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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2015

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PL
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No 85

Helping you become a better player

SS
O
NS

Tricks on how to play at

FAST SPEED!
LANG LANG

Global Ambassador for


the Leeds Competition
PLUS WIN TICKETS
to the gala recital
MASTERCLASS

How to use the left


and middle pedals

12LEARN
PIECES TO

LUCILLE

CHUNG

on small hands,
big repertoire
& memorisation

BEGINNER TO ADVANCED
IN-DEPTH LESSON
ON CHOPINS

AEOLIAN
HARP

ETUDE OP 25 NO 1

p01_pianist85.indd 1

STEP-BY-STEP

LESSONS
ON 3 OF THIS
ISSUES SCORES

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2 Pianist 85

17/07/2015 15:11

Pianist 85

CONTENTS

August-September 2015
The next issue of Pianist goes on sale 25 September 2015

84

72

14
4

Editors Note

Reader Competition Win Gabriela


Monteros latest stunning CD release

Readers Letters

Lang Lang on playing at Versailles and


being Global Ambassador for the Leeds

10 News Tchaikovsky Competition results,


Pianist composing competition winner
revealed, seagull attacks pianist and more

14 Lucille Chung Her small hands dont


put this fine pianist off playing huge
repertoire, as she tells Jessica Duchen

18 How to Play Masterclass 1

Mark Tanner on fast and slow playing

20 How to Play Masterclass 2

Graham Fitchs final article on pedalling


presses down on those other pedals the
una corda and sostenuto
Dont miss Grahams online lessons!

22 How to Play 1 Melanie Spanswick on


Hofmanns Melodie (Scores page 32)

24 How to Play 2 Lucy Parham on

Chopins Aeolian Harp Etude op 25 no 1


(Scores page 60)

26 How to Play 3 Janet Newman on


Pachulskis Prelude in C minor
(Scores page 50)

27 The Scores A pullout section of 40


pages of sheet music for all levels

45 Beginner Keyboard Class

Hans-Gnter Heumanns Lesson No 13:


Fifths, sixths & sevenths

67 Moment by Moment Tom Hewson,


winner of the Nottingham International
Jazz Piano Competition, talks about his
slightly peculiar way of life

68 Flex Time Can a yoga-inspired piano

method help your playing? We talk to the


creator of Piano-Yoga to find out

72 Sviatoslav Richter Claire Jackson


offers up an in-depth look at this
enigmatic Russian piano legend, born
100 years ago this year

74 Alexander Scriabin Its time for a

re-evaluation of this remarkable Russian


composer. Plus, learn one of his prludes
inside this issues Scores (page 58)

78 The Leeds Its founder and guiding

force, Dame Fanny Waterman, is retiring


at age 95. John Evans takes us on a guided

Cover photo: Lisa-Maria Mazzucco. Images this page, clockwise from top left: Lisa-Maria Mazzucco; Simon Wilkinson/SWIPX.com, Leeds International
Piano Competition 2012; Harald Hoffmann/DG. Notice: Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyrighted material in this magazine, however,
should copyrighted material inadvertently have been used, copyright acknowledgement will be made in a later issue of the magazine.

p03_Contents85-FINAL.indd 3

78
tour of the prestigious competition from
past to present, and asks whats in store
for the future

82 Subscribe today for just 4.50 an issue

by Direct Debit and receive a Dame Fanny


Waterman Piano Treasury book worth 9.99

84 Piano round-up Think that the piano

making world never changes? Think again


new designs and technologies are springing
up everywhere. Gez Kahan has the story

86 CD Reviews Theres lots of Grieg in

this issue, from Fialkowska, Moog and


Perianes, but for reviewer Marius Dawn,
its Gabriela Monteros heartfelt disc that
stands out in the end

88 Sheet Music Review Highlights

this issue include film scores; new editions


of Scriabin, Sibelius and Schubert;
music for three pianists at one piano and
popular encore pieces

89 Classifieds

Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter


Make sure you keep in touch with our
editorial team and receive exclusive extra
articles and interviews.
To register, visit:

www.pianistmagazine.com

17/07/2015 10:14

Editors note

his issue features many remarkable musicians who persevered even


when the odds were against them. Cover artist Lucille Chung, whose
interview appears on page 14, was told by the legendary concert
pianist Lazar Berman that her hands were too small to play Liszt. That
didnt deter her she went on to master the biggest and most challenging
repertoire. Then theres Dame Fanny Waterman, who realised her dream of
establishing a world-class piano competition in her home town of Leeds. This
year, at age 95, Dame Fanny steps down from the hugely successful competition
after 52 years. Read all about her legacy in John Evans article on page 78. The
new Global Ambassador to the Leeds Competition, Lang Lang, has always pulled
out all the stops, both in his playing and as an inspiration to millions of kids (and
adults) all over the world. Read my interview with him on page 8.
Lucille Chung isnt the only pianist who has small hands but big-hands
ambition. Turn to page 68 to read all about the pianist GNIA and her
Piano-Yoga method, and try the sample exercise from her book those with larger hands can benefit too.
As we report in this issues News, at the XV Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, a Russian, Dmitry
Masleev, took home the gold. As it happens, this issue we feature two Russian musical greats whose
centenaries are celebrated this year. On page 72, Claire Jackson looks at Sviatoslav Richter, an enigmatic
and brilliant pianist who is on many lists of top 10 best pianists (including mine). Michael Quinn
delves into the mystical soundworld of Scriabin on page 74, asking why his music challenges players and
listeners. Inside the Scores, youll find Scriabins gorgeous and accessible Prlude op 16 no 3.
Other unmissable scores include Granadoss May Song, Henselts Loves Repose and Pachulskis
Prelude. Each one is incredibly heartfelt, and most of them were real discoveries for me. For those with
guts, theres Chopins Etude op 25 no 1 to try (Lucy Parhams lesson will definitely help).
Lastly, take a peek at the piano round-up on page 82. There are some groundbreaking happenings in
the world of piano making. The straight-strung design Barenboim-Maene piano, for instance, was
commissioned by Daniel Barenboim. Inspired by a Liszt piano, Barenboim had a vision of a piano that
combines what worked in the past with current technology and like many other
remarkable figures in this issue, he was able to turn his dream into reality.
ERICA WORTH, EDITOR

Make sure that you keep in touch with me what Ive been up to, which
pianists Ive spoken to, exclusive extra articles and interviews by registering for
our FREE e-newsletter. All you need to do is go to www.pianistmagazine.com

COMPETITION

ENTER ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM

WIN A COPY OF GABRIELA MONTEROS NEW CD,


OUR EDITORS CHOICE IN THIS ISSUES CD REVIEWS

Answer the question below correctly, and you could be one of three winners
to receive a copy of Gabriela Monteros new CD, featuring Rachmaninovs
Piano Concerto No 2 and Monteros own improvisations, from Orchid Classics
(see review, page 86)
Where was the pianist Gabriela Montero born?
A: Italy
B: Spain
C: Venezuela

Benjamin Ealovega

ENTER ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM


Postcard entries are also accepted. Please send to Erica Worth, Editor, COMP PIA0117, Pianist,
6 Warrington Crescent, London W9 1EL, UK. Competition closes 25 September. Quote PIA0117 and
remember to put your name, address and telephone number on the postcard as well as your answer.
Answer to page 4 competition in Pianist No 82: B: Brahms. Congratulations to the three winners: Mr Tony
Loader (East Sussex), Mr Sin Lau (Cheshire), Mrs Kathleen Warwick (West Midlands)
4 Pianist 64

p04-editorial85-FINAL.indd 4

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Readers
Letters
Get in touch

I was deeply moved by the Star Letter in


Pianist No 84 charting Jennie Gardners
struggles and successes on the piano despite
her non-musical background.
I am of an earlier generation and by the
time issue 85 hits the shelves, I will be 73.
Yet I have never enjoyed playing so much
as I do now, thanks almost entirely to the
arrival of your magazine, to which I have
subscribed since issue 2. I had my first
piano lesson aged seven, eventually reached
Grade 6, but once I left home in the early
1960s to pursue a busy career as a provincial
news journalist, I scarcely touched a
keyboard for almost 15 years.
Now I divide my music time between
a Challen upright and a six-octave Casio
keyboard. Without wishing to blow my own
trumpet, in a strange sort of way I am a
natural, playing both by ear and from the
score, learning new pieces quickly and with a
range that includes hundreds of pop tunes,
jazzy numbers, light offerings and classical,
courtesy of Pianist. My limit is usually
intermediate but I am psyching myself for a
stiffer challenge.
Now heres the thing. Both my parents
suffered from dementia right up to their
deaths in their early nineties, and my
GP has announced to me I am a likely
candidate for this distressing condition.
So I keep myself busy with a regular
gardening page for my old paper, looking
after our large garden and losing myself on
the black-and-whites, which convinces me
that being able to read music keeps that
deadly disease at bay. Reading Pianist and
playing its scores is unquestionably a high
spot in my life, enabling me to create
beautiful tunes and, at the same time, fend
off that hereditary threat.
Graham Andrews, Devon
What an inspiring letter, and an idea for a
future article exploring your question: Does
playing the piano every day keep illness
(including dementia) at bay? Anecdotally, we
suspect that it does have some positive impact.
A surprise CD is on its way to you.

melodic
syncopation
triad

E D U C AT I O N

dominant

STAR LETTER
Can playing piano
keep ailments at bay?

s
Ornament clef
Reading the article Music Theory: Love It! Hate It! in Pianist No 84 transposing

Music Theory More, please!

tonic

WRITE TO:The Editor, Pianist, 6 Warrington Crescent, London, W9 1EL, UK


OR EMAIL: editor@pianistmagazine.com
STAR LETTER wins a surprise CD. Letters may be edited.

gave me grounds for some reminiscing. I studied piano here in Canada


intervals
from about age 9 to 15, completing my Grade 9 exam. Along with the
tritone
practical, I was obliged to study both history and harmony to a fairly
r
no
mi
advanced level. Harmony in particular was mostly a puzzle to me. At no
inversion
point in my studies did anyone suggest there was a reason for learning
ORY:
MUSIC THE IT!
these subjects it was simply mandatory to do it. I studied, memorised
HATE
and passed the exams that were concomitant with my piano exams.
I am retired now and, having some leisure time, I have resumed my
study of the piano. With the assistance of some reading and study on the
subject, I realise how important theory actually is and that a knowledge
of it can help the pianist immensely, particularly with memorising a
piece. Rather than the somewhat unreliable kinetic recall, one can
analyse and learn the harmonic aspects of the piece, which can be a solid support to
playing from memory.
So, yes, indeed: I think it would be an asset to your magazine to have a regular music theory column.
It would provide both a review and an introduction to the subject for many pianists of all levels.
Marnie McGrath, near Vancouver, BC, Canada

LOV E IT!

Music theory
causes anxiety in many
pianists, and
will help your playing yet getting to grips with it
immeasurably
tells you why you
should relax and give. John Evans
theory a try

ew would deny Mozart


who did with ex-commun
knew his music theory.
ication.
Pope Clement XIV
When, as a boy, he
must have approved
heard of Mozarts
arrangement because
Gregorio Allegris
rather
than expelling the
Miserere being sung
young genius, he
at
showered him with
the Sistine Chapel
praise.
in
No ones quite sure
Rome, he was so moved
why the Vatican
by it that, perhaps
had once been so touchy
not realising what
about
archaic rules he was
Miserere. Some say
breaking, he wrote
it was
it down by ear and
piece contained jealously because the
would play it at
guarded
the drop of a hat, even
ornamentation that
to the Pope
was
when he asked him
down but passed from never written
to.
generation
to
An everyday story
generation; others
of
say it features a
you might say, except a boy genius
musical interval in
the
before, the Vatican that centuries
once regarded as being bass that was
had
Miserere to be performedforbidden
known as the diabolus so ugly it was
beyond the
Sistine Chapel, threatening
Devil in music). Todayin musica (the
anyone
interval an augmented we call that
fourth, or a
70 Pianist 84

tritone (an interval


that spans three
whole tones).
As you can probably
nickname, the tritone tell from its
was a much
loathed and feared
musical device.
There really are stories
of people being
ex-communicated
for using it. For
these reasons, its unlikely
it in his original Miserere; Allegri used
composers
of his time didnt,
as a
it certainly found its rule. However,
way
versions and performanc into later
None of this evidently es of the work.
bothered
young Mozart or, it
seems, the Pope,
but Miserere and the
rules once
surrounding it serve
as a reminder to
anyone preparing for
their ABRSM

p70_Theory-FIN

ALish.indd 70

15/05/2015 09:11

I have been a piano teacher for over 20 years, and I agree with John Evanss view about the importance
of backing up playing with a knowledge of musical grammar. However, it is worth mentioning that
a pass at Grade 5 theory is not the only route towards the ABRSM higher grades. Several of my
students have enjoyed using the ABRSMs Practical Musicianship syllabus. The tests are carried out
through playing your chosen instrument, and the skills learned include harmonising, transposing and
improvisation, and the Grade 5 examination is an accepted alternative to Grade 5 theory. I have found
that students taking the practical route often seem better able to relate the musical grammar learned
to their playing and understanding of actual music, and to retain the knowledge long after the exam.
It is also good fun. I dont believe that any learning should be like the nasty medicine that John Evans
describes as often associated with learning music theory.
Jill Osborn, Bedfordshire
I returned to the piano about ten years ago at the age of 67. I had spent most of my life studying, first
industrial chemistry, then chemical engineering, then market research and marketing, along with some
other specialist topics. Id had enough of theory! I told my piano teacher no theory and no Bach; I just
want to play some nice tunes and work on a jazz technique.
However, as I began to play I realised just how much I love the classics, so I started out on a journey
through Chopin, Debussy, Granados, the Romantics and, for the last two years, Rachmaninov. I have
found that I cannot avoid theory. For me it works to study each piece in turn with my teacher and
consider its theory requirements. Gradually, I have built up a grounding in the theory necessary for my
repertoire its not ideal but it works for me. Articles in Pianist do help to broaden my understanding of
music and theory. So I owe you yet another vote of thanks.
David Kay, Doncaster
We received many excellent and thoughtful letters in response to our request in issue 84 for reader views of
music theory, with most writing positively about their own theory experiences and in favour of a future series
on music theory. It was especially difficult to choose our favourite letter, but wed like to award the copy of The
AB Guide to Music Theory to Marnie McGrath, whose letter appears above. Were still sketching out plans for
a music theory series, so if you have any further thoughts on this topic, please let us know.

The right warm-ups

I agree with Brenda Ogdons view [Diabolical stretching?, Letters, Pianist No 81] in that horizontal
hand stretching must not be exaggerated. To warm up, however, I suggest palm and finger stretching:
place your hands and fingers, palm uppermost, pressing hard touching underneath the keyboard,
then move them vigorously to and fro for a few seconds. This massages and stretches hand and fingers,
improving flexibility and blood circulation before playing. When athletes like Bolt prepare for the
100 meters, they use a similar stretching for their legs. We can profitably use the suggested version
for our fingers and hands.
Geoffrey Adkins, Rome, Italy
6 Pianist 85

p06_letters85-FINAL.indd 6

16/07/2015 09:27

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UP CLOSE

LANG

LANG

GLOBAL CITIZEN
Alix Laveau/Sony Classical (Versailles photos); Courtesy of Leeds International Piano Competition (Lang Lang & Dame Fanny); Allianz SE (students)

Hes always been a great emissary for the piano, and now Lang Lang has become Global
Ambassador for the Leeds Competition. He tells Erica Worth how it all came about

ow did you
become Global
Ambassador
for the Leeds
International
Piano
Competition?
Dame Fanny Waterman approached me
about it, and I decided to come to Leeds
to see the competition first hand. It is
obviously a legendary competition, and
the list of previous winners speaks for

the high standard it has set, but I was


also interested in how individualistic
the competitors might be. Suffice to
say, I was even more impressed seeing
the competition close up. Dame Fanny
asked me to meet the finalists before
the performances. They were a diverse
bunch, and I then decided I would take
on the Global Ambassador role.
Tell us about that initial meeting with
Dame Fanny.

Clockwise from bottom


left: Lang Lang at the
entrance of Leeds Town
Hall with Dame Fanny
Waterman; in Versailles
famous Hall of Mirrors;
with young pianists at
the Allianz Junior Music
Camp in 2014

When I arrived at her house, which


is full of momentos of students,
the Leeds Piano Competition and
many big moments in her life, she
immediately asked me to play. Its one
thing playing to a Royal Albert Hall
or Berlin Philharmonie audience, and
another playing to the most famous
piano teacher of all! We started to play
together and had really good fun. It
was the opposite of music making in a
pressured environment. I can see why
her students regard her with both fear
and love she has real magnetism and
a sense of history around her.
Will you stay in touch with Dame
Fanny after she steps down from the
Leeds later this year?
I dont think that Dame Fanny will ever
not be part of the Leeds!
Its fantastic that you are giving a
benefit concert on 9 September at
Leeds Town Hall and are donating
your fees to the Leeds Competition.
I am fortunate to have the career and
life through playing that I have, so
giving support where its appreciated is
an honour. The Leeds is a vital part of
the piano world, not just in Britain, but
for aspiring students worldwide. Its all
too easy to forget tradition and take for
granted that it will always be there.

8 Pianist 85

p08_Lang Lang-FINAL.indd 8

17/07/2015 09:08

Cant get enough of

LANG LANG?
See him play

Can you tell me about your Versailles


experience, which happened in June?
It had been a life-long dream of mine
to once give a concert at the magical
Chateau of Versailles. In June this
dream came true when I was invited
to play a recital in the famous Hall
of Mirrors. It is the most beautiful
place you can imagine, with its many
chandeliers, ornaments and its big
windows overseeing the park. I played
the four Chopin Scherzos and The
Seasons by Tchaikovsky. The concert
was captured by multiple cameras
and will be released on DVD by Sony
Classical this autumn. We produced a
studio recording in Paris with the same
programme for CD release.

You are very active on social media.


How do you see social media helping
other people feel inspired to listen,
watch and play the piano?
I think social media and technology
are a blessing for classical music. I
embrace social media, and love to
share my music with as many fans and
friends as possible. I love to follow how
technology changes the music world
almost daily and I am a keen observer
of all the new trends and opportunities
that arise.
When can we expect to see you
performing in London again?
I will be in London in November,
playing three concerts with the
Philharmonia Orchestra and Maestro
Esa-Pekka at the Royal Festival Hall.
I will play three different concertos in
three concerts: Bartk Piano Concerto
No 2, Prokofiev Piano Concerto No 3
and the Grieg Piano Concerto [see box
at right for more details].
Wed love to know how much
practising you do each day!
Nowadays I practise two hours a day
on average.
Lastly, what gives you the drive every
day, to get up there and play the
piano to the world?
Its the music. I simply love it. It gives
me energy!

Learn with Lang Lang

Mastering the Piano is the first series of books to be launched


in the Lang Lang Piano Academy, a major new piano
programme from Faber Music encompassing a range of
materials for pianists of all levels.The books are available from
the Pianist Digital Store at http://pianistm.ag/digitalshop

Lang Lang
inside Pianist

Lang Lang appeared on


the cover of issue 61, in
which you can read a
three-page interview
with Editor Erica
Worth.The issue is no
longer available in
print, but you can buy
it digitally (as an app)
by going to http://
pianistm.ag/issue61

FREE 40 PAGES OF SHEET MUSIC


& TUTORIAL CD

Pia
anis
i t
the pleasure of playing

No 61

LANG
LANG

ANATOMY
of a PIECE
How

to learn a piece
quickly & efficiently

Pianist

12

PIECES OF MUSIC

RE

LISTEN LEARN PLAY

HE

BEGINNER
INTERMEDIATE
ADVANCED SCORES

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PERFORMED BY CHENYIN LI

TO SEE LANG LANG LIVE


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Q&A

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Read more about the Leeds International


Piano Competition on page 78.

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EXCLU SIVE
INTERVIEW

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Two sparkling Chopin tracks


from his Live in Vienna album
HOW TO PLAY

FUNK STYLE
24/6/11 14:38:00

5.25

Tell us about your Allianz Junior


Music Camp, which takes place in
Vienna this November. It sounds like
it must be a once-in-a-lifetime chance
for ten gifted pianists!
This will be the third year of the
Allianz Junior Music Camp. The first
two camps took place in Munich and
Barcelona, and I am really looking
forward to taking the camp to Viennas
famous Musikverein this time. During
the camp the young students will
have lessons from our teachers, get to
explore the city and will meet likeminded young pianists from all around

the world. I will join the camp for


one day to meet the kids and teach
them in a masterclass held at the
Musikverein. Kids between eight and
14 years can apply by sending a video
to the Lang Lang International Music
Foundation. Last year we had some
excellent participants from the UK,
and I hope we will have some more UK
participants this year too.

A U G U S T- S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 1

How important do you feel it is to


expand classical music into todays
modern culture, especially among
young people?
It is expanding I see it. The classical
music world can seem impenetrable
and elite, we cant hide from that. We
need people coming into concert halls,
and I get a lot of families coming to my
concerts. We cant just be musicians,
we need audiences too, and they
dont want to feel alienated. Keeping
musicians standards high, but growing
the audiences at the same time is a
challenge for all of us.

Lang Lang appears in


recital at the LeedsTown
Hall on 9 Sept, prior to
the finals of the Leeds
International Piano
Competition; for tickets
and information go to
leedspiano.com. Lang
Lang appears at Londons
Royal Festival Hall, as part
of the Salonen/Lang Lang
Series, on 26 Nov, 1 Dec
and 3 Dec. For tickets, go
to www.southbankcentre.
co.uk. He opens the New
York Philharmonic season
on 24 Sept at Lincoln
Center with a performance of the Grieg Concerto (see
lincolncenter.org). Find out how to enter the Allianz Music
Camp by going to www.langlangfoundation.org

www.pianistmagazine.com
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News

All the latest news from the world of the piano

Pianist composing

RUSSIAN PIANIST
competition winner
DMITRY MASLEEV
TRIUMPHS AT
revealed!
XV TCHAIKOVSKY
Scarborough Fair arrangement sweeps the field
COMPETITION
Pianist is delighted to reveal that the winner of our first-ever composing competition is Derry
from Shropshire. After hours of play-throughs and deliberations, the judges selected
Excitement, joy and controversy Bertenshaw
Bertenshaws Intermediate/Advanced level arrangement of Scarborough Fair, finding it to be
a unique rhapsodic arrangement, full of sweeping lyrical moments and subtle key changes.
at world-famous event
We hasten to add that Bertenshaw submitted his 62-bar masterpiece in clear handwriting (see
One of the worlds major musical competitions, the
XV Tchaikovsky Competition, concluded at the end
of June with gold medals in their respective categories
for Russian pianist Dmitry Masleev (pictured above),
Mongolian baritone Ariunbaatar Ganhbaatar (also
the Grand Prix winner of the competition), Russian
mezzo-soprano Yulia Matochkina and Romanian
cellist Andrei Ionu Ioni. No first prize was awarded
in the violin category, although Taiwanese violinist
Yu-Chien Tseng received the silver.
In the piano category, the silver medal was shared
between Russian-Lithuanian Lucas Geniuas and
American George Li, while the bronze was shared
between Russians Sergei Redkin and Daniel
Kharitonov, with fourth prize going to Frenchman
Lucas Debargue, who also won the prize of the
Moscow Music Critics Association.
That last-noted prize is reminder that, as usual,
the Tchaikovsky Competition was not without
controversy. Lucas Debargue, who wowed the
audience with a Medtner sonata and Ravel Gaspard de
la nuit, inspired a minor slanging match between
jurors Boris Berezovsky and Peter Donohoe on social
media. Meanwhile, Jessica Duchen, a regular
contributor to Pianist, was unimpressed that the
all-male piano jury managed to produce an all-male
list of piano finalists. Can it REALLY be the case that
no women, not even Maria Mazo, were considered
good enough to have a try for the final? Or is it
same-old same-old yet again?
After going through the preliminary stages that
lasted several weeks, the five piano finalists had to
further prove their superhuman endurance in the
final, which required a performance of a Tchaikovsky
concerto (all but one finalist chose the First) plus a
showpiece concerto of their own selection.
There are concerts in the UK featuring some of the
competition winners, at Londons Cadogan Hall (26
Oct) and Birminghams Symphony Hall (28 Oct).
For details, go to cadoganhall.com or thsh.co.uk

above). That alone must have taken some work!


Bertenshaws winning arrangement will feature in a forthcoming issue of the magazine, along
with a full-length feature about the competition, highlighting some of our favourite entries,
plus giving feedback from the judges.
The competition attracted more than 80 entries from all over the world. Submissions included
arrangements of works by Bach, Tchaikovsky, Chopin, the Beatles, Vivaldi, Purcell (two versions
of Dido and Aeneas) and Charles Aznavour. The creativity and wide choice of repertoire amazed
the judges, who sifted through arrangements of God Save the Queen, Amazing Grace, Swing Low,
Sweet Chariot, Thunderbirds are Go, some lovely Irish traditional songs and a jazzy rendition of
Fr Elise entitled Jazz Elise, among many others.
Pianist would like to thank all those who entered. We know that it took a lot of hard work.
We are happy to announce that next year we will be running another composing competition
this time asking for original compositions. Watch this space!

Facelifts for Southbanks Queen


Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room
Key London halls will be closed for two years
The Southbank Centre has three of Londons
busiest halls, and from September, two of them
the Queen Elizabeth Hall (QEH; pictured top
right) and the smaller Purcell Room will be
closed for much-needed refurbishment. The two
halls, along with the Southbanks Hayward Gallery,
will be shut for a projected two years for essential
repairs and maintenance.
The works are not expected to be as extensive
as those at nearby Royal Festival Hall, which
received a major overhaul in 2007, but will
include much-needed renovation of seats,
production facilities, toilets, cloakroom, backstage
areas, heating, ticket desk, and, as much as is
feasible for the 1960s buildings, the energy and
environmental efficiency.
The 900-seat QEH is the main venue for the
Southbanks International Piano Series as well as
the International Chamber Music Series. During
the closure, some of the concerts will be relocated
to St Johns, Smith Square.
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News

All the latest news from the world of the piano

Saffron Halls new season


One of the UKs newest concert venues, the 740-seat
Saffron Hall in Essex, has announced its second season.
The Halls acoustically outstanding space received many
accolades when it first opened its doors and its forthcoming
season brings top-flight talent to match the sound.
Pianistic highlights include an exploration of composers
influenced by jazz featuring Steven Osborne, bassist Eddie
Gomez and the Britten Sinfonia (21 Nov); Andrs Schiff in
his Saffron Hall debut (31 Mar) and Simon Trpeski in the
Rachmaninov Second Concerto with the Oslo Philharmonic
and Vasily Petrenko (13 Mar). Then theres all three Brahms
piano trios played by violinist Leonidas Kavakos, cellist
Gautier Capuon and pianist Nikolai Lugansky (5 June).
Another development at Saffron will be the October
opening of a specialist Saturday music school, the Saffron
Centre for Young Musicians.
For full details about Saffron Hall, go to saffronhall.com

Saffron Hall (Saffron Hall); BGE (Mailley-Smith)

Critic Ted Greenfield dies


Edward Ted Greenfield, broadcaster, former Guardian chief
music critic and co-editor of the Penguin Record Guide, has
died in London, age 86.
Greenfield, born in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, studied piano
and voice from a young age. At Cambridge he chose first
modern languages, then law. Nudged in the direction of
journalism, Greenfield began writing for the then-Manchester
Guardian, and eventually served as chief music critic for the
paper from 1977 to 1993, and also wrote for Gramophone and
co-edited the Penguin Record Guide.
In 2010, Greenfield told the Spitalfields Life blog about his
philosophy as a critic: The first duty of a critic is to appreciate,
to try to understand what the artist is trying to do and how far
he has succeeded. You just have to try and sympathise.

