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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT REPORT

For

CHANDIGARH UNIVERSITY

Village Mamupur & Gharuan, Tehsil Kharar, Distt. Mohali

Category B (B2) Clause 8 (b) Township and Area Development Projects

PROJECT BY

CHNADIGARH EDUCATIONAL TRUST (REGD.)

(ToR issued by SEAC in its 143 rd meeting on 30.03.2016)

CONTENT

S.NO.

TOPICS

PAGE.NO

ToR and Reply CHAPTER 1-INTRODUCTION

1-7

1.0

Purpose of report

8-9

1.1

Identification of the project and project proponent

9

1.2

Brief description of the nature of site, location of the project

10-12

1.3

Scope of the study CHAPTER 2-PROJECT DESCRIPTION

13-14

2.0

Significance and objective of proposed project

15

2.1

Location of the project

15

2.2

Basic requirements CHAPTER 3-DESCRIPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

15-28

3.0

General

29

3.1

Methodology Adopted

29

3.2

Study area at a glance

29

3.3

Seismicity of area

30

3.4

Topography and Drainage of the area

30

3.5

Water environment

31-33

3.6

Meteorology & Climatology

33-34

3.7

Air Environment

34-43

3.8

Noise Environment

44

3.9

Soil Environment

44-45

3.10

Biological Environment

45-46

3.11

Demographic and Socio-Economic status

46-47

3.12

Land Environment

47

3.13

Traffic

47-48

3.14

Conclusion CHAPTER 4-ANTICIPATED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES

49

4.0

Environmental impact assessment

50

4.1

Impact on air environmental & mitigation measures

50

4.2

Impact on water environment &mitigation measures

50

4.3

Impact due to noise and mitigation measures

51

4.4

Impact due to solid waste generation and management

52

4.5

Impact on land environment and mitigation measures

52

4.6

Impact on infrastructure including power

52

4.7

CONCLUSION

52-54

CHAPTER 5-ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY

55

CHAPTER 6-ENVIRONMENTAL MONITERING PROGRAMME

6.0

Introduction

56

6.1

Objectives Of Environmental Monitoring Programme

56-57

CHAPTER 7-ADDITIONAL STUDIES

7.0

Introduction

58

7.1

Risk assessment & Disaster management plan

58-63

7.2

Carbon Footprinting

64

7.3

Management Frameworks And Conclusion CHAPTER 8-PROJECTS BENEFITS

64

8.0

Introduction

65

8.1

Developed infrastructure

65

8.2

Employment potentials

65

8.3

Increase in aesthetic beauty of the area by green belt development

65

8.4

Conclusion CHAPTER IX-ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN

66-67

9.0

Introduction

68

9.1

Post-Project operations

68

9.2

Overall recommendation and implementation schedule

68-70

ANNEXURE AND DRAWINGS

ANNEXURES

Page No.

A-1: Permission for change of land use

71-77

A-1A: Application for additional change of land use

78

A-2: Cost certificate

79-80

A-2A: NOC for approach road

81

A-3:List of Khasra

82-84

A-4:Application for ground water abstraction

85

A-5:Test Reports

86-111

A-6:Geotechnical investigation report

112-136

A-7: Detail of Plantation

137-139

A8: Memorandum of Understanding

140-146

A-9: Receipt of application for approval of groundwater abstraction

147-149

A-10:E-waste agreement

150

A-11: Impact Matrix

151

A-12: Environmental Policy

152-153

A-13: Hierarchy chart

154

A-14: Carbon foot printing

155-159

A-15: Consultant Credentials

160-166

DRAWINGS D-1: Conceptual Plan

170

LIST OF FIGURE

Figure

Page No.

Figure 1.1 Site Photographs

10

Figure 1.2 Project Site on Survey of India (Topo sheet)

11

Figure 1.3 Location Plan of the Project Site

11

Figure 1.4 Paranomic view showing key features within 500 m radius

12

Figure 2.1 Contour Plan

17

Figure 2.1(a) Landuse of the project site

16

Figure 2.2 Water Supply Layout

18

Figure 2.3 Schematic View of STP

24

Figure 2.4 Letter from PSPCL

26

Figure 2.5 Electrical Hazardous Plan

27

Figure 2.6 Parking Plan

28

Figure 3.1 Seismic Zone Map

30

Figure 3.2 Drainage Pattern

31

Figure3.3 Toposheet showing the Ground Water monitoring locations

32

Figure3.4 Toposheet showing the Ambient Air monitoring locations

35

Figure 3.4(a1) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of October (2015)

36

Figure 3.4(a2) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of November (2015)

37

Figure 3.4(a3) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of December (2015)

37

Figure 3.4(b1) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of October (2015)

38

Figure 3.4(b2) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of November (2015)

39

Figure 3.4(b3) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of December (2015)

39

Figure 3.4(c1) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of October (2015)

40

Figure 3.4(c2) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of November (2015)

41

Figure 3.4(c3) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of December (2015)

41

Figure 3.4(d1) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of October (2015)

42

Figure 3.4(d2) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of November (2015)

43

Figure 3.4(d3) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of December (2015)

43

Figure3.5 Toposheet showing the Ambient Noise monitoring locations

44

Figure3.6 Toposheet showing the Soil monitoring locations

45

Figure 3.7 Traffic Movement Data

47

Figure 4.1 Sewer Layout Plan

53

Figure 4.2 Storm Layout Plan

54

Figure 7.1 Map of India Showing Flood Zone

60

Figure 7.2 Fire fighting Plan

62

Figure 8.1 Landscape Plan

67

LIST OF TABLE

Table

Page No.

Table 1.1 Project Area Details

12

Table 2.1 Energy Conservation Detail

25

Table 3.1: Sampling Location for Ground water analysis

32

Table 3.2: Sampling Location for Ambient Air analysis

35

Table 3.2(a1): Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of October (2015)

36

Table 3.2(a2): Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of November

36

(2015)

Table 3.2(a3): Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of December

37

(2015)

Table 3.2(b1) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of October (2015)

38

Table 3.2(b2) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of November

38

(2015)

Table 3.2(b3) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of December(2015)

39

Table 3.2(c1) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of October (2015)

40

Table 3.2(c2) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of November (2015)

40

Table 3.2(c3) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of December (2015)

41

Table 3.2(d1) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of October (2015)

42

Table 3.2(d2) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of November (2015)

42

Table 3.2(d3) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of December (2015)

43

Table 3.3: Sampling Location for Ambient Noise analysis

44

Table 3.4: Sampling Location for Soil analysis

45

Table 3.5: Roads and Highways in the Study Area

48

Table 3.6: No. of Vehicles per day

48

Table 3.7: Existing traffic Scenario & LOS

48

Table 4.1: Rain water Recharging Calculations

51

Table7.1 : Fires - Classification & Extinguishing Media

63

Table 9.1 Budget allocation during Operation Phase:

69

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

Chandigarh University, Located at Village Gharuan & Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt. Mohali - Reply of TOR issued by SEAC in its 143 rd meeting held on 30.03.2016.

S.

Terms of Reference

REPLY

No.

1.

The project falls under category B-1 under item 8(b) Township and Area Development projects and requires an Environmental Impact Assessment Study for the entire site area.

Environment impact assessment study was conducted for three months from 9 th Oct to 26 th Dec, 2015 as per draft proposed TOR. The EIA report has been prepared on the basis of TOR’s; copy is enclosed.

 

Operation Stage

 

1.

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the residential, commercial, institutional, industrial, recreational, social, cultural & religious activities to be carried out.

Various environmental impacts will be there due to project activities which have been discussed in detail in Chapter-4 along with the environment measures which have been taken to nullify the impact on environment and to improve the general environment in long run. To control water pollution, STP of 1 MLD capacity is proposed at the site in additional to existing STP’s of 250 KLD (1 No.) and 450 KLD (1 No.). To control air pollution from 3 D.G sets, proper stack heights as per standards have been provided/ proposed. D.G sets are used only for back up. Noise & air pollution from movement of vehicles is controlled by providing 4.68 acres of green area (excluding the area provided for Karnal Technology) and green belt along the road sides has improved the environment and general aesthetics. Further movement of vehicles is limited inside the campus. Solid waste of all types is getting managed in an environment friendly manner to control its impact on environment. The biodegradable waste is cleared off by the first party as per Memorandum of Understanding attached as Annexure-8. The recyclable waste is sold to local vendors and receipt of same is attached as Annexure-9. E- waste is collected from individual departments, provided to the authorized E-waste collector. The

1

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

   

copy of agreement for the same is attached as

Annexure-10.

