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Basic Operations
This section provides an overview of concepts central to Star Trek Adventures, and a summary of the
core mechanics that run through the entire system: Tasks, and the Momentum and Threat economy.

Roles in Play
In any game of Star Trek Adventures, there are several roles to be played. These are defined as follows:
Most participants will be players. Each player possesses a single character normally referred to as a
player character, to distinguish those characters from the many non-player characters who populate
the game world. A single player may control several characters during play, but seldom more than one
at any given moment, and they will only have a single primary player character. Players make the
decisions that influence and direct their characters deciding what a character does in a situation, how
they react to a threat, and so forth.
The Games Master is responsible for everything else. The Games Master controls the non-player
characters, making decisions for them and determining their actions and responses. He is also
responsible for setting scenes, establishing environments, and determining how ongoing events unfold.
The Games Master is required to interpret how the rules apply to a given situation, such as ruling on the
Difficulty of tasks, or adjudicating when unusual situations or disagreements arise. Above all else, the
Games Master is not an adversary to the players the game works all the better if the Games Master is
a fan of the player characters and their exploits, albeit one who seeks to make those characters lives as
dramatic, exciting, and challenging as possible.

Dice
The Star Trek Adventures uses three types of dice to resolve the actions a character may attempt, and
the situations they may face.
The first, and most commonly-used, is the twenty-sided die, known throughout this document as a d20.
D20s are used for resolving Tasks, and for rolling on certain large tables. Often, multiple d20s will be
required. This is noted as Xd20, where X is the number of dice to be rolled. So, 2d20 denotes that two
twenty-sided dice should be rolled.
The second type of die is the six-sided die, or d6. These are used relatively infrequently, mainly to roll on
certain small tables. If multiple six-sided dice are required, it will be noted as Xd6, where X is the
number of dice required thus, 2d6 indicates that two six-sided dice should be rolled.
D6s are also used as Challenge Dice. Challenge Dice, or [CD], are a way of rolling a d6, used for
determining damage and governing special effects. When rolling a [CD], ignore any results of three or
four. Results of one and two are counted as normal, while results of five or six are referred to as Effects.
Effects have a value of 1, and additionally triggering certain special outcomes, depending on the
circumstances. Frequently, more than one Challenge Die is rolled at once; multiple Challenge Dice are
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noted as X[CD], where X is the number of Challenge Dice rolled. Thus, 4[CD] indicates that four
Challenge Dice should be rolled.
In most circumstances, more than once dice of any given type will be rolled at once. These dice
collectively are referred to as a dice pool or pool.
Re-rolls
Many circumstances allow a character to re-roll one or more dice. As this is a common occurrence, the
way this should be resolved is discussed here.
When an ability, item, or circumstance grants a re-roll, the player chooses the dice that will be re-rolled,
and rolls it (or another die of the same kind) in its place, replacing the original result entirely. The new
results stand, even if theyre the same as or worse than the original results.
Some situations allow for a specific number of dice to be re-rolled, while others allow all dice in a pool to
be re-rolled. In this instance, the player may choose how many dice from those he has rolled he wishes
to re-roll, up to the number of dice listed (if any) in essence, you may always choose not to re-roll a die
if you wish to keep that result.

Characters
Characters are represented using several values, traits, and basic considerations. These are described
here.
Attributes
Each character is defined by a collection of six attributes. These attributes indicate a characters inherent
abilities, and their physical and mental advantages and limitations. Most attributes for characters have
values from seven to twelve, with eight representing the human average. Higher attribute ratings,
though rare, represent greater ability, though no creature or character can have an attribute with a
value above fourteen.
The six Attributes are as follows:

Bravery comes into play whenever a character seeks to show daring, when they are at risk, and
when they enter combat and other perilous situations.
Control is about the character controlling themselves, both physically and mentally. It covers
hand-eye coordination and physical discipline, as well as mental stability and emotional control.
Empathy is used to understand the feelings of others, and it is vital in healing and treatment of
both injuries and psychological strain.
Presence is power of personality, for being diplomatic during negotiations, commanding the
respect of others, and even being charming or seductive.
Reason is at the heart of any action that applies to the rational mind, such as applying
theoretical knowledge, and making observations and deductions.
Resilience is a matter of physical and mental strength, resisting hardship and employing direct
methods such as brute force.

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Skills
In addition to the six attributes, each character has six Skills, which encompass the broad roles that
Starfleet Officers are expected to be proficient within. A character will have a value from 1-4 in each
Skill.

Command is diplomacy, persuasion, decisive decision-making, coordination of teams, bolstering


morale, resistance to fear, panic, or intimidation, and anything else expected of leaders.
Conn is piloting, astronavigation, and a broad knowledge of starship operations and functions. It
also covers the operation of vehicles other than starships, from shuttlecraft to ground vehicles.
Engineering is understanding and interacting with technology, including developing technical
solutions to problems.
Security is the use of force to subdue or eliminate threats, as well as strategy and tactics,
interrogation techniques, and peacekeeping methods. Security is often used to remain wary of
ones surroundings, to avoid notice, and to perform a range of intense physical activities.
Science is the understanding of numerous fields of scientific study, both on a theoretical level,
and in terms of their practical applications. This does not just cover hard sciences like physics,
chemistry, and biology, but also social sciences like anthropology. It also covers observation of
ones surroundings and discerning small details.
Medicine is the understanding of the physical and mental makeup of lifeforms, including a
knowledge of ailments and diseases that might befall them, the injuries and stresses they can
suffer, and the methods for treating those maladies in a wide range of species.

Focus
The Skills characters are trained in are broad; Focuses allow a character to demonstrate talent for a
smaller range of fields, representing specialization. Most characters will have four Focuses, one each at
ranks 4, 3, 2, and 2, and then treat all other Tasks as having Focus 1. Players are encouraged to create
their own Skills Focuses, but examples include:

Command: Diplomacy, Linguistics, Persuasion, Composure, Philosophy


Conn: Astronavigation, Evasive Action, Helm Operations, Small Craft, EVA
Engineering: Computers, Electro-Plasma Power Distribution, Transporters and Replicators, Warp
Field Dynamics
Security: Shipboard Tactical Systems, Hand-to-hand Combat, Infiltration, Espionage, Hand
Phasers, Interrogation
Science: Physics, Astrophysics, Geology, Exo-tectonics, Spatial Phenomena, Quantum
Mechanics, Anthropology, Botany
Medicine: Emergency Medicine, Trauma Surgery, Psychology, Alien Anatomy, Infectious
Diseases, Virology, Cybernetics, Genetics

Talents
Talents are additional benefits that a character possesses, that define areas of specialty, the advantages
of their personal approach to circumstances, and other interesting advantages. These normally take the
form of a bonus extra d20s, re-rolls, bonus Momentum, the ability to use a different skill in a situation,
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and so forth that applies when the character is performing types of Task or taking an approach to a
situation.

Core Rules Tasks


At the heart of the rules for Star Trek Adventures is the Task. Almost any activity where there is doubt in
the outcome, where failure or complications are interesting, or where the degree of success is
important can be regarded as one or more Tasks.
Tasks are handled using a characters Attributes, Skills, and Focuses, and the roll of two or more d20s.
Before attempting a Task, determine which Attributes, Skills, and Focuses (if any) are relevant to the
situation; the Games Master may provide these, or it may be left up to the characters creativity with
the Games Masters approval. Once these are known, determine the Target Number for that Task by
adding together the relevant Attribute and Skill.
The Games Master then sets the Difficulty of the Task. This will normally be 1, but simple Tasks may
have a Difficulty of 0, and some Tasks may have a higher Difficulty, particularly if there are external
factors that might cause problems.
The character then rolls two d20s. Each die that rolls equal to or less than the Target Number scores a
single Success. Each die that rolls a 1, or equal to or less than an applicable Focus for that Task, scores
two Successes. If the total number of successes scored is equal to or greater than the Difficulty, then the
Task is completed. Otherwise, the Task is failed.
If the total number of successes is greater than the Difficulty, then each success above and beyond the
Difficulty of the Task becomes a single point of Momentum. Momentum is used for several purposes
throughout the game. Momentum is described in full later.
There are circumstances in which a character may roll more than two d20s; these are described in the
Improving the Odds section, below.
Example: Scotty is attempting to squeeze additional power out of the Enterprise engines. His Target
Number is his Reason attribute (11) and Engineering Skill (4), for a total TN of 15, and he has a Focus of 4
in Starship Propulsion, and the Task has a Difficulty of 2. He rolls two d20s, rolling a 4 and a 19; the 4
scores two successes, while the 19 scores none. With two successes, Scotty is successful.
Difficulty
0

Descriptor
Simple

Average

Challenging

Daunting

Example
Researching a widely-known subject.
Shooting a training target with a phaser or disruptor.
Performing routine maintenance and repairs.
Researching a specialized subject.
Striking an enemy in hand-to-hand combat.
Rerouting power during an emergency.
Researching obscure information.
Shooting an enemy with a phaser or disruptor.
Repairing a Transporter Pad while under fire.
Researching restricted information.
Shooting an enemy with a phaser or disruptor in poor light.
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Epic

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Altering a subspace antenna to overcome interference, without the


proper tools.
Researching classified information.
Shooting an enemy in a defensive position with a phaser or disruptor, in
poor light.
Attempting to integrate Starfleet technology with the incompatible
technology of another species.
Researching a subject where the facts have been thoroughly redacted
from official records.
Shooting a small, fast-moving target with a phaser or disruptor, in poor
light.
Attempting a transport while at warp, to another vessel which is also at
warp.

Difficulty Zero Tasks


Certain circumstances can reduce the Difficulty of a Task, which may reduce the Difficulty to zero. At
other times, a Task may be so simple that it does not require dice to be rolled in the first place. These
are also Simple Tasks. If a Task is Simple, it does not require dice to be rolled: it is automatically
successful with zero successes, with no risk of Complications (see below). However, because no roll is
made, it can generate no Momentum even bonus Momentum from particularly advantageous
situations. A character can still choose to roll the dice against a Difficulty of 0, but this takes the normal
amount of time, and can generate Momentum as normal (indeed, because zero successes are required
to complete the Task, every success generated is Momentum), but this comes with the normal risk of
Complications as well.
Example: An Emergency Medical Hologram is attempting to perform triage of the injured during a
battle. This is well within the EMHs programming, so the Games Master decides that it has a Difficulty of
0. The EMH may either complete the Task automatically, or he can roll the dice to try and generate some
Momentum on the Task.
Opposed Task
At times, a character will not simply be trying to overcome the challenges and difficulties posed by
circumstances; instead, he may find himself trying to best an opponent, either directly (such as trying to
strike a defensive foe), or indirectly (multiple characters attempting to reach an object all at once).
These situations call for Opposed Task.
When two characters are in direct opposition to one another, each character involved performs a Task.
The character who achieves the greatest quantity of Momentum succeeds, achieving his goal, and then
subtracts the other characters Momentum total from his own. In the case of a tie, player characters
break ties in favour of non-player characters, unless the Games Master spends one point of Threat. If
both characters are player characters or NPCS, then the character with the higher Skill wins; if this is still
a tie, both sides should roll a d6 whichever side rolls highest wins. If this is still a tie, both sides should
keep rolling a d6 until a winner is decided.
If there are no other factors involved, the Difficulty of the Opposed Task is Simple D0 for both sides.
However, some situations may mean that it is possible for one or both sides to simply fail, without
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offering any opposition. These situations apply a higher Difficulty to the Task attempted by the
characters involved. If a character fails the Task, he automatically loses the opposed Task. If both
characters fail, then neither achieves anything.
If either side has some circumstance which would make their Task more challenging for them than for
their opponent, then that sides Task Difficulty increases as normal. As noted above, if one side fails the
Task outright and the other does not, then the failing character loses the opposed Task.
Characters may spend Momentum, add to Threat, spend Determination, or use any other means of
gaining successes or extra Momentum to boost their chances on an Opposed Task.
Example: Worf is locked in hand-to-hand combat with a JemHadar warrior, and Worf lashes out with his
mekleth. This is an Opposed Task, with a Difficulty of 1 for each participant. Worf has Bravery 12 and
Security 5, for a TN of 17, and is using his Focus in Mokbara (4). The JemHadar warrior has Bravery 11,
Security 3, and a Melee Focus of 2. Worf rolls an 8 and a 12, scoring two successes, enough to generate
one Momentum. The JemHadar rolls a 6 and a 15, scoring only a single success, and no Momentum.
After a few moments of struggle, Worf forces his way past the JemHadar warriors defences and brings
down his foe.
Voluntary Failure
There may be some situations where a player feels it may be better to fail than to waste resources on
buying bonus dice. This may be the case with a Task using a Skill the players character has no training
with, or where the Difficulty is high enough that success is unlikely to begin with.
With agreement from the Games Master, the player may choose to have his character fail a Task
automatically, where there are meaningful consequences for failure (such as being pursued, attempting
to perform a complex Task under pressure, avoiding an attack, etc.). To fail a Task voluntarily, the player
pays the Games Master one Threat. In exchange, the character immediately gains one point of
Determination (up to the normal maximum). A character may never choose voluntary failure for a
Difficulty 0 Task.
Determination points are discussed in detail later in this document.
Hazards and Consequences
In some cases, a Task may not be a simple matter of achieving a goal, but of avoiding some greater
problem. This might be an attempt to avoid some environmental hazard, or standing up to intimidation
or interrogation, for example. In such a situation, there is a known hazard being avoided, and the Task is
specifically to avoid that hazard. The hazard itself will normally be described in narrative terms, and that
description may provide justification for increasing the difficulty of, or outright preventing, certain
courses of action.
In other cases, a Task can have consequences; this is like a hazard in that there will be some narrative
problem that arises upon failure, but the Task is not specifically to avoid that problem; rather, the Task is
to achieve something specific, but the Task is risky, with unpleasant consequences in the event of
failure.