The Soul of Chopin


Mailley-Smith plays complete Chopin in London
Warren Mailley-Smith will perform all of Chopins
solo piano works at St Johns, Smith Square, London
over the course of the 2015-16 season. The 39-yearold English pianists recital on 4 September opens the
St Johns, Smith Square season and is the first of
eleven recitals in the new Chopin series.
Mailley-Smith has carefully planned the
programming so that the individual programmes
includes an early and a late work, a well-known and a
lesser work with a major group ballades, scherzos or
etudes featuring as a main theme, as the press release notes. The mazurkas are evenly split
between the programmes and run chronologically from first programme to the last. The
first programme, for instance, includes the Polonaise-Fantaisie and Andante Spianato and
Grande Polonaise Brilliante, as well several mazurkas, waltzes, nocturnes and so on. The
remaining recital dates are 23 Oct, 27 Nov, 15 Jan, 19 Feb, 4 Mar, 8 Apr, 29 Apr, 27 May,
17 June and 15 July.
Mailley-Smith previously presented a series called Young Chopin, and says of the
composer, I adore playing Chopin, for the sensation that his music creates in the hand, and
his wonderful combination of harmonic invention, breathtaking melody and virtuosity.
Further information at sjss.org.uk

ACCIDENT REPORT:
Paul Lewis and Anthony Hewitt
soar back up after falling down
Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, start all over again, says the song perfect advice for
concert pianists Paul Lewis and Anthony Hewitt, who were both injured recently in falls.
For Lewis, his encounter with a seagull resembled nothing so much as a scene from
Alfred Hitchcocks film The Birds. According to BBC News, Lewis was leaving rehearsals
with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra in June when the seagull swooped down
on him, causing him to lose his balance, fall and sprain a finger on his right hand. Friends
say he is practising again as he slowly heals the affected ligaments.
Ulverston Festival founder and pianist Anthony Hewitt was bicycling when he fell,
breaking his collar bone and dislocating his right shoulder. (Three years ago, Hewitt
bicycled from Lands End to John OGroats as The Olympianist, raising 13,000 for
charity.) After discovering that the healing process would last longer than six weeks,
Hewitt devised a programme for the Ulverston Festival of works for the left hand, while
Martin Roscoe stepped in for his performance with the Northern Sinfonia. One thing is
for sure I will certainly be steering clear of bicycles in the run-up to next years festival,
Hewitt told Cumbria Live. Pianist wishes both performers a swift and complete recovery.

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13 Pianist 85

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INTERVIEW

Life is

sweet
Lucille Chung hasnt let small hands
(she loves playing Liszt) or being
married to fellow concert pianist
Alessio Bax (they play duos) get
in the way of a blossoming career.
Jessica Duchen meets her

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If you could only play one


piece from now on, what
would it be?
Brahms Piano Concerto No 1.
If you could only play one
composer from now on, who
would it be?
Mozart.
One pianist, dead or alive,
whom youd travel long and
far to hear?
Grigory Sokolov.
One concert hall youd love to
play in?
Suntory Hall, Tokyo, with its
fabulous acoustics.

Up Close

Any technical struggles?


Big chords, because of my
small hands. I rework them with
sensible fingerings.

LUCILLE CHUNG

Chung, who hails from a family


of scientists, applies a forensic
perceptiveness and precise personal
systems to her work at the piano. Her
parents were born in Korea, met and
married in Germany, then moved to
California and later to Canada, where
they settled in Montreal. My father was
professor of genetics at the University
of Montreal and my mother was
director of dietetics at Montreal General
Hospital, she recounts. Of course they
loved music and went to concerts and
at school the cool thing for the girls to
do was to learn the piano, so that was
why I wanted to start.

amateurs on how to improve?


Be systematic it will help you to
sustain real quality.
If you werent a pianist, what
would you be?
A psychologist.
One person youd love to play
for?
Two: Grigory Sokolov and
Krystian Zimerman.
One composer youre not
quite ready to tackle?
Im not performing Bach in public
at the moment.
What other kind of music do
you like to listen to?
Jazz. And hip-hop when my
nephews and nieces come over.
But for listening I prefer going to
a concert and immersing myself
in a performance. I dont like
treating music as background.

own credit card. Now I look back and


wonder how I did it, but at the time
it seemed normal, because I wanted to
pursue my music. My father would
have preferred me to stay home and
have a regular life, but my mother
supported me and would come to visit
once a month. Theyd call me every
morning and again at night to make
sure I was safely home.
Having sloped off to Curtis, Chung
then began to slope off elsewhere in
the holidays. Rather than sticking with
just one teacher, she was hungry for
different experiences of coaching from
different musicians. During the summer

Im short and people assume that I must play


dainty music but then I play Ligeti or Liszt and
it shocks them. So perhaps it plays to my advantage
She was six years old. The school
piano teacher soon began to enter her
for competitions. I kept winning, but
we didnt even have a piano at home. My
parents thought: Oh, she must have
some talent, and bought a piano! Aged
ten she performed a concerto with the
Montreal Symphony Orchestra and at 13
she was accepted by the elite (in the best
way) Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.
She duly left home on her own.
It was great! she laughs. I had a real
sense of independence and
responsibility. I loved writing my own
cheques, paying the rent and having my

breaks, I would sneak away to London


for lessons with Maria Curcio, she says.
Of course, my teachers in Philadelphia
didnt like me going. But she taught me
so much about sound, musicianship
and technique which in an institution
they dont always teach. She knew the
instrument so well: how to sing and how
to speak through the piano.
It seems remarkable that Chung felt
she was not finding the technical rigour
she needed in her main institution:
Its because they assume you are
already formed and made, she says,
but when youre so young you need

All photos Lisa-Marie Mazzucco. Evening gown on page 16 by Lie Sang Bong

ucille Chung is waiting


for me in a caf in
Londons Holland Park,
ready to squeeze in a
lunch interview before
rushing off to Heathrow
Airport. At first it is
almost difficult to square up the
astonishing virtuosity and power of
Chungs playing as attested by her
recordings, which include nothing less
than the complete Ligeti Etudes with
the diminutive young woman about
to head home to New York with her
husband, the pianist Alessio Bax
[Pianist No 80s cover artist], and their
baby daughter, Mila. Yet its soon clear
that Chung is not one to let life,
physique or anything else stand in the
way of her music.
She has tiny hands and says some
of her teachers have apparently tried
to give her short shrift for that. When
I first came to Lazar Berman in Weimar,
he said: Oh, you have a small hand,
so youll never be able to play Liszt,
she remembers. That made me decide
to learn all the Liszt I possibly could.
In one year I learned the B minor
Sonata, the Spanish Rhapsody, a few
Hungarian Rhapsodies, some SchubertLiszt transcriptions just to show him.
And then I won second prize at the
Liszt Competition [also in Weimar].
I didnt want to be bothered by or put
down by such a comment. Im short
and people assume that I must play
dainty music but then I play Ligeti or
Liszt and it shocks them. So perhaps it
plays to my advantage.

What would be your advice to

Igo
UP

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INTERVIEW
that training. She had not had this
earlier. In Montreal, my piano teacher
was a nun and shed never performed in
her life. So I went from a nun to Curtis.
It was a big shock.
For further studies, having graduated
from both Curtis and Juilliard before
she was 20, Chung came to Europe and
enjoyed spells not only in Weimar but
also in Salzburg, where she studied with
Karl-Heinz Kmmerling, and at the
piano academy in Imola, Italy. There
I lived for a steal in a palazzo with
frescoes, she remembers.
Dial-up romance
It was at the 1997 Hamamatsu
International Piano Competition in
Japan that she found herself placed in
the same alphabetically determined
group as a young Italian named Alessio
Bax. Over four or five days, because of
this grouping, wed practise together,
eat together and perform rather close
to each other, she says. Thats how we
met. He won the competition I knew

he would! Afterwards he went back to


Dallas and I went back to Imola. Id
just got the Internet. He immediately
emailed me and we started writing to
each other every day, no matter where
we were. I remember trying to find
Internet in Brazil and Japan and at
that time it was dial-up in Italy, so I
had to wait for 6pm every day. It was
quite exhilarating, she grins. We did
about a year of emails. You really get
to know someone just by writing. Its a
kind of modern chivalry.
Then he came to play in Florence,
I went to see him for a day, and he
went back to the States. Finally we got
together on the telephone. And that
was that. We saw each other a few more
times and I moved to Dallas. When
you know, you know. My parents
thought I was crazy.
Its a lovely story, but isnt it asking
for trouble to have two concert pianists
in one household? Chung laughs. We
dont like practising, she jokes or half
jokes. We have two pianos in separate

LUCILLE CHUNG ON

MEMORISATION

I managed to memorise the Ligeti Etudes really quickly. My system for memorisation stems from the
secret fact that I cant sight-read possibly because I didnt learn how to do it young enough. That
means that when I see music its easier for me to memorise it on the spot, rather than trying to sightread it. I approach it in a way that is quite mathematical and it works perfectly for something like Ligeti.
First of all, I memorise the structure and intervals. I relate to numbers and patterns, and I apply
that to the music Im learning. Some people will play right through a piece, but I need to chop it up
mathematically. But once I have it memorised its quite quick to learn at the piano. Its painstaking
during the first few days, but I think its a faster process in the end.
Its a system I devised on my own, simply trying to survive. When I went to Curtis I had to learn a
Bach Prelude and Fugue every two weeks, so I ended up learning all of them which was wonderful
but I had to invent a way. The first thing was finding the patterns, looking at the structure, dividing
it up. I had to be very determined and concentrated: Id say to myself: OK today Im going to
memorise four pages and I wont stand up until Ive done it. And it was always a miracle; somehow
Id always find the way it had to be done.
One tip about fingerings: write it out. If you write out
something, it stays with you. I remember when I was
young everything was handwritten and Id remember
it. But nowadays everythings typed and sometimes
I wonder how peoples spelling works, even
whether they can write by hand. In New York
people bring computers and type everything, so
theres no tactile memory, nothing to put them in
touch with the text itself. So I find it interesting to
write out my fingerings. By hand.

rooms in our flat in New York, and it


works, but neither of us likes to practise
so much, so its quite the opposite from
fighting over it. Instead were always
telling each other to go and practise.
Were each others harshest critics
as well. Its nice to have an extra set of
ears there that you trust. Singers have
coaches all their lives, but as a pianist
you usually have to fend for yourself.
We play to each other and criticise
each other and each of us knows what
the other can do better.
Moving to Dallas had benefits besides
togetherness: Chung entered the SMU
Meadows School of the Arts, studying
with Baxs chief mentor, the Spanish
pianist Joaqun Achcarro. Hes the
type of person whod call on New Years
Day and say: I found a new fingering,
and play it on the piano down the
phone. You dont often find that kind
of mentorship! I was very lucky to
come to him.
Chung and Bax have now become
joint artistic directors of the Joaqun
Achcarro Foundation, which promotes
his legacy, organising concerts and
masterclasses around the US and Spain
and offering one scholarship per year to
a young pianist. Its quite exciting to be
on the promoter side of things, Chung
says. At first it was embassy based,
but now we go beyond that and have
developed many partnerships, including
one with Carnegie Hall.
Musical matching
Chungs career has been building
steadily, with a busy touring schedule
and several recordings to her name,
including the afore-mentioned Ligeti
etudes, a recent Mozart disc and a
prize-winning all-Scriabin disc. Besides
their flourishing individual careers,
Chung and Bax are well known for their
duo work. They have released a CD on
Signum Classics featuring Stravinskys
complete ballet score Petrushka in its
four-hand version, plus Brahms waltzes
and their own version of four Piazzolla
tangos. The result proves that though
each is a musician of great individuality,
with very different sounds and
approaches, together they can sound
entirely of one mind. Sometimes in a
duo you try so hard and it doesnt work;
other times you just click, says Chung.
No prizes for guessing which is
true here. Its like our relationship:
as soon as we met we had the feeling
we understood each other. Working
together isnt like working. Were on
the same line musically and we know
our own strengths. Even choosing our
repertoire, we already know who will
play No 1 or No 2 for each piece. We
cut out a lot of the usual nonsense and
get straight to the music.
One of their party pieces is Astor
Piazzollas Libertango: It changes at

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every performance, says Chung.


The harmonic base is the same and
we improvise on top of it, which
is a new medium for us, because
being classically trained we dont
often get to be creative in that sense.
Because we trust each others playing
completely, we can do it, especially
if we play it a few times in a row it
gets wilder and wilder and we really
hope we end together! A video of
them shows, at one point, Chung
playing in the centre of the keyboard
and Bax with one hand on either
side, effectively with his arms around
her. It is sweet. Very sweet. It is also
fabulous music-making.
The pair will spend more time in
Dallas from this new academic year
onwards: they now share an official
teaching post and are upping their
number of students. But they remain
New Yorkers at heart, with Bax an
excellent cook, as Pianist readers
will already know from his interview
inside issue 80 taking charge as chef
when friends come round.
Life has inevitably changed since
Milas birth. Its a lot of juggling, but
it works, says Chung. I slowed down
a bit after her birth, but now Im
gearing up again. Travelling is quite
easy when the baby is this young, but
it may be more difficult later. Earlier

this year Chung premiered a concerto


with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra
written by a local teenaged composer,
Chase Dobson; over the summer
she has recitals in Italy, Dresden,
Washington DC and the Bard
Music Festival in New York state.
In October she and Bax travel to
Argentina to perform at the legendary
Teatro Coln in Buenos Aires.
She also has a new CD on the
way, to add to her already substantial
discography: a programme of piano
music by Poulenc, on Signum
Records. I love Poulencs music,
she enthuses. I love the contrasts in
the miniatures one piece can be so
tender, and the next so incisive. I do
think its underrated. Maybe I feel an
affinity with it because my mother
tongue is actually French. Modestly,
when pressed, she reveals that she is
fluent in six languages.
Theres no doubt that Chungs mild
manner and bubbly nature disguise
a musician of great intelligence and
a pianist capable of jaw-dropping
virtuosity. Small hands, according
to some palm-readers, can signal big
ideas. Chung might just be living
proof of it.
For further details about Lucille
Chung, go to lucillechung.com.

L I S T E N L E A R N P L AY

12LEARN
PIECES TO

BEGINNER TO ADVANCED
IN-DEPTH LESSON
ON CHOPINS

AEOLIAN
HARP

ETUDE OP 25 NO 1

BONUS TRACKS
Every issue, Pianist brings you

pages of scores to learn and


Lucille Chung plays 40Brahms,
a CD to listen and learn from.
Saint-Sans and Scriabin
If your CD is missing, please
call 0113 200 2929 or email
laurenr@warnersgroup.co.uk

Discover Rameaus
Baroque gem

La Villageoise

ON THIS ISSUES CD Lucille Chung plays


Brahms, Scriabin and Saint-Sans on this
issues cover CD (her partner for the Brahms
duet is Alessio Bax). Find the full details on
the CD cover.

SCORES BY GRANADOS HENSELT SCRIABIN CIMAROSA


SCHUBERT HOFMANN and more performed by Chenyin Li
Pianist 85 CD cover-FINAL.indd 2

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16/07/2015 10:18

play

HOW TO

Changing gears

FAST & SLOW PLAYING

Do you dream of playing fluently and fast? Do you wish your slow playing could be better controlled?
Pianist and teacher Mark Tanner shares some tricks and tools to perfect your velocity

ianists tend to fixate on


fast playing it is
something that we yearn
to be able to do as we
become more adept, and
indeed the aspect that
adult learners often envy
in younger players. Adult learners can
cultivate a reliably dexterous technique
too, but extra attention may be needed
to ensure movement around the
instrument remains relaxed, coordinated
and unencumbered. This will be aided by
a carefully positioned seat (keeping a
little further back from the keyboard will
free up the elbows) and a conscious
top-of-the-bounce glancing blow of the
keys (which can be assisted by sitting a
notch lower than instinct might suggest).
Paradoxically, slow playing brings about
at least as significant a challenge as fast
playing with respect to sustaining a
centred, shapely cantabile through to the
ends of phrases. In this article, Ill look at
fast and slow playing and what
happens when you combine the two.
Physicists take care to distinguish
speed from velocity, defining the latter as
the speed of something in a given
direction. This is quite an apposite way
of thinking of it in pianistic terms too,
since it reminds us that directional force
is intrinsic to fast-moving music and
encourages us to channel our speed
purposefully. We often think of
technique as being one thing i.e. an
ability to whizz around the piano like a
crazed octopus whereas technique is
better thought of as anything we do to
make the instrument sound in a
particular way. This, of course, includes
subtle chord-voicing, pedalling, or
indeed the playing of a single note!
Playing at speed requires a lightness of
fingerwork and wrists, good motor skills
and an ability to conceptualise the
passages in question as a single gesture, as
opposed to a bunch of individual notes.
It also requires the brain and fingers to
function in perfect synchrony. After all,
slick fingers presuppose a quick brain,
even though it is the kinaesthetic, or
muscle memory, which we tend to be
preoccupied by when we begin to pile on
the tempo. Evenness is at least as
important as speed an Allegretto pace,
with evenly controlled fingers and active

shaping of phrases, will have a greater


impact than a Prestissimo speed riddled
with bumps, superficial fingerwork and
faulty coordination of the hands.
Besides, the piano is not a piece of
gymnastic equipment designed to
demonstrate the players prowess. Speed
for its own sake will tend to draw
attention to the performer, but often at
the expense of the music itself; in the
final count, speed or indeed velocity is
but one tool in our kitbag, not a vehicle
to bolster a players ego or titivate an
audience. I once asked a young player
why he was playing a piece marked
Adagio at such a fast speed. His response
was because I can. Enough said.
Fast playing
When a composer indicates a fast pace, it
will invariably be to promote a particular
characterisation capriciousness,
excitement, agitation or brilliance
hence tempo considerations should
always be aligned with a particular type of
musical charisma. If the pianist becomes
too excited and carried away with the
speed at which the music is moving, often
the audience will experience something
rather different: a breathless, tense
performance with an inordinate amount
of collateral damage in wrong notes or
fragmentation. Our task in playing
quickly is to lend the music just enough
momentum and animation to let it spring

TOP
TIPS

2
3
4
5

SUCCESS AT ANY SPEED


Speed helps to determine character, but only in carefully selected
instances should it be used as a means of demonstrating the
performers prowess.
In the main, target evenness, consistency and shape above pace.
Bear in mind the impact of different articulation and dynamics
when gauging appropriate speeds.
Slow playing requires an especially attentive ear for legato
shaping and cantabile tone; fast playing demands super-relaxed,
supple wrists and fingers.
Always think in patterns and larger gestures, regardless of speed
choice, and ensure that fingerings chosen at a slow speed will
work at the eventual target speed.

Mark Tanner is a pianist,


composer, writer, ABRSM
examiner and teacher. In 2015
his performing and academic
work will take him to Australia,
USA, South Africa and
Caribbean. This August he will
teach piano, composition and
improvisation at the Chethams
Summer School and presents
his own popular piano summer
school at Jackdaws. A dozen of
his pieces feature on current
exam syllabuses, including five
on the new Trinity College
piano syllabus. Spartan Press
has published 50 books of his
compositions, arrangements
and transcriptions. Find out
more at www.marktanner.info

to life in a musically satisfying way;


playing any faster soon becomes
gratuitous and counterproductive.
Showmanship is all well and good, but
there are loftier objectives in piano
playing than becoming known as the
fastest player in town.
Here are the main points to keep in
mind when playing at high velocity:
Suppleness (i.e. a lack of tension in the
fingers, wrists, or body).
Independence of fingers, which is
optimised by sensible fingerings and
well-considered placement on the keys.
Keeping closer to the keys and
minimise extraneous movements.
Thinking in longer gestures
unencumbered by barlines.
Using a leggiero touch, using relaxed
wrists and steely fingers.
Deploying sustain pedal only minimally.
Making mindful repetition of
homemade exercises and/or studies by
Burgmller, Czerny, Dohnnyi and so on.
Strange though it may seem, running
uses entirely different muscle groups
from walking. A speeded-up video of a
person walking will look like something
out of John Cleeses Ministry of Funny
Walks, not like someone running. The
same is true of piano playing.
Try making a video of yourself playing
an arpeggio over two or three octaves at
two contrasting speeds. Aim on each
occasion to play normally and smoothly.
Now play back both videos, but increase

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MASTERCLASS
the replay speed of the first one (various
apps will let you do this). This speededup version will look entirely different
from the second version, where you
actually played at a faster speed. The main
differences are the distance you will likely
be travelling away from the keyboard
when playing faster, alongside greater
contractions of both the fingers and
wrists we visibly fly, gathering
appreciable momentum, especially when
shifting to the new hand positions.
Moreover, as a general rule, the fingerings
you come up with at a slower speed are
very likely to be different from those you
find yourself needing when playing
quickly, due to the different muscularity
and trajectory of faster-paced playing.
My point is that practising at a slower
speed, though useful in some respects,
may well leave you with a false sense of
security, and potentially give you a bum
steer on fingerings. Hence, no amount
of slow playing will ever enable you to
play quickly; indeed, were you to practise
a passage at half speed for a year, you
would simply become proficient at
playing it slowly.
Articulation, patterns and
piano actions
An aspect frequently overlooked when
targeting a faster pace is the impact of
different types of articulation. Staccato
playing generally slows us down because
our wrists need to play a more active
role. Moreover, the louder we play, the
more pronounced the slowing effect
becomes. This is all the more true when
rendering octaves or chords, which at
speed will end up sounding staccato
whether we like it or not.
Try this: play a favourite running
passage several times, employing a
different combination of slurs and dots
on each occasion for example, all
legato, all staccato, slur-dot, dot-slur,
slurs and dots grouped in threes or fours,
then in alternation. Quite apart from the
changes to musical impact, you will
notice that the speed at which each
version works most comfortably will be
quite different. It is a good idea to jot
down metronome speeds to keep track of
your optimum pacing of all the above
elements so that you never become
tempted to over-egg the tempo a bit
like knowing your own vital statistics.
Composers tend to compose in
patterns, so the best approach is often to
search these out when learning to play at
a certain speed. There is little point in
being able to play the tonic version of a
melody in a Classical sonata at one
speed, and the dominant version at
another, which could well happen if you
fail to spot the potential for using the
same fingerings/hand positions. Look
beyond the obvious when considering
more convoluted patterns taking the
odd note or two in the other hand

(again, preferably adopting a similar


pattern) may alleviate issues of speed loss.
Consistency is definitely the name of the
game when it comes to homing in on an
appropriate speed.
When top pianists perform in such
venues as Carnegie Hall or Wigmore
Hall, they get to choose their instrument
a few days before. If all concert pianos
were identical in the weight of their
actions, there would seem little point in
doing this. Indeed, choosing the right
instrument for a major recital is a little
like having the right running shoes for
competing in an important track event.
For most of us, such indulgences crop up
rather rarely, but this should not prevent
us from finding something appropriate to
our needs. If in doubt, err on the light
side. An overly heavy action can cause too
much exertion of the wrists, arms and
upper body, all of which will slow us
down and exacerbate fatigue the
pianists bte noire. If forced to play on a
heavier instrument, keep close to the ends
of the keys and refrain from hunching
over the keyboard. Always imagine the
hammers striking the strings, nimbly and
effortlessly. The heavier the action, the
more we will tend to raise the fingers high
to combat it; while this can be desirable
as a technique for building finger
independence, we should guard against
extraneous movements and be aware of
the impact on both pace and dynamics.
Slow playing
Because our instrument creates sounds
that are always decaying, we can
encounter problems with creating a
convincing sense of line when playing
slowly. All too often we hear chopped-up
phrases or else ungainly bulges. We need
to pay attention to the beginning, middle
and end of every note we play just as
wind, brass or string players would so
we achieve a beautifully smooth,
controlled effect. The slower we play, the
more pedal we can permit ourselves,
though this is a general, not absolute rule.
It is a good idea to practise the melody on
its own, pedal-free, and create as much
natural shape as you can. As with most
other facets of effective piano playing, this
is actually something of an illusion.
A helpful exercise is occasionally to
practise melodies with the alternate hand,
which will encourage you to listen even
more intently and hence produce the
desired effect. There are two forces at
work when pianists play melodies
subtle dynamic/tone gradation and
tempo. This is why we will not need to
exaggerate dynamic effects quite as much
when playing music at faster speeds.
Remember also that the slower we
choose to play something, the more the
listener will tend to become absorbed by
the harmony rather than the melody, so
be sure this is what you are wanting!
Static-sounding playing is the kiss of

QUICK TRICKS

Mark Tanners advice for playing at


different speeds in 3 of this issues works

Granados Cancin de Mayo [Scores page 38]: This deliciously


song-like work needs to come over with appreciable poise and
tranquillity (marked apacible gentle). As is so often the case in
Romantic piano playing, much of the real work comes in honouring
the effortlessly flowing accompaniment. Spend time working hands
separately, initially without pedal. The Chopinesque RH triplets against
LH semiquavers (bar 10, etc.) will come about without undue angst if
you aim to target the chord at the top on each occasion. Home in on
the LH here, for the tendency will often be to suddenly hurry the
accompaniment. Target a spacious, tumbling quality in the melody.

Henselt Etude op 2 no 4 Repos damour [Scores page 42]:


This piece needs the lightest possible touch for the dainty RH
chords, so that the LH tune, marked molto cantabile e portando la
melodia, never has to work too hard to be heard. Aim for shape and
sensitivity; make it sound as unhurried and naive as you dare. The
fingerings are good for sharing out the tune from bar 9 onwards. At bar
19 make the most of the switch in roles to give the RH a chance to sing!

Chopin Etude op 25 no 1 [Scores page 60]: This study makes play


of arpeggiated chords. A significant challenge is how to pluck the
melodic line into life in a shapely fashion. The listener should not become
overwhelmed by the musics super-rich texture. Although there are 48
notes per bar, these need to be discretely tucked away. This confers a lot
of work to the RH little finger allow the elbows freedom to move
outwards on each beat, but maintain stillness of the upper torso too
much porridge stirring will render your performance turgid and bumpy.
[Read Lucy Parhams How to Play on this piece on page 24.]

death in slow music play buoyantly,


gently on the move at all times.
Mixing speeds
Piano music frequently requires the
player to combine fast and slow playing
within a single passage ornaments
invariably need to sound uncluttered and
effortless, even within a slow-moving
melodic line. The trick is not to tense up
when executing ornaments, and to
practise them in isolation first for it is
impossible to play with loose fingers if
the wrists are tense! Furthermore, pianists
often have to cope with different speeds
simultaneously, i.e. a slow, poised melody
set against a more florid accompaniment
(for example, Chopins Prlude in G
op14), or indeed the other way around
(such as Bachs Invention No 14 in B flat
BWV 785). In either case there will be
issues of balance to keep in mind, as well
as the need to adopt essentially a different
technique for each hand.
Finally, keep in mind the less is more
philosophy regarding speed, and
wherever possible, play to your strengths
if speed is not yet one of them, it is
better to opt for more relaxed,
atmospheric music when performing.
And in the meantime keep grafting away
at your technique; your day will come!
In the next issue Mark Tanner talks about
practising away from the piano.

