Sie sind auf Seite 1von 69
Royal College of Music Graduate School INTEGRATED MASTERS PROGRAMMES PERFORMANCE, VOCAL PERFORMANCE AND COMPOSITION

Royal College of Music

Graduate School

INTEGRATED MASTERS PROGRAMMES

PERFORMANCE, VOCAL PERFORMANCE AND COMPOSITION

REGULATIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION

2009–2010

Contents

1. Introduction How the Integrated Masters Programmes fit into the RCM Graduate School, names, courses and

their constituent pathways.

4

Overview of appendices and their content

6

2. Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes Descriptions of the skills you will expect to have developed, knowledge accrued and understanding gained upon completion of the Programme. Overall aims

7

Learning Outcomes: Skills and other attributes:

7

Practical Skills; Cognitive Skills; Transferable skills; Knowledge and understanding

3. Course Structure

Performance:

8

Available courses, pathways within them and the units that constitute each pathway.

9

Unit structure: Performance

9

Pathways

10

Diagram of overall routes through the Masters Programme in Performance

11

Related and Second Study

12

Unit types: Core units, Pathway Core units; Principal Study units; Electives

13

Restrictions on the selection of units

13–14

Patterns of study:

MMus Year One/PGDip in Performance

14

MMus Year 2/PGDip in Advanced Performance

15

Intensive MMus in Advanced Performance Taking the MMus Core Units separately

16

Vocal Performance:

20

Graduate Diploma and Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance

21

Artist Diploma in Opera

23

Routes through an Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance and Artist Diploma in Opera

24

Composition:

25

MMus in Composition and Pathways

25

Overall course structure

26

Overview showing the basic routes through the programme leading to PGDip or MMus qualifications

28

2

4. Part-time options Introduction

29

Typical plans of part-time study

30

5. Postgraduate Induction and starting the Programme Describes how you enter your chosen course and determine its nature and units

31

6. Progression Staying on for a second year, deferred assessments and reassessments

32

7. Assessment Describes how practical and written examinations are conducted with the RCM and how these results are ratified.

7.2

Practical assessments

7.3

Written assessments

7.4

Assessment teams and panels

7.5

External Examiners

7.6

Masters Programme Board of Examiners

34

7.9

Award of Distinction

35

8. Programme Management Arrangements

36

Appendices:

1. Programme Specification for the Integrated Masters Programme

37

2. Regulations and Overall Credit Framework for Taught Postgraduate Programmes

42

3. Procedures for the Submission and Marking of Postgraduate Written Work at the Royal College of Music 2008-2009: A Guide for Professors and Students

55

4. Guide to the Presentation of Written Work

60

5. General Information

65

6. Integrated Masters Programme Team Who’s Who

73

3

1

Introduction

Welcome to the Royal College of Music Graduate School.

The Graduate School contains seven programmes:

Integrated Masters Programme in Composition including courses in Composition and Composition for Screen (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications)

Integrated Masters Programme in Performance (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications)

Integrated Masters Programme in Vocal Performance (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications)

Graduate Diploma (Singer)

Artist Diploma in Opera

Artist Diploma in Performance

Doctor of Music

Within the framework of the Graduate School, many diverse activities undertaken by advanced student provide paths for exploring new ideas in composition, performance and vocal performance and other modes of practice-based research. We believe that this is most easily achieved in an environment that facilitates the exchange of knowledge and skills, underpinned by programmes that give you flexibility and inspire you to work to your full potential.

One of the central precepts of the Graduate School is the idea of the ‘informed musician’ and it aims to nurture not only students’ ability but also their musical intelligence. It is based on the premise that students at postgraduate level are best served by programmes that can be adjusted to individual needs. Accordingly, you will find that you have several choices to make in the devising of your course of study. This Handbook is specifically designed as your guide in that process for the Integrated Masters Programme . Other programmes within the Graduate School have their own designated handbooks. All may be obtained from the Registry or from the RCM website.

The Masters Programmes have a range of course options designed to enable you to employ your time at the RCM in ways that you feel most appropriate. The Masters Programmes comprise the Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip); the two-year Masters Degree in Advanced Composition/Performance/Vocal Performance (MMus) and the one-year Intensive Masters Degree in Advanced Composition/Performance/Vocal Performance (MMus). There are part-time patterns for all but the Intensive MMus.

