuals
or under the direct supervision of authorized individuals.

E4.4 Assignment

4.5 Preparation of Deenergization and Start-Up Sequence(s). Where system complexity requires, a written
sequencein checklist form should be prepared for equipment access,lockout/tagout, clearance, release, and
start-up.

E4.5 Preparation of De-energization and Start-Up Sequence(s). Although simple lockout/tagout applica-

5. Implementation
cedure

of Lockout/Tagout

distinctive lockout/tagout device only for the protection of personnel actually performing activities listed
in 3.1. The use of the distinctive lockout/tagout devices to keep the equipment/process out of service for
causesother than immediate personnel protection
should not be permitted. The use of lockout devices
for toolboxes, clothing lockers, etc, and the use of
tagout devices for nonrelated communications or functions should not be permitted.
ofDuties and Responsibilities, Special skills will be required to effect lockout/tagout of
equipment/process involving multiple forms of energy,
high-voltages, complex interconnected components,
and the like. It will normally be necessary to restrict
these activities to knowledgeable, authorized individuals to assure personnel safety.

tions, such as one employee and one energy source, do


not necessitate a prepared sequence, it is advisable to
have available written listings of all equipment and the
specific location of their energy isolating devices. The
sequence(s) prepared in checklist form should reflect
the developed order of energy isolating device activation, waiting times (if any), visual or audio signals, etc.

Pro-

5.1 Preparation for LockoutlTagout


5.1. I Notification of Personnel. All personnel affected by the lockout/tagout shall be notified of the
lockout/tagout application.

E5.1.1 Notification
ofPersonnel. Special operating
problems, unusual equipment/process modes, and factors affecting equipment/process release should be discussed by responsible personnel. Mutual understanding
with respect to scope and time of the lockout/tagout

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AMERICAN

NATIONAL

STANDARD

2244.1-1982

should exist. Affected employees should be notified


prior to the prearranged release of the equipment/
process to them.
5.1.2 Equipment Access and Release. A method
shall be established to provide a means of gaining access
to the equipment/process that involves acknowledgment
and release from use by the individual(s) responsible
for the equipment/process.
5.1.3 Plan. Where equipment/process complexity or
other conditions warrant, a lockout/tagout plan should
be developed to serve as a control measure for the duration of the job.

E5,1.3 Plan. ,4 lockout/tagout plan 1sof significant


value m establishing appropriate protective continuity.
particularly with respect to Jobs extendmg beyond the
initial work period or estabhshed shift schedule and In.
volving multlple personnel or crafts.
The plan should include. but not be hmlted to. the
following.
(1) Job objectives and involved equipment/process
(2) Estimated job duration
(3) Personnel and crafts involved
(4) Personnel sign-on and -off provisions
(5) Type, number. and location of all energy lsolatmg devices requiring lockout/tagout devices
(6) Responsible personnel approvals
(7) Start-up provisions

5.1.4 PreJob Briefing. Where equipment/process


complexity or other conditions warrant, an authorized
individual should review the lockout/tagout sequence
or plan with personnel affected by the lockout/tagout.
5.2 Application of Lockout/Tagout
5.2. I Equipment/Process Shutdown. Using appropriate equipment/process shutdown procedures all operating controls shall be turned off or returned to the
neutral mode by authorized individuals.
5.2.2 Equipment/Process Isolation. All involved
energy isolating devices shall be located and operated
in such a manner as to isolate the equipment/process
from the energy source(s). The lockout/tagout plan,
if developed, shall be followed.

E5.2.1 Equipment/Process Shutdown. Equipment/


process operating controls should be turned to neutral
to facilitate operation of the energy lsolatmg devices.
Energy isolating devices should not be operated under
load unless designed to do so.
E5.2.2 Equipment/Process Isolation. The survey
(see 4.1) of energy sources and lockout/tagout
sequence should be utilized to prevent energy isolating
devices from being omitted or operated in the wrong
sequence. A written checklist (sequence) is recommended even in the most routine operation.

5.2.3 LockoutlTagout Device Application. Appropriate lockout/tagout devices shall be applied to each
energy isolating device by authorized individuals. Except where the provisions of Section 6 apply, lockout
devices shall be attached in such a manner as to hold
the energy isolating devices in a safe position. Tagout
devices shall be attached in such a manner as to forbid
the operation of energy isolating devices. Tagout devices shall be attached to the energy isolating device
except that, where the installation does not permit this
attachment, they shall be located in such a position as
to be immediately obvious to anyone attempting to
operate the energy isolating device.
5.2.4 Verification of Isolation. One or both of the
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AMERICAN

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STANDARD

2244.1-1982

following actions shall be accomplished after lockout/


tagout application to determine if the operation of the
energy isolating devices has in fact produced the required isolation of the equipment/process.
(1) Operate the equipment/process operating controls (push buttons, switches, etc) to determine that
the energy isolation has been effective.
CAUTION: Return operating controls to neutral position after each test.
(2) Test the equipment/process by use of appropriate test equipment and/or visual inspection to determine that the energy isolation has been effective.
5.2.5 Srored Energy. The equipment/process shall
be carefully examined to detect and relieve, disconnect, or restrain any residual energy.