Hazardous waste is also disposed to PPCB authorized vendors. Solar water heaters are provided for energy conservation measures. No religious buildings are there inside the campus but various student societies are already working on various spiritual activities.

2.

Examine and submit complete traffic management plan, to ensure that no traffic congestion/ obstruction takes place along the main road/ highway in front of the University due to stoppage/ parking of vehicles including public/ private vehicles meant for loading/ unloading passengers/ students of the University.

Traffic management plan is discussed in chapter-3. The parking cum traffic movement plan is shown in chapter 2 as Fig.2.6.

3.

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the facilities to be provided such as water supply, electrical power supply, fuel supply & consumption including LPG, transportation and communication.

The water demand is met by 2 nos. of tube wells. The water balance is discussed in Chapter 2 of EIA report. Total energy requirement of project is 1940 KW and it has been provided by Punjab State Power Corporation Limited. Copy of approval is shown in chapter 2 as Fig.2.4. Total 3 DG sets of capacity 1010 KVA, 600 KVA and 320 KVA have been installed with inbuilt acoustic enclosure and are used as power backup. Stack height as per standards are provided to control air pollution. No. of LPG cylinders consumed are 600 number/ month. Further, use of LPG gas has low combustion emission, easily storable and burns off readily giving instant heat.

4.

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the sewerage & sewage treatment and its disposal systems and storm water & its drainage system.

Total design population of the project will be 28000 persons (3000 will be residential and 25000 will be floating), out of which the existing population is 14446 (2300 is residential and 12146 is floating). The water requirement of the project will be 1530 KLD out of which 856 KLD is the existing water demand and source of water supply is tubewell. The application for ground water

2

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

   

abstraction has already been submitted and copy of same is attached as Annexure-4. The layout showing the location of tube-well is shown in chapter 2 as Fig.2.2. 1224 KLD of sewer will be generated @ 80 % of total water requirement. STP of 1 MLD capacity based on MBBR technology will be installed at site to treat sewage in addition to existing STP’s of 250 KLD (1 No.) and 450 KLD (1 No.) capacity. The layout showing the location of STP is shown in chapter 4 as Fig.4.1. The treated sewage is being recycled for flushing (girls hostel No. 2), irrigation and excess will be disposed on 4 acres of green area developed under Karnal Technology. The storm water network is provided. Terrace runoff is being used to recharge ground water with 11 no. of rain water recharging pits. The layout plan showing the rain water recharging pits is shown in chapter 4 as Fig.4.2.

5.

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts caused due to the generation of captive power & emergency power.

Total Energy requirement of existing project is 1940 KW and it is provided by Punjab State Power Corporation Limited. 3 D.G sets are provided at site of 1010 KVA, 600 KVA and 320 KVA capacity with inbuilt acoustic enclosure and has been used as power backup. Stack height as per standards are provided to control air pollution. Solar water heaters have been provided. 7 x 2000 LPD is the capacity of solar water heater. The details are discussed in Chapter-2.

6.

Submit

the

details

of

the

During operation phase, 6,200 Kg/ day of Solid waste will be generated (@ 0.4 kg/cap/day for residential population & @ 0.2 kg/cap/day for Floating population) out of which presently approx. 3349.2 Kg/day of waste is generated from the University. The solid waste is segregated to biodegradable and non- biodegradable. The biodegradable waste is cleaned off by the first party as per the Memorandum of Understanding attached along as Annexure-8. The recyclable waste is sold to local vendors and receipt of same

management

&

handling

of

municipal

solid

waste,

e-waste,

hazardous

waste,

scrap

and

Biomedical Waste.

 

3

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

   

is attached as Annexure-9. E-waste is received from the respective departments and the same is collected by authorized E-waste collector. An agreement for this is attached as Annexure-10. The lubricating oil is changed during servicing of DG sets twice in a year. The burnt spent oil is collected in empty drums of 25 ltrs and kept at safe places at sub- station area and further disposed off to PPCB approved authorized recyclers.

7.

Submit the details of the socio economic impact due to the employment to be generated from the household activities.

Chandigarh University is currently providing jobs to 1736 no. of skilled employees and 1055 no. of unskilled employees. Out of which, 775 are teachers and 2016 are staff & workers. University has campus placement cell, it liaison with various private and public sector organization and arrange campus interviews for placement of the students. University has provided the opportunities to shopkeepers which are having shops inside the university. University is the right place for emerging engineers and researchers. Department of student welfare is established inside the university. Direct employment to the skilled labor for plumbing, maintenance, landscaping and security services are also there.

 

General

 

1.

Other details as indicated in Appendix III of EIA Notification 2006 and the manual titled as "EIA guidance Manual-Building, Construction, Township and area Development projects" published by the Ministry of Environment & Forests, New Delhi, should also be attended.

EIA Report as per Appendix III of EIA Notification 2006 considering details as mentioned in "EIA guidance Manual-Building, Construction, Township and area Development projects" is prepared and being submitted.

2.

Environmental aspects identified under some of the project activities may not be comprehensive and some of the significant aspects under some of the activities of the

All identified Environmental impacts have been studied and are mentioned in the EIA report.

4

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

 

project in question might not have been identified. All such environmental aspects may be added to the list.

 

3.

Some of the activities with their associated environmental aspects of the project in question might be of significant magnitude and not included in the list project activities. All such activities may be added to the list of project activities.

All project related activities have been discussed in the EIA report.

4.

The project proponent may add additional project activities and environmental aspects, if any, fill the impact matrix (copy attached) and carryout significance analysis for identifying the significant environmental aspects. Scale, sensitivity and duration of impacts; type, size and frequency of environmental aspects; applicable legal requirements; and concerns of interested parties and local public may be used as the basis for the significance analysis of the environmental aspects.

Impact Matrix is attached as Annexure 11.

5.

In the EIA study each of the environmental aspects listed in the TOR should be quantified, their positive and negative impacts on different areas of impacts should be identified and assessed and the results of such assessment should be reported in the EIA report.

EIA study has been done covering all the listed TOR’s with an assessment of their positive and negative impacts. Further anticipated impact against each TOR has been listed.

6.

In the Environment Management Plan, management of each of the significant environmental aspects (with identified and assessed significant environmental impacts) for mitigating the impacts should be

Mitigation measures to control the adverse impacts on Environment have been proposed and are listed in the TOR compliance and EIA report.

5

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

 

objectively stated.

 

7.

Environment Management Plan should include technical and institutional aspects for pre- treatment by constituent units.

Technical & Institutional aspects have been covered in the EMP in Chapter-9.

8.

Environmental Management Plan should be accompanied with Environmental Monitoring Plan and environmental cost and benefit assessment.

Environment monitoring will be on six monthly basis during operation phase. Environment cost and benefit assessment will be undertaken after the expansion project is 100% executed.

9.

Examine separately the details for operation phases both for Environmental Management Plan and Environmental Monitoring Plan.

Table: Expenditure on typical Environmental Measures during Operation phase.

 

S.No

Title

Capital

Recurring

 
 

Cost

Cost

Rs. Lacs

Rs.

Lacs/

Annum

1.

Air

Pollution

10

0.5

Control

2.

Water

Pollution

250

10

Control/

Sewage Treatment

Plant

3.

Noise Pollution Control (Including cost of Landscaping and Green Belt)

300

5.0

4.

Solid

Waste

2

1.0

Management

5.

Environment

5

1.0

Monitoring

and

Management

6.

RWH

50

2.0

7.

Miscellaneous

35

1.0

(Appointment

of

(includin

Consultants,

g

the

Management

of

consent

Environment Cell,

Fees)

Consent Fees)

 

Total Rs. Lacs

652

20.5

10.

Does the University have a well laid down Environment Policy? If so, it may be detailed in the EIA report.

Environment policy is already in place and is attached as Annexure 12.

6

Area Development Project, “ Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS

11.

Does the Environment policy prescribe for standard operating process / procedures to bring into focus any infringement / deviation / violation of the environmental or forest norms / conditions? If so, it may be detailed in the EIA.

All details as mentioned have been considered while drafting the Environmental Policy.

