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Individual Intervention Plan

Social and Communication Skills


(Identifying information has been removed or changed to protect
confidentiality)
Name: AV
Birthdate: **/**/****
Chronological Age: 3
School District of Residence: ******************
Parents Names: AV and BV
Address: ***************************************
General/Background Information:
AV is an active small young brunet girl who does not often play with other students. AV
is nonverbal and her active communication is limited to yelling when she wants something. She
becomes easily frustrated and yells and cries often when upset or frustrated. She has also recently
began to show signs of self injurious behavior including biting her arm when she becomes
frustrated, or when she is trying to avoid a task. AV sometimes displays self-simulative behavior
which include tapping any object that she is holding on the table or ground, hand flapping and
some rocking. Her play is independent and non-imaginative. Often it is limited to placing objects
in order or in a line.
Description of the Instructional Environment:
The Instructional environment is a self-contained special education preschool classroom at ********** Elementary. This classroom usually contains 34 other students. There is one intervention specialist in this classroom as well
as two additional adult assistants. The classroom is divided into 3 general
areas the first area includes a kitchenette, breakfast and activity tables, and
student cubbies. In the right corner of this area is a computer used by the
intervention specialist. The second area is a small table that is sectioned off
from the classroom by a shelves and dividers. This area is used mostly for
one on one work with children. On the back wall of the classroom there is a
smartboard. To the right of the smartboard there is an area for the students
to play as well as an area for students to calm down. The classroom has
picture schedules and many students in this room use a picture exchange
communication system to communicate. The hallways leading to the room
are large and usually free of clutter. The classrooms near the students
classroom are mostly universal pre-school classrooms.
Annual Goals

1. Present level of Performance:


AV will sometimes look at an object when directed. She does not
imitate action with a toy and rarely imitates a single body action. The
student has trouble with attending to objects for a long period of time.
Annual Goal:

By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using discrete trial training, Objects for actions
such as: a bell, toy car, flag, drum, or other manipulatives, and the prompt hierarchy from most
to least intrusive, AV will be able to imitate a single action, which is performed with an object,
with no prompting. AV will be able to imitate the action 6 out of 10 time during subsequent
trials.
Recommended evidence-based activity:
Instructional procedures to be used:
1.
Student will sit at one end of the table (An additional adult assistant or special chair
may be needed to keep the child in their seat).
2.
The teacher will sit at the table across from the student and gain the students
attention.
3.
The teacher will place 2 of the same objects on the table one in front of the student
and one in front of the teacher.
4.
The teacher will instruct do this while simultaneously modeling an action with one
object. (for example a teacher would say do this while placing a block in a bucket)
5.
The teacher will prompt the child to perform the action with the students object.
6.
The teacher will then reinforce the response.
7.
The teacher will perform the trial again (steps 2-6) fading prompts and reinforcing
responses differentially
8.
Eventually the teacher will only reinforce correct, un-prompted responses.
9.
When appropriate the teacher will complete steps 2-6 with a different item.
Prompting & Fading of Prompts:
If the student cannot complete the action independently the teacher will use an
appropriate prompt. As the student becomes increasingly independent the teacher will fade the
prompts. The teacher will start with a more intrusive prompt such as a partial physical prompt
and move to less intrusive prompts such as a touch prompt until the student can complete the
task independently.
Reinforcement:
a. Types of reinforcement delivered: Reinforcements would include the students favorite snack
(fruit snacks, cereal, other food item), the student is allowed to play with a favorite toy for 30
seconds, and verbal reinforcement such as good job or other affirming words.
b. Initial schedule of reinforcement: The student will receive a reinforcement after every
completed trial.
c. Fading of reinforcement: As the student becomes more independent the student will receive
less reinforcement.
1. After the first schedule of reinforcement the student will only receive reinforcement for trials
completed with a lower level of prompting then the initial prompt.
2. After the student is at the lowest level of prompting the student will receive reinforcement
after every correct trial with the lowest level of prompting.
3. Next the student will only receive reinforcement for completely independent trials.
4. After this the student will only receive reinforcement after every other independent trial.
5. Lastly the student will only receive reinforcement after the fourth correct trial.