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HOW TO

The other pedals

UNA CORDA & SOSTENUTO


In the last of his three-part series on pedalling, Graham Fitch looks at the middle and left pedals
una corda and sostenuto and explains how, when and why youll want to use them in your playing

fter discussing the right (sustaining) pedal in some detail


in my previous two articles on pedalling, Im going to end
with some thoughts on the remaining two pedals found
on most modern grand pianos the soft pedal and the
sostenuto. It is worth remembering that at points along
the pianos evolutionary timeline it had additional pedals
that have since disappeared. The moderator muffled the
sound by bringing strips of leather or cloth between the hammers and strings;
the lute brought a strip of felt into contact with the strings, producing a
gentle plucked effect; the bassoon created a raucous buzzing by moving a
strip of parchment into contact with the strings, and the janissary produced
percussion effects suitable for Turkish music. Of the three pedals that remain
today, the middle pedal may be a sostenuto (more about this later) or, on
some upright pianos, it may be a practice pedal, where a thin strip of felt is
lowered between the hammers and the strings to muffle the sound so you can
practise without disturbing your neighbours.
Lets begin with the left pedal otherwise known as the soft pedal,
the shift pedal (because on a grand piano the whole action including the
keyboard shifts to the right) or the una corda.
The soft pedal
The soft pedal is capable of so much more than merely playing softly. Yes,
it does usually make the sound softer but thats not really the main point
we should be able to control soft playing with our fingers, hands and arms.
Perhaps more importantly than using the left pedal to play more softly, we
use it when we want to change the timbre or the quality of the sound. The
left pedal reduces the percussive quality and gives the sound a bit more
mellowness, and we can use it at a variety of dynamic levels.
At the beginning of Bndiction de Dieu dans la solitude, Liszt was obviously
after a very special sound when he marked mezzo forte and una corda:

Moderato

U
? #### #c f f fj
#

f f f ff f ff f f f f f ff f ff f f
fff
ff f f
ff
f
f

mf cantando sempre

## # U
& # ## c

4 5 4 5 4 5
3
2 1 2 3
1

una corda

fw

## #
& # ## f ff ff ff f ff ff ff f ff ff ff f ff ff ff

Here we use the left pedal to take the focus and clarity out of the sound
without affecting the volume (the singing tenor line needs to be played
firmly). If you covered your mouth with a handkerchief and spoke quite
loudly, your voice would still sound loud, just less direct and clear.
There is a big difference in effect between the left pedal on an upright piano
and on a grand. On an upright, the pedal moves the hammers resting
position closer to the strings. Because the hammers have less distance to
travel, they reach the strings with reduced velocity and thus a reduction in
volume. The tone quality is not affected. On a grand piano, the action
(including the keyboard) is shifted over to the right. Hammers that in normal
position strike notes with three strings now only strike two of them, but this
only accounts for approximately the upper two thirds of the instruments
range. What really changes the timbre is that the strings are struck by a part

? #### # w
# f

WATCH GRAHAM ONLINE


Dont miss Graham Fitchs
video lessons, which youll find
on the Pianist website at
www.pianistmagazine.com.
Graham demonstrates
everything that he discusses
on these pages and more.
His current lessons are filmed
at Steinway Hall, London, on
a Model D concert grand.
Theres nothing like watching
the expert!

of the hammer where the felt is less compacted and hardened from regular
use. On its F308 grand, Fazioli added a fourth pedal, which functions just
like the soft pedal on an upright, allowing the player greater control over soft
playing without any change in tone colour (the piano is of course equipped
with the standard shift pedal too).
The term una corda (one string) is thus slightly misleading. On the early
pianos it was possible to use this pedal to cause the hammer to strike one
or two strings but this is not the case on the modern grand. Beethoven
requested these two degrees of shift in the slow movement of his Piano
Concerto No 4 and also in the Sonata opus 106 Hammerklavier.
One problem with making too many decisions about using the left pedal is
how much the effect varies from one instrument to the next. On some pianos,
the effect is a dramatic drop in sound and a subdued velvety tone quality; in
others it might be barely noticeable. Piano teachers seem wary of encouraging
the use of the left pedal, for fear their students will rely too much on the left
foot to play softly rather than developing full control of soft playing with the
fingers. Once you have developed a habit of muffling your sound by
constantly using the left pedal during your practice, it is remarkably difficult
to break. Try covering over the pedal with a book to stop you using it or
invest in a squeaky mouse toy that you place between the underside of the
pedal and the floor (every time your foot wanders back to the left pedal, the
squeak will alert you and over time help you break this habit).
You can achieve some wonderful silvery effects by putting the left pedal
down only slightly, or half or three-quarters of the way down. Experiment
with this, remembering it varies from piano to piano. We often use the left
pedal in conjunction with the sustaining pedal, remembering of course that
while the right pedal may need constant changing and adjusting the left
pedal is usually held down for an entire phrase or even a section of music.
It is not generally a good idea to use the soft pedal to assist with a
diminuendo, since this would change the tone colour. However, it can work
rather well when you want to
guarantee a really soft tapering
off in a slurred ending, such as
the very last chord of Chopins
Berceuse (right). Make sure the
soft pedal goes down before
you play this chord (you can
put it down just after the
penultimate chord).
It is helpful to think of
the left pedal as a change
u.c.

FF
? bb b FF
bb

f
f

? bb b
b b F
F

ff

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MASTERCLASS
of registration. Experiment with holding it down for an entire repeat in
a Baroque binary dance movement but do this judiciously, where it feels
appropriate to the character of the music. Consider using the left pedal
in echo effects and when a phrase is repeated, such as this example from
Chopins Fantasie in F minor. Here again we would not use the soft pedal to
play softly, but to make a tonal contrast between the two phrases:

bb
& b b FF

f f
f f

? b b FFF
bb
F

bb
& b b FF

fff fff fff

f f fJ

.j
f
f

. .j

f f f
f f f
fff fff fff

f f fJ

? b b FF
bb F
F

.
ff
ff
f

. .
ff nff
nff ff
f f

bb
& b b<#><n><#>
<n>

.
.
ff
ff nffff
f
f

It is most important not to recourse to the left pedal every time you see
pianissimo or you will take the intensity, shine and glitter out of the sound. I do
suggest it for the pianissimo in bar 2 of the Mozarts Fantasie in C minor (bars
1-2 are below) because it helps orchestrate the slur at the end of the phrase:

Adagio

Piano Sonata by Elliott Carter 1948 by Mercury Music Corp. Copyright renewed. Theodore Presser Sole Representative. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

bff ff #ff ff
j #f f bf

f bf
f fj

? c f bfj #f f bf f fj & f bf f
bf
#f
f b f #f f f f
f

u.c.

&c

j nf
f
nf f nf ffbf f f bf f bbff j
nf J
f
b f f f bf f
fJ
meno f
>
j
bb
FF
b
n
F
f
b
& <#> <#> FF
ff FFFF
FF
fJ
<n> F
sost. ped
meno mosso
.j .j # f.j
.
3
j # f n f #f
j
#
f
b
f
?
b
#f nf J
f
&b b
f
#
f
J
f
f fJ
J
.J . .
f
.
f
bb
&b b

(pp)

Composers rarely specify the use of the left pedal its use is at the
discretion of the performer.
The sostenuto pedal
Steinway patented the sostenuto pedal in the USA in 1874. While American
piano builders soon adopted it into their designs, it was not well received in
Europe. As an undergraduate piano student at the Royal College of Music in
the late 1970s, I was actively discouraged from using it, because there was no
guarantee the piano at the concert venue would be equipped with one, and
even if it were it might not be well enough regulated to rely upon.
The sostenuto pedal catches any dampers that are already raised and holds
them in the up position so they are not affected by the sustaining pedal,
which can be used independently and in conjunction with the sostenuto.
This allows you to sustain certain preselected notes but not others. For it to
work, the sostenuto has to be perfectly regulated, which it often isnt, even
on concert pianos! Remember that the note you wish to catch and sustain
has to go down when no other fingers are holding, and the sustaining pedal
cannot be fully down at the precise moment. So if you want to sustain a
bass in the sostenuto and the RH is also playing, whatever the RH is
holding down will also be caught in the pedal.
If you play a lot of 20th-century and contemporary music, particularly by
American composers, you may already use the sostenuto constantly. In the
extract from Elliott Carters sonata at the top of the next column, all the rests
and staccatos can be realised while the sostenuto holds on to the chord.The
sostenuto is also ideal for the Liszt and Busoni transcriptions of Bach using
it sustains long bass notes with changing harmonies played in higher registers.

poco marc.

w
w
w
w

w
w
w
w
>.
Some players like to use the sostenuto
for
Debussy
music, even
f
#
>
n fthis.andTheRavels
j
though those composers would
not
have
expected
combination
of
#ffor thechanging
? b
nfsustain
#fand#fthe right

using thebbsostenuto
to
pedal f
harmonies
b
# f the sustained
tends to create a tonal
note(s) and the
n fvacuum
# fbetween
. music
>
#
f
changing harmoniesnthat
sanitises
the
texture
of
the
inappropriately. Its
#
f
f J

just too squeaky clean! It is perfectly possible to realise all the special effects in
Debussy and Ravels fmusic by the use of fractional or vibrating pedalling (of
the sustaining pedal) allied with sensitivity to touch and voicing.
Rachmaninovs C sharp minor Prelude (below) is another example of
where judicious use of the sustaining pedal creates a lovely effect. By all
means use the sostenuto, but it is not at all necessary:

b
& b bb<#><n><#>
<n>

w
w
w
w
- -----####c ff ff ff ff f ff f
&
f f f f ff f ff
w

f
f
? ####c f
w
w
mf

-----fffff
ff f ff f f f
f f f ff

w
w
w
w

- ,- - - - - - ff ff ff ff ff f ff #f
f f f f f ff f # ff
fJ

f
ff
f
fJ

-----ffffff
ff ff ff ff f ff
f

f
ff

If you are using right pedal only, then dont even begin to adjust the pedal
until about halfway through the bar, after which I suggest vibrating the
pedal to sustain the bass octave and to partially clear the changes of
harmony above (see my article in Pianist No 84). Let us remember when
composers write this type of passage they are not after a clean sound
a certain amount of blurring is intended and perfectly acceptable.
However, Liszts Consolation No 3 in D flat does present a problem: how
to sustain the bass for so many bars, with so many changes of harmony
above. In 1883, some years after Liszt wrote this piece, he received a piano
from Steinway equipped with a sostenuto pedal. He was impressed with
the device and sanctioned its use in the Consolation. Use it to catch the bass
D flat at the start and change the right pedal with each new harmony.
In conclusion, unless the work specifically calls for the use of the
sostenuto, it is safe to assume that sonorities can be managed without it.
This does not mean you may not use this pedal it comes down to personal
judgement as well as practical concerns about individual pianos. If you are
at all reticent or squeamish about using the left pedal, consider that it has
been an integral part of piano design since the pianos inception and its
here to stay. It is a tool at our disposal; let us use it wisely and for effect. n
In the next issue Graham Fitch discusses the technique of forearm rotation.

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T MISS
NIE
DON
MELA KS
SWIC
SPAN
PIECE
ON THIS E

HOW TO

Heinrich HOFMANN (1842-1902)

N
LESSO

TRACK 3

BEGINNER/
INTERMEDIATE

Melodie, No 5 from Skizzen op 77

PAG
22

The German composer Heinrich Hofmann was described by the leading Viennese
critic Hanslick as not a highly gifted composer but a reliable, skilled practical
musician, able to present commonplace ideas in a tastefully refined form. Thats
true here, in this piece from his Skizzen (Sketches) for solo piano.
Playing tips: This is a sweet piece perfect for perfecting your even LH
accompaniment. Although the LH acts as the accompanist throught this piece, it

still has a lovely inner rising melody, which should be brought out subtly. Take note
of all the phrase markings and the changes in dynamics. The last three bars almost
sound like a chorale voice the chords, so that the top notes sound out the most.
Pedal tips: You will see some pedal markings on the score. Melanie Spanswick,
who gives the lesson on this piece, suggests using pedal with discretion.
Read Melanie Spanswicks step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 22.

Allegro moderato q = 116

&c F
1

FULL SCORE ON PAGE 32

{
&

3 2

4
2

FF

j
f

FF

& f

f nf
f f
1

f #f f f f nf f f

HEINRICH HOFMANN

Melodie, No 5 from Skizzen op 77

j
f

&

#f

5
3

ff

f f f f F
2

#ff

ff

#ff

nf

f #f f

4
1

3
1

2
1

f f f f f f f #f
3

f
2

mf

&

f f f f f f f f

F
p

&

&c f

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f f f
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f
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f
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f f f
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While this lovely Romantic piece is quite straightforward on the surface, you can take it to a higher
level with excellent legato and cantabile. Teacher and author Melanie Spanswick shows you how
Ability rating Beginner
Info
Key: C major
Tempo: Allegro Moderato
Style: Romantic

3 Cantabile
3 Phrasing
3 Legato technique

This tuneful, attractive little piece,


in the key of C major, is convenient
and comfortable to play. Melodie
was written by German composer
and pianist Heinrich Hofmann
(1842-1902) and offers an excellent
study in legato technique.
A tempo marking of crotchet
equals 116 beats per minute feels
appropriate. This tempo will help retain
the musical line and flowing character.
Short phrases suffice throughout,
providing a slightly breathless
demeanour, which is borne out in the
twisting and turning melody that is
combined with a forward-moving,
slightly chromatic accompaniment.
Hofmann sets out his musical ideas with
straightforward clarity. The pieces
structure is A-B-A (or ternary form),
with a very short coda at the end.
Use the sustaining pedal sparsely
when you play this piece. Although
Melodie is of a Romantic character,
it will not benefit from too much
pedal, as this will cloud the left hand
(LH) accompaniment and smudge the
melody too. Its probably a good idea
to use the pedal at cadential points or
at the end of a phrase, such as at bars 8
and 12. The chords at the end will need
careful pedalling (as marked), preferably
with a slight overlap. Remember to keep
your foot firmly on the pedal (when
taking it up and down), rather than
hitting it from above, as extra sound
effects wont compliment the smooth,
legato lines! (Youll see that I have added
suggested fingering and pedal markings
in the score.)

Fabrice Rizaato

Melanie Spanswick is a classical pianist, teacher, adjudicator, author


and presenter. She regularly conducts workshops and masterclasses
in Germany as well as for EPTA (European Piano Teachers
Association). She adjudicates for the British and International
Federation of Festivals and curates theClassical Conversations
Series, where she interviews eminent classical pianists on camera.
These interviews are published on YouTube. Her book, So You Want
To Play The Piano? has been critically acclaimed.
Find out more about Melanie at www.melaniespanswick.com

Will improve your

There is a natural dynamic rise and fall


within each phrase, as you might
expect from such a Romantic piece.
Once the tempo and underlying pulse
feels secure, allow some flexibility to
capture the nuances in the tops of
phrases. For example at bar 3, the second
beat, a G, might need a little time or
slight rubato (rhythmic flexibility or a
relaxation of strict time) going from the

preceding F to the succeeding E,


providing the appropriate expressive feel.
Similarly, the cadence (or end of phrase)
at bar 12 might require a mini hiatus,
giving time to breathe before repeating
the phrase again at bars 13-16.
The opening four bars are repeated
at bar 5, with brief chromatic flavour
in the last two bars (bars 7-8). Aim to
colour with a deeper, more sonorous,
yearning tone, by voicing and placing
the second and fourth beats of bar 7.
Hofmann enjoys springing chromatic
twists; at bar 15 and 16 the music flirts
with E minor, and at bar 22 and 23, a
chromatic downward passage in the LH
heralds the coda, adding an intrinsically
spacious quality.
A crucial technique to master for
this piece is the control of finger
legato. Good legato will provide the
specific colour and smooth touch
required. Both hands can benefit from
this technique. Work hands separately
to begin with, practising the opening
melody by searching for a warm timbre
within the key bed. In the first bar, keep
the thumb (beat 1) on the key right up
until the last millisecond, then transfer
weight from the thumb to the second or
index finger with a small rolled motion
on beat 2 (an A), only leaving the G as
the A is being depressed. This will need
quick movement, but will be easy to
implement with attentive listening; it
can also help to imagine your fingers are
stuck to the keys with glue!
The LH continuous quaver movement
really demands a creamy, fluid touch.
Each note must lead to the next with no
gaps in the sound, and with little note
accentuation. Tone should be carefully
graded from one note to the next, with
the exception of odd chromatic colour.
Again, listening is the best way to achieve
this, as well as practising with strong

fingers initially, lightening the touch


when the patterns have been assimilated.
Balance between hands is key to a
successful performance. The soft,
fluent quaver movement in the LH must
support and nurture a predominant

Learning Tip

The acciaccatura in the melody can


be played lightly, fluidly, and on the
main beat for a completely legato
line.

right-hand (RH) melody. Cantabile,


a singing style, is required. To sing on
the piano, each note must emanate a
beautiful rich tone, so aim to use your
wrist flexibly, combined with arm weight
(which plays an important role in tone
production), encouraging fingers to play
to the bottom of the key, cushioning the
sound with the pad of your finger tip.
This technique will encourage a resonant
melodic line, and can be applied to the
whole piece. Try to ensure total evenness
when playing each phrase too, so notes
in the tune lead logically and without
jerkiness to and from climactic points.
Observe Hofmanns markings in terms
of dynamics and tempo changes.
Bars 17 and 18 will require a ritenuto
(slowing down), allowing the phrase
to ebb away softly, before resuming
with the opening theme, A tempo (in
time). The last three bars, 24-26, can
be enhanced by a highlighted top line.
Balance the RH with hand weight biased
towards the fifth finger. Take each chord
down, making sure all notes sound
concurrently. Play the top line alone,
with plenty of colour, adding the other
parts only when you feel ready to
balance the tone, using appropriate wrist
motion and finger cushioning; each top
note should ring out, bringing this
work to an expressive close.

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CM

MY

CY

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play

HOW TO

CHOPIN

Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

From the first note to the last, this tude, with its glowing melody and a harp-like accompaniment,
is full of subtleties. Concert pianist and teacher Lucy Parham guides you through it
Ability rating
Info
Key: A flat
Tempo: Allegro sostenuto
Style: Romantic

Advanced

Will improve your

3 Leggiero touch in both hands


3 Forward momentum
3R
 H fifth finger strength

This beautiful and popular study is


often known as Angels Wings or
Aeolian Harp due to its florid
symmetry. Pianistically, it is a very
comfortable tude, lying beautifully
and organically under the hand,
although you will get some sense of
Chopins own long, tapering fingers
when you play it. This is definitely
written for a larger hand. I love to play
this piece, with its glowing melody set
within a harp-like accompaniment.
Chopin composed the opus 25
tudes, his second set of tudes,
when he was living in Paris in
the 1830s. I always think the score
looks more like a work of Liszt than
Chopin, and it is also visually a thing
of beauty. Coincidentally, this set of
tudes is dedicated to the Countess
Marie dAgoult. She was at that time
the mistress of Franz Liszt and it was
she who introduced Chopin to the
cigar-smoking novelist George Sand
(Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, to
use her real name rather than her
nom de plume). I love the story that
upon meeting Sand at a soire at
Liszts apartment, Chopin apparently
remarked, What a repulsive creature
she is; is she a really a woman? I am
inclined to doubt it! [see boxout,
opposite page, on Chopin and Liszt.]
It is essential that you treat this tude
almost as a Song without Words. The
melody is always at the forefront and the
technique to keeping the semiquavers
quietly plucked underneath the melody
is a very specific one.

Lucy Parham performs


her composer-portrait
concerts Rverie, with
Tim McInnerny at the
Machynlleth Festival,
Wales on 28 Aug, and
Odyssey of Love with
Juliet Stevenson and
Henry Goodman at
Kings Place (part of the
London Literary Festival)
on 3 Oct.
Her latest CD,
Odyssey of Love, with
Juliet Stevenson and
Henry Goodman is on
the Deux-Elles label. Lucy
will be in the recording
studio in September.
For other dates and
details, please visit
www.lucyparham.com

very special quality of tone, for which


you will need to sink deeply into the
bed of the key. The tempo should be
constantly flowing but never too fast.
Start by working on your left hand
(LH) alone and use a circular
movement from the thumb. I often
think it helps to imagine you are
drawing little circles with your elbow
but make sure the circles are small.
You definitely do not want your elbows
floating around all over the place. The
right hand (RH) should mirror the
circular movement of the LH so the
two hands are doing the same thing in
unison. Always remember that you are
circling away from the thumb, and this
will be a continuous movement to use
throughout the whole work.
The first note of the piece is crucial.
It is almost the only note in the entire
piece that stands alone. Draw it out
of the keyboard with an upwards
movement, but give it due weight as
it needs to be matched in tone by the
first note of bar 1. Now look at the
phrasing in the first bar and make sure
you phrase over the fourth beat in order
to lose the barline; you do not want
to stop on the first beat of each bar.
You are aiming to make the barlines
invisible.
You will notice there are three E flats
in the RH melody of bar 2. You
should be aiming to grade these three
notes downwards in order to create
a perfect decrescendo. The following
phrase climbs to a higher level, so
make sure when you reach bar 4 that

Sven Arnstein

Firstly, I would suggest learning this


piece all the way through by playing
it in chords. This will enable you to
grasp the sense of structure and the line
of the piece. It is in three very obvious
sections and you could try to master
these one by one.

the first note has a special ring to it.


You want to make the note shine!
The pedalling here is fairly obvious,
but make sure when you have the same
harmony over several beats you leave
the pedal down. There needs to be an
element of a wash of pedal (but no
blurring, please).

Learning Tip

At first, I would suggest learning


this all the way through by playing
it in chords. This will enable you to
grasp the sense of structure and
the line of the piece.

At the key change at bar 5 really sink


into the bass D to show the new
colour. When you arrive at bar8, try
feel a sense of spaciousness and do not
rush. At bars 11-12 the melody changes
from the opening. You need to reflect
this change with a different form of
tone and more weight in the fifth finger.
Again, never lose focus of the main
melody. Be aware that from bar 9
onwards that the dynamic marking is
piano, so resist the temptation to
overplay the dynamic and also resist
any urge to hurry!
When you reach bar 15, you need
to find a sense of calm and peace.
Observe the way that Chopin uses
small crotchets within each group
of six semiquavers (i.e. on the third
semiquaver of each group of six) to
highlight an inner melody. These
notes are important (and are often
overlooked), and should resound
like a bell or a gentle echo. They are
melodically more significant than the
fifth finger at this point. In fact, they
almost form a duet with the fifth finger.
In bar 16 you are trying to achieve the
perfect decrescendo and take a little
time and ease into bar 17. You almost
need to take a small breath, as a singer
might do, before you reach bar 17,
as this is a new section (our second
section, in terms of practising).
From this point, a long line drives
right through the next page until
the climax of the piece at bar 35. At
bar 17, Chopin highlights the LH
thumb in the same way the RH had the
inner melody two bars earlier. Again,
gently point this melody out and sink

Chopin marks Allegro sostenuto at


the start. The second word, sostenuto,
is of utmost importance, as it implies a
24 Pianist 85

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T MISS
DON PARHAMS
LUCY
PIECE
ON THIS E

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

N
LESSO

TRACK 12

PAG
24

This tude, nicknamed Aeolian Harp by Robert Schumann, is the first in a volume
of tudes dating from 1836.
Playing and pedal tips: Everything is spelled out for you when you read Lucy
Parhams article on page 24. But as you can see, there are a lot of notes on every page!

ADVANCED

A certain rotational technique is required in both hands, as well as a light plucking


technique to the inner notes, as Lucy explains. This is a wonderful piece and if you
take your time learning it, you will definitely be rewarded.
Read Lucy Parhams step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 24.

Allegro sostenuto q = 104

FULL SCORE ON PAGE 60

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60 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 60

into the fleshy side part of your


thumb. Bars 19 and 20 should
project more than the previous two
bars. A small crescendo is necessary
here and make sure you arrive at
bar 21, where it is imperative to
keep the tone level up. I should
also mention at this point that
as the tude progresses, the
accompanying semiquavers assume
more importance than they did in
the first few lines of the piece.
When you reach bar 22, please
observe the subito piano! This is
a beautiful moment and should
not be overlooked. You could also
experiment with being a little lighter
with the pedal too, as the whole
touch and melody becomes lighter
and slightly less into the keys than
the preceding couple of bars.
At bar 25 you really want to feel
a sense of expansion into the
beginning of bar 26 where the
melody really takes flight. Notice
the way in which Chopin marks the
bass notes here they are meant to
have more weight. I would suggest
that you use a wedge in the LH for
these notes (i.e. combining your
fourth with your fifth finger). Again,
always phrase that melody over the
barline, taking it from the second
beat rather than stopping on the first
beat of each bar. Try to imagine this
melody as if it were being sung.

08/07/2015 09:52

The second time this phrase


appears (i.e. at bar 30), you need
even more bass. You will also want
to aim to make a more colourful
melodic moment here, as the
harmony is more intense. A little
rubato is also called for. When you
reach bar 32 take a little breath and
drive forward for the next four bars
until you reach bar 35, the climax of
the piece. Here you need to establish
a big, warm tone right through until
the end of the phrase. The ensuing
bars are almost like a coda; the piece
is gradually winding down. When
you reach the top F in the middle of
bar 39, you must take a little time
and really place the note.
The final leggierissimo (at bar44)
needs what is called the perl
touch as if you are plucking the
keys. This passage is quite tricky
so I would suggest practising this
arpeggio sequence in all different
keys (but keeping the same
fingering!) in order to make it
ultimately easier to play in the key of
A flat. Tail away to nothing. The end
should be very harp-like, gossamer in
quality and beautifully quiet. The
LH needs a generous trill (with a
turn) and then a slow final
arpeggiated chord to finish the tude.
Lift the pedal slowly and release
your hands carefully any jerky
movements will spoil the mesmerising
end of this exquisite piece.