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Complications
Things dont always go entirely to plan. When attempting a Task, each d20 that rolls a 20 is a
Complication.
Complications are problems that crop up during the performance of a Task. They dont prevent a
character from succeeding, but they may impede later activities, or they may simply be inconvenient,
painful, or even embarrassing. Common Complications might be to add +1 to the Difficulty of a
subsequent Task, the failure of a piece or type of technology, or creating an obstacle that must be
overcome to proceed (a Task in itself). Alternatively, if the character doesnt wish to suffer an immediate
problem, or the Games Master doesnt want to inflict a Complication at that point, the Complication can
instead be bought off by adding two points to the Threat pool (see below).
If multiple 20s are rolled, they can be treated as a single big Complication (their effects added together
for greater effect), or resolved as separate Complications (including some or all of them being bought
off).
Success at Cost
Some Tasks cant really be failed outright; rather, there is uncertainty as to whether the Task can be
completed without problems. In such a situation, the Games Master may allow characters to Succeed at
a Cost, either stating this before the Task is attempted, or providing the option after the dice have been
rolled. If this option is provided, then a failed Task still allows the Task to be completed but the
character also suffers one automatic Complication, in addition to any caused by 20s being rolled.
In some cases, the cost can be increased further, at the Games Masters discretion, causing the
character to suffer more than one automatic Complication on a failed Task.
Complication Range
Some circumstances can make a Task uncertain, though not necessarily any more difficult. These factors
increase the Complication Range of a Task, making it more likely that complications will occur. Increasing
the Complication Range by one means that Complications occur for each d20 that rolls a 19 or 20 on
that Task. Increasing the Complication Range by two means Complications will occur on an 18, 19, or 20,
and so forth, as summarized on the following table.
Complication Range can never be increased by more than five.
Complication Range Increase
1
2
3
4
5

Complications Occur On
19-20
18-20
17-20
16-20
15-20

Improving the Odds


While succeeding at most common Tasks is a straightforward matter, even the most proficient character
cannot succeed at the most difficult Tasks without effort, opportunity, or assistance. Skill Focus can
allow a character to reach higher difficulties some of the time, but to truly triumph, a character needs to
find some other way of improving the odds.
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Star Trek Adventures provides several ways to do this, and most of those methods are similar
providing additional d20s for a character to roll on a Task. Extra dice allow a character to score more
successes, and thus hit higher difficulties or simply generate more Momentum. However, these extra
dice always come with some sort of cost, and which options a character chooses depends entirely upon
what costs they are willing and able to pay.
Broadly, there are five different ways to improve the odds. These are described in detail below, and can
be mixed-and-matched as the characters require. However, regardless of the methods used, a character
can never roll more than three additional d20s on any Task.
The Momentum spend Create Opportunity is a straightforward and effective way of obtaining additional
dice, normally representing coordination and the advantages of teamwork. Each point of Momentum
spent adds a single bonus d20 to a Task. This is simple and easy, but it naturally requires that the group
has Momentum to spend.
If the group doesnt have sufficient Momentum available to spend on Create Opportunity, then they
have the option of paying Threat to cover the cost. The result is the same each point of Threat paid to
the Games Master is a single bonus d20 to a Task but it commonly represents risky or reckless action
instead of cooperation. This is freely available, and can be done at any time, but comes with the cost
that the Games Master now has greater resources to empower his NPCs or otherwise complicate the
characters adventures.
In the Games Masters case, when buying bonus d20s for NPCs, these two options are identical the
Games Master spends points of Threat to add bonus dice to an NPCs Task.
Characters can turn to Determination to aid them from time to time. Each player character has a limited
supply of Determination points that can be spent in a variety of advantageous ways. One of those ways
is to add bonus dice. A single Determination point adds one bonus d20 to a Task; however, this bonus
d20 is unlike most, in that is comes pre-rolled. Bonus d20s bought using Determination points are
automatically assumed to have rolled a 1 simply grab a d20 and turn it so the 1 face is at the top. If a
character scores enough successes with just d20s bought with Determination, he may choose not to roll
any other dice if he does not wish to risk any Complications.
Teamwork & Assistance
This method, Assistance, differs a little from the other ways of improving the odds, in that it does not
add bonus dice directly, but rather allows other characters to contribute a little of their effort and Skill
to a Task.
Several Tasks can benefit from the assistance of others. If the situation, time, and Games Master allow,
several characters can work together as a team when attempting to perform a Task. When more than
one character is involved in a Task, one character is designated as the leader, and the other characters
are designated assistants. The Games Master may decide that only a certain number of characters may
assist there might be only limited space to get the assisting characters involved, for example or apply
other limitations.

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To assist with a Task, each player must describe how his character is assisting the Tasks leader. If the
Games Master approves, then each assistant rolls one d20, using his own Attribute, Skill, and Focus (if
any) to determine if any successes are scored, while the leader makes his Task as normal. Assistants may
not use any means to roll additional dice, though the leader may use Momentum, Threat,
Determination, or whatever other methods of gaining extra d20s he wishes. Because these dice are
rolled by other characters, they do not count towards the limit of three bonus d20s applied to a Task.
However, a character providing assistance cannot do anything else while he is assisting providing
assistance takes time and effort, and the Games Master may determine that only a finite number of
people may assist a given Task.
If the leader scores at least one success on his dice, then any successes generated by the assistants are
added to the leaders total. If the leader does not generate any successes, then any successes scored by
the assistants are lost.
Characters providing assistance do not have to use the same Skill or Focus as the character theyre
assisting indeed, assistance may sometimes be best provided by someone contributing different
knowledge and training.
Example: Chief OBrien is attempting to repair a faulty power relay on Deep Space Nine, with help from
Rom. OBrien attempts the Task as normal, scoring two successes. Rom rolls 1d20 against his Reason +
Engineering, and scores one success of his own, which he adds to OBriens total, making three successes
in total.
Example: During the battle against the Borg in Sector 001, Captain Picard points out a specific location
on the Borg Cube and gives the order to open fire. His specific direction is treated as assistance to Lt.
Daniels attack; Picard rolls 1d20 against Reason + Command, representing the fact that his assistance
comes from his direction and leadership skills, rather than from providing direct aid. Any successes that
Picard generates are added to Lt. Daniels Task.

Momentum
Whenever a character attempts a Task and scores a greater number of successes than the Difficulty,
then these excess successes become Momentum, a valuable resource that allows characters to
complete the Task more quickly or more thoroughly than normal, or otherwise gain additional benefits.
Each success above and beyond the Difficulty of a Task becomes one point of Momentum, which the
character may use immediately, may save for later, or some mixture of the two.
Example: Using a tricorder, Lieutenant Commander Data performs a scan of a strange spatial anomaly,
scoring four successes. As the Task had a Difficulty of 1, this means that he has generated three
Momentum.
Spending Momentum
Commonly, a character will spend some or all the Momentum he has generated to benefit the Task hes
currently attempting for example, a character attacking an opponent may spend Momentum to
increase the amount of damage he inflicts.

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As noted before, a character does not have to declare what he is using his Momentum for until he
chooses to spend it. To expand upon that, a character does not need to spend Momentum in advance
upon effects to continue the above example, a character attacking doesnt need to spend Momentum
to increase the amount of damage he inflicts until after he has made a damage roll. Momentum spends
can be made as soon as the need for them becomes apparent, and theres no chance of wasting
Momentum because you spent on a benefit you didnt need.
Momentum is always useful.
Most Momentum spends can only be used once on any given Task. In combat (described below), a
character can only use any given Momentum spend once in any Round. However, some Momentum
spends are described as Repeatable. This means they can be used as frequently as the character likes
and has the Momentum to spend upon them.
Once the characters Task has been resolved (or at the end of that Turn, in combat), any unspent
Momentum is lost. However, characters have the option to save Momentum for later use if they wish.
Saving Momentum
As noted above, characters have the option of saving Momentum, rather than letting unspent
Momentum go to waste. This saved Momentum goes into a group pool, which can be added to or drawn
from by any character in the group, representing the benefits of their collective successes. No more than
six points of Momentum may be saved into this pool at any one time.
During any successful Task, any member of the group may draw as many or as few points from the
group Momentum pool as he wishes, adding those points to any points he has generated on that Task.
He may subsequently spend that Momentum as he wishes, as if it had been generated from the Task. As
normal, Momentum only needs to be spent as needed, so a character does not have to choose how
much Momentum he is drawing from the group pool until he needs it, nor does he have to draw it all at
once.
At the end of each scene, or each full round in combat, the pool diminishes. One point of Momentum in
the pool is lost.
Immediate Momentum Spends
Some Momentum Spends are not tied to a specific Task; rather, they can be used freely as soon as they
are required, spending points directly from the groups Momentum pool rather than waiting for a
successful Task. These spends are referred to as Immediate. Immediate Momentum spends typically
have some other restrictions on how and when they can be used, but those restrictions are specific to
the individual spends.
Immediate Momentum spends can also be paid for with Threat, which will be described in depth later.
Generating a single point of Threat for the Games Master provides the same benefits as a single point of
Momentum spent. When paying for an Immediate Momentum spend, the cost can be split, paid partly
in Momentum and partly in Threat, if the character desires.

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NPCs and Saving Momentum


Unlike the player characters, non-player characters (any character controlled by the Games Master) do
not have the option of saving Momentum into a group pool. Instead, any NPC that concludes a Task with
Momentum left over can add a single point to the Games Masters Threat pool for each point of
Momentum unspent.
NPCs can spend from the Threat pool in the same way as player characters draw from the group
Momentum pool. The Threat pool is described in more detail later in this section, and in its own section.
Common Uses for Momentum
The most common uses for Momentum are listed below. However, players are also encouraged to be
creative in their use of Momentum. When you score an exceptional success, think in terms of how that
superb performance can be reflected in either the result of the immediate Task or in how the outcome
of that Task can impact what happens next.
Regardless of how it is used, Momentum spends must make a degree of narrative sense that is, the
benefit gained from Momentum must make sense from the perspective of the characters and the
Games Master may veto Momentum spends that do not support or reflect the fiction.

