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Lets Get Together AC v1.

1AC
Asian-Americans currently are caught in a quandary: they are
relatively legally privileged compared to other minority groups
such as blacks and Hispanics, but still are locked into a
position of subservience to whites despite the fact that they're
portrayed as being equal. This perception of equality is used to
incite Asian Americans into antiblack actions and discourses to
protect what they believe to be equality. This is proven in the
instance of Peter Liang, an Asian police officer who shot an
unarmed black man, completely unprovoked. He was spared
jail time due to his assimilation into whiteness as a police
officer, but still was the first NYPD officer convicted in decades
of an on-duty shooting because at the end of the day, his skin
is not white. The protests which followed ignored the
inherently antiblack violence that Liang committed in favor of
a grab for legal equality for Asians that can never exist in the
current paradigm.
Kang, 20161:
Every public thing that happens to Asian-Americans whether
the unexpected ascent of
AND
enjoyed the protections of whiteness, then how do you explain
his conviction?

1 1. Jay Caspian Kang, 2. 2016, 3+4. How Should AsianAmericans Feel About the Peter Liang Protests?, New York
Times, 5. Accessed 11/2/16, 6.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/magazine/how-shouldasian-americans-feel-about-the-peter-liang-protests.html?_r=1,
7. Jay Caspian Kang is an American writer and editor, most
known for his sports articles for Grantland, for which he
worked as an Editor until December 2013. He currently serves
as the science and technology editor for The New Yorker's
Elements blog., 8. No page.

The protests in the wake of Liangs conviction are indicative


the struggle in Asian-American communities right now is to
decide whether we look out for ourselves first and align fully
with whiteness, or build coalitions and create a unified
struggle.
Kim 20162:
On Tuesday, former New York police officer Peter Liang was sentenced to probation and
AND

racism, even when

the

self-interest of Asian Americans dictates otherwise.

A confrontation with police immunity at large and qualified


immunity specifically must go deeper we have to ask
ourselves first, why is it that when we take away police
immunity, we really only take away immunity from nonwhite
bodies, and second, to what extent are we complicit with
antiblack violence? This means political affirmations of the
topic are just a replication of antiblackness and lock in racial
hierarchies.
Kang 23:
2 1. Claire Jean Kim, 2. April 21, 2016, 3+4. Opinion The trial
of Peter Liang and confronting the reality of Asian American
privilege, Los Angeles Times, 5. Accessed 11/2/16, 6.
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-peter-liangasian-american-privilege-20160421-snap-story.html, 7.
Professor of Asian American studies and political science at UC
Irvine. She is the author of the award-winning book "Bitter
Fruit: The Politics of Black-Korean Conflict in New York City.",
8. No page.
3 1. Jay Caspian Kang, 2. 2016, 3+4. How Should AsianAmericans Feel About the Peter Liang Protests?, New York
Times, 5. Accessed 11/2/16, 6.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/magazine/how-shouldasian-americans-feel-about-the-peter-liang-protests.html?_r=1,
7. Jay Caspian Kang is an American writer and editor, most
known for his sports articles for Grantland, for which he
worked as an Editor until December 2013. He currently serves
as the science and technology editor for The New Yorker's

All these anxieties, born out of these small but crucial referendums on our place
AND

and the criminal-justice system

ignore the inconvenient singularity of Liangs

conviction?
My advocacy is to use the 1AC as a conscientizing protest of
the reentrenchment of antiblack and anti-Asian oppression of
the USFG that would take place through limiting qualified
immunity and as an affirmation of the Asian responsibility to
confront antiblackness the underlying power structure of
white supremacy means that the only people actually catching
heat if we limit qualified immunity would inevitably be people
of color.
Conscientization allows oppressed debaters to name their
world and understand the ways they relate to it in educational
spaces such as debate: this is a starting point for real world
change.
Osajima in 20074:
Conscientization for these respondents meant being able to
name their world. That is
AND

individual lives. Their descriptions of this process were quite consistent and similar.
Thus, acts of protest like the 1AC are essential to allowing
Asian-Americans to conscientize themselves by developing a
properly founded grammar to challenge oppression and to
investigate their relationships with racial hierarchies this is
the way we build coalitions.
Elements blog., 8. No page.
4 1. Keith Osajima, 2. 2007, 3 + 4. REPLENISHING THE RANKS:
Raising Critical Consciousness Among Asian Americans;
JOURNAL OF ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES (JAAS), February,
Volume 10, No. 1; p. 64], sourced from Scribd, 5. Accessed
10/20/16, 6.
https://www.scribd.com/document/254510841/AsianConscientization, 7. Professor and Director of the Race and
Ethnic Studies Program at the University of Redlands, 8. 67.