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Chopin and Liszt

The two contrasting personalities who shaped the Romantic eras pianism
Because Liszt lived so long (he died in 1886 at age 75) and Chopin died so young
(39 when he died in 1849), it is easy to forget that these two great Romantic-era
composers were born just a year apart. They both evidenced great talent as
children, but, as Chopin biographer Adam Zamoyski notes, Chopin was allowed a
relatively normal childhood, while Liszt was pushed by an ambitious father.
By the time the two men first met, in Paris, they had growing reputations as
performers and composers, and naturally gravitated to the same circles of young
artists. Liszt attended Chopins Paris debut in February 1832 and they later played
duets in public concerts. Chopin dedicated his Etudes op 10 to Liszt, writing
admiringly, I wish I could rob him of the way he plays my Etudes.
But their contrasting personalities Liszts more extroverted and theatrical,
Chopins introverted and refined meant a durable friendship was never really in
the cards. Their musical gods were different, too: Chopin admired Bach, Mozart
and Haydn, while Liszt praised Beethoven, whose passion too often approaches
cataclysm in Chopins view. For Chopin, public performance was a kind of torture
(he much preferred playing for small groups), while Liszt was at home on the
concert stage, as one who invented the idea of a recital would have to be. They
differed as well in the scale and focus of their compositions.
Liszt left Paris in 1835 to flee the scandal over his romance with Marie dAgoult,
while Paris remained Chopins base. After his death, Liszt wrote Chopins first
biography, a heartfelt panegyric to an admired contemporary. -Inge Kjemtrup

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14/9/2015 (whichever is sooner)

P24 HTP Lucy-FINAlish.indd 25

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play

T MISS S
DONNEWMAN
JANET
PIECE
ON THIS E

Henryk PACHULSKI (1859-1921)

N
LESSO

TRACK 9

HOW TO

Andante molto q = 54

b2
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2 1

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b

b
& b b fff

f
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ff

ff

f ff
f ff
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bfff

b
& b b ff
nf
5

Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

sim.

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cresc.

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melody. Make sure to dig the notes gently but firmly into the keys for a deep singing
tone. Try to make the LH do this too theres a lot of chromatic movement in the
LH chords, and its nice to be able to hear that inner movement. The B section,
which starts at bar 15, should be more agitated, before returning to the A section
again at bar 23. Pedalling is marked onto the score.
Read Janet Newmans step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 26.

f f f fff fff fff


? bb 42 f f f
b

HENRYK PACHULSKI

f
5

FULL SCORE ON PAGE 50

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

PAG
26

Composer and pianist Henryk Pachulski was of noble birth and was born to a forester
and his family who worked on the estate of Nadezhda von Meck, Tchaikovskys patron,
which may be why young Henryk was able to study with excellent teachers in Warsaw
and Moscow. This prelude comes from a set of six published in 1891.
Playing and pedal tips: This tender, romantic piece is in A-B-A form, with the LH
being the accompaniment throughout and with the RH taking the pining, singing

1 5

dim.

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08/07/2015 09:50

You can tailor this Chopin-like work to your personal style through listening carefully and
responding to the music. Teacher and performer Janet Newman offers helpful insights
Ability rating Intermediate
Info
Key: C minor
Tempo: Andante molto
Style: Romantic

Will improve your

3 Listening
3 Phrasing
3 Shaping of LH melody line

The Polish composer Henryk


Pachulski spent the majority of
his life in Russia. He studied with
renowned musicians such as Arensky
and Rubinstein at the Moscow
Conservatoire and later, he became a
professor there himself for many years.
There is an obvious influence of
Chopin in this little Romantic
Prelude. The octave movement within
the theme calls to mind Chopins
E minor Prlude opus 28 (as does
the chordal accompaniment), and
the chromaticism that pervades the
piece creates a sombre, dark mood
reminiscent of many Romantic works
of that time. Ive only previously come
across Pachulski in relation to graded
exams, so it has been a pleasure to get to
know his music a little better.

In bar 4, take your time to manoeuvre


your way through the finger
substitution. After all, it is a very
expressive moment and a small
ritardando feels exactly the right thing
to do. Also be aware that the final chord
(which has been taken in the RH for
ease of movement) should be the
quietest moment of the phrase, not
accidentally bashed out because of the
change of hand position! I also would
try to voice the top part of those chords
(LH thumb on G passing to the F in
the RH fourth finger and then over the
bar to the G in the LH again), because
when the RH melody is temporarily
still, there is room for the LH counter
melody to show itself. This also heralds
the emergence of the major tonality
in bar 5, raising both the mood as well
as the key.

There is much to enjoy and learn in


this piece. One of the main challenges
is learning how to manage the chords
with subtlety and nuance it can be
very easy to drown out the melody,
which at times, has a somewhat static
feel, especially if the tempo is too slowly
placed.
First decide upon the tempo that feels
appropriate for the music. While the
overall effect should be one of reflective
stillness, dont let the melody falter
there must be a sense of direction and
shape at all times so that the music
keeps moving forward in a natural way.
On the piano, slow melodies can be
difficult to shape as the pianist needs
to be keenly aware of grading between
each note, matching tone and evenness;
all problematic on what is, essentially, a
percussive instrument.
Practise the fingering with real
attention. Genuinely join every note
together and use your listening skills
ask yourself if each note leads to
the next without bumps or bulges, or
if there is something obtrusive in the
shape. Then double-check the fingering,
as this is usually where the problem lies.

In many ways, the left hand (LH)


has just as much melodic interest as
the main right hand (RH) theme. I
advise practising the LH alone in order
to discover the poignant little inner
melodies so that you can bring these
to the fore. The bass line is especially
important; begin by practising it alone
so that you have control over the way
you want to define it. Keep your hand
still upon the keys; just imagine that
the keys upon which your hand rest will
bring your hand up to restrike the next
chord, rather than you lifting your hand
off the keys to do so. This way, the sound
you make will be muted and tender as
opposed to harsh or strident the chords
should feel cushioned in tone.

Janet Newman is Head


of Keyboard at the Royal
Grammar School in
Guildford. In addition to
her teaching, she is in
demand as a freelance
pianist and is an examiner
for the ABRSM.

Pachulski repeats the thematic


material exactly in the next three bars.
Only when the diminished seventh
chord appears in bar 8 does the mood
revert to the sombre colour apparent
at the start. Show this by taking a little
time to let this phrase breathe. This
also allows you to place the opening
of the next phrase, an important one
musically, as the tempo can move on
somewhat. The LH in bars 10-11 is
really important too the chromaticism
increases in expressive intensity. I would
practise this by taking the chords in the
LH apart. Play the top part alone, then
add the middle (plus top), then bottom
(plus top). Also, just play the bottom
and middle notes alone for increased
security before finally adding all parts

together. Lean on the top voicing and


take enough time to clear the pedal on
each chord let this phrase slow down
at the end of bar 13 so that the chord
taken by the RH is not rushed.

Learning Tip

As ever, practise pedal with the


LH on its own, so that changes are
clearly executed. Take your time
with it, and squeeze the pedal,
never attack!

There is a slight gathering of pace


in bar 15. Each rising two-bar phrase
feels as if breath is being drawn in
and there is an obvious sense that
the music is clearly moving towards
a high point which finally occurs at
bar 20. From the beginning of this
section (bar 15 onwards), control the
dynamics carefully and try to shade
each note within the RH melody so
that the gradual crescendo is beautifully
graded; dont let the final forte feel in
any way forced or strident it should
be a natural and inevitable expression
of the musical direction before it falls
away again, returning to the suppressed,
contained theme at bar 23.
Start this final section using a very
quiet dynamic. There is a feeling here
that the music seems to have lost all
power to assert itself after the outburst
at bar 20. Restrained but intense, keep
the tone very focused and clear, but
have a sense that emotionally, all has
retreated within. Although there is a
slight brightening of the material at
bar 27 (again, the use of the major
tonality helps), this last section stays
quietly brooding through to the end
and it is important to maintain your
chordal control throughout so that the
musical atmosphere is not dispelled.
Im aware that I havent said a great
deal about the techniques of how
to practise much of this piece. I feel
that this is because in this particular
case, so much of playing it well is about
listening to and responding to the
music, which is a very personal thing
unique to each player. I hope, though,
that you have enough ideas here to
help you discover your own way to play
what is a very sensitive and beautifully
written little work.

26 Pianist 85

P26 HTP Janet-FINALish.indd 26

16/07/2015 13:26

Pianist 85
August-September 2015

Scores

LEARN MORE WITH OUR


VIDEO LESSONS

Contents
28

HEUMANN
Rainbow Fairy

30

LE COUPPEY
Arabian Air

32

HOFMANN
Melodie op 77 no 5

34

CIMAROSA
Sonata in G R14, third movement

37

BRESLAUR
Cuckoo op 46 no 21

38

GRANADOS
Cancon de Mayo op 1 no 3

42

HENSELT
Repos damour op 2 no 4

45

KEYBOARD CLASS
Fifths, sixths & sevenths

49

SCHUBERT
German Dance D783 no 7

50

PACHULSKI
Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

53

RAMEAU
La Villageoise

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App version also includes our pages of Scores from the
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so you can still listen to the Scores on the go!

58

SCRIABIN
Prlude in G flat op 16 no 3

60

CHOPIN
Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

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from the basics of playing to more demanding technical issues.
All you need to do is go to www.pianistmagazine.com/tv
to get started with the complete piano learning experience!
Our videos include:
Tim Stein and John Maul have made some
30 plus lessons for Pianist, all devoted to the
basics of learning the piano. Perfect for the
beginner pianist! Tims most recent lessons have
been on slurs, rhythm and using the thumb.
Past video lessons include the basics of chord
playing, sight-reading, fingering for beginners,
how to sit, geography of the keyboard
and more. These beginner-level lessons are
demonstrated on a Roland.
Graham Fitch gives his lessons for the more
intermediate/advanced player. There are over
20 of his masterclasses on the Pianist channel,
and more continue to be added. Grahams
subjects include pedalling, chords, passagework,
arpeggios, ornaments, voicing and different
touches. Grahams lessons come directly from
Steinway Hall, London, where he demonstrates
on a Model D concert grand.

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p27_Scores Intro 85-FINAL.indd 23

Quick guide to
UK/North American
note value terminology
w = semibreve/whole note
h = minim/half note
q = crotchet/quarter note
e = quaver/eighth note
x = semiquaver/16th note
y = demisemiquaver/32nd note
16/07/2015 10:19

Hans-Gnter HEUMANN

TRACK 1

BEGINNER

Rainbow Fairy

Rainbow Fairy is the first of 20 easy piano pieces in the newly released book Fantasy
1
Piano by Keyboard
Class contributor Hans-Gnter Heumann.
Playing tips: Try to keep the RH legato and make the melody really sing. The LH
is the calm accompaniment. You will see that there are ample pedal markings on the

score, as this needs to have a dreamy feel to it. Start pianissimo at bar 17, to make it

Rainbow
soundFairy
even more magical. This is a gorgeous piece, and it will surely be popular with
beginner level players and listeners alike.

Regenbogen-Fee / La
Arc-en-ciel
TakeFe
a look at
Pianists technical tips within the score.

There are no phrase markings,


but the melodic line is very
apparent. Sing it out loud first!

Keep soft throughout.

3
2

13

3
2

Bring out the top notes in all the


RH two-note chords, from bar 14
below to the end of the page.

(D. C. rit. )

28 Pianist 85

D.C. rit. means that you can slow down a bit when
you play this the second (final) time around.

56 691

2015 Schott Music GmbH & Co. KG, Mainz

P28 SCORES Heumann-FINAL.indd 28

The melody returns at the end of bar 8, but with some


new additions, such as the two-part chords in the RH.
Make sure the top note is the strongest.

3
2

The LH has more to say now too.

simile

Feel a real 3/4 lilt in the LH, with an emphasis


on the first beat, as in a waltz.

Hans-Gnter Heumann

Fine

Das widerrechtliche Kopieren von Noten ist gesetzlich


verboten und kann privat- und strafrechtlich verfolgt werden.
Unauthorised copying of music is forbidden by law,
and may result in criminal or civil action.

Schott Music GmbH & C, KG, Mainz

q = 88

Create a totally calm feeling for


this piece. Keep the pulse nice
and even.

08/07/2015 09:44

7
7

Hans-Gnter HEUMANN

TRACK 1

Rainbow Fairy

BEGINNER

pp

17
3

17

pp


3

3
pp

2
5
5

5


5

3 magically! And it stays that way5all the way through to


2
5start off
This shouldpp
5
5
(very quiet). Light fingerwork isneeded.

the end.
Start off pianissimo

Remember
to still keep in time. Rubato is not necessary.

3
2
5
5
5

21
3

5

5 2
5
5
21



21

21




5 3

3
2
5
5
5

55 3
25
5

this hands
note. Practise

Even articulation
is
needed
in
the
RH.
Feel
every

2
25 separately,
so
that you dont get
used
5 to hitting anywrong notes.

5
5 very slowly,

mp
25
5

25
5
mp

mp

mp

rit.

29
5
5

even.
Keep the LH notes steady and
rit.

29
5 5 Make aslight pause
over the RH F sharp and
the LH D natural.Then return to the opening.

rit.ends at the Fine sign at bar 16.


5
The piece
29
5

rit.

29

5

5

al Fine

D.C.

D.C.
al Fine

1
56 691

D.C.1al Fine

56 691
Feel the syncopation on the notes that are tied over the barline. Make a slight emphasis on these notes.

17

Schott Music GmbH & C, KG, Mainz

17

D.C. al Fine

56 691

29 Pianist 85

56 691
P28 SCORES Heumann-FINAL.indd 29

08/07/2015 09:44

Flix LE COUPPEY (1811-1887)

TRACK 2

BEGINNER

Arabian Air, No 28 from ABC du Piano

Flix Le Couppey was hired by the Paris Conservatoire at the tender age of 17 to teach
harmony even as he was still a student there. The talented young pianist became a
well-known teacher. His ABC du Piano was extremely popular.
Playing tips: Theres a lovely French Baroque quality to this piece. Take a look at the
phrase markings and notice how the LH sometimes mimics the RH. It should all sound

calm and legato, with dynamics rarely going above mezzo piano.
Pedal tips: Even though pedal has not been marked into the score (and is not 100
per cent required, as this is a Beginner piece), we advise you try two pedal changes per
bar that is, a change per every beat.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score.

This is in the key of A minor (notice the G sharp).


The minor key gives it that slightly soulful feel.
Both hands should play legato (smoothly). And we suggest hands
separately at first, as the parts are quite independent.

Observe all the crescendo and


dimuendo markings throughout,
such as the one below in bar 3.

Notice all the phrase markings.


They are important to adhere to.

Moderato q = 116

2
&4 f
1

? 42 f

f
2

#ff

2
5

The LH has its own melody. Play it on its own, and you will hear how beautiful
it is. Remember to project it when both hands come together. It shouldnt
overpower the RH, of course, but we should be able to hear it.

j
& f

f
? fJ

Put weight onto the


keys for the two-note
chord above...

This is a repeat of the opening. Consider playing it a little quieter this time.

f
p

#ff

3
5

... then an upward


motion for this twonote resolving chord.
Now you can start to increase the dynamic;
rf means to put emphasis on the note.

j
f
&

? ffJ

Observe all the short phrase markings in this


part, and the continual crescendos and
diminuendos.This will create more drama.

rf

rf

f
2

#f
4

30 Pianist 85

P30 SCORES Le Couppey-FINAL.indd 30

08/07/2015 09:45

Flix LE COUPPEY (1811-1887)

TRACK 2

BEGINNER

Arabian Air, No 28 from ABC du Piano

These semiquaver moments


might prove tricky. Keep them
light. Practise slowly too, at first!

Drop the dynamic to piano (soft).

12

&

f
p

? f

sf

j
f
&

Then resolve
softly to the E.

? ffJ

Crescendo up to the D.

2
3

rf

? f

f #f

Again, bring out the LH.

Bring out the LH here. Its


almost an answer the RH
from the previous bar.

f f f f f

f
J

f f f f
ff
#
f
1
3
5

Bring out this lovely


semiquaver run. Move
towards the crotchet E.

This phrase is the start of a short little coda.

j
& f

24

? ffJ

f
f

2
3

f
f
1

f
f

f.
f.
3

j
f.
1

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.

j
f.
2

Lift both hands for the


quaver rests.

f.
J

Notice staccato for the first time! Make the notes


detached, and even. A descrescendo is needed too.
31 Pianist 85

P30 SCORES Le Couppey-FINAL.indd 31

rf

20

& f

f
#
ff
1
3
5

Crescendo up to the E.
1

f f f f
2

f
J

Emphasise the LH F above. It has


to last through the whole bar.

16

.
#ff
J
2
4

U
ff
3
1

pp

U
ff
1
5

Try your hardest to play


the final chords at the
same time, very softly.

08/07/2015 09:45

S
MIS
NTANIE
DOM
L
E
KS
SWIC
SPAN
IECE
HIS P
ON TPAGE

Heinrich HOFMANN (1842-1902)

ON
LESS

TRACK 3

BEGINNER/
INTERMEDIATE

Melodie, No 5 from Skizzen op 77

22

The German composer Heinrich Hofmann was described by the leading Viennese
critic Hanslick as not a highly gifted composer but a reliable, skilled practical
musician, able to present commonplace ideas in a tastefully refined form. Thats
true here, in this piece from his Skizzen (Sketches) for solo piano.
Playing tips: This is a sweet piece perfect for perfecting your even LH
accompaniment. Although the LH acts as the accompanist throught this piece, it

still has a lovely inner rising melody, which should be brought out subtly. Take note
of all the phrase markings and the changes in dynamics. The last three bars almost
sound like a chorale voice the chords, so that the top notes sound out the most.
Pedal tips: You will see some pedal markings on the score. Melanie Spanswick,
who gives the lesson on this piece, suggests using pedal with discretion.
Read Melanie Spanswicks step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 22.

Allegro moderato q = 116

&c F
1

&

f
4

3 2

&c f

j
f

4
2

FF

FF

j
f

f f f f f f f f

#ff

5
3

ff

f f f f F
2

4
1

#ff

3
1

ff

2
1

f f f f f f f #f
3

nf

f
1

f #f f
2

f f
3

& f f f f
f f f
f
1

f
2

f
2

f f f f f f f f
2

f f f f

f f f

f f

mf

&

&

f #f f f f nf f f

f #f

& f f f f f nf f f

&

f
5

f f f f f f f f
2

32 Pianist 85

P32 SCORES Hofmann-FINAL.indd 32

08/07/2015 09:45

Heinrich HOFMANN (1842-1902)

TRACK 3

BEGINNER/
INTERMEDIATE

Melodie, No 5 from Skizzen op 77

12

f
2

&

f
2

f
2

f f #f f nf
2

f
J

f f f f
2

2
4

f nf
J

f ff
f #f

f f f f f f f f

j
f

f f f f F

& f

f f f

f
4

f f f f f f #f f

f f f f f f f f

& f f f
f

&

poco rit.

23

f f #F

& F

a tempo

18

&

f f f f f f f f

& f f
f
f #f f
f
f

21

f f f

2
4

&

f
f f f

& f #f f ff

15

f f
1

f
nf

FF

4
2
1

5
3

FFF

bf

f
1

P32 SCORES Hofmann-FINAL.indd 33

nf
1

f
1

f
f #f
2

F
2

nF
F
Pianist
1
5

33

85

rit.
3
1

5
2

FF

ff
-

pp

& f

FF
2
3

ff
1
5

5
1

f
fff2
5

bf

U
w
w
5
1

U
w
w
1
5

08/07/2015 09:45

Domenico CIMAROSA (1749-1801)

TRACK 4

INTERMEDIATE

Sonata in G R14, third movement

The Italian composer Domenico Cimarosa was a leading figure in opera, and his operas
were performed in many of the royal courts of Europe. His republican sympathies
caused him problems with the reinstated Bourban rulers of Venice, where he died in
1801. His works, including his many keyboard works, have a lightness and charm.
Playing tips: Try to imagine the sound of a fortepiano, an instrument of the Classical
era, when playing this energetic piece. The music should be full of rhythmic drive,
with the LH playing light, totally even quavers and the RH the detached semiquaver

melody. Aim for real finger independence between each note. There should be a
detached quality too hence no pedal. Try to adhere to all the dynamic markings. Bar
24 sees a new short eight-bar section keep the RH wrist loose for the two-note chords
otherwise the hand will tense up. Dont be put off by the quick tempo on the CD. You
will be able to build up the tempo over time.
Pedal tips: There are no pedal markings. We suggest just short dabs, sometimes, on
selected first beats of the bar.

Allegro q. = 63

#3 f f
f f
& 8
f f
4

? #38 f

& f

f.

?# f

{
{

f
5

?# f

&

f f
f f
f f

#
& f

10

f f
f f
f f

f.

f.

f
1

f
3

f
5

f
4

f
f

f
3

f
5

f
4

f.

f.

f.

#f

f #f

#f.

f.

f
5

mf

?# f
4

f.
1

34 Pianist 85

P34 SCORES Cimarosa-FINAL.indd 34

08/07/2015 09:45

Domenico CIMAROSA (1749-1801)

TRACK 4

13

&

#f
2

f #f

f.

&

# #ff
3
1

4
2

ff

&

# ff

ff

&

# bff

?# f

f.

.
#ff

ff.

f.
.
#ff
f.

ff.
f.

f.
3

f.

f.

f.
f.
1

ff

f.

f.

? # f-

25

ff.

4
1

f.
3

f.

f.

f.

f.

? # f-

22

f #f

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.
4

f.
bff
.

f.

f.

ff

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.

# f.

3
1

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.

4
2

5
3

bff

ff

f.
f
5
2

ff.

2
1

4
2

ff
.

bff

f.

f.

4
2

# f.
4

f.

f.
f

f.

#f

f.

f nf

? # #f

19

f nf

f.

# f

&

?# f

16

INTERMEDIATE

Sonata in G R14, third movement

3
1

ff

4
2

ff

5
1

ff

4
2

ff
.

35 Pianist 85

P34 SCORES Cimarosa-FINAL.indd 35

08/07/2015 09:46

Domenico CIMAROSA (1749-1801)

TRACK 4

#
& bff

28

&

&

f.

# f.

.
?# f
3

f.

f.

f.

f.

nf.

bf.

f.

f.

f-

f.

f.

f.

4
2

ff
.

ff
.

f.

f.

ff

ff
.
f.

f2

f.

f.
3

f.
4

f.

f.

f.

f.
3

f.
4

f.

f.

f.

ff

f.

f.

f.

#f

4
2

ff

f nf

ff

f.

f
f.

f nf

f.

f.

3
1

nf.

f.

nf

f.

f.

.
f
?#

40

f #f

# f.

?# f

37

bf
3

f.

f #f

f.

& f

f.
f

ff.

ff

f.

?# f

34

bff

& #f

f.
f

ff.

ff

?# f

31

INTERMEDIATE

Sonata in G R14, third movement

ff
.

f.

f.
1

f.

36 Pianist 85

P34 SCORES Cimarosa-FINAL.indd 36

08/07/2015 09:46

Emil BRESLAUR (1836-1899)

TRACK 5

German composer Emil Breslaur studied in Berlin, was choirmaster at the Reformed
Synagogue there and also the author of many books on piano technique, including
Die leichtesten Klavierstcke (The easiest piano pieces), from which this piece comes.
Playing tips: This is a great exercise for practising interplay between the hands. Think
of the cuckoos chirp, and how it is echoed. Thats how it happens on the piano: The

Allegretto q = 132

&

Key of G major.
Notice the
F sharp in the
key signature.

#c f.
4

mf

.
f. f
2

f f.

? #c

RH and the LH mimic the cuckoo in the first two bars, followed by a kind of answer
in the next two bars. Make sure to get the rhythm correct for the RH triplets always
think of moving towards the next full beat (first beat of the next bar), keeping the
triplet notes light. No pedal required.
Take a look at the technical tips within the score.

Keep the RH triplets light, moving


towards the crotchet in the next bar.

# f.
&

?#

f.

f.

Repeat of
the opening.

.
f f f f f

f. f f f f f f f f
4

f. f.

mp

f f

Practise slowly. Keep the notes light, even and


articulated. The LH answers the RH cuckoo,
like an echo.

BEGINNER

Cuckoo, op 46 no 21

f f

mf

These two bars above are like an answer to the first two bars.
They should be different, with legato and beautifully phrasing.
This is a repeat of the opening, but these two bars are different, in both hands.

f.

f.

f f f f

mp

f.

f f

f
mf

More of a singing quality is needed now.

& F

?#

f
3

f
f

f f
5

mf

f.

Back to the
opening
material.

Down/up
Down/up means pressure down on the first note, and up on the second. Continue this in the LH throughout this line.

# f.
&

13

?#

f.
1

f.

f.

f.

f.

f.

f f f f
4

f f
3

mp

f
1

Taper off gradually and with a small ritardando and diminuendo.


37 Pianist 85

P37 SCORES Breslauer-FINAL.indd 37

13/07/2015 09:07

Enrique GRANADOS (1867-1916)

TRACK 6

The popular, pretty Cancon de Mayo means May Song, and comes from a collection
by the Spanish composer Enrique Granados, which he composed in Barcelona.
Published in 1910 but likely written several years before, Cuentos de la juventud means
Stories of the young and comprises ten characteristic pieces. The year after this
collection was published, Granados composed his famous Goyescas.
Playing tips: This tender piece has a barcarolle quality to it. Before you begin, think

Apacible
Apacible
Apacible
5
Apacible
5
5

###### 6 f
#6
&
& ##### 688 f
& 8

{{

######
#
&
& #####
&

{{

#
?
? #######
? ## #

9
9
9
9

######
&
& ######
&

{{

#
?
? #######
? ## #

ff
f

5
5
5

3
3
3

2
2
2

1
1
1

f
ff
f
ff
f

2
2
2

1
1
1

2
2
2

ff
JfJ
J

ff
f

# ff
?
? ######## ff ff ff
? ## # f

6
6
6
6

5
5
5

5
5
5

2
2
2

j
ffjj
f
ff f
f ff
2

ff
f

ff
f

ff
ff
fpoco piu forte
poco
poco piu
piu forte
forte
ff
poco piu forte
f
ff ff ff f
f f

ff
f

ff
f

ff f f f
f ff ff ff

3
3
3

ff
f

ff
f
ff
f
3

ff
f

ff
Jf
J

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

1
1
1

ff
f
1

ff
f

ff
f
4
4
4

5
5
5

3
3
3

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f
f
f

2
2
2

1
1
1

4
4
4
4

ff
ff
f
f
f
f f

ff
f

ff
f

5
5
5

3
3
3

2
2
2

1
1
1

ff
f

ff
JfJ
J
4

pp
pp
pp
pp

ff
f

ff
f

5
5
5

3
3
3

ff
f

1
1
1

5
5
5

2
2
2

1
1
1

2
2
2

ff
f

ff f ff
f ff f

ff ff ff ff ff f
f f f f f ff

4
4
4

ff
f

2
2
2

3
3
3

2
2
2

ff
f
4
4
4
4

ff
f

f
ff ff ff ff ff f ff ff
f f f f f ff f

ff
f
ff
f
1
1
1
1

ff
f
ff
f
4
4
4
4

ff f f f f ff ## ff ff
f ff ff ff ff ff f # f f
f
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
cresc.
3
3
cresc.
3
cresc.
ff 3 ff cresc.
ff 3 f
ff
f
f
f
f
f f f f
f
1
1
1

1
1
1

2
2
2

1
1
1

ff
f
3
3
3

4
4
4

1
1
1

ff
f

ff f ff
f ff f
sim.
sim.
sim.
sim.
ff
Jf
J
ff
f

ff
f
ff
f

ff
f
ff
f

4
4
4

ff
f
1

2
2
2

ff
f

ff
f

ff
f
ff
f

5
5
5

ff
f

ff
f

ff
ff
f

1
1
1

3
3
3

2
2
2

3
3
3

j
ffjj
f
ff
f
1
1
1

3
3
3

ff
JfJ
J

ff
f

ff
f
4
4
4

ff f f f
f ff ff ff ff
f
ff ff ff f f f f ff f f f
f f f ff ff ff ff f f ff ff

ff
ff
f
ff
f

of the pulse/pace that you wish to take. The LH should sound calm and seamless, with
the RH ringing out. At bar 15, the melody appears again, this time octaves, so here it
will be more challenging. The ending is just beautiful, dying away into the distance.
We think you will fall in love with this piece, especially after youve listened to our
house pianist Chenyin Li perform it on our CD.
Pedal tips: You will need ample pedal, as suggested on the score.

ff
f
ff
f

ff f f f
f ff ff ff

ff
f
3
3
3

ff
f

ff
f
ff
f

1
1
1

ff
f

2
2
2

ff
f

ff
ff
f
f f f
f

ff
f

2
2
2

ff
f

ff
f
4
4
4

ff f f f
f ff ff f

2
2
2

ff
f

ff
f
3
3
3

p
p
p
p

######
f
&
& ###### ff
&

ff
JfJ
J
f
f
2
2
2

ff ff
f
#
?
? ######## 6688 ff ff f f
? ## # 68 f

3
3
3
3

INTERMEDIATE

Cancon de Mayo, No 3 from Cuentos de la juventud op 1

ff
f

2
2
2

ff
f
ff
f
2

ff
f
ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

1
1
1

ff
f
3
3
3

f
ff fff ff
f
5
5
5

2
2
2

1
1
1

ff
f
3
3
3
3

ff
f
ff
f

ff
f

2
2
2

3
3
3

f ff
ff
1

ff
f

1
1
1
1

ff
f

ff
f
3

ff ff ff ## ff
f f f #f
1
1
1

ff
f

ff
f

3
3
3
3

ff
f

38 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:46

Enrique GRANADOS (1867-1916)

TRACK 6

ff
#### f

f #f
f
f
f
f
f
f f#f f
f
f
f
f

11

&

f
J
f

ff
13
#### fJ
&

f f
f
f f
3
2

f
f
f
f f #f ff
J
5
1

#ff f

? #### f f f

5
1

3
2

f
ff
J

f
f f
ff
f f f
f

f f f
f
f
n
f
f
f f

ff f

poco rall.

a tempo

f
15
#### ff
&

f f
f f
J
5

ffff f
ffff f
4

ff
f
ff

ff
f
ff

f
#
# f
&##

? ####
####
&

f
ff

f
fff

f
fff
1

fff
ff
f f
ff

ff
1

ff
2

fff

f
ff

5
2

dim.

ff

R.H.

ff
ff
ff
f f ff
f f ff
f
f
f
f
f
f
ffff
ff
ffff
ff
ff
1

3
1

f
f
f
f
ff
2

ff

ff
R.H.

ff

f
? #### f f f f ff f f f f ff f f f f
f
f
f
3

# ff
#ff
5

pp

R.H.