12.

What is the hierarchical system or Administrative order of the University to deal with the environmental issues and for ensuring compliance with the EC conditions? Details of this system may be given.

The hierarchical system or Administrative order of the University to deal with the environmental issues and for ensuring compliance with the EC conditions is attached as Annexure 13.

13.

Does the University have a system of reporting of non compliances / violations of environmental norms? This reporting mechanism should be detailed in the EIA report.

The University will obey the objectives and Governance mechanism for reporting of non compliances / violations of environmental norms. The same is attached as Annexure 13

14.

Delineate the concrete proposal regarding activities to be undertaken under Corporate Social Responsibility programme, which should be long lasting in nature and should be as per the needs of a particular Village/area/ local habitats/ stakeholders to be adopted by the promoter 92 company, which can be done by involving a person having knowledge and experience of socio-economic activities.

The concrete proposal regarding activities to be undertaken under Corporate Social Responsibility discussed in Chapter-9 of EIA report.

7

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

SAS Nagar Project

1.0 PURPOSE OF THE REPORT

The Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change (MoEF & CC) introduced the Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) Notification, 2006 on 14 th September, 2006, which not only reengineered the entire environment clearance (EC) process specified under the EIA notification 1994, but also introduced a number of new developmental sectors which would require prior environmental clearance. The EIA notification 2006 has notified a list of 39 developmental sectors which have been further categorised as A or B based on their capacity and likely environmental impacts. Category B projects have been further categorised as B1 and B2. In this regard, area development projects are covered in Category-8 (b) B (B1) and require clearance at the level of SEIAA.

Project or Activity

Category with threshold limit

i)

Conditions if any

(1)

(2)

(3)

 

(4)

(5)

8

 

Building

/Construction

projects/Area

Development

projects

and

Townships

8(a)

Building and

 

≥20000

 

# The term “built up area” for the purpose of this Notification the built up or covered area on all the floors put together including its basement and other service areas, which are

Construction

sq.mtrs and

projects

<1,50,000

sq.mtrs.

of

built-up area

#

proposed in the building or construction projects. Note-1- The projects or activities shall not include industrial shed, school, college, hostel for educational institution, but such buildings shall ensure sustainable environmental management, solid and liquid waste management, rain water harvesting and may use recycled materials such as fly ash bricks.

 

Note-2-

“General

Conditions”

shall

not

apply.

8(b)

Townships

 

Covering

an

++ A project of Township and Area Development Projects covered under this item shall require an Environment Assessment report and be apprised as Category ‘B1’ Project. Note.- “General Conditions” shall not apply.

and Area

area

50 ha

Development

and

or

built

projects.

up

area

≥1,50,000

 

sq.mtrs ++

8

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

M/s Chandigarh Educational Trust is developing the educational institute namely “Chandigarh University” located at Village Gharaun and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt. SAS Nagar. As per the EIA notification, 14.09.2006, this project falls under Category ‘B’ and Project or Activity 8(b) [Township and Area Development Projects; built up area ≥1,50,000 sq.m]. The plot area of project is 56.206 acres and having built up area of 228557.84 sq.m.

Thereafter, EIA study was started based on standard TOR’s as per MoEF&CC notification S.O. 996(E) dated 10.04.2015. Case was considered in 143 rd SEAC, Punjab meeting held on 30.03.2016 for TOR and it was decided that EIA report can be prepared after successful submission of application. Thus, impact study was started from 9 th October 2015 to 26 th December, 2015.

“Environment” in EIA context mainly focuses, but is not limited to physical, chemical, biological, geological, social, economical, and aesthetic dimensions along with their complex interactions, which affect individuals, communities and ultimately determines their forms, character, relationship and survival. In EIA context, ‘effect’ and ‘impact’ can often be used interchangeably. However, ‘impact’ is considered as a value judgment of the significance of an effect. This report tries to evaluate the impacts of Chandigarh University, Village Gharaun and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt. SAS Nagar.

1.1 IDENTIFICATION OF THE PROJECT AND PROJECT PROPONENT

1.1.1 Project Proponent

Chandigarh University is located in sprawling green campus comprising of approx. 56.206 acres. Chandigarh University (CU) is a leading university envisioned to excel in research, innovation and entrepreneurship. Ranked among Asia's Best & Fastest Growing Education Institutes, provide inspirational learning to nurture students to lead the professional world.

With students from 29 Indian States and 20 Countries, CU is one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse universities in the vicinity of The City Beautiful- Chandigarh. The University is broadly organized into seven institutes, providing education through more than 50 programs including doctorates, post graduates and graduate programs in a variety of disciplines taught by more than 2000 tenured faculty members.

1.1.2 Project

The project is an educational project over a land area of 56.206 acres (2,27,457.61 Sq.m). The built up area of the project is 2,28,557.84 sq.m. The permission for change of land use has also been obtained for Institutional purpose Vide Memo No. 5503 CTP (Pb.)/SP. 43(M) dated- 29.01.2009 for 11.42 acres. Copy of same is attached as Annexure-1. The application for additional CLU of 16.006 acres is submitted and attached as Annexure- 1A.

The total cost of the project is Rs. 72.70 crores. The certificate showing project cost is attached at Annexure- 2. The construction has already been completed. Letter in this regard has been submitted to SEAC/SEIAA Punjab. The photographs are shown in Figure-1.

9

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.1 Site Photographs 1.2 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF
Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.1 Site Photographs 1.2 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF
Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.1 Site Photographs 1.2 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF
Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.1 Site Photographs 1.2 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF

Figure 1.1 Site Photographs

1.2 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE NATURE OF SITE, LOCATION OF THE PROJECT The land use of the area is examined. The following documents/drawings are provided:

A-1 & A-1A -Change of land Use Fig 1.1 -Site Photographs of the project site Fig 1.2- Topographic Sheet Fig 1.3- Location Plan Fig 1.4- Paranomic view showing key features within 500 m radius

10

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.2 Project Site on Survey of India

Figure 1.2 Project Site on Survey of India Toposheet No H43K10 Scale 1:50,000

1.2 Project Site on Survey of India Toposheet No H43K10 Scale 1:50,000 Figure 1.3 Location Plan

Figure 1.3 Location Plan of the Project Site

11

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 1.4 Paranomic view showing features within 500

Figure 1.4 Paranomic view showing features within 500 m radius

The project site is located at about 13 km from the Interstate Boundary. No wildlife or bird sanctuary comes within 10 km of project site. Clearance under The Forest Conservation, Act, 1980 and The C.R.Z Notification, 1991 is not required. NOC for approach road from Department of Forest, Govt. of India is attached as Annexure-2A.

The break-up of the area is given in the following table:

TABLE 1: PROJECT AREA DETAILS

S. No.

Description

Area in sq. ft

Area in sq.m

Area in Acres

Percentage

1.

Plot area

2448333.36

227457.61

56.206

 

2.

Built up area

2459282.33

228557.84

-

 
 

Ground

432956.347

40222.96

9.94

17.68%

3.

Coverage

4.

Green Area

378169.75

35133.12

8.68

15.03%

5.

Parking Area

850308.18

79027.92

19.52

34.70%

The total site area is 56.206 acres (or 2,27,457.61 Sq.m) with total built up area of 228557.84 sq.m. Distance of Kharar Railway Station 7 Km Chandigarh Airport 23 Km. The nearest town and district headquarters is Mohali District Court at a distance of 16 Km. No Protected forest, Reserve forest, Ecologically sensitive area, National Park, Biosphere Reserve & Wild Life Sanctuary are found within 10 km radius of the project site.

12

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

1.3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The project was considered by SEAC, Punjab in its meeting held on 134 th SEAC meeting on 23.10.2015 and TOR was issued in 143 rd SEAC meeting on 30.03.2016

The EIA study was conducted during the period Oct 9 th , 2015 to Dec 26 th , 2015. Efforts have been laid down to address various aspects of Impact of Project activity on the environment by incorporating issues provided out in TOR in the EIA/EMP Report.

S.No.

Terms of Reference

i)

The project falls under category B-1 under item 8(b) Township and Area Development projects and requires an Environmental Impact Assessment Study for the entire site area.