Create Opportunity. (Immediate, Repeatable). One of the most straightforward uses of


Momentum is to add an additional d20 to a future Task, with each point of Momentum spent
granting a single bonus d20. The decision to purchase these bonus dice must be made before
any dice are rolled on that Task. As noted in Improving the Odds (above), no more than three
bonus d20s may be used on a single Task.
Create Problem. (Immediate, Repeatable). A character can choose to make things more difficult
for a rival, adversary, or opponent creating problems, distractions, or presenting more direct
opposition. This increases the difficulty of a single Task by one or more steps, by spending two
Momentum per point of Difficulty increase. No individual Task can have its difficulty increased
by more than three steps in this way, and the increase lasts for a single Task, regardless of
whether the Task was passed or failed. The decision to increase a Tasks difficulty must be made
before any dice are rolled on that Task.
Obtain Information. (Repeatable). Momentum allows a character to learn more about a
situation. Each point of Momentum spend can be used to ask the Games Master a single
question about the current situation, or an item, object, structure, creature, or character
present in or relevant to the scene at hand. The Games Master must answer this question
truthfully, but the Games Master does not have to give complete information a partial or brief
answer that leaves room for further questions is more common. The information provided must
be relevant to the Task attempted, and it must be the kind of information that a character using
that skill would be able to determine a character could use Medicine to diagnose an illness, or
Security to identify a form of ranged weapon.
Improve Quality of Success. (Often Repeatable). Momentum can allow a character to succeed
stylishly, or to immediately capitalize upon or follow-up on his success. The effects of this are
broadly left to the Games Masters discretion, as is the cost, but some specific examples of this
are described elsewhere in the rules. Some examples of this kind of spend may be Repeatable,
such as inflicting more damage, or achieving greater progress when overcoming an obstacle.
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Increase Scope of Success. (Often Repeatable). With Momentum, you can affect additional
targets, increase the area affected by your successful Task, or otherwise enlarge the extent of
your accomplishment. The precise effects of this, and the cost, are left to the Games Masters
discretion. Under some circumstances, this may be Repeatable, such as affecting additional
people within a group.
Reduce Time Required. A favourite of Starfleet engineers everywhere, this Spend reduces the
amount of in-game time that a Task requires to complete. A Task that might take a whole day,
or several hours may now only take a single hour, for example. The precise effects of this, and
the cost, are left to the Games Masters discretion, but its common to allow one Momentum to
reduce the time of a Task in half. See Timed Challenges, below, for one way this can be used.

Determination
Main player characters begin each session with three or four Determination points, and no character
can have more than five Determination points at any point. Supporting characters do not begin play
with Determination points, though they can earn them.
As a characters pool of available Determination points refreshes at the beginning of each session,
players are encouraged to spend Determination points to influence the story and perform daring
actions. Since players should be rewarded with additional Determination points during play, they are
encouraged to use this resource often enough that they can benefit from bonus points awarded by the
Games Master.
Using Determination
There are a few uses of Determination in play.

Bonus d20: Before a Task, a character may spend Determination points to increase the chances
of success; each point spent adds a single d20 to the task, each of which is considered to have
already rolled a 1, and thus produced the best possible result.
Additional Task: The character may attempt to perform one additional Task, before handing
over to another character (in combat, and other situations where there is opposition).
Story Declaration: The player spends a point of Determination declares a single new fact about
the current scene and situation, which becomes true subject to the Games Masters approval.
Fight On: For the remainder of the scene, the character may ignore the effects of being Injured.

Gaining Determination
Beyond starting with new Determination at the start of each session, there are several ways for player
characters to gain Determination in play. As already stated, under no circumstances can a player
character have more than five Determination at once.

Games Master Reward: The Games Master should reward players with Determination for good
roleplaying, heroic actions, achieving important goals, and other significant moments in-game.
As a guideline, there should be two or three opportunities for players to gain Determination per
hour of play.
Values: A characters Values can be used to gain Determination, when they cause Complications
or are Challenged, as described below.
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Voluntary Failure: As described later, choosing to fail a Task voluntarily can be used to gain
Determination.

Values
When a character is created, the characters player creates several short phrases or statements that
describe the attitudes, beliefs, and convictions of that character. These are not simple opinions, but the
fundamental structure of the characters morals, ethics, and behavior. They are the things that define
who a character is as a person, why they behave the way they do, and what drives them during times of
struggle and hardship.
One type of Value is a relationship. Where most Values reflect something internal about the character, a
relationship reflects a bond between two characters, or a character and an organisation, specifically how
the character regards the other party described by the Value. This bond doesnt have to be positive old
grudges and resentments can have a definitive effect upon a characters nature but it must be
something significant, and something that shapes who the character is and how they act.
However, a characters Values are not static. They are potent driving forces for the character, but people
evolve and grow with their experiences, and in many cases, things that once felt like unshakeable beliefs
may come to be seen differently as time passes. There will be opportunities during play to alter a
characters Values.
Using Values
A characters Values can help a character in difficult situations. They often provide an additional push to
succeed, as the characters convictions drive them to achieve more than they might have done
otherwise. Whenever a character is attempting a Task for which one of their Values would be
advantageous, and purchases one or more additional d20s for that Task, the character gains one point
of bonus Momentum on that Task. Tasks, purchasing additional d20s, and Momentum, are described
later.
Example: Spock is attempting to uncover the truth behind a death that Captain Kirk is currently being
court-martialed for. Suspecting that the Enterprises computers have been tampered with, he sets about
testing his hypothesis. This is a Reason + Engineering Task, using his Computers Focus, with a Difficulty of
3. Given the difficulty, and the urgency, Spock buys an additional d20 for the Task. As the Task is
motivated by Spocks strong belief in logic and reason, Spock gains one Bonus Momentum, should the
Task succeed.
However, Values can also hinder a characters judgement, make them biased, blind them to possibilities,
or otherwise impair their ability to confront a situation effectively. Nobody is immune to their own
preconceptions and predilections, as much as they might wish to believe otherwise. If the character is in
a situation where one of their Values would make the situation more complicated or more difficult, the
Games Master may offer the player one Determination in exchange for suffering a Complication: this
may take the form of a course of action, or choosing not to act, but any kind of Complication is suitable
so long as it fits the circumstances. The player can choose not to accept this offer and players can
choose to suggest situations where their character might face this Complication but if they do, then
the setback occurs, without any ability to avoid it. The Games Master is the final arbiter of this, but
Complications from Values should only ever happen if both Games Master and player agree.
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Example: The Enterprise has rescued an injured Romulan after responding to a distress call in the Neutral
Zone. Dr. Crusher is attempting to save the Romulans life, to try and prevent hostilities with the Romulan
Empire, but the Romulan needs a blood transfusion. Worf is the only member of the crew with the
correct cellular factors to help. However, Worf despises Romulans, as they were responsible for the death
of his family, and this part of his Proud and Honorable Klingon Value; the Games Master offers Worf a
point of Determination and asks that Worf refuses to help the Romulan. Worf accepts, and the Romulan
dies in sickbay.
In either case, only one Value can be applied to a given Task or situation at once, except as noted below
under Challenging Values.
Some significant NPCs will have Values as well. A player may offer a point of Determination to suggest a
Complication for an NPC; if the Games Master agrees, the player spends that point of Determination,
and the Complication takes effect.
Challenging Values
Some situations are not as simple as a Value either helping or hindering the character. Some situations
may put a character in a difficult situation, where their Values are sorely tested, shaking their worldview
considerably. Maybe the character realizes about themselves, or learns something important from
someone or something they deeply revere or revile.
If a character has two Values which could affect a Task or situation, and those Values conflict with one
another one Value supports the action, the other impairs it then the character may Challenge one of
those Values. In that situation, the character selects one of those Values to lose out: this is the
Challenged Value. The character gains a single point of Determination before the Task or situation. Then
once the Task or situation is concluded, the Challenged Value is suppressed and cannot be used
positively or negatively from that point onwards. At the end of a mission, the character may alter the
Challenged Value to reflect the challenge to the characters beliefs, or replace it with a new Value that
represents some other aspect of the characters beliefs. In either case, the new Value can now be used
freely.
Example: Captain Archer, confronting a Xindi Arboreal, finds himself torn between two conflicting
Values: his belief in the peaceful exploration of space, and his anger towards the Xindi after their attack
on Earth. Eventually, after speaking with the Arboreal, Gralik, Archer realizes that not all the Xindi are
aware of, or in support of, the attack on Earth, and sets aside his anger; he gains a point of
Determination, and crosses out the Value that pertains to his anger.

Extended Tasks
In some situations, individual Tasks need to be more problematic to overcome without necessarily being
more difficult. This option replaces individual Tasks into Extended Tasks that cannot always be
overcome in a single attempt. Not every Task needs to be replaced in this way, and it should normally be
Key Tasks that are replaced.
Each Extended Task has a Progress track, and a Magnitude. The Progress track can be any value from
five to fifteen. The magnitude can be any value from one to five.
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Whenever a Task is completed towards an Extended Task, that character rolls two [CD], plus a number
of additional [CD] equal to Skill used for that Task. The total rolled is the number of points of Progress
marked off. If the total is five or more, then there is also a Breakthrough made on that Extended Task.
Further, if the last point of Progress is marked off, or if all the Progress has been marked off before the
Task was attempted, a Breakthrough is made. This means that, potentially, two Breakthroughs can be
made from a single Task one for a total of five or more, and one from either marking off all the
Progress or attempting the Task when all the Progress has been marked off.
Each Breakthrough reduces the difficulty of all further Tasks on that Extended Task by one, and when a
number of Breakthroughs have been made equal to the Magnitude of the Extended Task, the Extended
Task has been completely overcome.
Some Extended Tasks may be particularly trying to overcome, with a value called Resistance which
reduces the total rolled on the [CD] by one for each point of Resistance.
When rolling [CD] against an Extended Task, the character may spend one Momentum (Repeatable) to
add +1 to the total rolled, or to reduce the Resistance by 2, increasing the amount of Progress marked
off and making Breakthroughs more likely. Alternately, a character may spend one Momentum to reroll
any number of [CD] rolled.
Depending on the nature of the Extended Task, and the method the characters are using, the Games
Master may apply some special benefit from Effects rolled on the [CD]s. Common benefits are increasing
the total rolled an additional +1 per Effect or reducing the Resistance by one or more per Effect.
Complications against an Extended Task may restore marked-off points of Progress (four per
Complication), increase the Difficulty of the next Task to overcome the Extended Task, or increase the
Extended Tasks Resistance by two. In any case, these represent setbacks and additional problems that
may occur.

Core Rules Challenges


A Challenge is any circumstance, situation, or sequence of events which requires multiple Tasks or
Extended Tasks to overcome. There are a few different ways to resolve a Challenge, depending on the
nature of the Challenge and how the Games Master wishes to present the situation. These different
options can be combined as the Games Master sees fit, providing a toolbox for producing a wide range
of different problems for the characters to overcome.
Opposition in Challenges
In some circumstances, the characters may be working against an opposing force. There are a couple of
ways to resolve this, depending on the type of Challenge and opposition.

Disruption: The effect of the opposition is disruptive and distracting, even inconvenient, but
nothing more. Task Difficulties may increase by one or two because of the presence of this
opposition, representing their interference and the disruption it causes. It might even increase
the likelihood of a Complication, making them occur on a 19 or 20, or an 18, 19, or 20.

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Direct Opposition: The effect of the opposition is to directly act against the Tasks attempted,
turning them into Opposed Tasks. This may also add additional hazards or consequences to
those Tasks, as the opposition may create additional problems on failed Tasks.
Contest: The opposition is attempting to complete the same objective, and to complete them
sooner than the characters. Each side attempts a single Task, then hands over to the other side
to attempt a Task, regardless of which specific characters attempt each Task. Whichever side
completes the Challenge first, achieves some greater advantage. Characters can spend
Determination to attempt a second Task before handing over to the other side.
Conflict: The opposition have different, mutually-exclusive goals to the characters. This is
commonly used in Social and Combat Challenges, where each side has a different goal, and the
sequence of events is split into Rounds and Turns. This is described in full in the Combat section,
later.

So Crazy It Just Might Work!