Kang 35:
Each of these thoughts represents an uneasy, probing investigation
into the complicated, often
AND
things, even in private, I lack the vocabulary to discuss it.
Forming this discourse is especially key for Asians whiteness
currently incentivizes them to work against the freedom of
other races, so this recognition of the simultaneous privilege
and oppression we experience through acts of protest like the
AC are absolutely essential. The movement is forming now
we have no time to waste.
Kang 46:
This cultural aphasia comes from decades of political silence.

Asian-Americans, for

AND
5 1. Jay Caspian Kang, 2. 2016, 3+4. How Should AsianAmericans Feel About the Peter Liang Protests?, New York
Times, 5. Accessed 11/2/16, 6.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/magazine/how-shouldasian-americans-feel-about-the-peter-liang-protests.html?_r=1,
7. Jay Caspian Kang is an American writer and editor, most
known for his sports articles for Grantland, for which he
worked as an Editor until December 2013. He currently serves
as the science and technology editor for The New Yorker's
Elements blog., 8. No page.
6 1. Jay Caspian Kang, 2. 2016, 3+4. How Should AsianAmericans Feel About the Peter Liang Protests?, New York
Times, 5. Accessed 11/2/16, 6.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/23/magazine/how-shouldasian-americans-feel-about-the-peter-liang-protests.html?_r=1,
7. Jay Caspian Kang is an American writer and editor, most
known for his sports articles for Grantland, for which he
worked as an Editor until December 2013. He currently serves
as the science and technology editor for The New Yorker's
Elements blog., 8. No page.

hope it serves a more just cause than the freedom of Peter Liang.

The role of the ballot is to endorse the best performative use


of critical race theory to deconstruct structural and individual
oppression.
Choi and Lim in 2k147:
Originated as a counter weight to legal scholarship in the positivist and liberal legal tradition
AND

, and a variety of aspects shaping immigrant status

in a racialized society.

Analytic.

7 1. Yoonjung Choi and Jae Hoon Lim. 2. 2014, 3+4. "Korean Newcomer
Youth's Experiences of Racial Marginalization and Internalization of the
Model Minority Myth."Studies on Asia 1 (2014): 44, sourced from Proquest,
5. Accessed 10/20/16, 6.
http://search.proquest.com/openview/5bce07842feb9f24ff227d9108fe96ee/1
?pq-origsite=gscholar, 7. Choi is a professor at University of Maine at
Farmington; Lim teaches at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 8.
48-50.

Underview
Texts like the resolution should not be viewed from an
objective lens meaning is subjective and inherently shaped
by racism.
Shome 19968
In the paper, I thus argue for the importance of a postcolonial perspective for
AND

.
And, the impacts of the AFF are essential to motivating Asian
adolescents such as myself to realize the significance of our
identity otherization constantly pressures us into
assimilating whiteness.
-conscious-ness that must be the point of departure for all critical

Kumashiro 2k109:
While growing up, Michael felt Othered because of his race. His
unassimilable Asian
AND
model minority)

(Haney Lopez, 1996 ; Lowe, 1996)

Finally, deconstructing positive stereotypes of AsianAmericans and the Asian-American experience is essential
its the only way to strive towards equality otherwise
8 1. Raka Shome, 2. 1996, 3+4. Shome, R. (1996), Postcolonial
Interventions in the Rhetorical Canon: An Other View.
Communication Theory, 6: 4059. doi:10.1111/j.14682885.1996.tb00119.x 5. Accessed 10/25/16 6. (www.blackwellsynergy.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1468-2885.1996.tb00119.x). 7.
Doctoral candidate in the Speech Communication Department,
University of Georgia, Athens, 8.

9 1. Kevin K. Kumashiro, 2. 2010, 3+4. Supplementing


normalcy and otherness: Queer Asian American men reflect on
stereotypes, identity, and oppression from International
Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 5. Accessed
10/30/16, 6. No URL, 7. Dean of the School of Education at the
University of San Francisco, 8. 497-498.

whiteness uses the myth to set resistance groups against each


other.
9310:
Thus, the answer

to Posner's first question

is yes-Asian Americans are an

AND
Americans while simultaneously legitimizing the oppression of other racial minorities and poor whites.

10 [1993, Robert S. is a Professor of Law and an Associate


Dean for Research and Faculty Development, He also serves on
the advisory board of Berkeleys Asian American Law Journal.
Toward an Asian American Legal Scholarship: Critical Race
Theory, Post-Structuralism, and Narrative Space, 81 Cal. L.
Rev. 1241]