 

Operation Stage

i)

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the residential, commercial, institutional, industrial, recreational, social, cultural & religious activities to be carried out.

ii)

Examine and submit complete traffic management plan, to ensure that no traffic congestion/ obstruction takes place along the main road/ highway in front of the University due to stoppage/ parking of vehicles including public/ private vehicles meant for loading/ unloading passengers/ students of the University.

iii)

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the facilities to be provided such as water supply, electrical power supply, fuel supply & consumption including LPG, transportation and communication.

iv)

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts due to the sewerage & sewage treatment and its disposal systems and storm water & its drainage system.

v)

Examine and submit the details of the environmental impacts caused due to the generation of captive power & emergency power.

vi)

Submit the details of the management & handling of municipal solid waste, e-waste, hazardous waste, scrap and Biomedical Waste.

vii)

Submit the details of the socio economic impact due to the employment to be generated from the household activities.

 

General

i)

Other details as indicated in Appendix III of EIA Notification 2006 and the manual titled as "EIA guidance Manual-Building, Construction, Township and area Development projects" published by the Ministry of Environment & Forests, New Delhi, should also be attended.

ii)

Environmental aspects identified under some of the project activities may not be comprehensive and some of the significant aspects under some of the activities of the project in question might not have been identified. All such environmental aspects may be added to the list.

iii)

Some of the activities with their associated environmental aspects of the project in question might be of significant magnitude and not included in the list project activities. All such activities may be added to the list of project activities.

iv)

The project proponent may add additional project activities and environmental aspects, if any, fill the impact matrix (copy attached) and carryout significance analysis for identifying

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

 

the significant environmental aspects. Scale, sensitivity and duration of impacts; type, size and frequency of environmental aspects; applicable legal requirements; and concerns of interested parties and local public may be used as the basis for the significance analysis of the environmental aspects.

v)

In the EIA study each of the environmental aspects listed in the TOR should be quantified, their positive and negative impacts on different areas of impacts should be identified and assessed and the results of such assessment should be reported in the EIA report.

vi)

In the Environment Management Plan, management of each of the significant environmental aspects (with identified and assessed significant environmental impacts) for mitigating the impacts should be objectively stated.

vii)

Environment Management Plan should include technical and institutional aspects for pre- treatment by constituent units.

viii)

Environmental Management Plan should be accompanied with Environmental Monitoring Plan and environmental cost and benefit assessment.

ix)

Examine separately the details for operation phases both for Environmental Management Plan and Environmental Monitoring Plan.

x)

Does the University have a well laid down Environment Policy? If so, it may be detailed in the EIA report.

xi)

Does the Environment policy prescribe for standard operating process / procedures to bring into focus any infringement / deviation / violation of the environmental or forest norms / conditions? If so, it may be detailed in the EIA.

xii)

What is the hierarchical system or Administrative order of the University to deal with the environmental issues and for ensuring compliance with the EC conditions? Details of this system may be given.

xiii)

Does the University have a system of reporting of non compliances / violations of environmental norms? This reporting mechanism should be detailed in the EIA report.

xiv)

Delineate the concrete proposal regarding activities to be undertaken under Corporate Social Responsibility programme, which should be long lasting in nature and should be as per the needs of a particular Village/area/ local habitats/ stakeholders to be adopted by the promoter 92 company, which can be done by involving a person having knowledge and experience of socio-economic activities

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

CHAPTER 2

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

SAS Nagar Project

2.0 SIGNIFICANCE AND OBJECTIVE OF PROPOSED PROJECT

The basic objective of the project is as follow:

Chandigarh University is not only to provide education to the students but also adopt developmental approach which leads towards sustainable development. The project provides quality education to students of Punjab and other parts of the country.

2.1 LOCATION OF THE PROJECT

The conceptual plan is enclosed along as Drawing-1. The document showing the Khasra No. is attached at Annexure 3. The site has an easy access to land, power, water, transport and communication, approach through road & access distances from the nearest highway, railway station etc. In addition, No Protected forest, Reserve Forest, National Park, Biosphere Reserve & Wild Life Sanctuary are found within 10 km radius of the project site. Topographic sheet, Key plans showing the project site and its surrounding

features and contour map are provided as below:

Fig. 1.2 Topographic Sheet Fig. 1.4 Drawing showing key features within 500 m radius Drawing-1 Conceptual Plan Fig. 2.1 Contour/ Survey Plan

2.2 BASIC REQUIREMENTS

2.2.1 LAND USE The break-up of the area is given below:

PROJECT AREA DETAILS

Description

Area covered (%)

Area in Sq.ft

Area in Sq.m

Area in acres

Site area

-

2448333.36

227457.61

56.206

Built-up area

-

2459282.33

228557.84

-

Ground coverage

17.68

432956.347

40222.96

9.94

Green area

15.03

378169.75

35133.12

8.68

Open parking area

34.70

850308.18

79027.92

19.52

Landuse of the project site within 10 km radius is attached as Figure 2.1(a)

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 2.1(a) Landuse of the Project Site 2.2.2

Figure 2.1(a) Landuse of the Project Site

2.2.2 WATER The total design population of the project is 28000 persons (3000 is residential and 25000 is floating) out of which the existing population is 14446 (out of which 12146 floating and 2300 is residential). Total water requirement of the project will be 1530 KLD (@135 lpcd for residential and @45 lpcd for floating) out of which 856 KLD is the existing water demand. Water requirement is being met through tubewell for which application has been submitted and copy is attached as Annexure-4. Drawing showing the location of tubewell is attached as Figure 2.2.

16

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt

SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust Figure 2.1 Contour

Figure 2.1 Contour Plan

17

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt

SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

Distt SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust Figure 2.2 Water Supply Plan showing location of

Figure 2.2 Water Supply Plan showing location of Tubewells

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

The design sewer flow from the University will be 1224 KLD and STP of 1 MLD capacity based on MBBR technology will be installed at site to treat sewage in addition to existing STP, additional STP of 250 KLD (1 No.) and 450 KLD (1 No.). Treated sewage will be recycled for flushing in girl hostel-2 and excess of treated sewage will be disposed on 4 acres of land used as Karnal technology. Drawing showing the location of STP’s is attached as Drawing-3.Water balance diagram for existing as well as after expansion is given below.

Water Balance (Summer)

Tube-well Rain Water Recharging Roof Top & Storm water Domestic Demand 1530 KLD Horticulture Demand
Tube-well
Rain Water
Recharging
Roof Top & Storm
water
Domestic Demand
1530 KLD
Horticulture Demand - An
area of 18943.33 sq. mt. is
available with a demand of:
Flushing @ 35
lpcd
13 KLD
(Girls Hostel-2)
Domestic
1517 KLD
104 KLD – summer@ 5.5
lit.sq.m
To recharge
aquifer
Flow to Sewer 80%
Sewage Load 1224 KLD to be
Treated in STP of capacity 1 MLD
(proposed) and existing STP’s 250
KLD (No. 1) & 450 KLD (No. 1)
98%
recovery
1187 KLD
Treated Sewage 1200 KLD
Excess will be disposed on 4
acres of Green Area developed
under Karnal Technology @
295 KL/acre against the limit
of 400 KL/acre

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

Water Balance (Winter)

SAS Nagar Project

Tube-well Rain Water Recharging Roof Top & Storm water Domestic Demand 1530 KLD Horticulture Demand
Tube-well
Rain Water
Recharging
Roof Top & Storm
water
Domestic Demand
1530 KLD
Horticulture Demand - An
area of 18943.33 sq. mt.
is available with a
demand of:
To recharge
Flushing @ 35
lpcd
13 KLD
(Girls Hostel-2)
Domestic
aquifer
1517 KLD
34 KLD – winter@ 1.8
lit.sq.m
Flow to Sewer 80%
Sewage Load 1224 KLD to be
Treated in STP of capacity 1 MLD
(proposed) and existing STP’s 250
KLD (No. 1) & 450 KLD (No. 1)
98%
recovery
1187 KLD
Treated Sewage 1200 KLD
Excess will be disposed on 4
acres of Green Area developed
under Karnal Technology @
295 KL/acre against the limit
of 400 KL/acre

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

Water Balance (Monsoon)

SAS Nagar Project

Tube-well Rain Water Recharging Roof Top & Storm water Domestic Demand 1530 KLD To recharge
Tube-well
Rain Water
Recharging
Roof Top & Storm
water
Domestic Demand
1530 KLD
To recharge
aquifer
Flushing @ 35 lpcd
13 KLD
(Girls Hostel-2)
Domestic
1517 KLD
Horticulture Demand -
An area of 18943.33
sq. mt. is available with
a demand of:
Flow to Sewer
9 KLD - Monsoon@ 0.5
lit.sq.m
80%
Sewage Load 1224 KLD To
be Treated in STP of capacity
1 MLD (proposed) and
existing STP’s 250 KLD (No.
1) & 450 KLD (No. 1)
98%
recovery
1187 KLD
Treated Sewage 1200 KLD
Excess will be disposed on 4
acres of Green Area developed
under Karnal Technology @
295 KL/acre against the limit
of 400 KL/acre

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

The treated sewage will confirm to the limits as given below:

Characteristics of MBBR

S. No.

PARAMETERS

Unit

TREATED

SEWAGE

1.

pH

 

6.0 - 8.5

2.