3
5

5
2

ffff
ffff

f f fff
ff f

f f
f f
J

R.H.

21

fff
f f
f
ff

ff
1

f f
fJ f
ff
4

3
5

18

f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
2

3
5

pp

f f f f f
J

? #### f f f

? ####

INTERMEDIATE

Cancon de Mayo, No 3 from Cuentos de la juventud op 1

R.H. 4

5
2

R.H. 4

#ff
f
f
#
f
f f ff
f
f
f
ff
ff
2

39 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:46

Enrique GRANADOS (1867-1916)

TRACK 6

INTERMEDIATE

Cancon de Mayo, No 3 from Cuentos de la juventud op 1

####
&

5
2

f
f
? #### ##ff f f f ff ff f f f ff ##ff f f f fff f
f
f
f
f
f
f
R.H.

R.H.

3
1

f
f
f
f
f
f

f #fR
f
#f

24

#f
ff

f
2

a tempo

n fff
n
#### nf

rall.

meno

27

&

? ####

f nf

5
3

#### f
&

j
f f

5
3

f f
ff f ff f

4
3

fffff

30

5
3

2
1

ff ff ff ff
2
1

3 5
1 2

fff

fff ff

ff f
2

j
f f
J

f
f
f

f
J

ffff f
4

ffff

1
3

ff f
f
f
f
ff
4

ff

ffff

ff

f f f f
f
4

f
ffff fffff fffff fffff fffff
f
#
? ## # f
f
f
f
f
fff ff
f
#
# f
&##
5

f
ffff f
4

33

f
J

j
f f

f
ff f
5

f
J
3

ffff
1

ff
ff
ffff fffff
f
f
f
f
f
f
f ffffffffffff
? #### f
f
f
f
#### f f f
f ff
&

36

ffff ff
f
? #### f
f

f
f
fff

f f f f f f f f fff
J
f
J
4

poco piu forte

pp

ffff
f
f
#
f
ff
1

#f

ff
ff
f f f f
f f f f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
5

40 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:47

Enrique GRANADOS (1867-1916)

TRACK 6

39

&

INTERMEDIATE

Cancon de Mayo, No 3 from Cuentos de la juventud op 1

ff
#### f

f
J

f f #f
f
f
f
f f f f f f#f f
f
1

f f f f f
J

pp

f f
f f
f f f f
f
f
f f f f f
? #### f f
f f f
f f f
f
ff
#### fJ
&

3
2

f
f
f
f f #f ff
J

41

5
1

3
5

f
#### f
&

44

? ####

poco rall.

f f f
ff f ff ff
f
J

f
f
? #### f f f #ff f f
5

f
f
f f nf f f f f f
f

5
2
1

ff

ff

f f
f f
J

ffff f
ffff f

f ff
ff
f
f
ff
ff
2

? ####

f f fff
ff f

f f

####
&

f f
f
f
f f f f

3
2

ff
R.H.

dim.

ff
f
f
ffff

5
2

R.H.

f f ff
f f ff
f
f
f f
f f
2

49

? ####

ff

ff

f
ff

3
1

fff
f f
f
ff

f f f
ff
f f
ff
f f

ff
ff
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
3

ff
ff
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f

f
#
## # ff
&

ffff
ffff

f f
f f
J

f f
fJ f

47

rall.

ff

ff
R.H.

FF

FF

R.H.

f f ff
f f ff
f
f
f f f f f f f f f F
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
F
5

41 Pianist 85

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Adolf von HENSELT (1814-1889)

TRACK 7

INTERMEDIATE

Repos damour, No 4 from 12 Etudes charactristiques op 2

In 1837-8, in the early years of his marriage, German composer and pianist Adolf
von Henselt wrote two volumes of Etudes charactristiques, opp 2 and 5, both
containing tremendously passionate pieces such as Repos damour (Loves repose).
Henselt is said to have had a very wide hand span, as this piece perhaps shows.
Playing tips: Here is a piece where the LH carries most of the melody for a change,
and the RH the light accompaniment. You will see though, that we suggest some
hand distribution (e.g. bars 9-10, bars 15-16, etc). At those moments, a listener

must never be able to tell that the melody is changing hands. There are some lovely
points where you are expected to slow down closely observe the various ritardandos
throughout. You will also notice the marking tardando (bar 18), which means
delay. Things get trickier later on, in places such as bar 30 where the LH must carry
the melody and cope with quite a bit of stretching at the same time.
Pedal tips: Four changes per bar (every beat). Try for a shallow pedalling technique.
Sometimes, when the harmony is the same, you can hold the pedal over two beats.

Allegro sostenuto

Allegro sostenuto
j j
b
j
j
j j j
c
b
f

&b
fffj fffj f. j ffj fffj fffj fffj
& b c ff. ff. ff. ff. ff. ff. ff.
f. anima
f.
f. f. f.
.
p con
p con animaf
? bbc f f f
f f f f
F
? bbc F f f
f f f f
molto cantabile
e
portando
la melodia

cantabile


molto
e portando la melodia

{
5
5

2
2

b
& bb ffjj ffjj
& b fff fff
f f>
f
? bb
f >f
? bb fw
fw f

j
ffj
ff

b
& bb ffjj ffjj f
& b fff fff >f
f f
cresc.
>
cresc.
? bb fF f
f
?b
b fF

j
ffj
ff f
f
1

{{
9

3
3

3
3

P42 SCORES Henselt-FINAL.indd 42

5
3
5
3

j j fj ffj
ffj ffj ffj fj
ff fff fff
ff
f
f f f f
w
f
f f f f
w

j j j
f
ffj ffj ffj
fff fff f
f ff
f f f
fw f f
w

j
ffj
ff
ff

j
ffjj ffj fj
ff
ff ff ffj ff
f f>
cresc. assai
>
cresc. assai
f
f f
f
fF f
F

ffjj
ff

j
ffj
ff

fw
fw

f
f

f
f
1

j j
j
ffj ffj bnffj
f n f ff bnff
f nf
>
>f f
f Ff
bf
f F
bf
f
4

j
ffj
ff.
ff
.

j
j j
ffj ffj fj
ff fff ff
f f

f
f

j
j j
fffj ffj ffj
ff. f ff. f f.
f. ff
.
.
f
f f f
f
f f f

j
ffj
ff

j
j j
fffj ffj ffj
fff. ff. f ff. f
f. f.
.
f f f
Ff f f

F
sim.
sim.
1

1
1

4
2
4
2

1
1

42 Pianist 85

j
fffj
ff. f
.

j
ffj
ff f
f
1
1

bf
bf
4
4

j
n
f
fj #ff
# f nff #fJf
#f > J
>f
f
f
f

j
ffj
ff.
ff
.

f
f
4

j
f
ffj
fff

f
f
2

ff fff
Jff fJf
J fJ

f nf
Ff n f
F
1

08/07/2015 09:48

Adolf von HENSELT (1814-1889)

TRACK 7

b f f nf f
f
& b ff ff fJ fJ ffJ
J J

13

f
? bb F

>
f nf

rit.

f #f
1

4
2

bf f f
f
F
f
2

f
? bb F

tardando 1

j
ff #ffj
f nf f

fF # f

j
fff f f f f F ff ff f f f ff f f f f
f f J J f J fJ f
J
J
J J
cantabile

marc.

f f f
f
w

f
2

4 5

>
f
f f F ff ff f f
fJ
fJ J J
5

f
F ff f f f f f f ff f f
J fJ fJ fJ fJ
j
j
fff fff
ffj ffj >f
f
? bb f f
f f f f
f
fw

F
F

1
2

>
b
&b f

25

f F
f f f f f fff
f
f
f
f
fJ J fJ fJ fJ fJ
>
ffj
? bb f <n>f f f
f f f

F
F

f f f
1

ten.

>
b
&b f

ff nfff
f J
J

1
4

a tempo

4
2

f
w

>
f

pp

j j
ff nfff ff ff nff ff
f J
fJ fJ
f
f
J

j
#fff

j j j
j f
f
j
f
b

& b ff ff f nff ffJ ff ff f ff


J
>
>

17

21

INTERMEDIATE

Repos damour, No 4 from 12 Etudes charactristiques op 2

>
f

ff
fJ
T
#

ff
fJ

>
f ff
f
J
4

con anima.

f fff f
fJ
f

f f
F
f fbf
f
f f ff f ff bnff ff fff
J J J
fJ J J
J

j
fff
fF f

cresc.

f
bf

nf
f

1 2

f
F

43 Pianist 85

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Adolf von HENSELT (1814-1889)

TRACK 7

f
f f
F
f
fffff
b
f
n
f
f
f
f
#
f
f
f
b
f
& ff ff f f ff J fJ ff ff fJ
J
J
J
J J J J
5

29

b
&b

? bb

ff nf f f #f
f f ff
J J
J
4

sempre cresc.
1

f
? bb F f

33

INTERMEDIATE

Repos damour, No 4 from 12 Etudes charactristiques op 2

1 2

f nf
F

#f
f

f
bf

f
w

^
f

fff nf ff f f
J f J nfJ
5

>
f nf
F
1

2
1

bf f f
f
F
f
2

4
2

>
bf

cresc.
2

f f f
F
1

f
F

ff bf
J

fff
J

2
1

f f
f

bfj F

f
f

4
1

3
1

fj f

f f f
F

b
& b ff f f
ff f ff f b ff f f # f f f f f n f
f

J
J
J
J
p
j nfj n fj nfj

b
f
nf
? bb f
f
f
f
nf f f f nf #f f
5

f nff f f
f
f J fJ bf ff f ff ff ff f
J J J fJ
4

dim.

perdendosi

41

5
2

#f

fz
5

4
2

>
>
f nf nf nff f f
f f f
f f
fJ f J J fJ fJ f
>
>

b f f f bf f f f bf nf f f #f
f f nff
b
& ff f ff fJ ff ff ff ff ff J
J J J J
J
J J J

4 5

37

f
? bb ff nf

3
2

>
f f f f nf
f f ff ff ff f ff #f fff nf ff f nff f f
J J J J fJ
fJ J J J
p poco ritenuto
mf
>
^ ^
f nf f #f
f
f f f
F
w
F
F

^
f

fz

3
1

nf f

3
1

#nFFF

1
3

nff bff
nf
f

w
w
w

44 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:48

A Z E R T Y

H A NS - G NTER HEUMA NN

B E Gzerty
INNERS
XXXX (XXXXX)

PLAGE

KEYBOARD CLASS
LESSON 13: FIFTHS, SIXTHS AND SEVENTHS

On these four pages, Pianist covers the most basic stages of learning the piano through a series of lessons by Hans-Gnter Heumann.
Lesson No 13 looks at the intervals of the fifth, sixth and seventh, which you will find in most pieces you play. You may want to refer
back to Keyboard Class Lesson 1, in Pianist No 73, which introduced the intervals.

That Sound Is So Lovely


From the opera The Magic Flute by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), arranged by Hans-Gnter Heumann
Add an interval of a fifth or a sixth in each bar marked with an arrow. Use minims (half notes), semibreves (whole notes) or crotchets
(eighth notes) to complete the missing rhythm. You will find that you are able to hear which chord sounds best just by trying it.
The sign at the start (below) is another way of writing 4/4 time. Note the instruction marcato, which means marked or emphasised.

asasasasas

Interval: Sixth
On the piano:

Melodic interval:

Harmonic interval:

= distance of 6 notes

45 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 10:20

HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

PLAGE

Allegretto op 139 no 7 A

Z E R T Y

Carl Czerny (1791-1857), from 100 Easy Exercises op 139


There are many examples of sixths in this short piece.

XXXX (XXXXX)

zerty

du faux texte Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus
tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta. Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut
remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis militiae dedi. Naves cepi
sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus
civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta.
Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis
militiae dedi. Naves cepi sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque tot.

Carl Czerny
(1791-1857)
Country: Austria
Period: Classical/Romantic
Works: Over 1,000

Carl Czerny was a pupil of Ludwig van Beethoven and a teacher of


Franz Liszt. He is well known by pianists today primarily for his technical
exercises, although he composed in many musical genres, including
symphonies, sacred music and chamber works. He was highly regarded as
a pianist and piano teacher as well as for his pedagogical works.
Among Czernys best-known compositions are: 100 Easy Exercises op 139,
School of Velocity op 299, 40 Daily Exercises op 337, School of Piano op 500,
First Instructor op 599, The Art of Finger Dexterity op 740 and Preliminary
School of Velocity op 849. Czerny was one of the first composers to use
etude (exercise, study) as a title.

Technique Tip
Ensure that your wrist remains relaxed while playing sixths. Take regular short breaks to avoid tension.
To relax, let your arms hang loosely by your sides and shake them gently.

46 Pianist 85

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HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

Waltz

A Z E R T Y

XXXX (XXXXX)
There are many sixths in this waltz by Anton Diabelli (1781-1858),
as well as two sevenths. The interval of the seventh is described below.

PLAGE

zerty

Interval: Seventh
On the piano:

Continued overleaf...
Melodic interval:

Harmonic interval:

= distance of 7 notes

Octave transposition sign


Play the note or notes that appear above this sign an octave
(Italian: ottava) lower than written. This applies for the duration of
the dotted line.

Play the note or notes that appear below this sign an octave
higher than written.

47 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 10:21

HANS-GNTER HEUMANN KEYBOARD CLASS

PLAGE

Waltz

(continued from previous page)

A Z E R T Y
XXXX (XXXXX)

zerty

du faux texte Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus
tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta. Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut
remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis militiae dedi. Naves cepi
sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque toto in orbe terrarum saepe gessi, victorque omnibus veniam petentibus
civibus peperci. Externas gentes, quibus tuto ignosci potuit, conservare quam excidere malui. Millia civium Romanorum sub sacramento meo fuerunt circiter quingenta.
Ex quibus deduxi in colonias aut remisi in municipia sua stipendis emeritis millia aliquanto plura quam trecenta, et iis omnibus agros adsignavi aut pecuniam pro praemiis
militiae dedi. Naves cepi sescentas praeter eas, si quae minores quam triremes fuerunt.Bella terra et mari civilia externaque tot.

Practice tip
It is important to focus on problem passages and transitions when
practising. If you practise these parts frequently and do not always start
from the beginning of the piece, you will save yourself a lot of unnecessary
frustration and time. In this way, you can divide the piece up into sections,
so if you do go wrong, you will be better prepared to pick it up from
that point and continue.

sf or sforzato = a very strong accent

This applies only to one note or chord.


Vivace = lively, fast

Hans-Gnter Heumann continues his beginner series in the next issue.


To find out more about Heumann, go to www.schott-music.com

48 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 10:21

Franz SCHUBERT (1797-1828)

TRACK 8

Composed in 1823-4, this light-hearted dance is one of some 400 less serious solo
piano gems that Schubert wrote throughout his life. Though not himself a keen
dancer, he was always happy to compose and play dance music for his friends. We
have presented previous dances from this collection in Pianist Nos 73 and 76.
Playing tips: Even though this waltz-like dance is extremely short, theres a lot you
can do with it. And its not as easy as it seems. Firstly, find that special lilting quality.
Too much of it, however, and it will feel a bit too oom-pah-pah, and too little, it
will sound flat. The LH has to move quickly over the keyboard. Its definitely worth

Moderato
Moderato
5
3

bbbb 433
&
& 4

5
5
1
3
3
1
1

bbbb
&
&

5
3
5
5
1
3
3
1
1

ff
>>ff

p
p
p

j
fffj
ff

ff
?
? bbbb f ff
f

bb bf>>ff
b
&
& b bff

11
11
11

?
? bbbb

fz
fz
fz

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff

fff
ff
ff
ff

ff
ffJ
J

j
fffj
f

ff
>>ff

ff
ff

?
? bbbb 4433

5
5
5

INTERMEDIATE

German Dance D783 no 7

fff
ff..

fff
f.. f
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff

fff
ff..
ff
ff

fff
ff
nnff
ff
f

4
2
4
4
1
2
2
1
1

3
2
3
3
1
2
2
1
1

fff
f
ff
ff

ff

ff
ff

ff
ff f

ff
ff

j
ffj
ff
f

ff
ff

p
p
p

ff

bbff
f

>>FF
F
F
ff

FF
FF

ff f
f f
ff ff f

ff
>>fff

5
3
5
5
1
3
3
1
1

ff
ff
f..
ff
ff

ff
ff.
.
ff
ff

fff
f..

FF
>>FF

practising the LH on its own, trying not to look at the keyboard (blind practice,
as its known). Voice the chords in the RH carefully, making sure to emphasise the
top notes. The second section should be louder and more joyous. For those with
smaller hands, the repeated chord in the penultimate bar in the RH will be a
challenge to play, as the stretch between the second and fifth finger is wide. In such
instances as this, as soon as youve played the chord, relax and close in the hand, in
order to avoid injury.
Pedal tips: Pedal up on the third beat.

ff
ff
f
ff
f

bfff
bff
f
ff

ff
ff
ff
f

ff
f

ff

4
2
4
4
1
2
2
1
1

ff
ff
ff
f

>>f
>>f
f
f

f
f
f
bbfff fff ffff bffff
JJ
b
ff ff
ff f f
ff
ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff
f

ff
ff
f

ff
f

ff
f

ff

>>FF
F
F

4
2
4
4
1
2
2
1
1

FF
F
>>FFF
ff

ff
ff

ff
f

fffff fffff
JJ
ff ff
f f

ff
fff

FF
FF
F

ff
ff

FF
FF

49 Pianist 85

P49 SCORES Schubert-FINAL.indd 49

13/07/2015 09:08

S
MIS
NTWMANS
DOT
E
N
JANE
IECE
HIS P
ON T AGE

Henryk PACHULSKI (1859-1921)

ON

LESS

TRACK 9

P 6
2

Composer and pianist Henryk Pachulski was of noble birth and was born to a forester
and his family who worked on the estate of Nadezhda von Meck, Tchaikovskys patron,
which may be why young Henryk was able to study with excellent teachers in Warsaw
and Moscow. This prelude comes from a set of six published in 1891.
Playing and pedal tips: This tender, romantic piece is in A-B-A form, with the LH
being the accompaniment throughout and with the RH taking the pining, singing

Andante molto q = 54

b2
& b b4 f

2 1

ff ff ff fff fff fff


? bb 42
b

2
3
5

b
& b b fff

ffj
f
f

fff

1
3
4

sim.

fff

fff fff fff fff fff fff

&

ff

ff

fff

ff

1
3

fff

1
2
4

2
3
4

nf

f
3

bfff

bf

fff

fff

fff

fff

fff

2
3
5

10

b
&b b f

1
3
4

cresc.

fff bfff fff fff

n fff fff fff bnfff fff fff

4
2
1

f f

2
3
5

b
& b b ff
nf

1
3
4

1
2
5 - 1

b
&b b f

fff ff
b ff

1 2

fff fff fff fff fff fff

3 5

fff

b
&b b f
b ff
? bb nf
b

2
4

melody. Make sure to dig the notes gently but firmly into the keys for a deep singing
tone. Try to make the LH do this too theres a lot of chromatic movement in the
LH chords, and its nice to be able to hear that inner movement. The B section,
which starts at bar 15, should be more agitated, before returning to the A section
again at bar 23. Pedalling is marked onto the score.
Read Janet Newmans step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 26.

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

fff fff fff fff fff fff


1
3
4

f3

f4

f-

1 5

dim.

fff

fff bn fff #fff fff


1
2
5

1
2
5

ff nff
f f
3
5

ff f
f n ff

f
ff
-

ff
f-

ff
f-

ff n ff bff
f- f- f-

1
3
5

1
3

fff
-

ff
f-

1
2
5

50 Pianist 85

P50 SCORES Pachulski-FINAL.indd 50

08/07/2015 09:50

Henryk PACHULSKI (1859-1921)

TRACK 9

un poco agitato

b
&b b f

13

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

2 5

b
&b b f

pp

mp

ffj f f f f f f
f ff ff ff ff ff ff
f
4
2
1

ff ff ff f
? b f f f n fff
bb
f
5 1

ff ff ff fff fff fff fff fff fff n fff fff fff


4

1
3

17

? bb
b

mf

ff

ff

ff b fff fff fff

2
4

b
&b b f

ff ff ff # ff
f f f ff

fff

ff

fff

n ffj
f
f f

Tempo I

ff

ff n fff fff fff

rit.

f
J

&

nnbfff fff fff fff fff fff


1
2
5

1
3
5

f f f f f
n ff ff ff ff ff fff
1
3
5

fff

fff fff fff fff fff fff ff


nf

1
3
5

1
4
5

f
5

2 1

1
3

4
2
1

fff

b
&b b f

23

fff fff fff

? bb
b

1
2
5

20

pp

b
& b b ff

2
4

ff

ff

fff
1
2
4

fff

1
3
4

1
3
5

fff

fff bn fff fff fff


1
3
4

51 Pianist 85

P50 SCORES Pachulski-FINAL.indd 51

08/07/2015 09:50

Henryk PACHULSKI (1859-1921)

TRACK 9

26

b
&b b f

b
&b b f

4
2
1

ffj
f
f f

1
2
5 - 1

fff

1
3
4

&

b
&b b f

ff ff ff fff fff fff

fff fff fff fff fff fff

1
3

2
3
4

1
2
4

nf

bf

bfff

fff

fff

fff

fff

fff

2
3
5

fff fff fff fff fff fff


1
3
4

f-

f-

f3

1 5

fff

fff bn fff #fff fff


1
2
5

ff nff
f f

ff f
f n ff

f
ff
-

ff
friten.

35

32

f f f

fff bfff fff fff

b
&b b f

2
3
5

b
& b b ff
nf

f
2

ff
b ff

2
3
5

b
& b b fff

b
& b b bf f f
n ff ff ff

29

INTERMEDIATE

Prelude in C minor op 8 no 1

5
2 5

ff ff ff f
? bb f f f n fff
b
f

f
4

pi lento
5
2

5
1

ff f
nf

pp
ffj f f f f f f nf f f f f f f
f ff ff ff ff ff ff # ff ff ff ff ff ff f nff
f f
f

5 1 5

ff n ff bff
f- f- f

ff
f

U
f
2

U
ff

fff
-

ff
f

j
f
ff
J

52 Pianist 85

P50 SCORES Pachulski-FINAL.indd 52

08/07/2015 09:50

Jean-Philippe RAMEAU (1683-1764)


La Villageoise from Pices de Clavecin

TRACK 10

A leading figure of the French Baroque era, Jean-Philippe Rameau came from a
family of keyboard players, which is no surprise when you consider his vast output
for keyboard, including several volumes of the Pices de Clavecin. Rameau was also
well known as a theorist and the creator of operas for the court of Louis XV.
Playing tips: We suggest that you practise this piece at a snails pace, hands
separately at first. This will ensure clean playing, and a strong rhythm. Rhythm is
the essence here it should sound forthright and precise, with a slight clipped feel

to the articulation. Listen to the CD for guidance. Half of the challenge in learning
this piece will be with the ornamentation (and on our CD, pianist Chenyin Li uses
a lot of extra embellishments!). However, the notes themselves are not overly
challenging, and they fit well under the hands. A new section appears at bar 49,
where you should make the semiquavers fluid, but still with that slightly detached
articulation. We are sure you will enjoy playing this piece, so persevere!
Pedal tips: Very little just a dab of pedal on the odd important note/end of phrase.