6. The reinforcement will be completely removed.


Generalization Procedures:
The student will learn play related imitations.
The student will be able to imitate a typically developing peer who is playing with an object. A
student will sit with a peer and imitate the peers play.
At home a parent could teach a child simple skills such as cleaning up toys. A parent would say
do this as he/she picked up a toy and put it in a toy box. The parent could reinforce the child for
putting the toy when the child imitated the action independently.
Measurement of progress to the goal:
The teacher will keep a record of how many times the child imitated the action
throughout the year by recording data on a data collection check list that includes the amount of
trials, number and type of prompt, and the date.

2. Present Level of Performance:


Currently AV has very limited communicative behavior. She often
screams or cries to indicate that she wants something. When she is finished
with an item she will throw the item or move away from an item. The student
will sometimes will look at an object when directed. She cannot request an
object or toy by pointing.
Annual Goal:
By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using preferred items and non-preferred items,
verbal cues, touch prompts, and gestural prompts, AV will be able to indicate her preference
between two objects by pointing to the desired object with no more than two verbal prompts. AV
will indicate her preference by pointing during 80% of the trials.
Recommended activity:
Instructional procedures to be used:
1. Student will sit at one end of the table (An additional adult assistant may be needed to
keep the child in their seat).
2. The teacher will sit at the table across from the student and gain the students attention.
3. The teacher will hold two items in view of the child.
4. The teacher will say Do you want a _________ or a _________?
5. The teacher will then prompt the student to point to the most desired item.
6. Once the student points to an item the teacher should immediately give the chosen item to
the student.
7. The teacher should repeat this trial with new objects as well as the initial objects.
Prompting & Fading of Prompts:
If the student cannot complete the action independently the teacher will use an
appropriate prompt. As the student becomes increasingly independent the teacher will fade the
prompts. The teacher will start with a more intrusive prompt such as a partial physical prompt
and move to less intrusive prompts such as a touch prompt until the student can complete the
task independently.

Reinforcement:
a. Types of reinforcement delivered: Student will be given the item that they chose. If it
is a food item the student will be able to eat it, if it is a toy the student will be allowed
to play with the toy for 30 seconds. When the student points to an item correctly the
teacher will verbally reinforce the child.
b. Initial schedule of reinforcement: The teacher will verbally reinforce the student
every time the student points to an item.
c. Fading of reinforcement: As the student becomes more independent the teacher will
give less verbal praise. When the student has completed the task independently
multiple times the teacher will stop all verbal praise and the student will only receive
the item that they have pointed to.
Generalization Procedures:
1. When at home a parent or guardian will hold out 2 items and will say Do you want
a_________ or a _________? when the student points to the item the parent or guardian
will immediately give the child the item.
2. In a universal pre-k classroom a teacher could hold out two Picture Exchange
Communication cards of two desired items say Do you want a_________ or a
_________? When the child points to the desired card the teacher could immediately
give the child that item.
3. This could also be used in community and other family settings.
Measurement of progress to the goal: Progress will be monitored
through teacher observation and with data collection forms.

3. Present level of Performance:


The students current basic communicative functions are limited to uttering cries and
incomprehensible shouts. When AV wants attention or help she will begin to cry, screech, or bite
her arm.
Annual Goal:
By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using deferential reinforcement of an alternative
behavior, differential reinforcement of positive behavior, and preferred items as reinforcement,
AV will be able to alert the teacher that she needs help using a physical gesture. AV will use a
physical gesture 70% of the time when requesting help from a teacher with only one prompt
maximum.
Recommended activity:
Developmental Area:
Basic communicative functions, requesting help
Asking for help is an important skill that every child needs to know. If a
student does not have the ability to ask for help the student may become
frustrated or irritated. This intervention will teach the student the basic life
skill of asking for help.
Description of the activity:

Child is placed in a situation where he/she needs help. The child is taught
how to properly ask for help. Help is given when the child correctly asks.
Adult to Child:
Adult places the child in a situation where the child needs help
Adult will teach child how to get the adults attention using a physical gesture
such as raising her hand.
Teacher waits and watches until the child requests help.
Teacher selects activities that the child will be attentive to
Teacher prompts the student.
The student can ask the teacher to open a food or drink at lunch time
The student can request help fixing a computer that is unplugged.
Child to Peer:
The child indicates that they need help by raising her hand, pointing to
herself or by using other physical gestures.
The child responds to situations and uses hand gestures and head movement
to indicate needs.
Other Strategies:
An older student can help Anastasia when she raises her hand or makes a
help gesture
AV can hold up a card with the word help on it
Measurement of progress to the goal:
The teacher will collect data through informal observations. The teacher will use both
antidotal recording and check lists to track the students progress. The teacher will record how
many times the student asked for help using an appropriate gesture.