TSS

ppm

<100

3.

BOD

ppm

<20

4.

COD

ppm

80

5.

Total kjeldahl nitrogen(as N0)

ppm

<10

6.

Ammonia Nitrogen ( as N)

ppm

<2

7.

Total phosphorous

ppm

<2

8.

Fecal Coli form

MPN / 100 ml

1 x 10 3

9.

Oil & Grease

ppm

< 5

The proposed Sewage Treatment System: MBBR (Moving Bed Bioreactor Technology) Sewerage System An external sewage network shall collect the sewage from all units, and flow by gravity to the Sewage Treatment Plant. Following are the benefits of providing the Sewage Treatment Plant in the present circumstances:

Reduced net daily water requirements, source for Horticultural purposes by utilization of the treated wastewater.

Reduced dependence on the public utilities for water supply and sewerage systems.

Sludge generated from the Sewage Treatment Plant shall be rich in organic content and an excellent fertilizer for horticultural purposes.

a. Treatment Technology

The sewage will be first passed through a Bar Screen Chamber where any extraneous matter would get trapped. The influent would overflow by gravity to the Oil & Grease Chamber which is provided for safety

so that the oil may not inhibit the biological growth in the MBBR reactors.

The sewage would then collected in an Equalization Tank where the variations in flow and characteristics are dampened, which otherwise can lead to operational problems and moreover it allows a constant flow rate downstream. Here the sewage is kept in mixed condition by means of coarse air bubble diffusion.

The Bio Reactor is based on the Fluidized Random Aerobic Reactor which combines the advantage of an Activated Sludge Plant with the Random distribution systems such as Biofilter with capacities that could be as low as 1/10 th of ASP and fractional power consumption, such a reactor is ideal for the efficient removal of BOD and organics from the wastewater.

The tanks are packed with RIGID PP-UV-sterilized Gas Fluted Media with liquid random distribution wherein air diffusers are placed to uniformly release air across the tanks. Working Principle:

Bacteria grow rapidly in the Bio-Pac unit under properly engineered conditions. They consume organic chemical for their growth and remove them from the wastewater. The bacteria converts chemical into

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

biological cells, which under proper growth conditions, form slims. The bacteria adhere to available surfaces and accumulate into what we call random biological film or fixed film. The high surface area-to- volume ratio of the units allows for accumulation of substantial concentration of bacteria in the relatively small reactor units. Further, the accumulated bacteria which provides high rates of removal or organic chemicals are fixed in the system and do not need to be recycled back to the basin. In the Bio Reactor system the water is constantly flowing through rigid PVC matrix to which the biological film attached. As the water flows past the biological film, bacteria in the film absorb organic chemicals as well as oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other trace nutrients required for their growth. As the bacteria grow on the matrix and as more chemicals are added to the unit, the stationary biological film will continue to build in thickness. As the film becomes thicker the depth of penetration by diffusion of the absorbed material such as oxygen or other nutrients is not sufficient to reach the entire distance through the slime of the plastic media. At some point, the film will become sufficiently thick and portion of the film closest to the plastic media will not receive any food or nutrient, particularly oxygen. The inner layer of the film becomes anaerobic and the organisms lose their ability to adhere to the media surface. The shear forces of the water and / or air bubbles flowing through the matrix will ultimately become great enough to tear this portion of the biological film loose from the media. This process is called sloughing. The solids which slough from the media will flow out of the system with the sewages and are to be removed from the water through clarification in a settling module. The exposed portion of media surface will repeat the process of slime accumulation and sloughing.

In actual operation of the Bio Reactor units, biological film will be in a state of dynamic, continuous growth and sloughing. At any given time, portion of the media are always at some point between forming a new film sloughing.

Sewage Quality:

The Sewage discharged from the Bio reactor system will contain sloughed biological solids, but would be relatively free of soluble organic chemicals. The quantity of biological solids in the sewage will depend substantially on the quantity of suspended solids and the concentration of soluble BOD entering system. It is therefore necessary to provide means of separating the biological mass from the sewage. Package unit contains tube settlers for sedimentation and 60 Gross fluted Rigid PVC fill media for the FAB units to treat the wastewater for discharge into the receiving waters and/or the sanitary sewers as per the local regulations. The media thickness changes with the design parameters/depth of the unit and can vary from 0.25 to 0.40 mm thickness.

1. Tube Settler: Here we are providing the Tube Settler along with the PVC media which will enhance the

contact period and thereby the improved performance. The Tube settler will have a determined lope in the bottom to collect the suspended solids from the waste water. The sludge will be suited to the Sludge Drying Beds.

2. Pressure Sand Filter: Here the treated water coming from the TSS will be treated for the suspended

impurity removal. 3. Activated Carbon Filter: Here the water coming from the ACF will be treated for colour removal, suspended impurity removal and the treated water shall be sent to the sewer.

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

4. Filter Press: A filter comprises a set of vertical, juxtaposed recessed plates, presses against each other by hydraulic jacks at one end of the set. The pressure applied to the joint face of each filtering plate must withstand the chamber internal pressure developed by the sludge pumping system. This vertical plate layout forms watertight filtration chambers allowing easy mechanization for the discharge of cakes. Filter clothes finely or tightly meshed are applied to the two grooved surfaces in this plat.

Primary Treatment: This is the first step of inlet waste mainly consist of removal of coarse particles, oil and grace and mixing co-agents in the water for removal of suspended solids through sedimentations. After this treatment scheme, the BOD, TSS, COD, and O&G level comes down to 20% of initial levels.

Secondary Treatment:

This is second step of waste water treatment. It mainly consist aerobic process of the Primary treated water, bacterial growth, EM dosing addition of oxygen and chemical which help in bacterial growth and lastly settlement of the biological waste as sludge. Normally it is found that the reduction level in TSS, BOD, O & G and COD after an efficient secondary treatment will be as under-

Tertiary Treatment:

This is the final stage of treatment where the Sewage after secondary treatment first is mixed with Sodium Hypo Chloride and then Sewage will be passed through (PSF) dual media filter and (ACF) activated carbon filter where sand, anthracite and activated carbon will be used as filtration media. Once the above limits achieved thereafter the final outlet water will also confirms the Bio Assay test of 90% of fish survive.

Schematic drawing are enclosed as Figure 2.3.

fish survive. Schematic drawing are enclosed as Figure 2.3. Figure 2.3 Schematic View of STP based

Figure 2.3 Schematic View of STP based on MBBR Technology

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

2.2.3 POWER

Total Energy requirement of 1940 KW to be provided by Punjab State Power Corporation Limited. Copy of approval is shown in Fig. 2.4. 3 D.G sets of capacity 1010 KVA, 600 KVA and 320 KVA have been installed for power backup. CFL and LED lighting is provided in Block-9. Quantification of energy saved is discussed below. Table 2.1 Energy Conservation Detail

S.N

Description

Points

Wattage

Conv.

Total

Total watt

Saving/Hr

Saving/

Total

O

/CFL

Lamp

watt

with

8 hrs

Saving

watt

with

Filament

units/

CFL/Hr

lamp/Hrs.