Moderato q = 112

#2
& 4f

? # 42

f
2

# f f
f f
&

# fF f f f
2
5

#
& f

10

?#

j
f

f f

ff

fF

f #f

FF
F

? # ff

f
f

F
F

m
#FF

f f f f
f f ff f
f f
f

f
3

1
4

1
3

j
f f

f f f

2
5

f f m
f f

f f f f

m
f f

1 2 1

ff

f f f f

f
f

#fF f f f

m
f

f
&

2
5

1
5

fF f f f

#m
& f f

ff

2
1

1 2

F
f f f f

5
2
1

m
#f f f f

2 3 2

f
f

15

3 2

f
f

f
5

?#

m
#f f
2 3 2

INTERMEDIATE

F
f f f f

f
f

ff

53 Pianist 85

P53 SCORES Rameau-FINAL.indd 53

08/07/2015 09:51

Jean-Philippe RAMEAU (1683-1764)


La Villageoise from Pices de Clavecin

TRACK 10

#f
&

20

&

f
f

#m
& f

24

2 3 2
1

f f

& f f
# fj f
&

#
& f

33

38

j
f

f
f

ff

f f

F
?# f f f f

f f f f

f f f

f f

f f f f
f ff ff f
f
f

ff

& f

f f

?# f
F

f f f
f

f f

29

?# f

f f f f f f

f f f f f

fF f f f

ff

m
f f

f f

f
f

ff

f f f

m
#FF

m
f f

f
f

f f f f

f f f f
F

f f m
f f

m
f f f f

f f

#m
f f f f

INTERMEDIATE

f f f f

# fF f f f

f f

54 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:51

Jean-Philippe RAMEAU (1683-1764)


La Villageoise from Pices de Clavecin

TRACK 10

43

&

# #m
f

?#

fF

#m
& f f

f #f

FF
F

? # ff

f
f

F
F

j
f

ff

&

#f f f f f f f f
&

51

& fff

f f f f
& #f #f f f

? # #f

F
f

fff

f f f
f f f f f
5

fff

&

? # fff

m
f

f f
f f
f f f f

#fF

f f #f f f f f f

# f f #f f f f f f
&

54

57

f f

f f f f f f f f

47

f
f

INTERMEDIATE

f #f f f f f f

f #f f
#f f f f f
f
##ff

F
#f #f f
#f f f f f

f f f f f f
#
f
f
1

f
##fff

55 Pianist 85

P53 SCORES Rameau-FINAL.indd 55

08/07/2015 09:51

Jean-Philippe RAMEAU (1683-1764)


La Villageoise from Pices de Clavecin

TRACK 10

60

&

# fj f

?#

f f f
f f #f f
f

f f
f f
f #f f f

f f f
f
?# f f f f

66

?#

f
f

f f
& f f #f
f f #f
f

#f f f
f #f #f f
f
5

f f

#f

m
#f f #F

# f
&

63

f f

INTERMEDIATE

#f

f f #f f f f f f
f
f

f
f

f f #f
f f f
f

f f #f f f f f f

#
& f f #f
f f f
f
f

f f # f f f f f f #f

?# f
f

f
f

f
f

#
& f

69

72

f
f f f
? # f #f f f

#f

f f #f
f f f
f
f

f f f f f #f f f

f f

f #f f
f f f
f
f

56 Pianist 85

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08/07/2015 09:51

Jean-Philippe RAMEAU (1683-1764)


La Villageoise from Pices de Clavecin

TRACK 10

# #m
& f

?# F

f #f

75

#
& f

f #f

78

?# f

#f
&

f f f

j
f

f f f

#f
&

85

f f f f
F

f
f

f f

f f f

f f f f f f

#m
f f f f
f f f

F
#FF

82

?# f

f f f

? # #f
F

f
f

f
f

ff

ff

f f f f
# fF f f f

m
#FF
f f f
f
#f
f #f f

m
#f f f f

f f f

f f

m
f

f f f
f f f
f
f

f f
f f f f f f
f

2 3 2

89

f f f
f f f f f

f f f f f f
?# f f f f f f f
f
f
fF f f f
f
#
& f

INTERMEDIATE

f #f

FF
F

F
F

57 Pianist 85

P53 SCORES Rameau-FINAL.indd 57

08/07/2015 09:51

Alexander SCRIABIN (1872-1915)


Prlude in G flat op 16 no 3

TRACK 11

Russian composer and pianist Alexander Scriabin wrote several sets of prludes. This
prlude comes from a set of five and dates from 1895. Read more about Scriabin
and his music in the article on page 74.
Playing tips: Analyse the rhythm before you begin. It is in 4/4, but you will notice
that the RH melody is mainly in triplets. Later on, though, at around bar 25, it
breaks into groups of varied semiquavers per beat. Those filigree moments are
rhythmically tricky and we suggest you tap out the rhythm of the whole of the RH
before beginning to embark on the note-learning. When you begin, count the pulse
silently to yourself before, or you will lose your way almost immediately, especially

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

seeing the melody has an improvisatory feel to it. Note how groups of crotchet chords
answer the florid melody (e,g, bars 9-10, bars 15-16, etc). Make the chords sound
like an echo answering to the melody, voicing them so that the top line stands out.
There should be a sense of wonderment in this piece. There are ritardandos and
rubatos throughout you need to get used to feeling the ebb and flow.
Pedal tips: Even though it is not marked in the score, we suggest one pedal change
per beat. However, try to incorporate subtle techniques here and there, such as half/
flutter pedal. Experiment, and always listen. Hold down the pedal for a long time
when the piece ends.

Andante
cantabile qqq =
63
Andante cantabile
=
= 63
63

ff ff
ff ff ff ff f ff ff f
f

bbbbbbbbbbbcc
&
& b

?
? bbbbbbbbbbcc
bb

6
6

5
5
5

2
2
2

3
3
3

&
&

3
3
3

5
5
5

1
1
1

2
2
2

1
1
1

4
4
4

2
2
2

5
5
5

bbbbbbbbbbb f ff. ff. ff ff ff ff f f f f f ff f f f f ff ff ff f


&
fff
& b f . .
ff f f f f f
ff f
cresc.
mf dim.
cresc.
mf dim.
f
f
ff
ff ff
ff
ff fff
ff
?
ff
ff ff
ff
? bbbbbbbbbb ff
f
f
ff
f
ff
f
bb

1
1
1
4
4
4

3
3
3

2
2
2
5
5
5

2
2
2
5
5
5

1
1
1
4
4
4

1
1
1
3
3
3

bbbbbbbbbbb f ff ff
&
& b ff ff f ffff
f f f ff
f
p
p

?
? bbbbbbbbbb
bb

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff

1
1
1

ff
ff

1
1
1

2
2
2
5
5
5

2
2
2
5
5
5

fff
ffff

ff
ff
f

ff
ff
f

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff f
ff

ff
ff

1
1
1
3
3
3

1
1
1
4
4
4

ff
ff
ff
ff
ff
ff

ff ff f ff f nf ff ff
bbbbb b
f
f
b
f
f f nff
&
& b b bbb ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff
cresc.
mf
cresc.
mf dim.
dim.
f
ff
ff
ff
f
f
f
f
ff
f
ff
f
ff
f
?
f
ff fff
? bbbbbbbbbb fff
ff
bb

2
2
2

2
2
2
5
5
5

2
2
2

3
3
3

ff
ff

ff
ff

1
1
1
3
3
3

1
1
1
4
3
4
4 3
3

ff
ff
2
2
2
5
5
5

ff ff f
ff f f ff ff ff
ff
ff
1
1
1

ff
ff

ff
ff
1
1
1
4
4
4

5
5
5

2
2
2

1
1
1

ff
ff

2
2
2
5
5
5

ff ff jj f f ff ff f f
ff ff f f
f f f ff ff
f
3
3
3
ff
ff ff
ff
ff f
ff
ff ff
ff
ff
ff

13
13

5
5
5

5
5
5

2
2
2

ff ff
f
f
f
?
f
?f

ff ff
ff ff ff ff f ff ff ff
f
1
1
1

ff ff fjj
f

ff ff ff f ff
1
1
1

p
p

1
1
1

9
9

2
2
2

3
3
3

fff
f
ff
ff

ff
fff
p
p

ff
ff

ff
ff
f
ff
ff

ffff
ff

nnfff
nn ffff

ff
ff
f

ff
ff
f

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff

ff
ff

nnff
nnff

58 Pianist 85

P58 SCORES Scriabin-FINAL.indd 58

13/07/2015 09:09

Alexander SCRIABIN (1872-1915)


Prlude in G flat op 16 no 3

TRACK 11

INTERMEDIATE/
ADVANCED

{{
{{
{{
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59 Pianist 85

P58 SCORES Scriabin-FINAL.indd 59

08/07/2015 09:52

ISS
S
T M
HAM
R
DON
A
P
LUCY
IECE
HIS P
ON T AGE

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

ON

LESS

TRACK 12

P 4
2

This tude, nicknamed Aeolian Harp by Robert Schumann, is the first in a volume
of tudes dating from 1836.
Playing and pedal tips: Everything is spelled out for you when you read Lucy
Parhams article on page 24. But as you can see, there are a lot of notes on every page!

ADVANCED

A certain rotational technique is required in both hands, as well as a light plucking


technique to the inner notes, as Lucy explains. This is a wonderful piece and if you
take your time learning it, you will definitely be rewarded.
Read Lucy Parhams step-by-step lesson on this piece on page 24.

Allegro sostenuto q = 104


3

b f f f f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f
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ff

60 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 60

08/07/2015 09:52

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

TRACK 12

ADVANCED

f
f
f
f
f
f
f
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&b b f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f

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fff

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fffff
f

61 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 61

08/07/2015 09:52

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

TRACK 12

bb
&b b f f f

17

? bb
bb
nf

ff

ff f

bf
ff ff

ff

ff f
f

ff

nf f f
f nf f
f
f
f
f ff
ff
f
f

ADVANCED

ff

ff

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b
f ff
f ff
f ff
f ff
&
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f
f

19

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b f

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&
f
f
f

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b f

f f f

nf

nf f

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f
f f nf

nf bf nf

21

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rit.

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23

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nf #f

nf

ff ff fff fffff
nf

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f
b

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f

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nf

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nf

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nf

ff

#f

f
f f #f f f #f f f f
f

nf
f
nf
f #f f f f f f f f f #f f f
f
f
f

62 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 62

08/07/2015 09:52

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

TRACK 12

a tempo

bbb nf #f f n f f f f f
b
nf nf f
f
&

25

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b b nf

b
& b bb

27

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ff

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b f

ff

fff

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f #f

ff

fff

fff

f
ff ff

f f f

f
3

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ff

ff

ff

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ff

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f

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fff

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f
ff

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f

fff

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ff f

fff

f
ff

fff

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f
f
f
f
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ff
ff

f
f

ff

ff

fff

nf

f
ff ff

f f f
1

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b f

ff

b
& b bb f f f

b
& b bb

fff

#f #f

29

31

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b f

nf

fffff fffff fffff


f
f

f
f

nf
ff ff
ff ff
f

f
f

ff
ff

ff
ff

f
ff ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

f
ff

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f
f

fffff
f f f

ff
ff

f
f

bf
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ff ff
f

ff

f
f

ff

f nf f
f

ADVANCED

f f bf f f
bf f

ff

bf
f

fffff
ff

ff

bf

fffff

fffff
f

poco a poco cresc.

f
4

f f f

63 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 63

08/07/2015 09:52

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

TRACK 12

ADVANCED

bbb f f f f f nf f f f f f nf nf f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
b
&
f
f
f
f
f

33

? bb
bb
f

b
& b bb

35

f
ff

? bb b f
b

fbf
f nf

f
bf

f f f

f f ff f
ff

dim.

ff

f
f

ff

nf n f f

bf

ff

bf f
fbf

f
f

f f nf f f
ff

ff

fff

ff

f f f

fffff

sfp

f
ff ff

ff f
f

nf

ff

ff

nf

bf

appassionato

bf

f
ff

fff

ff

ff

f
nf

ff

ff

ff f
f

f
ff

fff

ff f
f

ff

fff

ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f ff f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f
b
b
f ff
f ff
f ff
f ff
&b b
f
f
f
f

37

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b

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

fff

f
b f
& b bb f f f f f f f f f f

39

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b

ff

ff

f
ff
pp

ff

ff

f
f

ff
ff

ff
ff

f
f

ff
ff

fff

fff

fff

ff

ff

f
ff ff

ff f
f

ff

f
ff ff

ff

ff

ff f

dim.

f
ff ff

ff

f
ff ff

64 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 64

08/07/2015 09:52

Frdric CHOPIN (1810-1849)


Etude in A flat op 25 no 1

TRACK 12

bb
&b b f f f

41

? bb ff
bb f
f

b
& b bb f

ff
f

ff

fff

f
f

ff
f

f
fffff ff

fff

fff

f
f

ff
f

ff

ff
ff

ffff
ff

ff

ffff

ff ff
f

f
f

ffff

ff ff
f

ff

fffff

ff ff
f

pp

ff

ff f
f

ff

leggierissimo

43

? bb b
b

f f ff f
ff

ADVANCED

f
f
ff ff

fff
ff
f
f
f
fff
& ff
f
f

ff

ff f

ff

smorzando

ff

ff
ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff

ff
f

ff f
f

ff

f
ff

f
ff

<>

b
& b bb

47

f f f

ff
f
ff

f f f

ff

f f f

ff

ff
ff
f
ff ff
f
ff
ff

f f f

ff

ff
f
ff

f f f

f f f

ff
ff
ff
ff

f f f

ppp

65 Pianist 85

P60 SCORES Chopin-FINAL.indd 65

ff

fff

ff

ff

ff.
f

f.
f.