5.3 Release from Lockout1 Tagout


5.3. I Equipment/Process. Before energy is restored
to the equipment/process, a visual inspection of the
work area shall be made by an authorized individual
to ensure that all nonessential items have been removed
and that all components are operationally intact.
53.2 Personnel. Before energy is restored to the
equipment/process, a personnel count or administrative
technique shall be employed to verify that personnel
are in the clear. This check-out procedure should be
supplemented with a visual verification that personnel
are in the clear.
5.3.3 Lockout/Tagout Device(s) Removal. Each
lockout/tagout device shall be removed from each
energy isolating device by the affected individual who
applied the device or under the direct supervision of
an authorized individual, except where the provisions
of Section 6 apply.

6. Special Lockout/Tagout

E5.2.5 Stored Energy. Blocks or other physical restraints may be necessary to guarantee total rmmobilizatron of the equrpment/process. In the case of electrrcal circuits, grounds may be necessary to discharge
energy. Bleed valves may require operation to relieve
pressure.
E5.3.1 Equipment/Process.
The equipment/process
should be inspected for obstructions, incomplete work,
etc. In some situations. a team inspection is performed
using checkhsts with appropriate tramed personnel
checking out specific components such as hydraulic,
electrical, pneumatic, etc.
E5.3.2 Personnel. It should be ascertained that personnel are physically clear ofequrpment/process. Multrple personnel and energy source situations demand
comprehensive measures to ensure that assigned work
has been completed and all personnel have cleared the
equipment/process.
E5.3.3 LockoutfTagout
Device(s) Removal. In instances where employees are not available (sickness,
injury, etc) to clear the control of their personal lock/
tag protection, a specific procedure should be employed to ensure the integrity of the lockout/tagout.

Considerations

6. I Lockout/Tagout Interruption (Testing of Energized


Equipment). In situations where the energy isolating device(s) is locked/tagged and there is a need for testing or
positioning of the equipment/process, the following sequence shall apply:
(1) Clear equipment/process of tools and materials
(2) Clear personnel
(3) Clear the control of locks/tags according to
established procedure
(4) Proceed with test, etc
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(5) Deenergize all systems and relock/retag the controls to continue the work
6.2 Equipment Design and Performance Limitations.
Alternative effective protective techniques shall be employed where the equipment/process design prohibits
use of the established lockout/tagout devices.
6.3 Exposure of Outside Personnel. Established lockout/tagout procedures should be employed for the protection of individuals from outside organizations (service representatives, contractors employees, and other
outside personnel), where exposure exists due to their
involvement with work in progress. An authorized representative of such outside organizations shall be made
aware of established lockout/tagout procedures and informed of the necessity of adapting and enforcing lockout/tagout protection which shall be compatible with
existing in-plant lockout/tagout procedures.

E6.3 Exposure of Outside Personnel. Interaction be-

6.4 Multiple Personnel Protection (Group Lockout/


Tagout). When a crew, craft, department, or other
group lockout/tagout device(s) is used, it shall afford
the affected employee a level of protection equivalent
to that provided by personal lockout/tagout devices.

E6.4 Multiple Personnel Protection (Group Lockout/


Tagout). Situations exist where. due to the scope of

tween employees and outside personnel 1sa source of


potential injury due to misunderstandings and differences in specific lockoutltagout procedures and devices. For this reason, it 1sparticularly important that
the employer and outsrde indivrdual personnel and contractors reach a mutual understanding and agreement
as to what procedures and devices will be rn use.
Written verification of the understanding 1sdesirable.

the job, the complexity of the equipment/process. the


number of mvolved personnel and craft groups, etc. a
more functionally practical method of lockout/tagout
than indivrdual single-source, smgle indivrdual lockout/
tagout is required. Under these crrcumstances. techniques are employed to provide a workable approach
to ensure that no unexpected energization or start of
equipment/process occurs. The following elements are
often found in group lockout/tagout procedures
(1) Primary responsibility for a number of personnel working under the protection of a particular lockout/tagout device vested in an authorized indrvidual.
(2) Procedural provision for ascertaining the exposure status of individual crew members with regard to
the lockout/tagout of the equrpment/process
(3) Provision for overall job-associated lockout/
tagout with control responsibility assigned to a
designated individual to coordinate affected work
forces, and to ensure protection continuity.