KWH

1

Energy saved by using CFL instead of filament/warm lamps

3000

18

40

54000

120000

66000

528000

528

KWH

2

Energy saved by using LED instead of filament/warm lamps

544

13

40

7072

21760

14688

117504

117.5

 

TOTAL SAVING PER DAY BY USING CFL and LED INSTEAD OF FILAMENT LAMP

645.5

 

KWh

 

TOTAL ENERGY SAVING IN %AGE

4%

Solar water heaters have been provided. 7 x 2000 LPD is the capacity of solar water heater. With respect to the electrical installation of all the materials/appliances etc. to be carried out in conformity of the Electricity Act, 2003 and the Electricity Rules, 1956. Following codes of standards are being followed and is being followed in future for electrical safety programme:

National Building Code of India, 2005

IS 9583:1981 Code of practice for emergency lighting.

IS 1979 Part 17 Codes of Practice for maintenance of electrical switchgear and control gear.

IS 2309: 1989 Code of Practice for Protection of Building and allied structure against lighting. Electrical Hazardous Plan is shown in Fig.2.5

2.2.4 PARKING REQUIREMENT

Adequate provision is made for parking at the project site. There is adequate parking provision for visiotors so as not to disturb the traffic and allow smooth movement at the site.Parking plan is shown in Fig. 2.6.

Table 2: Parking Details

S.No

Parking Type

Area in sq. m

No. of cars

1.

Open Parking

79027.92/18

4390

 

Total cars provided

4390

 

Total ECS required(@ 0.75 ECS/ 100 sq.m built up area)

1714

Further the institue is having 40 buses for which3 acres of separate land on rent has been provided for arking purposes.

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 2.4 Letter from

Figure 2.4 Letter from PSPCL

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 2.5 Electrical Hazardous Plan

Figure 2.5 Electrical Hazardous Plan

27

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt

SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt SAS Nagar Project By: Chandigarh Educational Trust Figure 2.6 Parking

Figure 2.6 Parking Plan

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

CHAPTER 3 DESCRIPTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

3.0 GENERAL

Sustainable development is built on three basic premises i.e., economic growth, ecological balance and social progress. Economic growth achieved in a way that does not consider the environmental concerns, is not being sustainable in the long run. Therefore, sustainable development needs careful integration of environmental, economic, and social needs in order to achieve both an increased standard of living in short term, and a net gain or equilibrium among human, natural, and economic resources to support future generations in the long term. It is necessary to understand the links between environment and development in order to make choices for development that is being economically efficient, socially equitable and responsible, as well as environmentally sound.

Social Development Sustainable Development Economic Environmental Development Development This chapter provides
Social
Development
Sustainable
Development
Economic
Environmental
Development
Development
This chapter provides baseline information on the project.

3.1 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED

The study for the project area includes the project site and surroundings. The area up to 500 m is considered as core zone and the area lying within 10 km radius from the proposed site is considered as buffer zone in which some impacts may be observed on its environment. The baseline data for the project site area was collected in accordance with the laid down guidelines for primary and secondary data and is enclosed in Annexure-5.

3.2 STUDY AREA AT A GLANCE

General Particulars:

VILLAGE : GHARAUN & MAMUPUR TEHSIL : KHARAR

DISTRICT :

MOHALI

STATE : PUNJAB See Fig.1.4. Drawing showing key features within 500 m radius.

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

3.3 SEISMICITY OF AREA

The area is located in Zone-IV as per ISO 1893 (Part I):

SAS Nagar Project

in Zone-IV as per ISO 1893 (Part I): SAS Nagar Project F F i i g

FFiigg 33

11

SSEEIISSMMIICC ZZOONNEE MMAAPP

Accordingly all structures is designed to meet the National Building Code 2005 requirements for Zone-IV.

3.4 TOPOGRAPHY AND DRAINAGE OF THE AREA The coordinate of the project site area are 30°46'46.82'' N & 76°34'31.87'' E. Contour level of the site varies from 98.63 m to 101.38 m. Contour Plan is shown in Figure. 2.1. The entire area is gently flat with an imperceptible slope towards South-West and some undulation. Plan showing Drainage pattern of the project site is enclosed as Figure 3.2. Both remain undisturbed with the project development.

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 3.2 Drainage Pattern 3.5 WATER ENVIRONMENT Water

Figure 3.2 Drainage Pattern

3.5 WATER ENVIRONMENT Water Environment of an area includes: a) Surface water as Rivers, lakes etc. and b) Ground Water. There is no perennial source of surface water in the area except seasonal rivulet Janti Devi Ki Rao. The ground water samples at project site were analysed as per IS:10500 and reports are attached at Annexure-5. The analysis of water shows that all the parameters are well within the permissible limits of Indian Standards of drinking water (IS: 10500: 2012). List of ground water sampling location is given in below mentioned table:

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Table 3.1: Sampling Location for Ground water analysis

   

Sampling

Direction from the Project site

Distance from the Project Site (km)

Station

Sampling Location

Location Code

1.

Project Site

GW0

-

-

2.

Village Hasanpur

GW1

NW

2.1

3.

Village Rurki

GW2

SE

2.4

4.

Village Khanpur

GW3

SE

5.0

SE 2.4 4. Village Khanpur GW3 SE 5.0 Figure3.3 Toposheet showing the Ground Water monitoring

Figure3.3 Toposheet showing the Ground Water monitoring locations

3.5.1 HYDRO-GEOLOGY (SOURCE: CGWB)

The S.A.S Nagar district is occupied by Quaternary Alluvial deposits belonging to the vast Indo-Gangetic alluvial plains, which forms the main aquifer system. Groundwater occurs under phreatic conditions in the shallow aquifers while leaky confined to conditions occur along the deeper aquifers of Quaternary alluvial deposits. The CGWB has drilled 11 exploratory wells, 2 slim holes and 1 piezometer in the district in the depth range of 295-590 m bgl to determine the various aquifer systems and its extent. All the exploratory wells drilled in the Derabassi block were abandoned due to insufficient thickness of aquifer zones and low yield. Exploratory drilling has revealed 4-13 saturated granular zones comprising of fine to coarse sand, silt and kankar up to the total drilled depth of 460 m in Kharra and Sialba Majra blocks. The discharge ranges from 870-2407 lpm for 21.65 and 11.36 m drawdown respectively. The transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity varies between 55 to 862 m 2 /day and 7.4-48 m/day respectively. The storativity value ranges between 7.3*10-42.4*10-3, which clearly indicates a leaky confined condition. In the case of unconfined aquifer, depth to water level ranges from 4.1 to 13.02 m bgl during pre-monsoon and 4.1 to 12.89 m bgl during post monsoon. In major part of the district, the water level ranges between 5 and 10 m while the water level in the northern part is more than 10 m bgl. Seasonal fluctuation shows that, in general, there is

32

Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

an overall decline in the water level except few isolated patches. The long-term trend of water level also shows that there is decline in water level on major part of the area ranging from 0.11 to 0.80 m/yr except a few isolated patches where the rise is at the rate if 0.51 m/yr which is insignificant.

(Source:http://cgwb.gov.in/District_Profile/Punjab/SAS%20Nagar.pdf)

3.6 METEOROLOGY & CLIMATOLOGY

3.6.1 Introduction

The meteorological parameters studied are temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. The prominent wind direction is North-West. Meteorology plays a vital role in affecting the dispersion of pollutants into the atmosphere. Since meteorological factors show wide fluctuations with time, meaningful interpretation can be drawn only from long-term reliable data. Such source of data can be taken up from the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), which maintains a network of meteorological stations at several important locations.

3.6.2 Climate

Mohali has a sub-tropical continental monsoon climate characterized by a seasonal rhythm: hot summers, slightly cold winters, unreliable rainfall and great variation in temperature (1 °C to 44 °C). In winter, frost sometimes occurs during December and January. The normal annual rainfall of the district is 1061 mm which is unevenly distributed over the area in 49 days. The south west monsoon contributes about 80% of annual rainfall. The city also receives occasional winter rains from the west.

(Source: Mohali District at a Glance)

3.6.2.1 Temperature Summer: The temperature in summer may rise to a maximum of 44°C. Temperatures generally remain between 35°C to 42°C. Autumn: In autumn, the temperature may rise to a maximum of 36°C. Temperatures usually remain between 16° to 27° in autumn. The minimum temperature is around 13°C. Winter: Average temperatures in winter (November to February) remain at (max) 7°C to 15 °C and (min) - 2°C to 5°C. Spring: Spring temperatures vary between (max) 16°C to 25°C and (min) 9°C to 18°C.