fff

f.
ff

fff

ff

fff

ff

f
f
~~~~~

nf f

fff

ff

ff

w
w
w
w
w

b
& b bb

f f

ff
ff

ff

b
& b bb

ff

ff
f
f ff f

bbb f f f f
b
&
f

45

08/07/2015 09:52

PianistAug15.ai 1 04/07/2015 11:07:24

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2 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 11:50

P I A N I S T AT W O R K

Moment by

moment
Erica Worth catches up with jazz pianist
Tom Hewson, the latest winner of the
Nottingham International Jazz Piano
Competition, to nd out how victory has
affected his slightly peculiar life

as winning this
competition
changed things?
Yes, in the sense
that its given me
some new things
to work towards.
Winning the competition coincided
with my CD release, and then part of
the prize was a headline gig at Ronnie
Scotts. Thats a first for me.

How did it feel to win?


It was brilliant! Playing solo in jazz
is quite a special thing, especially on
a big beautiful Bsendorfer Imperial
and in a great space like Nottinghams
Albert Hall, where the finals took place.
[One of Toms winning performances is
featured on this issues covermount CD.]

Did you have to do lots of preparation?


Id put quite a lot of work into it. But I
tried not to over-prepare, as I may have
done in the past. Particularly for a jazz
musician, you need to have a spirit as if
you dont know whats going to happen
next. On the stage, you need that
unpredictability and immediacy. If you
can surprise yourself, then you are going
to surprise the audience. You do a lot of
work, a lot of preparing, a lot of theory,
a lot of getting inside the music, then
when it gets down to it, only five per
cent of what youve worked on actually
gets in there. Ninety-five per cent is
generated based on that.

Were you classically trained?


I learned in a very structured and
classical way from age 5 to 18, with a
great teacher in Ashford, Kent, called
Stephen Dandridge. Then I went to
university to New College, Oxford
and continued, but broadened out
into composing. I was interesting in
composing and not just playing. I

wanted the whole musical experience


the history, the context. All this persuaded
me to do a music degree as an academic
thing. Classical piano performance was
just one element of the degree.
What made you take the jazz route?
Id always done some jazz during school,
but I never had any lessons; I never
studied it in a structured way. My dad
was into rock n roll, jazz and blues,
and threw guitars my way (I play cello,
bass and guitar). At school I was playing
Ravel and Beethoven in the days, and
bass in a funk band at night. After my
degree, I did a masters in jazz at Trinity.
People often assume that all jazz
musicians can improvise naturally, but
is it something you have to work at?
Absolutely! Theres this perception
that we pluck things out of thin air.
Improvisation, in itself, is making things
up. But always its informed by so much
that youve studied. You are composing
in the moment. Thats the defining
aspect of being a jazz musician: when
you go to a jazz gig, you should feel like
its happening there and then yet on
another day, it will be quite different.

Are you always learning?


Yes. In the last few years, I have
broadened what I study and listen to.
Theres something to learn in any piece
of music. I have spent a lot of time
learning about 20th-century harmony,
forms, composing learning how the
music works. In college you learn the
tools of improvising and harmony
basically. But now I feel that I am
beginning to learn more about the
things you really search after such as
shape, why you love the music you love,
atmosphere, character, honesty, and then
trying to get those elements into your
music. You try to learn a deeper element.

Listen to Slightly
Peculiar on this issues
CD. Tom Hewson
will appear at the
London Jazz Festival
on 16 November, and
at Ronnie Scotts also
in the autumn (date
tbc). His new album,
Treehouse, will be out
in October on the CAM
JAZZ label. For further
details, go to www.
tomhewson.com.

Tell us about the track Slightly


Peculiar, which is featured on our CD?
Its the title track of my 2012 solo album,
Slightly Peculiar. I wrote it to say thank
you to various people for supporting me
in my slightly peculiar way of life. Its in
5/8 time, and it has the kind of glitches
and odd twists that I tend to use in my
compositions to keep things slightly
surprising and not predictable.

Do you have to work on your


technique, like a classical pianist does?
Classical pianists first reaction to jazz
pianists is often, What on earth are
they doing? There is a thought that we
have flawed technique in some ways.
The demands of playing jazz in a group
change the way that you have to play.
From a practical point of view, a lot of
the pianos are not very good, and they
are miked up or put through a PA. Tone,
sustain and depth of sound can go out
of the window! If youre playing with
a drummer, classical technique doesnt
get you heard, so you have to find a way
to get heard. You are often part of the
rhythm section and you always have to
be generating a rhythmic feel. Sometimes
delicacy and touch are not what its
about; its about a swing, rhythm, a
percussive feel. Also, its easy to let the
left hand slip because its not doing as
much dexterous stuff in a jazz group as
it would with a Chopin tude. Thats
whats nice about playing solo jazz you
need to keep the technique on top form.
Youve got both hands across the whole
piano and theres more space to use your
whole technique, more variety of touch.

Anything exciting coming up?


Im launching my new album with
my trio Treehouse at the London Jazz
Festival on 16 November, performing
alongside John Taylor, who is also on the
bill. Hes a big inspiration.

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16/07/2015 10:21

M I N D & B O DY

Flex Time

Can a yoga-inspired piano method bring greater


focus to your playing and help small hands
stretch further? Inge Kjemtrup talks to Russian
concert pianist GNIA, the creator of Piano-Yoga

For more than three months, GNIA


researched the problem of small hands
playing big hand repertoire. No obvious
solution emerged. She knew better than
to get into Schumann territory with
complicated stretching devices, and she
began to consider what she already knew.
My hands are not flexible, she says. I
was doing lots of yoga then, and I felt
taller and stronger afterwards. So I
created exercises that enabled me to play
the piece for the concert.
Its perhaps unsurprising that this
daughter of scientists (both parents are
mathematicians) would develop a
systematic method like Piano-Yoga.
Music is also part of her DNA, however.
Born in Kharkov, Ukraine, GNIA is the
great-granddaughter of Regina Horowitz,
sister of the famous pianist Vladimir. She
studied with Regina (the dedicatee of her
book), and then with Sergei Yushkevitch
at the Kharkov State Institute of the Arts.
She arrived on British shores after
winning a scholarship to the Guildhall
School, first focusing on the fortepiano,
and then on the piano, taking lessons
with Joan Havill. She left the Guildhall
having won the Premier Prix, and went
to the Trinity College of Music, where
she studied with Douglas Finch.
Winning an audition for the Park Lane
Group, a charity that supports young
artists and composers, brought her into
contemporary music. She recorded an
album featuring four contemporary
Russian woman composers, including
Sofia Gubaidulina. More recently, she has
delved more seriously into composing.
But Piano-Yoga is an abiding occupation.

iano-Yoga the
term conjures up
an image of a
leotard-wearing
pianist striking
an intricate pose
with a piano;
perhaps with one foot on the stool,
the other on a pedal, with one hand
gripping the lid. Sounds awkward.
Some people do think its yoga next to
the piano, says GNIA, the founder of
Piano-Yoga, when we meet at Steinway
Hall in London.
In fact, Piano-Yoga has nothing to do
with doing the Downward-Facing Dog
position on top of your piano but
everything to do with making best use
of your specific anatomy, strength and
flexibility to help your playing.
Piano-Yoga aims at being nothing less
than a holistic approach toward playing
the piano, as GNIA writes in her
book, Transform your hands: A complete
ten week course of piano exercises.
It was her own experience as a concert
pianist with small hands that led GNIA
(her one-word name is a creative variant
of Evgenia) to look more closely at
aspects of strength and flexibility that
might help her play what she wanted to
play on the piano music by the
maestro of big hands himself, Sergei
Rachmaninov. It all started when asked
to perform Rachmaninovs Rhapsody on a
Theme of Paganini with an orchestra. She
couldnt say no even though her
teachers had warned her that smallhanded players like her couldnt (or
shouldnt) take on such a massive work.

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M I N D & B O DY
After successfully playing the
Rachmaninov concert, GNIA began
developing her Piano-Yoga method,
teaching it one on one and in
workshops. Already an enthusiast
practitioner of yoga, she then spent two
years to become a qualified British
Wheel of Yoga teacher, studying
anatomy as part of that training.
This understanding evidently proved
useful to her. Near the start of Transform
your hands, theres a Hand Map, a
photo of a hand with some of the parts
marked out. Skin creases reflect the
range of movement at each joint, reads
the text below this striking image.
Range of music
Talking to GNIA, I quickly realize
there would be nothing like a hands-on
experience to get a better sense of
Piano-Yoga. I put down my notepad,
and she takes me through some of
preliminary exercises, such as her Digits
exercise (see box, opposite). I then sit
down at the Steinway grand, where she
shows me the steps for finding the right
sitting position at the piano. First, Im
asked to put my feet on the floor and to
lift up my toes, before slowly putting
them down, ideally one by one (an
instruction I am unable to comply with
successfully). Then I have to raise my
heels as high as I can and lower them,
again slowly. GNIA guides me further in
exercises to align shoulders and fingertips,
and asks me to play. I have a sense of
released tension, although Im not sure if
that isnt partly that Im trying to please
someone who is clearly a fine teacher.
So far, weve just touched on exercises
in the Preliminary Stage: Foundation
Piano-Yoga in the first part of her book.
GNIA advises spending at least a week
on this seemingly simple stage before
advancing to Stage One: Core Piano
Yoga. This is followed by sections for
players with small hands (and another for
large hands) and then two further stages
for intermediate and advanced pianists.
Some exercises are based on photos and
text, but most at the later stages are based
on printed music. There are also
recommended pieces to play at each stage.
Exercise Six: Flat Fingers in the
Preliminary Stage presents several

exercises based on various types of


seventh chords. In her book, GNIA
explains that most exercises in the book
must be done with flat fingers. This
advice, she tells me, is often overlooked
by pianists eager for quick results. I
observe that playing with flat fingers
doesnt seem like good technique, so why
must the exercises be done this way?
The idea of flat/straight fingers comes
from yoga: you lengthen first, and then
build strength, replies GNIA. Playing
with flat fingers will activate three sides
of the hands.
Unsurprisingly, a number of pianists
have come to GNIA because they have
some kind of injury from their playing.
There are two sides to injury, she tells
me: the actual physical injury and the
psychological injury, which might mean
that even though the physical aspect is
healed, the mind-set that caused the
injury is still there. Unless bad habits
and behaviours are re-examined, the
possibility for physical injury remains,
lurking in the background. Many of her
injured pupils share a similar profile:
professional pianists in their early thirties
who work non-stop. What they also have
in common, she says with a note of
exasperation, is that they are people who
dont know how to relax and take breaks.
Between performing, composing and
teaching, GNIA must lead a non-stop
life too. Piano-Yoga takes up a good part
of her time, with teaching, plans for
more books (I have another three books
half-written), videos and training of
other Piano-Yoga teachers as well all in
the mix. Training new Piano-Yoga
teachers will be a challenge, she says.
They have to be credited musicians, she
asserts. Theyd have to study anatomy,
philosophy, technique... for me, music is
philosophy, then you need technique.
This autumn, GNIA is launching a
club on the first Wednesday of the
month at Schott Music in central
London. The aim of the club is to spread
the teaching of Piano-Yoga and to
connect like-minded people, she
explains. The activities will include some
practical physical exercises that pianists
could use in their practice routine, a
short presentation from me on a specific
topic, and question-and-answer sessions.

Try it! Digits a Piano-Yoga exercise


Aim: To make your fingers stronger.
Initial position: Put both hands on your knees so the palms
cover the kneecaps. Lift both arms off the knees, keeping the
hand position exactly as it was when when on your knees. Make
sure that the tips of your thumbs are bent towards the palms.
Then, while still keeping the hands in their original position,
turn them so your thumbs are on top, above your little fingers.
Each hand should look like it is holding a ball (see photo).
Exercise: Your fingers are divided into three parts called
phalanxes. The proximal phalanx is the bottom part of the finger
nearest your palm, followed by the middle phalanx, and lastly
the distal phalanx located on the top part, the finger tip.
Concentrate your attention on the bottom (proximal
phalanxes) of all your fingers. Tense them for three seconds,
then relax. Do this three times. Proceed in the same manner to
concentrating on tensing the top parts (distal phalanxes) of all
your fingers. This is a slightly trickier task.
Once you feel that you are doing it correctly, proceed to
the most advanced stage. Concentrate your attention on the
middle phalanxes of fingers two, three, four and five. Tense
them for three seconds, then relax. Can you feel all the different
phalanxes of your fingers?
Benefit: This exercise involves thought process and visualisation
techniques, as it is impossible to isolate each joint separately. If
you do this exercise regularly, after one week you will not only
become sensitive to different parts of your fingers, but also start
building up their strength.
This is an edited excerpt from Transform your hands: A complete
ten week course of piano exercises, created by GNIA.
Previous page: PianoYoga founder GNIA
demonstrates one aspect
of finding a good sitting
position at the piano;
a stretching exercise on
the keyboard
This page: GNIA leads a
group Piano-Yoga class;
the Digits exercise

There will be some time for people to


perform as well, although this wont be
necessary to attend the club.
If after reading this article, youre
intrigued by Piano-Yoga but you cant
make it to London, GNIAs book
might help. As one of the endorsements
in the front of her book says of PianoYoga: The exercises increase strength
and coordination between different
parts of the finger and hand, but also
focus on the complex relationship
between the whole body and mind in
the act of performance.
The idea is that the book is like a little
gym, says GNIA. An hour of PianoYoga can save you hours of practice. n
To find out more about Piano-Yoga,
GNIAs book or the new Piano-Yoga club,
go to www.piano-yoga.com.

70 Pianist 85

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LEGENDS

SVIATOSLAV

ICHTE
(1915-1997)

The precision, musicality and creativity of Sviatoslav Richters


playing won him fans worldwide. Claire Jackson looks at the
enigmatic Russian pianist who loathed the recording studio

Decca/Arje Plas; Courtesy Jean-Efflam Bavouzet

sk any music fan to


name their top five
pianists from
yesteryear and
chances are that
Sviatoslav Richter will
make the shortlist.
The Russian pianist blended academic
precision with an intense musicality that
made him one of the most significant
artists of the 20th century. Richter
whose centenary we celebrate this year
is particularly beloved for his wideranging tone colour and variegated
touch, which live on in his vast
discography (see box, opposite page).
By todays standards, Richter was no
wunderkind. His German parents were
musical, but Richter did not have formal
training until he was 22, when he
enrolled at the Moscow Conservatory as
a pupil of Heinrich Neuhaus, who
taught many of the worlds greatest
pianists. Although Neuhaus is said to

have claimed that he taught Richter


almost nothing, Richter was quick to
acknowledge his influence, declaring:
Neuhaus would take out your soul,
make some experiments on it and return
it to you enriched and beautiful.
Richter won the USSR music
competition in 1945, the Stalin Prize in
1949 and performed over 100 concerts
a year throughout the Soviet bloc during
the Cold War period. Rough recordings
of Richters performances began to make
their way outside the Iron Curtain, and
interest in his pianism was growing. In
1960 he was permitted to travel
internationally as a Peoples Artist. His
first performance was in Finland,
followed by a tour of the US.
Richters appearance in America was
hugely anticipated and his fans were
not disappointed. Baltimore-based music
critic and pianophile Stephen Wigler
remembers going to see the pianists first
performance at Carnegie Hall. I had

Right: Sviatoslav
Richters signature on
Jean-Efflam Bavouzets
Prokofiev Eighth Sonata
score

never heard anything like it in my life.


Wigler attended several more recitals
when Richter returned to the US in
1965 and 1970. Americans went nuts,
he recalls, His playing was even better
than I remembered. Youd see pianists in
the audience, ones you would only ever
see on stage Horowitz, Ashkenazy.
Richter was as popular in the US as
Cliburn had been in Moscow in 1958.
The enigma explained
What was it about this enigmatic
performer that captured everyones
attention? Wigler suggests that Richters
choice in repertoire may have played a
part. At that time all-Beethoven recitals
were rare and the Prokofiev sonatas were
virtually unknown in the West, he
explains. I cant think of any major
pianist with the exception of Horowitz
who played this music. Richter played
Debussy in a way that was electrifying.

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16/07/2015 10:22

He made it sound gigantic, like an entire


orchestra was playing. I couldnt believe
how beautiful it was. Usually it takes a
while to get a feeling for unknown
works, even masterpieces, but when
Richter played music that was unfamiliar
the Prokofiev sixth and eighth sonatas,
for example it was tremendous. To this
day when I hear a Prokofiev sonata Im
always listening in the shadow of
Richters performance in Carnegie Hall.
It is perhaps unsurprising that Richter
was a renowned interpreter of Prokofiev,
given that he worked closely with the
composer. Richter gave the premiere
of Prokofievs Sonata Nos 6, 7 and 9,
the latter of which he was the dedicatee.
He made his first and last appearance
as a conductor to premiere Prokofievs
Symphony Concerto for cello and
orchestra. The cellist was Mstislav
Rostropovich, another important
collaborator. Richter appeared regularly
at the Aldeburgh Festival, and in
1965-67 he performed with Benjamin
Britten as a piano duo. In 1966 Britten
wrote to Richter (in German, their
common language): Es war ein freude
und ehre mit dich zu spielen, und ich
habe nie vorher solches Klavierspielen
gehrt wie in Liszt, Schubert, Chopin,
Scriabin! (It was a joy and an honour to
perform with you, and I have never before
heard such piano-playing in Liszt,
Schubert, Chopin, Scriabin!). Richter also
worked with David Oistrakh, Elisabeth
Leonskaja and the Borodin Quartet, as
well as soprano Nina Dorliak.
Dorliak, whom he first accompanied
in 1945, went on to become his
life-long partner. They never married,
and it was widely rumoured that
Dorliak provided a social front for
Richters homosexuality. Richter never
formally came out and Dorliak stayed
by his side until his death, dying
herself just a few months later.
Richter lived during a period when
homophobia was deeply ingrained
within society; outing himself as gay
could have led to imprisonment or even
worse. Although Richter seldom
discussed his personal life, a new
biography by the Danish composer
Karl Aage Rasmussen, Sviatoslav
Richter: Pianist fills in many of the
blanks, as well as openly describing the
pianist as being gay. Clearly, this fact is
irrelevant to Richters musicianship.
However, its worth noting because
some accounts assert that Richter was
withdrawn, and even prone to
unfriendliness its possible that he was
coping with a complex personal
situation, which deserves empathy.
Despite his introverted nature, Richter
was not afraid to stick his neck out when
it came to musical accuracy. If someone
did not play all the repeats he would go
berserk; he was a very exacting musician,
says Wigler. He was known to stop

speaking to people if they did not abide


by the composers wishes. Legend has it
that after attending a recital given by
Murray Perahia, where the younger
pianist performed Chopins Sonata No 3
without observing a first movement
repeat, Richter called for a meeting with
the soloist backstage so that he could
discuss the omission.
Richter was a big man almost six feet
tall who had huge hands. A generous
handspan does not automatically
indicate a gift for challenging intervals
and articulate phrasing, but there was an
obvious physical aspect that took his
playing to a higher level. Wigler once
discussed the matter with Clifford
Curzon, also a Richter fan. Clifford had
big hands but he held his hands up and
said that Richters were bigger than his.
Richter dwarfed the piano. He was a
phenomenal personality.
Generous gifts
French pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet has
been an admirer of Richters pianism
since, as a 16-year-old conservatoire
student, he first heard the Russian
perform in Paris. At that time it was
possible to sneak in during the
intermission, he smiles. Missing the
first half is one of the biggest regrets of
my life. I remember every single gesture
at the opening of the Tempest; it was
a revelation. [Richter played Beethoven
op 31 no 2 Tempest and op 31 no 3 in
the second half.] I had no idea that it
was possible to play the piano this way.
The emotional range was almost
unbearable. Even thinking about it now
I have goosebumps.
Richter did not return to the US after
his New York recital with David Oistrakh
in 1970 was disrupted by anti-Soviet
protests. He continued to perform in
Europe and Japan, and embarked on a
six-month tour of Siberia as late as 1986.
However, like many concert pianists, he
tired of the travel and had a life-long
dislike of flying. Perhaps surprisingly,
given his spiralling discography, Richter
did not enjoy the recording process.
Jacques Leiser, a concert manager who
worked with Richter for 37 years, told
the New York Times that Richter found
studio recording unnatural and highpressured. But even when we recorded
him onstage, he insisted that he not be
able to see the microphones. We would
have to hide them in potted palms and
among vases of flowers. Some critics
have highlighted how varied Richters
performances were in terms of quality.
If ever I am not satisfied with my playing
I always think about Richter, says
Bavouzet. When he was inspired he was
on top form but at the same time he gave
recitals that were not that good. That
must have been so difficult for him. I can
imagine that he might not have had an
easy life for that reason.

LISTEN TO THE LEGEND

Sviatoslav Richter: Complete Decca, Philips & DG


Recordings (Decca 478 6778; 50 CDs plus bonus CD)
To celebrate what would have been Richters 100th birthday,
Universal has gathered his complete Decca, Philips and
DG recordings spanning nearly four decades (1956-1992)
into one collection for the first time. Universal has done
whatever it could to find the original recording dates and
locations for nearly all of the CDs in the collection.
Richter never liked the recording studio. He was also
not the easiest for a conductor to work with: the Karajan
partnership in the Tchaikovsky Concerto here is a good
example, where its obvious that both have their own very
different ideas. He accompanied singers a few times (a fine
example is his partnership with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
just listen to the wonderful Schubert Winterreise) and
his chamber recordings often come from live recordings
(e.g. the unmissable Franck Piano Quintet with the Borodin
Quartet), as do the majority of the solo recordings in this set.
This collection offers pianism of a truly gigantic level. Best
are his Mantua recordings of a handful of Haydn sonatas,
ideally recorded but shortly afterwards dismissed by the
pianist. Dont miss his Prokofiev and Beethoven sonatas or
his Prokofiev No 5 and Rachmaninov No 2 concertos.
Sony has released its Richter Complete Album Collection,
neglecting to shout from the rooftops that this release
includes, for the first time on CD, Richters 1960 OctoberDecember Carnegie Hall recitals (including two recitals
with the same programme recorded two days apart). These
recitals show Richter at his most stunning (though again, the
artist was dissatisfied). We can but hope that Warner collects
every bit they have from their EMI archives, including the
tapes from innumerable live concerts.
Marius Dawn

Richter valued his fans. Bavouzet


remembers an occasion when Richter
gave seven encores: At one point he said
Im sorry, I have no more pieces to
play! There were still 20 people in the
hall so he said, Well, if you dont mind
I am going to practise for my concert
tomorrow and the audience stayed to
listen. Interestingly, Richter did not
give autographs immediately after
concerts. The tradition was that you
gave him the programme or score after
the performance and then you got it
back at his hotel the next morning,
explains Bavouzet. He always signed in
specific places within the music; at the
place he loved the most. For example,
when I sent him the complete Prokofiev
sonatas he signed at the recapitulation
of the first movement of the eighth.
Richter spent much of his later life in
Paris and Germany, performing until
illness struck in his eighties. He died of
a heart attack in Moscow at age 82. n

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16/07/2015 10:22

H I S TO R Y

mystic
traveller
Alexander Scriabin
1872-1915

Listeners are strongly divided about Scriabins dense,


complex music. But with the centenary of his death,
its time for a re-evaluation of this remarkable
Russian composer, writes Michael Quinn

p74_Scriabin-FINALish.indd 74

15/07/2015 14:16

Paderewski, Schnabel and Horszowski).


As a child, Scriabin learned to compose,
play and even build pianos, and later
studied alongside Rachmaninov at the
Moscow Conservatory.
Only just turned 20, he saw his music
published for the first time in 1893
elegant solo piano pieces owing much
to Chopin (whose scores Scriabin is said
to have placed under his pillow when
he slept). Three years later he garnered
critical acclaim and public adulation
alike for his First Piano Concerto. It
prompted a startled Stravinsky to ask,
Scriabin: where does he come from and
who are his followers?
Bittersweet nostalgia
Musically, Scriabin was the product of a
thoroughly conventional, Russianaccented education to which was added
the perceptible influence of Chopin.
Such origins are self-evident in a
Horowitz encore favourite that appeared
in Pianist No 24, the opus 1 no 2
Etude. Eminently playable and
satisfyingly expressive in its plaintive
C sharp minor key signature, it poses
no difficulty to the listener while
making just enough technical demands
(pay attention to those dynamic
markings!) to stretch the novice player.
The opus 3 Mazurkas (the sheet
music for No 3 was published in Pianist
No 60 and for No 3 in Pianist No 11)
similarly owe a debt to Chopin, but in
them, as music journalist Bryce
Morrison has noted, Scriabin moves
from bittersweet nostalgia typical of
the younger composer into a
convoluted idiom and, finally, into a
pensive and hallucinatory shadowland.
That gathering darkness can be
observed in the three sets of later tudes
(opp 8, 42 and 65) where Scriabins own
distinctive soundworld coloured by a
language increasingly his own and
characterised by vividly contrasted
rhythms begins to emerge. By the time
of 1912s opus 65 Etudes, his obsessive
preoccupation with what he deemed the
Mystic Chord C-F sharp-B flat-E-A-D
was well to the fore along with a
performing style described as feverish,
sumptuous, ethereal.
The great poet-pianist Alfred Brendel
regarded Scriabin as superfluous
because, he said, I could find Scriabin
in concentrated form in Liszts Valses
oublies and Liszts music offers
wonderfully attractive musical fountains
and springs. More sympathetically,
Sviatoslav Richter lit upon the
intimidating challenges and
intoxicating attractions of Scriabins
music when he described it as a heady
liqueur on which you can get drunk
periodically, a poetical drug, a crystal
thats easily broken.
In the relatively late and transitional
Feuillet dalbum (the first of the opus 45

SCRIABIN INSIDE PIANIST


Highlights of Scores inside recent issues
Ingasas

Alexand er SCRIAB IN
(1871-1 915)

Track 10

Mazurka op 3 no 3

Mazurka op 3 no 3 (issue 60)


Nocturne for the Left Hand
op 9 no 2, with a How to Play
lesson from Lucy Parham
(issue 72)
Prlude op 37 no 1 (issue 57)
Prlude for the Left Hand op 9
no 1 (issue 47)

Past issue scores are available


at the Pianist Digital Store:
http://pianistm.ag/digitalshop

INTERMEDIATE

This is an early work, dating


from 1889, and very unlike
the dense and complex
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61 Pianist

11/5/11 09:28:23

72

10/5/13

album leaves, the score of which was in


Pianist No 33) youll find more than a
hint of the intoxication Richter insisted
was at the centre of the best of Scriabins
music. And perhaps, too, a more than
glancing reference to the vivacity and
energy of Liszt. Certainly in
performance it requires a molten,
viscous quality that beginners should
approach with due caution.
Caution was certainly Peter
Donohoes watchword with Scriabin. A
late convert I didnt play a note of his
music for over 40 years earlier this
year he played all of the sonatas in
concert and will imminently release a
disc devoted to the composers solo
piano works. His verdict on the music
seems closer to the truth when he
describes it as certainly not easy but it
is both fascinating and, if it doesnt
seem odd to say so, enjoyable.
Perhaps it is the constant sense of
something subcutaneous being stirred in
the later works the sonatas especially
that forms part of Scriabins intriguing
allure for Donohoe. Theres a sense of
alchemy about it. He dominates your
emotions, and for a long time after
you practise and perform it, you feel
different. If I practise the Ninth or,
particularly, the Tenth Sonata, I get
strange; I really do feel weird. Scriabin
gets into your subconscious in the way
that Wagner does.
This issues cover artist, Lucille Chung,
(who has recorded Scriabin on the
Dynamic label, and who you can hear
play two Scriabin pieces on this issues
covermount CD) echoes Donohoe with
greater enthusiasm. Scriabin was a great
pianist and wrote in a highly idiomatic
way. His music combines a very rare mix
of purity, primal expression, raw
emotions, and mysticism, very often
within the same piece. He uses the piano
as a starting point for something that is
truly beyond this world: a set of
emotions, colours and an explosion of
the senses that can be both incredibly
stimulating and satisfying.
Where, then, to start with a figure so
stigmatised as Scriabin? Progress

12:50:40

O
PAGE 58

o composer has
challenged musicians
and music lovers so
much or divided
opinion so extremely
as Alexander
Nikolayevich Scriabin,
the centenary of whose death at the early
age of 43 falls this year. Stubbornly,
Scriabin remains a composer who
provokes a certain wary nervousness
when first encountered by listeners. Yet
his music is arguably one of the best kept
secrets of classical music. Where the early
tudes are altogether beguiling and easy
on the ear, the later music, dense and
daunting at first encounter though it
might be, richly rewards a listeners
efforts to engage with it.
Born in 1872, Scriabin was old enough
to have begun composing with a musical
language dominated by tonality, and
young enough to have encountered and
embraced the emergence of atonality,
developing it with such intense
singularity of intent and expression that
it became, almost by disconcerting
compulsion, increasingly more dissonant.
On first encounter with Scriabins
later, larger compositions, his music can
seem wholly indigestible, its sense of
confusing, chewy complexity heightened
by his often bewildering interests in
theosophy and mysticism, in synaesthesia
and symbolism. More than any other
composer, Scriabins music has the ability
to divide listeners, a quality recognised
early on by the authoritative Great Soviet
Encyclopaedia, which pithily observed
that no composer has had more scorn
heaped on him or greater love bestowed.
The staunchly opposing views of
the Russian maverick can be broadly
summed up with two very diverging
opinions: the eminent critic Ernest
Newman, who declared the wind that
blows through [his] music is the veritable
wind that blows through the cosmos,
and the conductor Adrian Boult, who
took a decidedly more jaundiced view,
succinctly dismissing him as evil.
But with just a little effort (as readers
of Pianist who have played any of his
scores included in past issues will know),
Scriabins music offers considerable
rewards for both the head and the
heart. Its possible to map out and
to negotiate a trajectory from almost
innocent simplicity to a vigorous,
dark-hued and Byzantine complexity, a
journey the composer himself adroitly
described in 1903: I was once a
Chopinist, then a Wagnerist, now I am
only a Scriabinist.
Scriabins beginnings suggest little
of his end. He was born into an
aristocratic family in Moscow on
6 January 1872. His mother was a
concert pianist admired by Rubinstein
and was a pupil of Theodor Leschetizky
(whose illustrious protgs included

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H I S TO R Y
chronologically through the music from
the early, Chopin-influenced piano
pieces to the later Daedalian sonatas and
the astonishingly taut but dangerously
unstable orchestral works, and a sense
emerges of a composer pulling in two
directions, simultaneously drilling into
subterranean specifics while pitching for
cosmic universality. Choose to work
backwards and the experience is very
different indeed.
If you get to know the beauties of the
two first sets of tudes and the first three
sonatas, explains Donohoe, you will
find a composer who is very definitely
entrenched in the Romantic tradition.
That will lead to fear when you hear
the Seventh or later sonatas as Scriabins
world becomes more arcane.
Scriabins own advice to the parents
of the 11-year-old Vladimir Horowitz
offers some insight into the composers
view of himself and his vision for his
music. Your son will always be a good
pianist, but that is not enough, he told
the prodigys guardians. He must be a
cultured man, also.
Passionate preoccupations
For Scriabin, culture was clearly both
an all-encompassing intellectual concern
capable of accommodating, even
embracing, faddish isms, and an
aesthetic notion that prompted the
idiosyncratic technical preoccupations
and philosophical eccentricities that
colour and shape the later music. More
succinctly, Peter Donohoe describes it as
a preoccupation with something not fully
explicable to anyone apart from himself .
Citing Chopin, Debussy, Ravel,
Shostakovich and Rachmaninov as all
unique, and all with voices that feel very
different to play, Donohoe confidently
adds Scriabins name to the list. When
one starts to learn his music there is a
definite piano style (a harmonic as well
as an instrumental one) that you dont
find in any other composer. He is one of
those composers with a unique voice and

world to occupying a decidedly


otherworldly position all of his own.
Dating from as early as 1892, the first
three sonatas sit comfortably alongside
similar exercises by Rachmaninov and
Chopin, although even from the First,
with its darkly exhilarating Russian
funeral march and unrelenting sense of
despair, you catch a glimpse of what the
future would produce.
Composed in the feverishly creative
summer of 1903 that produced a
remarkable 40 piano works, the compact,
eight-minute-long Fourth Sonata
marks a crossroads in Scriabins creative
direction. Invoking the flight to a distant
star, it finds him clearly on the edge of
his own leap into the unknown worlds
of mysticism his association with the
theosophical creed popularised by the
occultist Madame Blavatsky and, not
least if most disturbingly, his growing
conviction that he was God and the
peculiar scientific oddness of synaesthesia,
the association of sounds with colours.
So prevalent became Scriabins
fascination with the notion that in his
1910 symphonic poem Prometheus he
included a part for clavier lumires
(keyboard of lights). Although he
employed conventional musical
notation, the passage was intended to
project colour rather than sound.
The sonatas get progressively thornier,
each more intricately gnarled, fervidly
intense and taxing than the one before,
the incandescent White Mass that is the
Seventh notwithstanding. The Black
Mass Ninth and the Tenth Sonatas are
cast in searing arcs supported and kept
aloft by a virtuosity not seen since Liszt
and seldom encountered again afterwards.
Scriabins early death from septicaemia
means, of course, that we will never know
in what direction and to what end he
might have taken his music. (Just as it will
remain a tantalising what if to consider
how different a composer he might have
been had he not become so transfixed and
consumed by his mystical visions.)

Sviatoslav Richter described Scriabins


music as a heady liqueur on which you
can get drunk periodically, a poetical
drug, a crystal thats easily broken
it makes him seem like a genuinely
important figure. That, for me, is the
sign of a great composer.
Covering the whole of Scriabins
creative life, the ten piano sonatas
offer telling stepping-stones in the
development of Scriabins musical (and
extra-musical) preoccupations. They