4. Present level of performance:


Currently AV is able to play parallel with her own set of materials next to peers. She is
unable to take turns when working with one partner during an activity that has predictable turns.
She has trouble with sharing materials and with cooperative play with one partner.
Annual Goal:
By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using direct instruction, the prompt hierarchy
from most to least intrusive, and video modeling, AV will be able to take turns with one partner
when completing a familiar activity with predictable turns. AV will be able to correctly take her
turn 2 out of 5 times during an activity.
Recommended activity:
Description of the activity:
The teacher will select a close ended activity. The activity should be simple
and allow for student turn taking and a waiting period. One activity could be

two students cooperatively building a block tower on one mat. Chose two
colors of blocks and place them in a bin.
Adult to Child:
The adult will prompt the students to take turns stacking their blocks on top
of each other. The adult prompts the first student to place a block on the mat
while prompting the other student to wait. The teacher will then prompt the
first child to wait while prompting the second child to stack his item. The task
is continued until each child can take turns stacking blocks independently.
Child Peer:
The child must share blocks and take turns stacking blocks. The student
must be able to wait for the peer to take his/her turn.
Other Strategies:
Other simple strategies include: Playing catch, taking turns using a music
playing device at a listening center, and a child blows bubbles and then
hands the bubble mixture and wand to his or her partner, the activity
continues until the pre-determined end of the activity. The student could take
turns with a typically developing peer.
Measurement of progress to the goal:
The teacher will collect data through observations. The teacher will use both antidotal
recording and check lists to track the students progress.

5. Present level of performance:


AV is able to cry and yell. She does not imitate actions unless prompted to do so many
times with the use of intrusive prompts such as full physical or partial physical prompts.
Annual Goal:
By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using verbal prompts, direct instruction and
repeated reinforced trials, AV will imitate mouth movements and some simple vocalizations. She
will imitate these vocalizations and mouth movements with 75% accuracy when the trial is
repeated 10 times.
Recommended activity:
Description of the activity:
The teacher will create simple cause and effect games that use mouth
movements and or vocalizations. For example the teacher would attempt to
have the child imitate her as the teacher sticks out her tongue and touches
her head.
Adult to Child:
The teacher could make a sound as she passed an item to a child. The
teacher could direct the child to make the same sound while simultaneously
passing the item back to the teacher.
The teacher could pretend to eat something inedible. The teacher could then
make a face that portrays the item does not taste good. The teacher will

repeat this and then eventually push the item towards the child and prompt
the child to imitate the displeased look that the teacher has been making.
Child to Peer:
Child would be paired with a typically developing peer. The peer would
demonstrate blowing bubbles. The child would be given a matching set of
bubble mixture and watch the peer attempting to imitate the peers action.
Other Strategies:
Use scaffolding build on what the child is already able to do.
Shape inappropriate behaviors into desired responses or actions.
Use another meaningful activity that involves mimicking facial features or
sounds
Play videos that prompt the child to imitate actions or sounds (what does a
______ say videos)
Measurement of progress toward the goal:
The teacher will collect data using observations and by keeping
anecdotal records.

6. Present level of performance:


AV does not keep items organized around the classroom. She will throw
items or leave them scattered around the room. AV does not clean up after
completing tasks.
Annual Goal:
By the end of the 2016/17 school year, using the prompt hierarchy from most to least
intrusive, pictures, and positive reinforcement, AV will place her coat and backpack in her
designated cubby with no more than one visual prompt, 4 out of 5 days out of the week.
Recommended activity:
The teacher would establish a space for the child to hang her coat and
backpack. Every morning the teacher will direct the student to put her jacket
and coat into their designated locations. The space should be free of clutter
and separate from the places to put other items. The teacher will instruct the
student by first using the most intrusive prompt and fading the prompts as
the student becomes more independent. Eventually the teacher would only
hold up a picture of the cubby and the student would put the jacket and book
bag in the cubby.
Measurement of progress toward the goal:
The teacher will record the amount of times the student completes the
goal on a daily data collection form. The teacher will also keep anecdotal
records about the students morning routine.