3.6.3 Rainfall

The normal annual rainfall of the district is 1061 mm which is unevenly distributed over the area in 49 days. The south west monsoon contributes about 80% of annual rainfall. The city also receives occasional

winter rains from the west. Source:sasnagar.gov.in/overview.htm,http://india.gov.in/outerwin.php?id=http://sasnagar.gov.in/CG WB Report.

3.6.4 Micro-Meteorology at Site

The Wind rose diagram prepared on the basis of meteorological data monitoring near project site is given

below:

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project 3.7 AIR ENVIRONMENT To study the baseline air

3.7 AIR ENVIRONMENT To study the baseline air quality scenario in the study area, 4 Ambient Air Quality-Monitoring (AAQM) stations were selected in the study area. The ambient air quality monitoring stations were set up at the following locations:

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Table 3.2: Sampling Location for Ambient Air analysis

   

Sampling

Direction from the Project site

Distance from the Project Site (km)

Station

Sampling Location

Location Code

1.

Project Site

A0

-

-

2.

Village Hasanpur

A1

NW

2.1

3.

Village Rurki

A2

SE

2.4

4.

Village Khanpur

A3

SE

5.0

To study the baseline air quality scenario in the study area, 4 Ambient Air Quality-Monitoring (AAQM) stations were selected in the study area. The ambient air quality monitoring stations were set up at the following locations.

monitoring stations were set up at the following locations. Figure3.4 Toposheet showing the Ambient Air monitoring

Figure3.4 Toposheet showing the Ambient Air monitoring locations

3.7.1 Monitoring Results Monitoring station-wise minimum and statistical analysis (minimum, maximum, arthimetic mean) for measured levels of PM2.5, PM10, SO2 and NO2 in study area for the monitoring period are shown parameter wise in Table 3.4 (a1)-3.4( a1).

(i) Particulate Matter (PM 2.5 )

The 24- hourly average PM 2.5 level varied station-wise between 31.25 µg/m 3 to 47.08 µg/m 3 in October, 33.2 µg/m 3 to 46.86 µg/m 3 in November and from 33.61 µg/m 3 to 48.12 µg/m 3 in December. The limit 60 µg/m 3 is stipulated for residential, Rural and other areas in National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Month wise variation of PM 2.5 is pictorially shown in Figure-3.2 (a1) to 3.2 (a3).

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Table 3.2(a1) Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of October (2015)

 

PM 2.5 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

38.49

47.08

41.06

60

A1

31.25

36.25

33.57

60

A2

33.89

35.58

34.88

60

A3

34.17

36.1

35.26

60

35.58 34.88 60 A3 34.17 36.1 35.26 60 Figure 3.4(a1) Station wise Variation of PM 2

Figure 3.4(a1) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of October (2015)

Table 3.2(a2) Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of November (2015)

 

PM 2.5 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

37.08

46.86

41.65

60

A1

33.2

36.82

35.33

60

A2

33.33

34.44

34.01

60

A3

34.44

37.76

35.84

60

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 3.4(a2) Station wise Variation of PM 2

Figure 3.4(a2) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of November (2015)

Table 3.2(a3) Summary of PM 2.5 Level Monitored of December (2015)

 

PM 2.5 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

38.91

48.12

41.29

60

A1

33.61

35.27

34.34

60

A2

34.44

36.25

34.93

60

A3

34.02

36.4

35.16

60

36.25 34.93 60 A3 34.02 36.4 35.16 60 Figure 3.4(a3) Station wise Variation of PM 2

Figure 3.4(a3) Station wise Variation of PM 2.5 of December (2015)

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

(ii) Particulate Matter (PM 10 ) The 24- hourly average PM 10 level varied station-wise between 97.16 µg/m 3 to 109.73 µg/m 3 in October, 97.96 µg/m 3 to 106.96 µg/m 3 in November and from 97.32 µg/m 3 to 108.79 µg/m 3 in December. The limit 100 µg/m 3 is stipulated for residential, Rural and other areas in National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Month wise variation of PM 10 is pictorially shown in Figure-3.2 (b1) to 3.2 (b3).

Table 3.2(b1) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of October (2015)

 

PM 10 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

103.01

109.73

105.65

100

A1

97.16

101.33

98.31

100

A2

97.27

100.78

98.82

100

A3

99.41

101.29

100.24

100

98.82 100 A3 99.41 101.29 100.24 100 Figure 3.4(b1) Station wise Variation of PM 1 0

Figure 3.4(b1) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of October (2015)

Table 3.2(b2) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of November (2015)

 

PM 10 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

102.06

106.96

104.77

100

A1

97.96

101.53

99.68

100

A2

98.06

101.88

99.87

100

A3

99.01

102.47

100.73

100

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 3.4(b2) Station wise Variation of PM 1

Figure 3.4(b2) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of November (2015)

Table 3.2(b3) Summary of PM 10 Level Monitored of December (2015)

 

PM 10 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

102.06

108.79

104.99

100

A1

97.63

100.77

99.23

100

A2

98.11

100.97

99.41

100

A3

97.32

102.52

99.37

100

99.41 100 A3 97.32 102.52 99.37 100 Figure 3.4(b3) Station wise Variation of PM 1 0

Figure 3.4(b3) Station wise Variation of PM 10 of December (2015)

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

(iii)Sulphur Dioxide (SO 2 ) The 24- hourly average SO 2 level varied station-wise between 3.26 µg/m 3 to 6.53 µg/m 3 in October, 3.46 µg/m 3 to 7.79 µg/m 3 in November and from 3.50 µg/m 3 to 6.97 µg/m 3 in December. The limit 80 µg/m 3 is stipulated for residential, Rural and other areas in National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Month wise variation of SO 2 is pictorially shown in Figure-3.2 (c1) to 3.2 (c3).

Table 3.2(c1) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of October (2015)

 

SO 2 (µg/m 3 )

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

4.54

6.53

5.21

80

A1

3.27

5.87

4.48

80

A2

3.26

5.84

4.49

80

A3

3.28

5.88

4.73

80

5.84 4.49 80 A3 3.28 5.88 4.73 80 Figure 3.4(c1) Station wise Variation of SO 2

Figure 3.4(c1) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of October (2015)

Table 3.2(c2) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of November (2015)

 

SO2(µg/m3)

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

5.21

7.79

6.18

80

A1

3.46

5.24

4.34

80

A2

4.31

6.08

4.88

80

A3

3.47

5.21

4.35

80

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

SO 2 (µg/m 3 ) November (2015) 90 80 70 60 50 Min. 40 Max.
SO 2 (µg/m 3 ) November (2015)
90
80
70
60
50
Min.
40
Max.
30
Avg.
20
NAAQS
10
0
A0
A1
A2
A3
AAQMS
Concentration(µg/m 3 )

Figure 3.4(c2) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of November (2015)

Table 3.2(c2) Summary of SO 2 Level Monitored of December (2015)

 

SO2(µg/m3)

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

4.34

6.1

5.1

80

A1

3.55

6.1

4.89

80

A2

4.33

5.23

4.77

80

A3

3.5

6.97

5.11

80

SO 2 (µg/m 3 ) December (2015) 90 80 70 60 50 Min. 40 Max.
SO 2 (µg/m 3 ) December (2015)
90
80
70
60
50
Min.
40
Max.
30
Avg.
20
10
NAAQS
0
A0
A1
A2
A3
AAQMS
Concentration(µg/m 3 )

Figure 3.4(c3) Station wise Variation of SO 2 of December (2015)

(iv)Nitrogen Oxide (NO 2 )

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

The 24- hourly average NO 2 level varied station-wise between 5.29 µg/m 3 to 11.69 µg/m 3 in October, 3.46 µg/m 3 to 7.79 µg/m 3 in November and from 3.50 µg/m 3 to 6.97 µg/m 3 in December. The limit 80 µg/m 3 is stipulated for residential, Rural and other areas in National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Month wise variation of NO 2 is pictorially shown in Figure-3.2 (d1) to 3.2 (d3).