One common element of the exploits and successes of Starfleet crews is a tendency to employ creative,
often bizarre strategies to resolve seemingly-impossible situations. Human determination and ingenuity
is often credited with this, but just as often the exacting reason and logic of Vulcans can allow them to
take chances with a certainty and calculating effectiveness that is difficult to match: this ability to
achieve the seemingly impossible is not a trait of any one species, but of the kind and quality of officer
that Starfleet trains and employs.
Consequently, when running Star Trek: Adventures, the Games Master should not only expect, but
encourage, plans that seem crazy, though even if a crazy plan is possible, that doesnt mean it
should be easy. Be wary in such situations that a detailed Challenge might be derailed or taken along
unexpected paths where crazy plans are involved.

Basic Challenge
A Basic Challenge is, as the name suggests, relatively straightforward for all involved. It consists of two
or more Tasks or Extended Tasks, of a type and difficulty determined by the Games Master. These Tasks
or Extended Tasks are the core of the Challenge, the crucial activities that must be completed to
overcome the Challenge, and they are referred to as Key Tasks. Once all the Key Tasks have been
completed successfully, the Challenge is complete.
The Games Master may determine that these Key Tasks be completed in order, or otherwise say that
Key Tasks cannot be attempted until certain other Key Tasks have been completed. These restrictions
should naturally flow from the narrative of the situation if the Challenge is to reach Main Engineering
and shut down the Warp Core before it breaches, then the Task to reach Engineering must naturally
come first.
Characters may, at their option, attempt other Tasks during a Basic Challenge; these wont directly
contribute to overcoming the Challenge, but they can be used to remove Complications, to generate
Momentum to benefit the group, or, at the Games Masters discretion, to reduce the difficulty of a Key
Task (normally by one, but the Games Master may permit Momentum to be spent for a greater
reduction).
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Structuring Basic Challenges


There are a few different ways that the Games Master might structure a Basic Challenge. At the simplest
level, having the individual Key Tasks being completely independent of one another requires the least
effort in rules terms, but may not be suitable for a lot of different situations. There are two other
common approaches as well:
Linear Challenges arrange the Key Tasks into an order, where each Key Task must be completed before
the next can be attempted. These are easy to handle, but they are somewhat inflexible and tend to limit
the creativity of the characters in how they approach the Challenge.
Gated Challenges require a little more effort from the Games Master to set up, but theyre flexible and
can be adapted to a range of circumstances. In a Gated Challenge, some of the Key Tasks can only be
attempted if one or more other Key Tasks have already been completed; the Games Master might want
to present this as a chart that clearly denotes which Key Tasks unlock the restricted Tasks.

Timed Challenge
Functionally like a Basic Challenge, a Timed Challenge adds an additional concern: time.
At the start of the Challenge, the Games Master determines the number of Intervals that the Challenge
must be completed within, and how long a period that each Interval represents (ten minutes, an hour, a
day, etc). The ideal number of Intervals is equal to about 2-3 times the number of Key Tasks involved in
the Challenge, with a smaller number of Intervals resulting in more time pressure on the characters. If
one or more of the Key Tasks is an Extended Task, then there should be intervals equal to 2-3 times the
Magnitude of each Extended Task, plus the number of other Tasks. The Games Master should also
determine what happens when Time runs out this should be a severe consequence.
Each Task attempted takes two Intervals to attempt by default; characters can spend one Momentum
on a successful Task to reduce this to one Interval. A Complication may cause a Task to take longer,
adding a single Interval to the Task. This applies equally to both Key Tasks and to any others attempted
during the Challenge.

Social Conflict
An officers ability to deal with people determines their successes and their failures. Captains in
particular need to be able to read and deal with people both individually and collectively, and that isnt
limited to their crews, but also to strangers, and as the captain is the face and representative of their
ship or station, and so must have some knack for diplomacy.
Social Conflict is a collective term for Tasks and Challenges that are resolved through deception,
diplomacy, bargaining, intimidation, and a range of other social skills. Not all personal interactions are
Social Conflict, but all Social Conflict is driven by interactions, especially those where each side has
different goals or may not wish to yield to the others.
The core of Social Conflict is a desire or objective. One side wants something that the other can help
them obtain. Both sides may have their own objectives. In the simplest circumstances, a character may
simply ask for their objective, seeking to convince the other to accede to a request; this will often be a
simple Task, with the difficulty determined by how reasonable the request is and how willing or
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unwilling the other is to comply (and some tasks may be deemed impossible under normal
circumstances). This is called the Persuasion Task, but a simple request may not be enough: failing this
Task means that the character not only doesnt get what they want, but it also prevents them from
making the request again without some change of circumstances or altering of the request. This is
where Social Conflict Tools come in: Social Conflict Tools are all methods by which a character can alter
the context and circumstances of a Social Conflict, moving things in their favour.
During Social Conflict, each side may have different goals, meaning that each side will engage in their
own Tasks to further those goals. Even in something as seemingly one-directional as an interrogation,
the interrogator will be trying to get information, while the interrogated party may seek to provide false
information or level threats.

Intimidation
A direct, and often rather crude, method of coercion is to inspire fear, doubt, and uncertainty.
Intimidation is the practice by which a person uses threats to compel action. If a circumstance allows for
intimidation, and the character has a means of threatening their opponent (this is crucial; you cant
reasonably threaten a Klingon in a battlecruiser while youre on the ground unarmed), then the
character may attempt an Opposed Task to intimidate. The difficulties of each Task will be determined
by the relative perceived strengths of each side: it is easier to intimidate, and to resist being intimidated,
from a position of strength.
In the most basic form, this may be a Simple Task, reducing the difficulty of a Persuasion Task by one. In
others, it may be an Extended Task, where the Progress and Magnitude represent the courage and
determination of the target, and each Breakthrough made reduces the difficulty of the Persuasion Task
by one; scoring Breakthroughs equal to Magnitude may result in the target becoming completely
compliant. This latter case may be particularly representative of advanced or brutal interrogation
techniques, when coercing a target to reveal information. This Progress track should be equal to the
characters Bravery or Control attribute, whichever is higher, plus the characters Command or Security
skill (again, whichever is higher). If the character has any Focus appropriate to resisting coercion, treat
that value as Resistance.
The drawback to intimidation is that it is inherently hostile, which can cause problems of its own.
Employing intimidation creates an antagonistic tension between the two sides which can worsen other
forms of interaction, cause lingering resentment, or even provoke a target to aggression. Intimidation is
not a path to a protracted and stable peace.
Example: Gul Madred has Jean-Luc Picard captive, and wants to learn the Federations plans. Picard has
no intention of giving up these plans, so Madreds initial Persuasion Task is impossible simply asking for
the plans wont work. Instead, Madred sets about using a range of interrogation techniques on Picard to
try and break his spirit a form of intimidation, to try and make his Persuasion Task possible.
Intimidating Picard is an Extended Task, rather than a single Task. Picards total Progress track is 17,
from his Control of 11 and his Command of 5. He also has a Focus of Composure (2), providing him with
two points of Resistance as well. Madreds initial difficulty is 5, but over time and successive attempts, he
begins to wear down Picards resolve, reducing the Progress track and making successive Tasks easier.
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Negotiation
The heart of trade and diplomacy on countless worlds, negotiation is a fine art, requiring a keen and
perceptive mind and a strong will. Negotiation involves the offering of recompense in exchange for
whatever has been requested, and this recompense can take any form, with different people and
different circumstances susceptible to different offers. The Ferengi trade in Gold-pressed Latinum and
other precious goods, continually adjusting their offers until they reach the best deal for themselves.
Diplomats mediate disputes, arranging the terms of trade agreements and territorial disputes by
securing concessions from each side until both sides are willing to comply. In both cases, almost
anything could be offered in trade, and each new offer is considered a new change of circumstances for
the Persuasion Task, influencing the difficulty and permitting a new attempt if one has already failed.
Negotiations may involve a lot of position shifting from both sides, as they make and retract offers, or
discover that the other party doesnt have what they want. In some situations, numerous instances of
negotiation might be needed to obtain what one party wants from a third- or fourth-party to progress.
Negotiations drawback is in the cost of success: characters may find themselves offering more than
they wanted to give up to succeed. Failing to provide whatever was offered can also produce serious
problems. In some ways, negotiation is the antithesis of intimidation achieving a goal through offering
something productive, rather than threatening something destructive. Certainly, few beings will be
amenable to trade and negotiation if they have been threatened before, and such trades may often
have a steeper cost because of previous hostile acts.
Example: Confronted by thousands of light years of Borg space, and lacking any other route through or
around it, Janeway chooses to capitalize on the Borg conflict with Species 8472. While the Borg regard
diplomacy and negotiation as irrelevant, the unique situation gives Voyager an opportunity: Voyager can
innovate and devise a means of defeating Species 8472 where the Borg cannot. Ensuring that the data
on this innovation is safe from assimilation, Janeway proposes a trade to the Borg: in exchange for safe
passage across Borg space, Voyager will provide the Borg with the technology to win their conflict.
Where previously the Persuasion Task would have been impossible, now there is a possibility. The
Difficulty of the Task is now 5, allowing Janeway to attempt the Persuasion Task. If this fails, Janeway
can alter or adjust the deal shes offering to make a new attempt, possibly at a lower difficulty.

Deception
Deception is a useful tool, but also a dangerous one. Importantly, it can be used in support of both
intimidation and negotiation, and by itself, but effective deception requires skill, cunning, and an
understanding of who youre trying to deceive.
Successfully deceiving someone sets in place a falsehood, and convinces the target of some fact or facts
which are not true, with subsequent Persuasion Tasks having their difficulty determined with those
fictitious facts in mind. Deception is always an Opposed Task, with the difficulty of the lie being
determined by how reasonable or believable it is to that target, while the difficulty of the targets Task
to resist being determined by the targets suspicions or lack thereof. It is difficult to convince someone
of something they know to be false, and it is difficult to lie to someone who is expecting you to lie.

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Deception may be modelled as a Simple Task, or as an Extended Task, depending on the complexity and
depth of the lie and how wary the target is. With an Extended Task, each Breakthrough may represent a
smaller establishing lie that feeds into the greater one, while Progress and Magnitude should reflect
how resistant the target is to believing that lie. The Progress track of the Extended Task should be equal
to the targets Empathy or Reason, whichever is higher, plus the characters Command or Security skill
(again, whichever is higher). If the character has any Focus appropriate to vigilance, wariness, or
spotting deceit, treat that value as Resistance.
Usefully, deception can be used to establish falsehoods that can in turn be used for intimidation or
deception. A fictional weapon system can be used to threaten a foe into surrendering as surely as a real
one, if the lie is well-told, and history is full of scams, cons, and tricks where people offered something
they didnt have.
The problem with deception is, of course, that its all a lie. If the target discovers that they were
deceived, they will hesitate to trust the character in future, or worse, seek recompense or retribution.
Further, Complications suffered may reveal holes in a deception, making the target suspicious (which in
turn makes other attempts to deceive more difficult).
Example: Freshly-recovered from the rapid aging he had been suffering from, Kirk retakes command of
the Enterprise as Romulans move to attack. Outnumbered and outgunned, the Enterprise cant fight its
way from the situation, even with Kirk in command. Kirk, remembering that one of their encrypted
channels has recently been broken by the Romulans, orders a message to be broadcast, announcing that
the vessel will use its Corbomite Device to self-destruct, destroying every other vessel nearby. The
Games Master sets the difficulty at 2: the lie is somewhat implausible, but the Romulans dont know that
Starfleet know the encrypted channel has been broken, so they have little reason to suspect that its a lie.
Kirk succeeds, and with the Games Masters approval, spends two Momentum to reduce the difficulty of
the following Persuasion Task to 0. The Romulans, believing Kirks ruse, choose to withdraw.