reveal a composer moving from being
squarely rooted in an already inhabited

Perhaps Scriabins premature death


robbed us of something else: a clear
lineage of succeeding generations of
composers whom he might have
influenced. Messiaen aside (and that
largely due to his fascination with
synaesthesia), it is difficult to think of
others who share any commonality of
language with him. Sorabji, perhaps,
but only, surely, in terms of a shared

SCRIABIN ON DISC
Complete Etudes
Piers Lane
Hyperion CDH55242
Complete Mazurkas
Eric Le Van
Music & Arts CD1125
Complete Pomes
Pascal Amoyel
Calliope 9360
Complete Sonatas
Marc-Andr Hamelin
Hyperion CDA67131/2 (2 discs)
Complete Prludes
Piers Lane
Hyperion: Vol 1 CDH55450, Vol 2
CDH55451
24 Prludes op 11
(with Sonatas 4 & 10)
Mikhail Pletnev
Erato 5099962865128
Vers la flamme
(plus solo piano works)
Vladimir Ashkenazy
Decca 478 8155
Piano Concerto
Yevgeny Sudbin, Bergen Philharmonic
Orchestra/Andrew Litton
BIS SACD BIS2088
Scriabin Edition (complete works)
Various artists
Decca 478 8168 (18 discs)

predisposition towards hubristic


idiosyncrasy and over-reaching scale.
But the current anniversary offers the
perfect prompt to listen again to
Scriabins music to test whether or not
his reputation for impenetrability is
deserved by one of the most esoteric of
all composers. If there is a lineage to be
found, then surely it is somewhere in the
vibrant extremes of jazz music rather
than the classical repertoire, a thought
not lost on Peter Donohoe.
Its true that there are plenty of jazz
chords and jazz rhythms to be found in
Scriabin. Playing the second movement
of the Fourth Sonata, you can so easily
end up sounding like Art Tatum.
A one-off from the beginning of the
20th century, perhaps, finally, at the
beginning of the 21st century with its
abundant and accommodating plurality,
Scriabin is about to come more clearly
into focus. Maybe he will no longer
be regarded as an outsider, someone who,
in the words of another great musical
iconoclast, Stravinsky, was a musical
traveller without a passport.

76 Pianist 85

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17/07/2015 12:47

COMPETITIONS

The Leeds Legacy


Dame Fanny Waterman, the Leeds Competition founder and guiding force, is retiring.
John Evans asks Dame Fanny (and others) whats next for this prestigious event

Simon Wilkinson/SWIPX.com, Leeds International Piano Competition (LIPC) 2012 (this page). All other photos courtesy of LIPC

his year, 54 years


since she woke her
sleeping husband to
tell him shed had
an idea for an
international piano
competition in
Leeds, Dame Fanny Waterman 95
years young steps down from the helm
of the great British institution she
helped to found.
I put the scenario of a Leeds without
its long-time leader to Nick Westerman,
head of operations at the Leeds
International Piano Competition
(LIPC). Of all the challenges the LIPC
has faced in its 54 years, surely this is
the greatest? Without question, it is,
he says. However, helpfully, Dame
Fanny said she would not leave until her
successor has been found. We are
getting close and I am confident that
towards the end of this year, we will be
in a position to name that person.
Rather than attempt the surely
impossible task of identifying and
recruiting someone cast in the same
mould as Dame Fanny, Westerman
says he and his colleagues are keen that
the role fits the person.
Dame Fanny is unique and wears
many hats fundraiser, judge, publicist,
administrator, campaigner and so on
but we are looking at various different
models for the role her successor will
take on. Different candidates bring
different qualities but the heart of the
job is to sustain and nurture Dame
Fannys legacy for the benefit of
musicians and audiences today, and
in the future.
Its a phrase Fanny Waterman herself
might have used all those years ago
when telling her husband of her idea to
launch a piano competition in her home
city. Perhaps still fuzzy with sleep, he
said the idea might work in London but

Above: Leeds Town Hall


during the 2012 Leeds
International Piano
Competition
Opposite, clockwise from
top left: Dame Fanny with
with Leeds co-founder
Marion Thorpe, with Dr
Geoffrey de Keyser on
their wedding day and
with the 2012 finalists
(winner Federico Colli is
on her left)

never in Leeds. The city fathers also


struggled with the concept of an
international piano competition on
their doorstep. They considered the idea
elitist but their argument crumbled
when Jack Lyons, a Leeds businessman
and national arts benefactor, threatened
to withdraw his donation of 1,000 if
the city refused to match it. It shamed
them into action and, albeit reluctantly,
they found the cash.
Today, says Westerman, the city and
the region couldnt be more supportive.
Its a relationship that works for us and
for them, as well for the whole region,
and were proud of it.

No-nonsense attitude
Born in the city in 1920, Fanny
Waterman is a Leeds girl through and
through. Despite all her achievements
and high-society connections, she speaks
with a Yorkshire accent and, true to her
regions traditions, is direct and
no-nonsense. Her parents a RussianJewish migr father and English
mother were poor (she recalls her
mother crying when couldnt afford to
pay the grocery bill) but did everything
they could to nurture their daughters
burgeoning talent for the piano.
No one had central heating then, so
it might be bitterly cold when I was

78 Pianist 85

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practising and I would have to


wear a coat, she remembers.
They encouraged their
daughters musical interests and
took her to concerts at Leeds
Town Hall where she saw many
of the greatest musicians of the
day, among them Kreisler,
Heifetz, Arrau and Schnabel.
At the age of eight she saw
Rachmaninov. I remember the
atmosphere as much as the
playing, she says. It was magic.
In 1940 Waterman became a
piano student at the Royal
College of Music, and while
there, scooped up a succession
of major awards. Among her
proudest achievements was
performing at the Proms in
1942 (the programme notes
reassured the audience that
should an air-raid warning
sound, they would be told
immediately, but that the
concert would continue).
Although she may have
avoided the bombs, inevitably
Fanny could not avoid the
call-up; her choice the womens
land army or a reserved
occupation. I was no gardener,
so I became a piano teacher,
she says.
She had found her destiny
and was back in Leeds for the
remainder of the war, and
throughout the post-war years,
she taught at home and
travelled widely giving concerts.
However, by the late 1950s,
Fanny Waterman found herself growing
frustrated with a society that appeared
not to care much for its young pianists.
Her plan to launch a piano competition
took hold but. as she recalls, it was
her husbands scepticism that morning
in 1961 that made it a reality. The
minute he said it would never work,
I became determined to prove him
wrong, she says. Thats where my
courage and my ambition came out.

Federico Colli, the winner of the


previous Leeds, in 2012, is in no doubt
about the place the Leeds now occupies
in the world of piano competitions.
It is in the worlds top five along with
the Tchaikovsky, the Van Cliburn, the
Chopin and the Queen Elizabeth, he
says. If you win the Leeds, or any of the
other four, you cannot enter any other
piano competition. It wouldnt be
logical; you are already at the top.

Federico Colli: The Leeds is in the worlds top


five competitions and if you win it, you cannot
enter any other piano competition. It wouldnt
be logical; you are already at the top
Its a status that is not lost on Dame
Fanny herself. During the winners
dinner Colli remembers a conversation
with her during which she emphasised
the significance of his success and
his responsibility as a Leeds winner.
She told me that now I had a lot of
responsibility on my shoulders, says

These qualities, plus an inexhaustible


appetite for work, have never left her.
They have been the fuel that, along with
her supporters (among them her close
friend Marion Thorpe, Countess of
Harewood, and the competitions first
patron, Princess Mary) have helped
power the Leeds to success.

Colli. She said I was no longer like my


fellow competitors; that now I stood in
comparison with the greatest pianists.
She told me to choose engagements
that reflected my position, and always
to go on stage in the right physical and
mental shape.
Dame Fanny is equally clear on this
point. Our competition is for young
professionals who have sufficient
repertoire to take on a career, she says.
Our engagements are the finest in the
world. To play with the four London
orchestras, the RLPO and the Hall
Thats what has put Leeds at the top,
and weve got to the stay there.
It wasnt always so. The first Leeds,
held in 1963, became mired in
controversy when it was revealed that
the winner, local boy Michael Roll, was
a pupil of the competitions founder. It
was very embarrassing, admits Fanny
Waterman. He was a pupil of mine,
and hed won the first competition.
To make matters worse, shed given
him a piano lesson on the morning of
one of the rounds. He was playing
Beethovens Appassionata and I gave
him a quick lesson on it, she says.

79 Pianist 85

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COMPETITIONS
Later the same day, at the end of the
round, Clifford Curzon dashed out of
the hall and told me Rolls performance
of the piece was one of the greatest he
had ever heard.
After the final round, when the
jury declared he had won, it was very,
very difficult. I thought, What have
I done?
Today, Michael Roll says the drama
went right over his head. I was only
17. and my biggest concern was
learning enough repertoire to go
touring, he says. It was the age of the
Iron Curtain and I guess some people
were frustrated that I beat the secondplaced Russian. However, I recently
found out that eight of the 10 jury
members voted for me. Curzon, Anda
and Britten were especially enthusiastic
about my playing.
Roll says that looking back on it, his
win was a double-edged sword. It
thrust me into the limelight when
perhaps I wasnt prepared but it gave me
the opportunity to work with some of
the biggest names in music: Britten,
Giulini, Barbirolli I even played
Brittens piano concerto to him in his
house. These opportunities were
mind-blowing. Without winning the
Leeds, I might never have gone into the
profession. I owe it so much.
The competitions reputation for
identifying stayers in the piano world,
artists whose talent and individuality
would secure them legendary status
and a long-term career at the very
top, was forged in 1969 with Radu
Lupu. He was followed, in 1972, by
Murray Perahia.
Perahia looked like he needed a good
meal, says Waterman. After his

Michael Roll: Winning the Leeds thrust me into the


limelight when perhaps I wasnt prepared, but it gave me the
opportunity to work with some of the biggest names in music.
Without winning I might not have gone into the profession
performance, the jury wiped their eyes
and were stunned into silence.
The Leeds knack for discovering
stellar talent continued. In 1975 it was
the turn of Dmitri Alexeev (with
Mitsuko Uchida second and Andrs
Schiff third) and in 1978, Michel

Above: the 1987 Leeds


finalists, including Simon
Rattle, Noriko Ogawa and
Boris Berezovsky
Below, l-r: Leeds winners
Radu Lupu (playing in
1969s finals), Michael Roll
(1963) and Murray Perahia
(in 1972s finals)
Opposite: recent winners
Sunwook Kim (2009) and
Federico Colli (2012)

Dalberto. Since then, Jon KimuraParker, Artur Pizarro and, from the
younger generation, Alessio Bax and
Sunwook Kim have all emerged in the
competitions glare.
Federico Colli says the experience
has been life changing. With the
responsibility and the weight of
expectation on me, I think so much
harder about the music I play. It is one
thing to arrive at the top of the
mountain but its more important to
stay, so I am working hard to be a more
rounded musician.
For example, when I study a piece of
Debussy, it is no longer enough for me
just to know the piece in isolation; I
must know the context and the period
in which it was written. This is very
important to me.
A lot of pianists are very good, very
quickly. But the Leeds is looking for
something else, and it is this quality of
historical as well as musical insight that
I am working hard to develop.
Waterman has said few of the
competitions past winners stay in
touch. So far, Colli is proving to be the
exception. Dame Fanny is like my
second grandmother. When I have
doubts about repertoire for specific
audiences, I can call her and she will
help me. Her advice and support are
very important to me.

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16/07/2015 10:23

Listening to Colli speak about the


Leeds and Fanny Waterman, one
cant help feeling a degree of sympathy
for those charged with finding her
replacement. Westerman may appear
to be confident, and his plan to recast
the positions role to suit its holders
skills and talents, sounds wise.
However, so often, the departure of an
institutions powerful, charismatic and
single-minded founder who may, on
occasion and by necessity, row against
the tide (Fanny Watermans husband
said her greatest quality was her
unpredictability), can herald a period
of real uncertainty.
Jessica Duchen, the music critic and
contributor to Pianist magazine, who is
a great admirer of the Leeds, wonders if
it can survive without Dame Fanny.
In her blog, Duchen wrote: The
Leeds puts Britain on the map for
young musicians from all over the
world. While certain other competitions
are up to their armpits in gossip about
jury corruption, it has survived with a
squeaky-clean reputation (comparatively
speaking), and a name for choosing
superb musicians as its winners. Its
the one everyone wants to win. Dame
Fanny has a sure touch for everything
from inspiration to fundraising to
musical judgment. People are asking
who might step into her shoes. I
wonder whether the competition can
survive at all without her.
Eyes on the future
Westerman has no such concerns and,
like his outgoing boss is, instead,
looking to the future and to this years
competition (26 August-13 September)
in particular. We will be streaming all
the rounds live so that people can enjoy
it wherever they are, he says. The core
repertoire will always be at the heart of
the Leeds but we will be encouraging
entrants to go off piste a little. For
example, this year, one entrant is
playing one of his own compositions. I
take my hat off to him! Also, we will be
doing much more to encourage and
develop younger audiences.
You could say Fanny Waterman has
been doing just that, all her life, in her
teaching, her tutor books (they have sold
over two million copies) and her support
of young musicians, In fact, central to
her plans post-Leeds, is encouraging
young people to enjoy listening to, as
much as playing, classical music. Im
very concerned about the lack of music
in schools, she says.
In an interview with this magazine in
2008, when she was 89, Dame Fanny
insisted her energy was undimmed.
If you dont use it, you lose it, she said.
If you want to keep going, keep going.
You dont stop working because you
grow old. You grow old because you
stop working.

Today, at the age of 95, she still


claims to work 10-hour days.
Dame Fannys shoes will be hard to
fill but whatever direction her successor
takes the Leeds in, he or she could do
worse than heed her clear justification
for its existence: As a young pianist,
youve made a decision that this is the
moment youre ready to take a risk.
Have you got the courage? Are you
prepared not to succeed where you had
hoped? Are you going to be put off
completely by the result or will your
attitude be, Ill show them?

Its an approach that has served


Dame Fanny Waterman well, and its
one that whoever ends up as her
successor might also benefit from.
For more about the Leeds, go to
www.leedspiano.com. Pianist will be
reporting on the winners in the next issue.
Dame Fannys autobiography Dame
Fanny Waterman: My Life in Music comes
out in September (Faber Publishing;
ISBN: 978-0571539185). Read an
interview with Lang Lang, LIPCs Global
Ambassador, on page 8.

READER COMPETITION
One lucky winner will receive a pair of tickets to the Prize Winners Gala Recital on
13 Sept at 2pm at the Great Hall, University of Leeds, where each of the six finalists
will give a recital. Plus, the winner is invited to a pre-gala drinks reception and gets
an overnight stay at the Doubletree Hilton, Leeds.
One runner-up will receive a pair of tickets to the Prize Winners Gala Recital.
Simply answer the question below:
In which UK city was Dame Fanny Waterman born?
A: Nottingham B: Bristol C: Leeds
ENTER ONLINE AT WWW.PIANISTMAGAZINE.COM
Postcard entries also accepted. Please send to: Lauren Beharrell, COM PIA0116,
Pianist magazine, 5th Floor, 32-32 Park Row, Leeds, LS1 5JD. Competition closes
Friday 28 August. Quote PIA0116 and remember to put your name and telephone
number on the postcard as well as your answer.

81 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 10:23

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12/05/2015 11:41
10:56

MAKERS

Piano round-up

ell kick
off our
round-up of
latest news
from piano
makers with
one of those
and finally items from the national
news the unveiling of a new brand
with a famous name. Just as our last

issue was going to press, concert pianist


Daniel Barenboim was holding a special
lunchtime event at the Royal Festival
Hall in London to present his new
piano, the Barenboim-Maene concert
grand, to the media.
There are only two of these pianos
(currently) in existence. One belongs to
Barenboim, who commissioned it after
playing a restored piano from Liszts
time Barenboim was struck by the
alternative musical possibilities the
older pianos design offered. The other
belongs to Chris Maene, a Belgian
instrument maker and restorer who
Steinway recommended when
Barenboim approached them with his
concept. Its uncertain whether more
will be built or what they might cost.
From the outside, save for the
makers name, the instrument is barely
distinguishable from the Steinway
grand one generally associates with
Barenboim. Thats no surprise, since so
many of the components were supplied
by Steinway. Inside, though, there are
striking and significant differences from
the standard cross-strung design that
has dominated piano building for more
than a century. Barenboims epiphany
was not just to listen to the sonic
possibilities of a Liszt-era piano but to
realize that many of its design flaws
problems projecting in larger concert

Clockwise from top


left: Pianist Editor
Erica Worth with
Annekatrin Frster at
Peregrines Pianos in
London; Steinways
new Fibonacci model;
Steinway UKs
Louis XV and the
Barenboim-Maene
piano at the launch

halls or surviving the robust playing of


performers such as Liszt himself could
now be overcome by using modern
materials and techniques while retaining
the original straight-strung design.
While that approach isnt completely
revolutionary Stuart & Sons and
Richard Dain with his Phoenix are
among those not so much thinking
outside the box as thinking more deeply
within it Barenboims venture and its
attendant publicity (including a series of
Schubert recitals on the new instrument)
have reminded the world that innovative
piano design neednt be a thing of the
past. Even if the production run of the
Barenboim-Maene instrument never
happens, perhaps it will spark a more
general interest among makers to revisit
some of the characteristics of earlier
instruments with the benefits of
contemporary engineering.
And now, from Steinway players to
Steinway player pianos. Spirio is the
companys new baby, a built-in digital
system, available in the UK currently in
211cm B and 180cm O models (in
the USA the B and M models), which
means your piano can play itself. Before
you as a Pianist reader dive in to ask
why youd need that when you can play
your piano perfectly well for yourself,
consider how many hours that piano is
unused. It could be entertaining you

Erica Worth (Barenboim-Maene piano; Louis XV piano)

London has been the scene of plenty of piano action over the past couple of months.
Gez Kahan cherry-picks some of the noteworthy happenings and interesting innovations

84 Pianist 85

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16/07/2015 11:54

PIANOFORTE
TUNERS ASSOCIATION

Do you:
Need a piano tuner?
Need advice about purchasing a piano?
Want to join the Association?
Want to become a piano tuner?
during your evening meal, for example.
It could be inspiring the non-musicians
in your household to take an interest in
the piano (as happened, many years ago
in the age of the bellows-driven pianola,
to this writer). And it could be helping
improve your own playing. How so?
The Spirios big selling point is its
library of performances by Steinway
Artists which includes the majority of
todays concert pianists, along with
top-notch jazz and pop players. This is
not just a matter of being able to enjoy a
Chopin recital by an acknowledged
maestro in the comfort of your own
living room, complete with all the
richness and dynamic nuances of a real
piano. You can also compare
interpretations of the same piece by
different players and learn from the
differences. And, of course, you can get
your piano to play works that you love to
hear but have not yet had time to learn.
The system is only available factory
fitted theres no retrofit option, even
for a Steinway instrument, and,
obviously, putting a Spirio system,
complete with Steinway Artist
performances on a different brand would
make no sense at all.
Meanwhile, the company continues
to turn out regular pianos and has just
notched up its 600,000th instrument.
To mark this milestone, it went to
town on the design the case of the
Fibonacci (named after the Fibonacci
spiral incorporated in its veneer) is
made entirely from natural Macassar
ebony. Having been shown first on the
Steinway & Sons stand at the
Masterpiece London fair in June, it is
now travelling the world.
Steinways UK showroom has also
commissioned its own art piano. The

Visit www.pianotuner.org.uk
Louis XV has a black satin finish
with gilt carvings, inspired by styles
or contact the Secretary on
from the Rococo period. Its yours for
0845 602 8796
just 350,000.
But Steinway hasnt been the only
The Association provides the music profession and general
game in town in recent weeks.
Printed by
greenstret
Publisher.
public
with
a first
class professional service in which they trust.
Annekatrin Frster was the guest of
15:40PM 20/10/108
honour at Peregrines Pianos promotional
File SMH - Pianist 1008.dtp, page 1.
Adobe PDF
event and musical soire in its Grays Inn
Road, London, showroom.
Annekatrin Frster, now director of
1
10/03/2015
the company, is the fifth generation Pianoforte.indd
of
Frster family to be involved in the
When you need printed music,
business since August Frster was
established in 1859. Based in Lbau, a
just visit the Hound ...
small town in Saxony, Frster gained a
fine reputation, especially in eastern
Europe a vintage model was one of
the authentic instruments used in the
... and see for yourself why so many customers
Oscar-winning movie, The Pianist but
from around the world return to ...
suffered, like many other brands, under
Communist control after World War II.
Since German reunification, the
company, now back in the hands of its
founding family, has flourished.
During the event, Ms Frster, on
her first visit to London, presented
Peregrines Pianos with a certificate as

an established leader in print music one-stop
one of August Frsters five best dealers
worldwide in 2014.
shopping
As we end this round-up, Pianist is
planning a trip to the new Blthner

over 400,000 competitively priced scores
London showroom later this week.
listed online
Well let you know all about it in the
next issue. n

used by music librarians across the world

11:07

www.sheetmusichound.com

To find out about Steinways new Spirio,


go to www.steinwayspirio.com; for other
Steinway pianos including the Fibonacci,
go to www.steinway.com. Theres more
about August Frster at Peregines Pianos
(www.peregrines-pianos.com) and
www.august-foerster.de. Blthner news
can be found at www.bluthner.co.uk

Email: hound@sheetmusichound.com - Tel/Fax:+44(0)845


1760
+44(0)1667838
455701
Sheet Music Hound Limited Drumdelnies, Delnies, IV12 5NT

85 Pianist 85

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REVIEW CD

Marius Dawn praises Grieg from Fialkowska, Moog and Perianes, but its
Gabriela Monteros heartfelt lament that is the real stand-out this issue
Pianist star ratings: Essential go get it! Really great A ne release Average Fair
Buy these CDs from the Pianist website.Visit http://pianistm.ag/cdreviews

Edit o rs

BAVOUZET & GUY

C HOI C E

GABRIELA MONTERO

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No 2; Montero:


Ex Patria and Improvisations
YOA Orchestra of the Americas/Carlos
Miguel Prieto
Orchid Classics ORC100047
This release is Gabriela Monteros lament for Venezuela. Her falling-out
with the present government has made it impossible for her to visit her
homeland. As the extensive booklet reminds us, it is sadly not
uncommon for composers to be expelled, flee or seek refuge outside the
country they were born. Rachmaninov made a dramatic exit from the
Russia he sorely missed, and when listening to his Second Piano
Concerto on this disc, one can hear a clear sense of nostalgic longing
and universal sadness. Yet its interesting to note that the work was
composed when Rachmaninov still believed he could remain in Russia.
Montero holds the Concerto in rhythmic restraint, playing down the
virtuosic passages, yet keeping a forward momentum. This works well,
even if there are many other versions of the Concerto that are more
extrovert. The slow movement, with some fine woodwind playing from
the youthful orchestra, bears a strong resemblance to Monteros own
composition for piano and orchestra Ex Patria, where she cries out her
desperation and frustration in her remarkably fine opus No 1.
Theres a final treat with her three Improvisations an art once dished
up by pianists of the Golden Age. Montero is a master pianist, composer
and improviser. What Venezuela has lost, the rest of the world has gained.

JANINA FIALKOWSKA

Transcriptions for
two pianists. Works
by Debussy,
Stravinsky &
Bartk
Chandos
Records
CHAN 10863

Grieg: Lyric Pieces


(selection)
ATMA
Classique
ACD2 2696

Comparing Jean-Efflam Bavouzet


and Franois-Frdric Guys new
recording of Stravinskys four-hand
version of Le sacre du Printemps with
Barenboim and Argerichs version is
unfair, because the latter are such
towering musical personalities. But
no comparisons are necessary with
Bavouzets successful arrangement of
Debussys Jeux. In Jeux, the
virtuosity of the two players is never
in doubt, and the razor-sharp
rhythmic drive and pistol-clear
attack of the syncopated chords is
breathtaking in its relentless drive
towards harmonies Debussy more or
less invented in his last great
orchestral composition. For Jeux
alone, this is worth having.

On the heels of Stephen Houghs


release of a selection of the Grieg
Lyric Pieces [Editors Choice, Pianist
No 84] comes Janina Fialkowska,
with her own selection from all ten
books. Where Houghs Grieg is full
of elegance, Fialkowskas is more
down to earth, which might be more
of what the composer had in mind.
But the music can take both types of
interpretation. Fialkowskas opening
Arietta draws us straight into the
cosmos of the Lyric Pieces, and she is
robust and boisterous in outgoing
pieces such as March of the Trolls
without losing the intimate charm
required. With only a handful of
duplicates, this CD can sit next to
Houghs Grieg on your CD shelf.

NELSON GOERNER

JOSEPH MOOG

JAVIER PERIANES

HOWARD SHELLEY

I have always thought Nelson


Goerners playing to be on a very
high level. His reliable and deep
musicality always comes to the
forefront of his interpretations, and
he always lets the composer come
first. Examples of this can be found
on his Chopin discs, which bear
repeated listening. On this disc,
Goerner takes on two of Schumanns
greatest works plus the devilish
Toccata, the latter tossed off without
the slightest strain. His Kreisleriana
is among the finest ever recorded,
and the Symphonic Etudes with the
posthumous studies inserted
organically also receive a sovereign
interpretation. One of the finest
Schumann releases this year.

In most recordings the Grieg


Concerto is coupled with the
Schumann (the opening bars of the
concertos do resemble each other.)
Here, though, Joseph Moog pairs the
Grieg with the entertaining
Moszkowski E major Concerto, an
innovation that is worth five stars on
its own. Other recordings of this
concerto are cast aside by Moogs
charm, lan and committed
musicality. Orchestral support from
the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie
Saarbrcken Kaiserslautern and
Nicholas Milton is lively and the
recording is clear and well focused.
If the Grieg is a tad lacklustre, the
disc is nonetheless a gem for Moogs
excellent Moszkowski.

Its almost impossible to come up


with a precise discography of
recordings of the Grieg Concerto,
because a new one pops up every
month. Perianess version is from a
live London concert where he had
the luxurious support of the BBC
Symphony and Sakari Oramo. This
version will give pleasure to those
who want an unfussy, brilliant and
virtuosic concerto. The first
movement cadenza is especially
successful and the finale really
dances. The CD also includes a
studio recording of a dozen Lyric
Pieces, showing the pianist fully
understands the idiom. It is all well
recorded and performed, and only
lacks a final ounce of excitement.

The Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra


with their versatile conductor and
pianist Howard Shelley have
unearthed so many Romantic piano
concertos that one fears theyll run
out. Luckily not! Here the less-thanoriginal Henri Herz is treated with
as much gravitas as his fellow
composer and friend Chopin might
be. Herzs showy crowd-pleasers are
played with such elegance and
security that they sound better than
they are. Theres nothing wrong with
the light music when the standard is
this high. Concerto No 2 is fine, but
the real fun starts with the two Grande
Fantasies on popular operas and the
sparkling Polonaise where Shelley
lets his hair down to splendid effect.

Schumann:
Kreisleriana;
Symphonic Etudes;
Toccata op 7
Zig-Zag
Territories
ZZT352

Moszkowski Piano
Concerto in E;
Grieg: Piano
Concerto
Onyx
ONYX4144

Grieg: Piano
Concerto; Lyric
Pieces (selection)
BBC SO/Sakari
Oramo
Harmonia
Mundi
HMC 902205

The Romantic Piano


Concerto Vol 66:
Henri Herz piano
concertos
Tasmanian SO/
Shelley
Hyperion
CDA68100

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17/07/2015 09:24

RECENT PIANO RELEASES


The finest pianists playing great composers
SEPTEMBER 2015

SEPTEMBER 2015

OCTOBER 2015

OCTOBER 2015

Jean-Efflam Bavouzet

Imogen Cooper

Louis Lortie / Hlne Mercier

Barry Douglas

Piern: Works for Piano &


Orchestra, Vol. 2

More Schumann piano music

Works for two pianos and orchestra

CHAN 10874

CHAN 10875

Brahms: Complete Works for


Solo Piano, Vol. 5

CHAN 10871

CHAN 10878

www.chandos.net
www.theclassicalshop.net (24-bit studio masters, lossless, MP3)

STAY IN THE KNOW

New releases Reviews Special offers Artist features

Piano Releases - Pianist Sept 2015.indd 1

15/07/2015 23:13

87 Pianist 85

p87 Ads.indd 87

16/07/2015 11:30

BOOKS MARKED WITH AN * ARE AVAILABLE AT THE PIANIST DIGITAL STORE http://pianistm.ag/digitalshop

REVIEW SHEET MUSIC


New editions of Scriabin and Schubert from Brenreiter, film scores, ABRSMs favourite
encores and music for three (on one piano) feature in Michael McMillans round-up
HANON*

SCHUBERT *
Fantasy in C
Wanderer; Fantasy in
C Wanderer plus
Fantasies
Brenreiter
BA10870 (ISMN: 9790-006-52582-9);
BA10862 (ISMN: 9790-006-52665-9)

The Virtuoso Pianist


Chester Music
ISBN: 978-178305-810-5

FILM SCORES FOR SOLO


PIANO

CONCERT FAVOURITES

Wise
Publications
ISBN: 978-178305-949-2

Wilhelm Ohmen
Schott
ISBN: 978-3-79579881-9

This edition is practically identical to


the Schirmer edition that has been
around for over a century. The music
(60 exercises) is the same. The text
Theodore Bakers translation of the
original French is also precisely the
same, though printed in a more
modern font. It is spread out on the
page in exactly the same manner for
the first 45 exercises, and then with
minute variations. There are just two
features that distinguish this edition
from Schirmers: firstly, the musical
engraving is smaller (a little too small
for my liking) and sharper. Secondly,
it comes with an access code that
allows you to download recordings of
all the exercises by Chris Hopkins. If
you think these qualities are worth an
extra 5, this edition is for you.
Otherwise, stick with Schirmers, or
choose Alfreds similarly inexpensive
edition for its fold-flat spiral binding.

Schubert never referred to his


Fantasy in C (D760) as the
Wanderer, but the name has stuck,
due to the resemblance of the
second movements theme to his
song of the same name. Brenreiters
new edition is based on the Urtext
of their New Schubert Edition,
initially prepared by Christa
Landon, and completed in this
instance by Walther Drr. The
music is beautifully presented; no
fingering or pedalling indications
are included. A few pages of
historical information and
performance practice notes round
out a very affordable and impressive
package. For double the price, you
can buy a Brenreiter volume that
also has Schuberts two earlier
fantasies the five-page Fantasy in
C minor (D2) and the so-called
Graz Fantasy in C (D605).

This collection of 32 pieces caters


to those who want to play music
heard in films, TV shows and
documentaries. Several pieces (e.g.
those from Intouchables, Marie
Antoinette and The Hours) were
originally piano solos, and are
presented in unsimplified form.
The other pieces either contain
some instrumental backing to
the piano in the soundtrack (e.g.
music from Waltz for Bashir and
Between Strangers) or are completely
orchestral (Barbers Adagio for
Strings; music from the BBCs Frozen
Planet and Planet Earth). They are
found here in solo arrangements
at Grade 4-7. One minor blemish,
which doesnt detract from the
books appeal, is that the alphabetical
index doesnt quite correspond to the
order that the pieces appear in the
book nor on the downloads page.

The front cover of this book says it


contains The Finest Concert and
Encore Pieces. This is debatable,
but it does have a good collection of
popular encore pieces. There is a
satisfying amount and variety of
music here 21 pieces (just over
120 pages) that have all been
edited, and in some cases arranged,
by Wilhelm Ohmen, a German
pianist and teacher. They include
favourites such as Sindings Rustle of
Spring, Rubinsteins Mlodie,
Couperins Le Tic-Toc-Choc and a
few transcriptions by Liszt, as well
as lesser-known works by Reger,
Strauss and Gottschalk. The main
attraction is that that the book
gathers together a diverse range of
interesting and enjoyable material
in a clear, easy-to-read edition. The
main drawback is its price, because
its not cheap (20/24).

SIBELIUS

SCRIABIN*

CONTEST WINNERS FOR


THREE, VOLS 1-5

ENCORE, BOOKS 1-4*

Piano trios (one piano, six hands)


are great fun, and offer students of
similar abilities the chance to
experience playing as part of an
ensemble. The likes of Christopher
Norton, Melody Bober and Robert
Vandall have contributed to this
proliferating genre. In Contest
Winners for Three, Vandall and other
well-known American educational
composers such as Joyce Grill,
Martha Mier and Carrie Kraft offer
original creations and arrangements
of familiar tunes (e.g. Yankee Doodle,
Greensleeves). There are five or six
pieces per book, and difficulty reaches
about Grade 4 by the final book the
three parts are equal in difficulty and
interest. Younger students will
particularly enjoy Threes a Crowd Rag
in Book 3, which involves the top
player being pushed off the stool!

In 2007, Faber published a set of five


books called The Best of Grade ,
advertised as having the best piano
pieces ever selected by the major
examination boards. The ABRSMs
new set of saddle-stitched books
include the best-loved ABRSM
piano pieces, so its interesting that
these sets have only two pieces in
common. Each book contains music
covering two grades (seven to 11
pieces per grade), with most pieces
stemming from the past seven
syllabuses, i.e. from year 2000
onwards. The range is wide enough
to suit all tastes, making these
fantastic books for students. The
reliability of the grading means they
are also useful guides for new teachers
looking to expand their repertoire.
The music is clearly printed with
helpful editorial guidance.

Piano Pieces
Breitkopf
ISMN: 979-0-00418445-5

In 1996, the National Library of


Finland and the Sibelius Society of
Finland began creating a complete
critical edition of Sibeliuss works.
The solo piano section of the project
(four volumes) was finished last year,
and Breitkopf has already published
selected opuses. The material for this
collection of 18 pieces is drawn from
all four volumes, representing a
sample of Sibeliuss output from
across his career. One frequently
played piece the Romance op 24
no 9 is included, but the remainder
will be unfamiliar to all but Sibelius
specialists. Fingering is not provided,
most pieces are under three pages
long and difficulty is Grade 6-8. A
commendable and charming
potpourri of Sibelius, then, that will
pique the curiosity of those wanting
to go beyond the well-known works.

Complete Piano
Sonatas Vol IV
Brenreiter
BA9619 (ISMN: 9790-006-53693-1)

To date Brenreiter has published


three volumes (Vols I, II, and now
IV) of Scriabins piano sonatas, all
edited by Christoph Flamm. This
fourth volume contains the last two
sonatas, No 9 (op 68 Black Mass),
and No 10 (op 70). The first edition
(1913) is the basis for this edition.
Reference is made to the autographs
and to the 1926 edition by Nikolai
Zhilyayev; editorial decisions are
noted in the Critical Commentary.
Scriabins aborted first autograph for
the Ninth is printed as an appendix
and theres a 12-page preface on the
works genesis. When combined
with Brenreiters high production
quality and clarity of presentation,
its easy to see why this edition is
endorsed by no less a performing
artist than Marc-Andr Hamelin; its
quality is reflected in its price.

Alfred Music
ISBN-10: 978-073909-927-8 (Bk
1); -928-5 (Bk 2);
-929-2 (Bk 3);
-930-8 (Bk 4);
-931-5 (Bk 5)

ABRSM
ISBN: 978-1-84849847-1 (Bk 1); -848-8
(Bk 2); -849-5 (Bk 3);
-850-1 (Bk 4)

8888
Pianist
85
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