Table 3.2(d1) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of October (2015)

 

NO2(µg/m3)

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

7.04

11.69

9.54

80

A1

6.37

10.07

8.28

80

A2

5.29

8.5

6.56

80

A3

5.82

9.53

7.69

80

8.5 6.56 80 A3 5.82 9.53 7.69 80 Figure 3.4(d1) Station wise Variation of NO 2

Figure 3.4(d1) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of October (2015)

Table 3.2(d2) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of November (2015)

 

NO2(µg/m3)

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

8.97

12.75

10.52

80

A1

6.9

10.66

9.06

80

A2

7.36

11.73

9.86

80

A3

7.46

9.49

8.61

80

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust SAS Nagar Project Figure 3.4(d2) Station wise Variation of NO 2

Figure 3.4(d2) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of November (2015)

Table 3.2(d3) Summary of NO 2 Level Monitored of December (2015)

 

NO2(µg/m3)

 

Location Code

Min.

Max.

Avg.

NAAQS

A0

9

11.15

10.05

80

A1

7.41

12.13

9.72

80

A2

8.44

10.93

9.75

80

A3

8.45

12.75

10.4

80

10.93 9.75 80 A3 8.45 12.75 10.4 80 Figure 3.4(d3) Station wise Variation of NO 2

Figure 3.4(d3) Station wise Variation of NO 2 of December (2015)

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

3.8 NOISE ENVIRONMENT

Noise monitoring data at project site is presented in test reports in Annexure-5. The noise levels in the

project area are well within the prescribed limits by the CPCB for educational area. The ambient noise quality monitoring stations were set up at the following locations:

Table 3.3: Sampling Location for Ambient Noise analysis

   

Sampling

Direction from the Project site

Distance from the Project Site (km)

Station

Sampling Location

Location Code

1.

Project Site

A0

-

-

2.

Village Hasanpur

A1

NW

2.1

3.

Village Rurki

A2

SE

2.4

4.

Village Khanpur

A3

SE

5.0

A2 SE 2.4 4. Village Khanpur A3 SE 5.0 Figure3.5 Toposheet showing the Ambient Noise monitoring

Figure3.5 Toposheet showing the Ambient Noise monitoring locations

3.9 SOIL ENVIRONMENT

Mohali area can be broadly grouped into two depending upon its geomorphic features as alluvial fan and alluvial plains. Alluvial fans are deposited by hill torrents with a wavy plain rather than a steep slope. Adjacent to the alluvial fan are the alluvial plains which forms a part of large Indo- Gangetic Quaternary basin comprises of thick sand and silty sand layers interbedded with silt and clay beds. The alluvial plains are of vital economic value as it supports the dense population of the district. The soils are mainly developed on alluvium under the dominant influence of climate followed by topography and time. The major soil type of the district is weakly solonized tropical arid brown soils. Soil samples were collected from project site and surrounding area. The Geo- technical investigation report is enclosed as Annexure-6. (Source: CGWB).

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

In order to get the characteristics of the soil in the project area, soil analysis was carried out during the study. The ambient noise quality monitoring stations were set up at the following locations:

Table 3.4: Sampling Location for Soil analysis

   

Sampling

Direction from the Project site

Distance from the Project Site (km)

Station

Sampling Location

Location Code

1.

Project Site

S0

-

-

2.

Village Hasanpur

S1

NW

2.1

3.

Village Rurki

S2

SE

2.4

4.

Village Khanpur

S3

SE

5.0

S2 SE 2.4 4. Village Khanpur S3 SE 5.0 Figure3.6 Toposheet showing the Soil monitoring locations

Figure3.6 Toposheet showing the Soil monitoring locations

3.10 BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT FLORA As per Punjab Forest Department @ 6% area of Punjab is under forests. This is because as the department also includes tree cover around road and rail lines under the Forest cover. As per FSI @ 6.7% area of the State geographical area is under Forest cover [Source- State of Environment, Punjab 2014]. However, Mohali is now a well developed city with avenue plantation along the roads. The various trees are planted. Detail of plantation is attached as Annexure-7.

FAUNA The fauna in the area consists of House crow (Corvus splendens); Myna (Acridotheres tristicus); Pigeon (Columba livia); House Rat (Rattus rattus); Parrot (Psittacula kraweri); Indian cuckoo (Megalaima

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

merulinus); Common Bee-eater (Merops orientalis); and other common domesticated animals as cows, bulls, buffaloes, pig etc.

3.11 DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIO ECONOMIC STATUS Introduction Socio-economic study of an area gives an opportunity to assess the socio economic conditions of an area. The fabrics of socio-economic changes are very complicated that this study would seem to be very limited. The project being in category 8 (b), the socio-economic data is presented from secondary sources as it gives reasonably clear picture of the socio-economic conditions prevailing in the study area.

Only the agricultural land has been purchased from the land owners at the prevailing market value varying from Rs 1.3 crores per acre. Farmers purchased more alternative agricultural land in nearby areas and thus increasing their assets.

Mohali is a District adjacent to Chandigarh. It is declared as 18 th District in Punjab, India in 2006. It is officially named after the eldest son of Guru Gobind Singh, Sahibzada Ajit Singh Nagar (SAS Nagar). Mohali with Chandigarh and Panchkula form a part of the Chandigarh Tricity. It was earlier a part of the Rupnagar District, and was carved out into a separate district in the year 2006.

Mohali is located to the West of Chandigarh. It is almost a continuation of Chandigarh. To its north is Rupnagar district. To its south are Fatehgarh Sahib and Patiala. It is 316 m above Mean Sea Level (MSL). The population as per 2011 census is 9,86,147 of which male and female were 5,24,989 and 4,61,158 respectively. Chandigarh, Panchkula, Zirakpur, Pinjore, Kharar, Kurali, Ropar and Morinda are nearby locations.The Master Plan of Mohali has been recently extended up to 127 sectors. Now, PUDA's functions of planning and urban development have been transferred to the Greater Mohali Area Development Authority (GMADA).

(Source: Census, 2011) There are many prominent industries and corporate units within which include PTL (Punjab Tractor Limited), ICI Paints, Quark, Philips, Dell and the Godrej Group, thus Mohali’s reputation as a home for large, multinational corporations is growing.

These multinational corporations generate 25,000 direct and 100,000 indirect jobs. There is large population that is looking forward to houses as such. The people of the area who have given lands are now educating their children for jobs in these industries. The area has very good healthcare facility. This includes Fortis Healthcare Limited, Max Super Speciality Hospital & IVY Hospital who have set up a Super-Specialty Hospitals in Mohali.

The area is also becoming an entertainment hub and many malls & multiplexes are coming like

1. Parsvnath Developers Ltd. (coming up with the mall - multiplex under the name Mall Matrix)

2. Ansal Plaza (Coming up with 5 screen multiplex)

3. TDI Mall

4. Cosmo-Plaza Shopping Mall (Ambala-Chandigarh Highway), Zirakpur

5. City Centre , Zirakpur

6. Mohali City Center, Sector 62, Mohali

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust

SAS Nagar Project

7. Global Mall, Mohali (Zirakpur)

8. Westend Mall, Mohali.

9. Chandigarh Engineering College, Mohali

10. Shaheed Udham Singh College of Engineering & Technology, Tangori, Mohali

11. Punjab College of Engineering & technology, Mohali

3.12 LAND ENVIRONMENT

The project site has a flat topography and was an unutilized area. Land with respect to soil erosion, the ground survey has been conducted to assess the soil susceptibility related with soil erosion. The landscaped area @ 8.68 acres of the total plot area is also act as a safe guard for soil erosion. The probability of soil erosion is not envisaged with respect to soil characteristic, topography and rainfall during operation phase of the project as all required measures are being adopted. The provided green area is also act as a safe guard for soil erosion. The proximity of soil erosion is not envisaged with respect to soil characteristics, topography and rainfall during operation phase of the project as all required measures are adopted. The land use of the study area was examined and is shown in Fig 2.1(a)

3.13 TRAFFIC

The traffic data count on main connecting road to the site i.e. NH-95 is shown in fig. 3.7. The road is two

lane and sufficient to cater the future traffic load.

Figure 3.7 Traffic Movement Data

the future traffic load. Figure 3.7 Traffic Movement Data 3.13.1 TRAFFIC STUDY Traffic study measurements were

3.13.1 TRAFFIC STUDY Traffic study measurements were performed at one location at National Highway-95 to assess impact on local transport infrastructure due to this project. Traffic study measurements were performed at one location. Road and highway are given in Table 3.5

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Area Development Project, “Chandigarh University”, Village Gharuan and Mamupur, Tehsil Kharar, Distt By: Chandigarh Educational Trust