Evidence
The counterpoint to deception is evidence offering something that provides certainty and proof of a
characters claims. In many cases, providing evidence may be a straightforward affair, automatically
successful, but convincing someone of that the evidence is legitimate may be difficult, particularly if that
person expects deception, which may set a difficulty for a Task.
Evidence can be used in conjunction with any of the other Social Conflict Tools, and their use often
drives uses of those tools: providing proof of your ability to carry out a threat can be vital when
intimidating, giving evidence of your ability to pay during negotiations can smooth things along, and
even deception can benefit from the right forged documentation if it helps make the lie more
believable.
Example: Confronted by the unenviable situation of being worshipped as a god by the Mintakan people,
Picard chooses to bring one of their number aboard to try and disprove their belief. Little by little, he
reveals facts about his people to her, trying to establish the idea that they are mortal, and just more
technologically advanced, without giving too much information and making the situation worse. Each
reveal reduces the difficulty of the Persuasion Task by one, but Picard is wary of exposing the Mintakan
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to more of his culture than necessary. He reduces the difficulty down to 3, but fails, and the Games
Master declares that hell need something bigger to reduce the difficulty further, so Picard shows her
sickbay, and the death of one of his own people, to prove that he doesnt have control over life and
death. This piece of evidence, and Picards final Persuasion Task are enough to convince the Mintakan.
Now they only have to convince the rest of her people

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Red Alert Combat Rules


This section deals with situations where violence hopefully a last resort, or a tool of self-defense has
broken out. Combat does not prevent other methods being used, and any worthwhile battle will have an
objective above and beyond simply overcoming the enemy. These goals are normally straightforward:
reaching a location, object, or person, or preventing the enemy from doing those things. There may also
be a time factor involved in a combat encounter, where achieving the goal in a particular timeframe is
necessary, or one side needs to fend off the enemy long enough to complete some other Challenge.
One important consideration for combat in Star Trek Adventures is that not all combats are fought to
the bitter end few combatants are willing to die pointlessly, and even implacable foes like the Borg or
the JemHadar know the value of regrouping for another attack rather than pushing on against hopeless
odds. Instead, combats frequently end in one side or another retreating or withdrawing from the battle.
This may involve a fighting withdrawal on foot, the arrival of a transport craft such as a shuttle, or being
beamed out.

Action Order
As noted in Oppositions in Challenges, the sequence of events in Combat is split into Rounds and Turns.
During a Round, every character takes a single Turn, during which that character can attempt a single
Task. In addition, they may also take additional Minor Actions, which happen separately from the main
Task.
At the start of a Combat, the Games Master determines a single character to take the first Turn. This is
determined in the following way:
1. The Games Master evaluates the situation, to see if circumstances dictate that the NPCs should
naturally act first in the situation. This may come about because of a surprise attack or ambush,
which in turn may have resulted from previous Tasks or Challenges.
2. The Games Master considers if there are any immediate or split-second considerations that
might allow the NPCs to act first, or any reason for the NPCs to act first that are not so definitive
as those in stage one. This can come about because of a Complication, or lacking an available
Complication, by the Games Master spending two Threat.
3. Failing any other reason for the NPCs to act first, the Games Master nominates a single player
character to act first.
After a character has completed their Turn attempted a single Task and whatever Minor Actions they
wish to perform the player hands the action to the opposing side (typically, but not always, Games
Master-controlled NPCs), who will choose a single character to act next. Alternatively, the player may
spend two Momentum (Immediate) to keep the initiative, handing the action to another player
character instead. Once a player has opted to keep the initiative, nobody on that side may keep the
initiative again until the opposition have taken at least one Turn of their own. In any case, no character
may take more than one Turn in a Round.
Once all characters on one side have taken a Turn, then any remaining characters on the other side take
their Turns in any order they choose, one at a time, until all characters on both sides have taken one
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Turn. Once all characters on both sides have taken a Turn, then the action goes to whichever side did
not take the last Turn, and the whole process begins again for the next Round.
Example: A trio of Starfleet Officer PCs are ambushed by a pair of JemHadar. The JemHadar were
invisible, concealed by their Shrouding ability, when they attack began, so the Games Master determines
that they go first. The Games Master chooses the JemHadar leader to take the first Turn, killing one of
the Starfleet Officers in the process. After this, the action passes to the Starfleet Officers. One acts, and
generates two Momentum from her Task, choosing to keep the initiative and pass to another Starfleet
Officer, who acts, and then passes to the JemHadar again. As all the (surviving) Starfleet characters have
acted, and there is one JemHadar remaining, that JemHadar acts and finishes the round. The next
round begins with one of the Starfleet Officers.

Personal Combat
Combat between individuals is a swift, deadly, and intense affair, resolved quickly and often at great
cost. With the advent of directed energy weaponry, individuals can be incapacitated, killed, or even
disintegrated with single shots, and melee combat is only slightly less final in its results, as enemies
bludgeon and lacerate one another.
At the core of personal combat is the Attack. An Attack is a specific form of Task intended to
incapacitate or kill an enemy, or to inflict damage upon a structure, whether unarmed or using a
weapon. A successful Attack incapacitates the target of that Attack.

Environment and Zones


In battle, knowing where everyone is can be of vital importance, and determining both absolute position
(where you are on the battlefield) and relative position (how far you are from a given friend or foe) is
important. Rather than track everything in precise distances, however, Star Trek Adventures resolves
this matter using abstract zones.
An environment represents the battlefield. This may be a building, a city street, an area of wilderness,
part of a starship, or something of that sort. An environment is divided into several zones based on the
terrain features or natural divisions present in the area. For example, a building or starship interior may
treat individual rooms as distinct zones, using the internal walls and bulkheads as natural divisions, while
a city street may focus zones around features like parked vehicles, the fronts of buildings, alleyways, and
so forth. Zones are often defined in three dimensions, so the Games Master may choose to map
multiple floors of a building, connected by stairs and elevators, or consider a few empty zones above
the battlefield for flying objects. A relatively simple battlefield may consist of three to five significant
zones, while complex environments may have many more. More zones are typically more interesting
than fewer, as they provide a greater variety of movement options and tactical opportunities, but this
can take more planning on the part of the Games Master.
Because zones are of no fixed size, they can be varied to accommodate the Games Masters preferences
for a given scene, and to represent certain other factors. For example, a battle in a forest may be divided
into many small zones amongst the trees, and a couple of larger zones representing clearings. The larger
size of the clearing zones helps convey quicker movement and easier target acquisition in open areas,
while the smaller zones convey cramped conditions and short lines of sight. However, zones should not
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be too complex a consideration under most circumstances a few seconds to describe zones and their
relative positions, or to sketch out a rough map on a piece of spare paper, is all thats needed for most
situations. Of course, this doesnt prevent the Games Master coming up with elaborate environments if
he wishes to spend more time coming up with maps.
Individual zones can and often should have terrain effects defined when the Games Master creates
them. This may be as simple as providing cover, or imposing difficult terrain, but the Games Master is
welcome to devise other terrain effects, such as objects that can be interacted with, hazards to
overcome, or even terrain that changes under particular circumstances, such as the expenditure of
Threat. Some zones may be defined more by the absence of terrain than its presence, and some
environments are enhanced by a few empty zones between obstacles.
Games Masters who desire concrete values rather than abstract ranges are encouraged to set specific
sizes and shapes for individual zones, essentially using them as a large grid.
Characters and Zones
To help players visualize their characters place in an encounter, and to manage combat effectively, its
important to keep track of which zone characters are in at any given moment. This should be relatively
easy in most cases. As zones are defined by the terrain and around them, tracking a character can be a
matter of simple description an enemy might be behind the bar or standing by the blue car. This has
the advantage of relying on natural language and intuitive concepts, rather than specific game terms,
and avoids the tracking of specific distances which can become fiddly where there are many characters
present.
Larger or particularly complex scenes may become tricky to track purely by memory, so the Games
Master may wish to use something extra to help remind everyone of which character is where. If youre
already using a sketched map, then marking character positions in pencil (so they can be easily erased
and redrawn) is a simple approach, as is using tokens or miniatures, and moving them around as
required.
Distances
Movement and ranged attacks need some sense of distance to make them meaningful. In combat, the
relative placement of zones determines this distance. To keep things simple and fluid, range is measured
in four categories, and one state.

The state of Reach is when an object or character is within arms length of the character.
Characters enter Reach to interact with objects manually, to attack in close combat, and to
perform any other actions where they may need to touch the target or subject of their action.
Reach isnt a specific range, but rather is a state that a character can declare when he moves
that is, when a character moves into or within a zone, he may freely declare that he is moving
into or out of Reach of a given object or character. Moving out of Reach of an enemy may be
risky, however, with the threat of harm if done incautiously.
Close range is defined as the zone the character is within at the time. Moving within Close range
is a trivial affair. Close range is, in essence, a distance of 0 zones.
Medium range is defined as any zone adjacent to the characters current zone. Medium range is
a distance of 1 zone.
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Long range is defined as objects and creatures two zones away from a characters current zone.
Long range is a distance of 2 zones.
Extreme range is any creatures and objects beyond Long range. Extreme range is a distance of
three or more zones.

Distances and Communication


Characters will want to communicate during combat calls for help, battle-cries, and other dialogue can
abound in combat. In most cases, characters can converse normally within Close range theyre near
enough to one another to be heard and to make themselves understood without raising their voices.
A character at Medium range can be communicated with, but only at a raised volume shouting, rather
than talking. At Long and Extreme range, you can shout to draw attention, but conveying any meaning
or understanding someone is unlikely. Communicators and similar technologies make distance less of a
consideration.
Distance and Perception
The further away something is, the harder it is to notice. In game terms, this means that characters in
distant zones are harder to observe or identify than those nearby. A character increases the difficulty of
Tasks to try and notice creatures or objects by one step at Medium range, by two when dealing with
creatures and objects at Long range, and by three when trying to discern things at Extreme range. A
creature that isnt trying to avoid notice requires a Difficulty 0 Task under normal circumstances, while
attempting a Task to avoid notice makes things more difficult. Creatures or objects that are particularly
noticeable someone firing a phaser, shouting, or a fast-moving or brightly-colored object may reduce
the difficulty further.
Other Senses
Human perception, broadly, is dominated by sight and hearing, and thus these are the senses dealt with
most frequently by the rules. However, other senses can come into play at times. Naturally, a
characters sense of touch is limited to Reach. The sense of smell is most effective for humans within
Reach, and Tasks made to detect something outside of Reach by smell increase in difficulty by one step,
plus one step for each range category beyond Close.
Naturally, non-human characters and creatures may have different expectations for their senses for
example, Ferengi can often discern details by hearing that a human cannot. A creature with a
particularly keen sense may reduce the difficulty of all Tasks related to that sense, while dull senses
would increase the difficulty of those Tasks.
Telepathy can be thought of as a sense in this regard, able to discern thoughts and the mental presence
of other creatures over a distance. Similarly, the use of scanning equipment, such as Tricorders, can
allow a character to detect and discern things that they would be unable to perceive otherwise.
Movement and Terrain
Moving to anywhere within Medium range is a minor activity, rather than a Task. Moving further than
this requires a Task, though this has a Difficulty of 0 under normal circumstances.

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Moving as a Task increases in Difficulty if the terrain in any of the zones to be moved through is rough,
hindering, or hazardous in any way. The consequences of failure vary based on the nature of the terrain:
failure may result in the characters movement stopping prematurely outside of the difficult terrain, the
character falling prone, or suffering the effects of the terrain hazard, which may include damage or
injury.
Movement may take many different forms on this scale; walking, running, jumping across gaps or down
sheer drops, swimming through bodies of water, climbing steep or sheer surfaces, and so forth. The
difficulty of these Tasks should be evaluated separately.
Other Kinds of Terrain
There are a range of other terrain effects that might be present in a zone, beyond just difficult terrain.
The most common are discussed below.
Cover is one of most common terrain effects, representing objects that interfere with a characters
ability to see or attack a target clearly. Cover provides additional Soak against Attacks, as described in
the Damage, Injury, and Recovery section, below, and is normally divided into Light Cover (providing
2[CD] Soak) and Heavy Cover (4[CD] Soak). Light Cover typically represents lightweight objects that
provide little protection, but which obscure the targets form and position, while Heavy Cover
represents solid objects that can protect from attacks directly. A zone will either provide cover
universally (granting the benefits of that Cover to any creature in the zone), or the Games Master may
denote features within the zone that grant Cover (requiring that the character be within Reach of that
feature to benefit).
Interactive Objects are any object or terrain feature that a character could conceivably interact with.
Doors and windows are a common example, as are control panels and computer terminals. Interacting
with these objects may take little time or effort under normal circumstances (a Minor Action), but a
complex system might require a Task to interact with properly.