6.5 Coordination (Shift/Schedule Change). Provisions


shall be made to ensure the continuity of lockout/tagout protection during shift or personnel change. Specific procedures shall be developed for such situations.
6.6 Authorization for LockoutfTagout Application
and Removal. Where written lockout/tagout plans exist
and are used for complex systems, lockout/tagout devices shall be installed and removed only at the direction of the authorized individual who has control of
the plan.
6.7 Work on Energized Equipment. Personnel performing the activities listed in 3.1, other than normal operating activities, should do so under de-energized conditions
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in accordance with the lockout/tagout procedures required in this standard (see 5.2.1). Where work on energized equipment is required, acceptable procedures and
equipment shall be employed to provide effective protection to personnel.
6.8 Production Operations. Personnel performing the
activities listed in 3.1, other than normal operating activities, should do so under deenergized conditions in
accordance with the lockout/tagout procedures required
in this standard (see 5.2.1). In the case of required
repetitive minor adjustments where this is not feasible,
or in the case of normal production operations, these
activities shall be accomplished under the protection
of specially designed control circuits, control equipment, and operating procedures, that provide proven
effective protection for the affected personnel.

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*Fw=dix

(This Appendix is not part of American National Standard 2244.1-1982,


purposes only.)

but is Included for mformattonal

Sample Lockout Procedure

The following sample lockout procedure is provided as a guide for the development of a specific lockout procedure. A tagout procedure would be smiilar m format. Where complexity requires. a more comprehensive procedure
shall be developed, documented. and implemented.
LOCKOUT
(Name of Company)

Lockout procedure for

Purpose
This procedure establishes the minimum requirements for lockout of energy sources that could cause mjury to
personnel. All employees shall comply with the procedure.

Responsibility
The responsibility for seeing that this procedure is followed is bindmg upon all employees. All employees shall be
instructed m the safety significance of the lockout procedure by (designate individual). Each new or transferred
affected employee shall be instructed by (designate individuals) in the purpose and use of the lockout procedure.

Preparation for Lockout


Employees authorized to perform lockout shall be certain as to which switch. valve or other energy isolating devices apply to the equipment bemg locked out. More than one energy source (electrical, mechanical. or others)
may be involved. Any questionable identification of sources shall be cleared by the employees with their supervisors. Before lockout commences, job authonzation should be obtamed.

Sequence of Lockout Procedure


(1 j Notify all affected employees that a lockout 1srequired and the reason therefor.
(2) If the equipment is operatm g. shut it down by the normal stopping procedure (depress stop button. open
toggle switch. etc).
(3) Operate the switch, valve. or other energy isolating device so that the energy source(s) (electrical. mechanl.
cal, hydraulic, etc) is disconnected or isolated from the equipment. Stored energy, such as that in capacitors.
springs, elevated machine members. rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems. and air. gas. steam, or water pressure.
etc. must also be dissipated or restrained by methods such as grounding. repositioning. blocking. bleedmgdown, etc.
(4) Lockout the energy lsolatmg devices with an assigned indrvldual lock.
(5) After ensurmg that no personnel are exposed and as a check on having discontlected the energy sources,
operate the push button or other normal operating controls to make certain the equipment will not operate.
CAUTION: Return operating controls to neutral position after the test.
(6) The equipment is now locked out.
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AMERICAN

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2244.1-1982

Restoring Equipment to Service


(1) When the job is complete and equipment is ready for testing or normal service, check the equipment area
to see that no one is exposed.
(2) When equipment is all clear. remove all locks. The energy isolating devtces may be operated to restore
energy to equipment.

Procedure Involving More Than One Person


In the preceding steps, if more than one individual 1srequired to lock out equipment, each shall place his own per.
sonal lock on the energy isolating device(s). One designated indtvtdual of a work crew or a supervisor, with the
knowledge of the crew, may lock out equipment for the whole crew. In such cases,it shall be the responsibility
of the individual to carry out all steps of the lockout procedure and inform the crew when rt 1ssafe to work on
the equipment. Additionally, the designated individual shall not remove a crew lock until tt has been verified
that all Individuals are clear.

Rules for Using Lockout Procedure


All equipment shall be locked out to protect against accidental or inadvertent operation when such operation
could cause injury to personnel. Do not attempt to operate any switch, valve, or other energy isolating device
bearing a lock.

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Licensed to AJS and Associates/David Durham


ANSI Store order #X100517 Downloaded: 7/22/2003 2:38:18 PM ET
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