Combat Tasks and Minor Actions


In any given Turn in a Combat, a character can attempt a single Task, and several Minor Actions. Several
common Tasks for Combat are listed in this section, as are a range of common Minor Actions.
Minor Actions
Minor Actions are activities a character can undertake that dont count as a Task, and which dont
require dice to be rolled. They are often taken in support of a Task, such as moving into position before
an Attack is made. A character can attempt as many Minor Actions as they wish each Turn. However,
only the first one comes with no cost. Each Minor Action taken after the first requires the expenditure of
Momentum (Immediate), with the cost increasing for each successive Minor Action one Momentum
for the second Minor Action, two for the second, three for the third, and so forth. Each Minor Action can
only be attempted once per Turn.
Minor Actions
1st
2nd
3rd

Cost
0
1
2
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4th
3
5th
4
6th and Subsequent +1 to previous cost
The most common Minor Actions are as follows:

Aim: The character may re-roll a single d20 made on an Attack during this Turn.
Draw Item: The character may pick up an item within Reach, draw a weapon or other item
carried on their person/stowed in their gear. If the item does not require a Task to use, it can be
used immediately upon taking this action, allowing a character to draw and use the item with a
single Minor Action.
Drop Prone: The character immediately drops to the ground, making himself a smaller target.
While prone, a character gains two Soak for each Effect rolled on a Cover dice, and increases the
difficulty of all ranged attacks against him from Medium range or further by one step. However,
melee attacks and ranged attacks at Close range gain two bonus Momentum against the
character, and he cannot attempt any movement-related Tasks. A character may not Stand and
Drop Prone in the same Turn.
Interact: The character interacts with an object in the environment. Particularly complex
interactions may require a Task instead.
Movement: The character moves to any point within Medium range. This Minor Action cannot
be taken if the character performs any movement-related Tasks. This movement is slow and
careful enough to move through difficult or hazardous terrain without problem.
Prepare: The character prepares for, or spends time setting up, for a Task. Some Tasks require
this Minor Action to be taken before the Task can be attempted.
Stand: If the character is prone, he may take this action to stand, losing all the benefits and
disadvantages of being prone. A character may not Stand and Drop Prone in the same Turn.

Tasks
A character can attempt a single Task during each Turn, though there are a few ways that a character
can attempt a second Task. Regardless of the method used, a character cannot attempt more than two
Tasks in a round.

Determination: A character may spend one Determination to take a second Task during a Turn.
Momentum: A character may spend two Momentum from a successful Task to attempt a
second Task; however, this second Task increases in difficulty by one.
Leadership: Some characters have actions that demonstrate their prowess as leaders, granting
an additional Task to characters under their command. This Task is attempted immediately,
during the commanding characters Turn, and is assisted by the commanding character.

The following Tasks are common to Combats.

Assist: The character performs some activity that will grant an ally an advantage. The character
nominates a single ally they can communicate with, and declares how they are giving aid,
including which Attribute, Skill, and Focus (if any) they are assisting with. During the nominated
allys Task, the character provides assistance using the chosen Attribute, Skill, and Focus, as
normal for assisting on a Task.
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Attack: The character Attacks an enemy or other viable target, and attempts to inflict harm. See
Making an Attack, below, for a full explanation.
Direct: This action is available only to a character in a position of authority: a character whose
role involves leadership (the Commanding Officer, Executive Officer, or a Department Head), the
designated mission leader, or failing any of that, the highest-ranking character present. The
character nominates a single other character present, and the nominated character may
immediately attempt a single Task, assisted by the commanding character.
Exploit: The character takes additional time and concentrating readying an Attack, looking for
vulnerabilities, or attempting to gain some other advantage. The character nominates a single
target they can perceive, and attempts a Task with a Difficulty of 1, using Attribute, Skill, and
Focus (if any) determined by how they are attempting to gain an advantage. If this succeeds,
then the characters first Attack, before the end of their next Turn, gains the Intense quality,
increasing the cost to resist Injury from the Attack by one per Effect rolled. If the character
wishes, they may spend one Momentum (Repeatable) on this Task to add a bonus d20 to the
Attack, and +1[CD] to the attacks Damage. A character may attempt to confer the benefits of
this Task to an ally instead of themselves; this increases the difficulty by one.
Guard: The character finds some defensible position, focusses on their surroundings, or
otherwise gains additional readiness for attack. This is a Task with a Difficulty of 1, and success
increases the difficulty of any Attacks made against the character by one until the start of that
characters next Turn. If the character is in Cover, then they may also add +1 to the total rolled
for each Effect. A character may attempt to confer the benefits of this Task to an ally instead of
themselves; this increases the difficulty by one, and the effect lasts until the start of the allys
next Turn.
Pass: The character chooses not to attempt a Task. If the character takes no Minor Actions this
Turn, then the character does not count as having taken a Turn, and may act later in the Round
instead.
Ready: The character declares that they are waiting for a particular situation or event to occur
before attempting a Task. This situation or event must be chosen when Ready is declared, as
must the Task to be attempted when that situation occurs. When this triggering situation
occurs, the character with the readied Task temporarily interrupts the acting characters Turn to
resolve the reading Task. Once the readied Task has resolved, events continue as normal. If the
triggering situation does not occur before the characters next Turn, the readied Task is lost.
Characters who take a readied Task can still perform Minor Actions during their Turn as normal.
Sprint: The character attempts a Difficulty 0 Bravery + Security Task. Success means that the
character moves one zone (to any point in Medium range), and one additional zone per
Momentum spent (Repeatable). A character may not attempt this Task more than once per
Round, and not at all if the character has performed the Movement Minor Action. Terrain and
other factors may increase the difficulty of this Task, and the Task allows Success with Cost (that
is, failure means a basic success with no Momentum, but also inflicts a single Complication).
Treatment: The character attempts to treat the injuries of a character within Reach. This is an
Empathy + Medicine Task with a Difficulty of 1; success means that the injured character is
stabilized and will not die at the end of the scene, but they remain incapacitated. Momentum
spent can allow a character to treat multiple patients, costing two Momentum (Repeatable) for
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each additional Patient within Reach. Momentum spent can also allow a character to provide
more significant healing; two Momentum (Repeatable) allows a single patient to ignore the
effects of their injury for the remainder of the scene, though any Tasks to heal that Injury after
the scene increase by one due to the strain on the body this causes.
Other Tasks: A range of other Tasks can be performed during a combat, the limits of which are
left to the discretion of the Games Master. Circumstances or objectives may dictate that a
character attempts Tasks to repair or disable equipment during a combat (for example), or to
perform other activities that dont directly relate to the fighting, and particularly desperate or
dangerous situations may require overcoming Extended Tasks or even a Challenge while battle
rages around them.

Making an Attack
Attacks, as the most important and the most direct of Combat Tasks, require a little more discussion
than the other Combat Tasks. The process for making an attack is as follows:
1. The attacker chooses the weapon they plan to attack with. This can be a melee weapon,
including making an attack with no weapon (an unarmed attack), or a ranged weapon.
2. The attacker then nominates a viable target for that weapon. A melee weapon can only be used
to attack enemies and objects within Reach. A ranged weapon can be used to attack enemies
that are visible to the attacker. The character should also declare whether the attack is intended
to Stun or to Kill, though some weapons may not allow this choice.
3. The attacker attempts a Task, determined by the type of Attack.
a. For a melee Attack, the attacker attempts a Bravery + Security Task with a Difficulty of 1,
opposed by the targets Bravery + Security (also Difficulty 1). If the target wins the
Opposed Task, then they are considered to have made a successful Attack instead.
b. For a ranged Attack, the attacker attempts a Control + Security Task with a Difficulty of
2. This is not an Opposed Task. This difficulty increases by one if there is an enemy
within Reach.
4. If the Task is successful, then the Attack inflicts damage, as described in Damage, Injury, and
Recovery, below.

Damage, Injury, and Recovery


When a character is successfully hit by an Attack during combat, a character may become Injured. Some
environmental effects also come with a risk of Injury, such as falling from great heights, being set on fire,
exposure to hostile environments, industrial or engineering accidents, and a range of other hazards.
Attacks and other hazards have a damage rating, which will be a number of Challenge Dice, or [CD], with
the total rolled applied against the character. Characters have a quantity of Stress, representing their
ability to respond to peril and avoid the worst of it; Stress functions similarly to the Progress track of an
Extended Task. Some characters will also have a quantity of Soak, which reduces this total, allowing
them to shrug off certain types of Attacks through protective gear, innate resilience, or circumstantial
advantages like Cover. A characters normal maximum Stress is equal to the characters Resilience, plus
the characters Security skill. At the end of a scene, a characters Stress returns to its normal value.

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Whenever a character suffers damage, roll the [CD] for the attack or hazards damage rating. The total
rolled is then reduced by one for each point of Soak the target possesses. If this final amount of damage
is one or higher, it removes a single point of Stress from the character for each point of damage. If a
character suffers five or more damage (after reduction for Soak), or is reduced to 0 Stress, or suffers one
or more damage when already at 0 Stress, then the character may have been Injured.
Each time a character has a chance to be Injured in this way, the character has a choice: either accept
becoming Injured, or spend Momentum to resist the Attack evading at the last moment, or ignoring its
effects for some other reason. In any given scene, the first time a character has a chance to be Injured, it
costs one Momentum (Immediate) to resist the Attack. Each time after that during the same scene, the
cost increases by one. If a character would be Injured multiple times by the same Attack if the attack
inflicts five or more damage and reduces the target to 0 Stress, or inflicts five or more damage when the
target was already at 0 Stress then the cost to resist the Injury is increased by one as well.
An Injured character cannot attempt Tasks or perform Minor Actions, and is essentially no longer
participating in the scene, unless that character spends one Determination to keep fighting. Spending a
point of Determination here allows the character to keep fighting normally despite being Injured for the
rest of the scene.
Recovering from Injury is another matter. If the Attack or hazard that inflicted the Injury was intended to
Stun, then the Injury is recovered automatically at the end of the scene: the character regains
consciousness without difficulty, though they may be in an awkward situation if the enemy managed to
capture them in the process. If the Attack or hazard was intended to kill, then the Injury is more serious;
an Injured character will die at the end of the scene without medical attention (such as the Treatment
Task), and even if the character is stabilized (prevented from dying), they cannot engage in any activities
until the Injury has been healed properly requiring surgery.
Surgery is a Reason + Medicine Task, with a Difficulty of 2; success removes the Injury entirely.
Complications may mean that there is some lingering after-effect upon the character maybe they
required a prosthesis, need additional time to recover, or require additional treatment (regular checkups, medication, etc) for a time after the surgery. Failure means the patient dies, though the Games
Master may allow some circumstances where surgery allows Success at Cost instead.
Death isnt entirely insurmountable, either. It is, however, far more difficult to overcome, and such a
feat can only be attempted if the patient died within the last half hour; such an endeavor is at least an
Extended Task, or even a Challenge, rather than merely a Task, the nature of which depends on the
methods and techniques used. Reviving a dead patient can only be attempted once, and if unsuccessful,
the patient remains dead. Exotic techniques and technologies beyond conventional medical science may
allow deceased patients to be revived more easily or after significantly longer periods of time, but these
methods are not commonplace or easily accessible.
Objects have Structure instead of Stress, but it functions in essentially the same way, and most objects
will have a small amount of Soak, representing their durability. Where a character would suffer a risk of
Injury, an object breaks; walls and barriers are opened, complex systems cease functioning, and so forth.

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Weapons
Weapons have a number of common traits and values that determine the specifics of how they function.
The key elements of a weapon are what type of weapon it is, its damage rating, the size of the weapon,
and any qualities it possesses that influence how it is used.

Type: This will either be Melee or Ranged, determining how the weapon is used.
Damage Rating: This will be a number of [CD], and possibly one or more benefits that trigger
when Effects are rolled. All weapons gain a number of additional [CD] to their damage rating
equal to the Security skill of the character.
Size: This will be a number, with higher values representing larger weapons. If the characters
Resilience is lower than the Size of the weapon, any attacks using the weapon increase in
difficulty by two, unless the character uses the Prepare Minor Action before making an Attack. If
the weapon is being used in one hand, the characters Resilience counts as half (round up) for
this purpose.
Qualities: These are additional rules, providing additional restrictions or benefits that apply to
the weapons use.

Playtest Note: Bonus damage from a characters Security Skill has been included on the pregenerated
characters already.
Damage Effects
The following abilities provide additional benefits whenever an Effect is rolled on the [CD]. As noted
earlier, an Effect is any roll of 5 or 6 on a [CD], and Effects naturally add +1 to the total rolled in addition
to any benefits provided by these abilities.

Area: The attack affects a wider area, and can affect several targets at once. The attack
automatically affects any character or damageable object within Reach of the initial target, and
then one additional target within Close range of the initial target for each Effect rolled, starting
with the next closest (as determined by the Games Master). If one or more Complications is
rolled when using an Area attack, the Games Master may choose to use Complications to have
an ally in the area affected by the Attack. A target cannot be hit if it would have been more
difficult to hit than the initial target.
Intense: The attack is designed to inflict massive harm on a target, incapacitating them far more
swiftly. The Cost to resist an Injury caused by an Intense weapon increases by one for each
Effect rolled.
Knockdown: If one or more Effects are rolled on this Attack, then the target is knocked prone.
The target may resist this effect by adding a number of points to Threat equal to the number of
Effects rolled.
Piercing X: The Attack ignores X points of the targets total Soak for each Effect rolled.
Unforgiving X: If the Attack is benefitting from an Exploit Task, then the Attack gains Vicious X.
Vicious X: The Attack inflicts X additional damage for each Effect rolled.

Qualities
The following additional qualities alter the way the weapon functions, some in positive ways, others by
applying restrictions.
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Charge X: The weapon has an adaptable energy supply, allowing its potency to be scaled to
different levels. X is the number of Charges the weapon possesses, which are restored at the
end of a scene (the weapon recharges, power cells are replaced, etc). Charges can be spent on
the following effects: +1[CD] damage (1 Charge), Area (2 Charges), Intense (2 Charges), Piercing
X (1 Charge), Vicious X (2 Charges). Multiple Charges may be spent on a single attack, and must
be spent before the dice are rolled for the Attack.
Cumbersome: The weapon is awkward and tricky to use. The weapon cannot be used to Attack
unless a Preparation Minor Action is performed during the same Turn. This is in addition to any
other Preparation Minor Actions required due to size.
Deadly: The weapon can only be used to Kill.
Debilitating: Medicine Tasks to treat or heal Injuries caused by this weapon increase in difficulty
by one.
Hidden X: The weapon is easy to conceal, or designed to be disguised as something else. When
the weapon is hidden, any search of the owning character requires a Reason + Sciences or
Reason + Security Task, with a difficulty of X, to locate the weapon. A character may use a single
Minor Action to conceal a Hidden weapon.
Nonlethal: The weapon can only be used to Stun.

Weapons List
The following weapons are common to the Federation and other Alpha and Beta Quadrant cultures in
the 23rd and 24th centuries.
Name
Unarmed Strike
Knife/Dagger
Blade (Sword, Mekleth, etc)
Heavy Blade (Batleth, Kartakin)
Phaser Type 1
Phaser Type 2
Phaser Type 3 (Phaser Rifle)
Disruptor Pistol
Disruptor Rifle
JemHadar Plasma Pistol
JemHadar Plasma Rifle

Type
Melee
Melee
Melee
Melee
Ranged
Ranged
Ranged
Ranged
Ranged
Ranged
Ranged

Damage Rating
1[CD] Knockdown
1[CD] Unforgiving 1
2[CD], Vicious 1
3[CD], Vicious 1
2[CD]
3[CD]
4[CD]
3[CD] Vicious 1
4[CD] Vicious 1
3[CD] Vicious 1
4[CD] Vicious 1

Size
1
3
4
7
2
3
5
3
5
3
5

Qualities
Nonlethal
Hidden 1

Cumbersome
Charge 3
Charge 5
Charge 7
Deadly
Deadly
Debilitating
Debilitating

Combat Momentum Spends


Momentum is a key tactical resource during combat. When a character generates Momentum in
combat, he has numerous options available to him which can help overcome his enemies, empower his
allies, and bolster his own prowess.
The following table provides a few additional options available to a character when he generates one or
more Momentum in combat. These are in addition to the normal uses of Momentum, and any others
that players or Games Master create themselves.

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Under Cost, where a spend is listed with an R, it means the spend is Repeatable. Where the spend is
listed with an I, it means the spend is Immediate. If neither note is present, then the Momentum
spend may only be used once per Round at most.
Momentum Spend
Bonus Damage

Cost
1R

Disarm

2/3

Extra Minor Actions

1+ I R

Keep the Initiative

2I

Penetration

1R

Re-Roll Damage
Resist Injury

1
1+ I R

Second Wind
Secondary Target

1IR
2

Swift Task

Effect
A character can increase the damage inflicted by a successful Attack,
regardless of the type of Attack. Each Momentum spent adds +1
damage.
One weapon held by the target is knocked away and falls to the
ground within Reach. This costs 2 Momentum if the target is holding
the weapon in one hand or 3 Momentum if the weapon is braced or
held in two hands.
Take additional Minor Actions, cost is equal to number of Minor
Actions already taken that Turn.
Pass the action order to another ally instead of the enemy; may only
be done once before the enemy has taken at least one action.
The damage inflicted by the current Attack ignores an amount of Soak
equal to two for each Momentum spent.
The player may re-roll any number of [CD] from the current Attack
Resist suffering a single Injury. The cost increases by +1 for each Injury
the character has already Resisted this scene. Other factors may
increase the cost further.
The character regains one point of lost Stress.
A second target within Reach of the Attacks target is also affected by
the Attack, and suffers half the attacks damage, rounding down.
The character may attempt one additional Task, increasing the
difficulty by one over what the Task would normally require.

Games Masters Guidance Threat


The Games Masters biggest tool beyond imagination is Threat. During each adventure, the Threat
pool will grow and shrink as the player characters act and the Games Master responds (and vice versa).
Threat is an abstract measure of potential threats and dangers the larger the Threat pool, the greater
the likelihood that something will endanger or imperil the player characters and their ship. Spending
Threat turns that potential danger into actual problems.
For the most part, Threat will grow because players take action; players can pay for additional dice to
bolster their chances of success, and to take Reactions that improve their ability to survive. Threat will
shrink when the Games Master does those things with NPCs, or activates abilities on some foes. In this
way, the amount of pressure the player characters apply to a situation provides NPCs with the means
to push back commensurately, ensuring that situations remain challenging, and adjust themselves to the
players choices.
Beyond serving as a mirror of the player characters abilities, the Games Master can use Threat to trigger
sudden changes in the environment, bring in reinforcements on the fly, or create or exacerbate
Complications and other problematic circumstances.
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NPCs can use Threat in the same way player characters use banked Momentum. That is, an NPC can buy
extra d20s for a Task, increase the difficulty of Tasks against them, retain the initiative in combat, and so
forth, by spending Threat. Similarly, any ability or action that would normally be paid for by adding to
Threat is used by paying Threat from the pool if performed by a Games Master-controlled NPC. Similarly,
just as PCs can add points to Threat when they suffer Complications, an NPC suffering a Complication
can cause the Threat pool to shrink. The exception to all of this is Voluntary Failure NPCs cant gain
Determination (as noted below), so theres no point in them using the Voluntary Failure rule.
Beyond that, player characters have access to a number of resources Determination, Power, Crew
Support which would be needlessly fiddly for the Games Master to track for each and every NPC, many
of which may only appear for a single turn in a single scene. Those resources are abstracted into the
Threat pool for NPCs, so NPC ships spend Threat to use Power, powerful NPCs use Threat to replicate
Determination, and so forth.

Gaining Threat
A variety of game events allows the Games Master to add more points to the Threat pool. For example,
certain strange or dangerous environments might naturally generate a point or two of Threat,
representing the innate peril of the location. Alternatively, certain foes may bring with them a few
points of Threat, representing the threat that foe represents. As noted above, however, the player
characters are the main source of Threat points, and they may increase Threat during their adventures.
Here are a few examples of how the Threat pool might grow:

Immediate Momentum: Whenever the character uses an Immediate Momentum Spend such
as to buy bonus d20s he normally chooses to pay that cost in Momentum from the groups
pool. However, the character may instead choose to pay some or all of that cost by adding one
point of Threat to the pool for each point of Momentum that would otherwise have been spent.
Complications. When a character suffers one or more Complications on a Task, they or the
Games Master may choose not to suffer the Complication immediately, in exchange for adding
two to the Threat pool.
Voluntary Failure. If a player character chooses to fail a task voluntarily and the Games Master
agrees to it he pays the Games Master one Threat, and gains one Determination point.
Threatening Circumstances. The environment or circumstances of a new scene may be
threatening enough to warrant adding one or two Threat to the pool automatically. Similarly,
some NPCs this will be listed in their rules may generate Threat just for turning up, or in
response to particular circumstances.
NPC Momentum. NPCs with unspent Momentum cannot save it as player characters can NPCs
dont have a group Momentum pool. Instead, an NPC can add one Threat to the pool for each
Momentum spent.

Spending Threat
Broadly, the Games Master uses Threat in to make the lives of the player characters interesting and
challenging. This is done in two ways Complications, and mechanical effects.
A complication is an inconvenient change of circumstances. It is a new obstacle to overcome (like an
explosion or collapse that cuts off a route of escape), a loss of resources (such as Power), something that
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impairs the character in the short term (a sprained ankle), or an embarrassing situation (like a social faux
pas).
The Games Master can make a note of which actions generate Threat during a session. These can be
used as an inspiration for triggering later complications. Threat use is an abstract mechanic and doesnt
require this kind of direct connection but that doesnt mean it cant be a useful seed for improvisation.
Minor inconvenience. One Threat can be used to create a minor inconvenience. As a general guideline,
a minor inconvenience will require a Minor Action to fix, overcome, or circumvent. Theyre nuisances,
rather than serious threats. A minor inconvenience might be a momentary distraction, a fleeting glimpse
of something unsettling, or even something unfortunate but not particularly troublesome.
Complication. A standard Complication costs two Threat, or is generated by rolling a natural 20 on a
Task. Complications may involve the loss of significant resources. If the problem lingers (as opposed to
loss of resources or damage, which is over in an instant), it will normally take a Standard Action to
overcome the Complication, or work around it. Theyre a significant distraction, or dealing with them
requires focus and attention.
Serious Complication. Spending larger amounts of Threat four or more or combining the effects of
multiple Complications from 20s rolled on a Task creates a serious complication. These complications
create severe issues, or situations that persist for a prolonged period, which the characters will need to
expend great effort to work around. In combat, they may take several actions to overcome, or they may
inflict serious injuries.

Other Uses of Threat


Beyond complications, the Games Master can use Threat in a wide range of ways that interact with the
game mechanics. These uses are described below:
NPC Momentum. The Games Master may use the Threat pool in the same was as players use banked
Momentum. As NPCs also pay unspent Momentum into the Threat pool, this basically means that the
Threat pool is in all ways the Games Masters equivalent to the players Momentum pool. This includes
all Immediate Momentum Spends, such as Create Opportunity for bonus d20s, or Create Problem to
increase Task difficulties. As normal, all these spends should be accompanied by some narrative
justification each spend must make sense within the context of the story.
NPC Complications. Whenever an NPC suffers one or more Complications on a Task, the Games Master
may choose to remove two Threat from the pool increase of causing that NPC to suffer a Complication.
As with Complications suffered by player characters, each 20 rolled is a separate Complication, which
can be resolved separately, or grouped together into a more severe complication.
NPC Resources. Power, Crew Support, and other expendable resources used to boost the effect of a
Task are not tracked individually for NPCs. Instead, an NPC can be granted the benefit of a single unit of
a resource by paying one Threat. The normal limits for the use of these resources still apply.
NPC Special Abilities. Some powerful or significant NPCs may have access to potent abilities or
equipment. As noted in their descriptions, these abilities may require the Games Master to spend one or
more Threat to activate them.
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Summon Reinforcements. Sometimes the player characters dominate an encounter or clear through a
combat in record time. Other times, the Games Master may wish to slowly increase the tension or add
some extra complexity to a key scene. One way to do this is by summoning reinforcements using Threat.
Reinforcements arrive at the end of the current round, they must arrive in a logical way, and they
cannot act in the round they arrive. The typical cost of adding Reinforcements to a scene is 1 Threat per
individual person added to a scene, or Threat equal to the number of Turns an NPC vessel can take to
add that vessel.
Environmental Events
Dramatic scenes often play out in exciting environments a firefight through a starships corridors, a
chase through a busy marketplace, a chasm over a river of lava, etc. When describing encounters, the
Games Master is encouraged to provide details to the players to help them visualize the scene, and
sometimes it can be interesting to bring the environment alive using Threat.
Environmental effects are a particularly complicated category of Threat spends, as the effects of the
environment can be many and varied. Further, there is a fine line between environmental effects and
complications while complications are often personal, affecting individuals due to choices made, some
complications can influence the environment around the characters as well. Consequently, the range of
possible environmental effects should be fairly diverse.
Minor effects ones that typically cost one Threat are typically things like flickering lights, unstable
floors, and thick smoke. These dont cause a significant problem their typical effect is to increase the
difficulty of a single Task by one step, or to require a Difficulty 1 Task where one would not normally be
required; this effect applies to a single character for each point of Threat spent. This represents the
environmental problem at its worst, becoming an issue just as a character attempts something, and the
Task affected should be determined when the Momentum is spent, based on what it represents
lighting and concealment issues might affect Tasks to observe or detect enemies, or Attacks with ranged
weapons, while unstable floors could affect movement-related Tasks. Alternately, if an effect is
persistent but minor, it might increase the chance of further Complications, increasing the Complication
Range of a particular kind of Task (pick a single skill) for the rest of the scene.
More significant effects are somewhat more varied, and cost at least two Threat. An environmental
effect like this can come in almost any form.
Hazards inflict damage on the affected character. This can be any type of damage damage can come
from factors like fire, collapsing structures, dangerous chemicals, and other perils. The number of points
of Threat spent determines how much damage is inflicted, as well as any applicable damage effects. The
amount of damage and the effects chosen should make sense for the environmental hazard it
represents.
A hazards effects are automatic apply the damage immediately to the chosen character or vessel. If
the Games Master wants to add an element of uncertainty, he may choose to allow characters to
attempt a Task to avoid or overcome the hazard determined when the Threat is spent, which must be
an appropriate choice for the hazard being avoided. The difficulty of this Task may reduce the overall
Threat cost of the hazard the easier the hazard is to avoid, the less Threat it costs. Regardless of the
reduction applied, the minimum Threat cost is 1.
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Damage
Threat Cost
2[CD]
2
3[CD]
3
4[CD]
4
5[CD]
5
6[CD]
6
Damage Effect or Quality
Threat Cost
Area
2
Debilitating
2
Intense
1
Knockdown
1
Nonlethal
Reduce overall Threat Cost by 2
Piercing X
Equal to half X, rounding up.
Vicious X
Equal to X
Task Difficulty
Threat Cost
No Skill Test
+0
Difficulty 1
Reduce overall Threat Cost by 3
Difficulty 2
Reduce overall Threat Cost by 1
Difficulty 3 or higher
+0
Lingering impediments typically cost two Threat, and increase the difficulty of all Tasks of a single type
(pick one Task, additional skills may be picked by spending one Threat each) for the duration of the
scene. This affects all characters in the affected area. These often represent a significant change in
circumstances in the environment movement might become more difficult if part of a building
collapses, for example, while being plunged into darkness could impede sight.
One more unusual option is for the Games Master to Split the Party. Few circumstances can complicate
the player characters plans like suddenly finding themselves divided. It can be tricky to use perhaps a
door seals behind part of the group, or a section of floor collapses beneath one or more of the
characters but whatever happens, some circumstance contrives to separate the player characters
temporarily. When used, the group is split into two, and the Games Master picks which player
characters end up in each part of the group. The Games Master then pays a number of Threat equal to
the number of player characters in the larger of the two parts of the group. These two parts of the group
cannot directly interact with one another (though some means of communication will likely still
function, such as radios) until they find some means to reunite. Reuniting immediately may take some
effort, determined by whatever occurred to split the group in the first place, but the separation only
lasts until the next scene (by which point, the characters have managed to find another way to regroup).

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Adversaries
This section describes the way in which non-player characters NPCs function in game terms, and the
means by which a Games Master might structure an encounter.

Target Categories
The many life-forms that characters are likely to face come in many shapes and sizes, and where some
are mighty entities that can stand alone against many foes, others function in coordinated groups. The
following categories exist for NPCs.
Some categories of NPC have a limit to the amount of Threat they can spend to resist an Injury. This limit
means that the Games Master cannot spend more Threat than that limit to resist any one Injury; thus, a
Trooper NPC can only spend one Threat to resist any Injury, meaning that it cannot pay to resist any
Injury that would cost more than one Threat.

Troopers are rank-and-file personnel and ordinary people. Troopers are the normal type of NPC
present in a scene. Trooper NPCs cannot spend more than one point of Threat to resist suffering
an Injury. Troopers do not have Skill Focuses, and simply use the basic Focus of 1 for all Tasks.
They do not have Values.
Elites are more dedicated and resourceful characters, often with specialist skills and exceptional
talents. Elite NPCs cannot spend more than three points of Threat to resist suffering an Injury.
Elite NPCs have Skill Focuses, though none with a value greater than 2. They have a single Value,
relating to their race and affiliation.
Nemeses are leaders amongst their kind, with a wide range of skills and abilities. Nemesis NPCs
have no limit on Threat spent to resist an Injury. Nemesis NPCs are unique named characters,
who have the full range of Skill Focuses, several Values, and other noteworthy abilities. In
addition, a Nemesis may spend three Threat in order to gain the benefits of a single point of
Determination.

NPCs and Values


Typically speaking, non-player characters dont have Determination points to spend; only Nemeses can
gain the benefit of them. However, some NPCs do have Values. In situations where an NPCs Value
create a Complication, or their Values are Challenged, the Games Master adds three points to Threat,
rather than giving the NPC a point of Determination.

Common Traits
The following are a number of common rules and abilities possessed by creatures in Star Trek
Adventures. These abilities are referred to by name only in the individual NPC entries, and require you
to refer here for the specifics of each rule.
Extraordinary Attribute X
One or more of the creatures attributes are far beyond the normal range for humanoids. This is
indicated by a number, which is added as automatic successes on Tasks using that attribute. For
example, a creature with Extraordinary Reason 1 gains one success on all Tasks using Reason, in addition
to any generated by rolling. Extraordinary Attributes, in addition to being noted in a creatures Special
Abilities section, will be noted next to the Attribute as an extra value in parentheses.
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Fast Recovery X
The creature recovers from stress and injury quickly. At the start of each of its Turns, the creature
regains X Stress, up to its normal maximum. If the creature is Injured at the start of its turn, it may
instead spend two Threat in order to remove that Injury.
Immune to X
The creature is unperturbed by conditions and effects caused by one of a number of sources of difficulty
or hindrance, such as vacuum, extremes of temperature, poison, disease, etc. The most common
sources of conditions are described below:

Cold: The creature is unaffected by effects derived from extreme cold, including damage.
Disease: The creature is immune to the effects of disease, and will never suffer the symptoms of
any disease. If the creature is exposed to a disease it may become a carrier able to spread the
disease if it is contagious.
Fear: The creature is incapable of feeling fear, continuing undeterred despite the greatest
terror. The creature cannot be intimidated or threatened.
Heat: The creature is unaffected by effects derived from extreme heat, including damage from
fire.
Pain: The creature is incapable of feeling pain, continuing undeterred despite the most horrific
agony. The creature cannot be Injured by Stun attacks, nor is it affected by any penalties or
hindrances caused by pain.
Poison: The creature is unaffected by all forms of poison, venom, and toxin.
Vacuum: The creature suffers no damage from being exposed to hard vacuum, or other
extremes of atmospheric pressure, and cannot suffocate.

Keen Senses (sense type)


One of the creatures senses is particularly keen. Choose one of the following: sight, hearing, or scent.
The creature reduces the Difficulty of all Tasks which use that sense to detect or observe.
Machine X
The creature is not a living being, but a machine, or some form of cybernetic organism. It is highly
resistant to environmental conditions, reducing the Difficulty of Tasks to resist extremes of heat and
cost by two, and it is immune to the effects of suffocation, starvation, and thirst. Further, the machines
sturdy construction grants it Soak equal to X.
Menacing
The creature is dangerous, heralding a greater problem for those who confront it. When a creature with
this rule enters a scene, immediately add a point to the Threat pool.
Night Vision
The creature has some way of perceiving its environment even in pitch darkness perceiving infrared or
ultraviolet light, echolocation, or some other method. Tasks the creature attempts do not increase in
Difficulty as a result of darkness.
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Threatening X
The creature is powerful and dangerous, with a vitality and drive that allows it to triumph where others
might fail. The creature begins each scene with X Threat, that may only be used to benefit itself, and
which are not drawn from the general Threat pool.

Combat Encounter Structure


Broadly speaking, an average personal combat encounter that challenges a group of player characters
should consists of a number of Trooper NPCs equal to one and a half times the number of player
characters, or Elite NPCs equal to the number of player characters. For example, if there are four player
characters, then an average combat encounter should consist of four Elite NPCs or six Trooper NPCs.
This is not to say that more NPCs cant be added to a fight to make it tougher, but these baselines are
worth keeping in mind, so that the Games Master knows whether hes making a battle easier or more
difficult. This represents a basic approach to structuring an encounter, however, and it still requires a
degree of judgement on the part of the Games Master individual NPCs vary in power, beyond the
rough target categories. Significantly larger numbers of NPCs should arrive in waves, with new groups
arriving on the scene periodically by the Games Master spending Threat.
An important element of structuring an encounter is number of available actions. If the NPCs have fewer
available actions than the player characters, then they are much less likely to present a challenge. In
personal combat, because combatants can be incapacitated quickly, a degree of redundancy is useful
amongst NPCs, so having a few more NPC actions than there are player actions (at least initially) allows
the NPC side to take one or two casualties without severely impacting the difficulty of the encounter.
With starships, a more equal number of actions on each side is acceptable, given the greater durability
of a starship.
As noted at the start of the Combat section, it is important to remember that combat encounters should
not necessarily be to the death. A combat encounter should serve a specific purpose beyond the
violence itself, meaning that achieving the objective should be prioritized by both sides, and few forces
are willing to sacrifice endless soldiers to the completion of a goal and may call for a retreat before then.
There are two other factors that can be relevant when determining how easy or difficult an encounter
will be: environment, and Threat.
Environmental factors can shift the balance in battle. A preponderance of cover or short lines of sight
can favour melee and short-ranged shooting over longer-ranged weapons, while large open spaces and
difficult terrain favour long ranged shooting. Terrain can be deliberately set-up to favour one side over
another, particularly if one side is defending an objective.
Threat can shift the balance in battle as well, and this is entirely by design. Spending Threat can amplify
the potency of NPCs, or add new NPCs to the fight. By comparison, spending little or no Threat on NPCs
during a scene can make them less effective, which can turn a challenging battle into a simple one. This
can be used by the Games Master to scale encounters to the player characters successes and failures
successful player characters can be met by stronger resistance and to make later battles in an
adventure more difficult.
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