The Masters Programme in Performance contains a number of pathways:

Accompanist/Repetiteur

Chamber/Ensemble Musician

Conductor

Historical Performance

Orchestral Musician

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

4

These pathways operate as free-standing one- or two-year programmes of study. The two exceptions to this are the Repetiteur strand of the Accompanist/Repetiteur pathway and the Chamber Ensemble pathway that are only available within the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance.

All the pathways of the Masters Programme in Performance are practical in their focus and designed to help you reach the highest standards. They also aim to help you to become self-sufficient and self-critical and seek to equip you for the profession as well as to prepare you for the changes that you will undoubtedly encounter in your career. If you choose a pattern of study that leads to the MMus qualification, the practical focus of your study will be complemented by relevant scholarly aspects.

Students normally enter Year One of the Masters Programme, electing to work towards the PGDip or MMus following a process of induction. You will have to apply to stay on for a second year of study, regardless of which qualification you are working toward. Once your application is lodged, you will also need to complete the first year successfully to progress to the second. Further details of this process appear later in the Handbook. If you are now entering your second year, you should now have a clear idea of how the programme works and what to expect from the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance.

1.1 At the end of each year of study, you will receive a transcript showing the units you have successfully completed. If you complete sufficient units successfully, your transcript will record you as being eligible for the PGDip in Performance after the first year and the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance after the second. For the Postgraduate Diploma, the actual award title, PGDip, is therefore the same in the second year, but the transcript will show not only the greater number of units gained after two years but also the fact that at least one of those taken in the second year is specifically designated as being at the Advanced Performance level. If you are staying for a second year, you will not formally receive the PGDip in Performance. Only if you leave after Year One or before completing Year Two will this qualification be awarded.

1.2 You will be studying on one of the pathways available, as listed above in 1.5. Depending on which pathway you are following, you may be taking a specialist unit as part of your core study. In addition, you will take some form of Principal Study to which you may apply to add one, or in some cases two, additional studies. These are called Second Studies in the case of more substantial provision, Related Studies where the provision is less, and Electives.

1.3 If you are undertaking MMus study, you will find three MMus Elective units, (Academic Portfolio, Lecture Presentation and Critical Project). Two of these must be successfully completed to gain the degree, and one, the Academic Portfolio, is mandatory for all MMus candidates. The Academic Portfolio is normally taken in the first year of study. If you are on the Intensive MMus, you must take the Academic Portfolio, and either the Lecture Presentation or the Critical Project during your one calendar year of study.

Once your pathway-core units and necessary Principal Study elements have been decided upon, you may have some space left to take further units to bring you up to your full quota (normally 120 credits for each year of the PGDip or the MMus and 180 credits for the one-year Intensive MMus). If so, you will choose from a range of other Elective units. When choosing Electives for second-year study, these are normally different from those taken in Year 1, though differentiated content in specific Electives may fulfil this requirement.

5

1.4 At the back of the full version of this booklet there are six appendices. For those with the shorter version, these may also be found easily in the student area of the RCM intranet. The first of these is what is known as a Programme Specification. It is a useful summary of the programme, written in a standard format used by many UK universities, including conservatoires. You may find it a useful ‘portrait’ of your studies; when you have finished your studies, it will also enable you to show someone unfamiliar with the programme what you had to do to get the award and what kinds of qualities they should expect to find in you.

1.5 The second appendix contains the regulations by which the programme operates. You will probably only refer to them for specific information – for example, how your overall result is calculated or what happens if you fail a unit. All the same, it is a good idea to look through them at an early stage so that they are not completely unfamiliar when you may need them urgently.

1.6 The third appendix describes procedures for the submission of written work and its marking

1.7 The fourth appendix is important in that it describes acceptable conventions for the submission of written work and also a warning about the nature and consequences of plagiarism.

1.8 Appendix 6 includes general information about other procedures including changing professors, interrupting studies and the college facilities.

1.9 In the main sections of the main handbook that follow, you will find the aims and learning outcomes of the programme stated, its structure set out and the arrangements for induction, progression and assessment described. Then there are descriptions of each of the units from which the programme is made up. The final section deals with the management of the programme.

1.10 Included in this last section are details of how feedback about the programme is obtained. Your views as a student are very important in this and can help to influence how the programme develops and improves. Therefore, please take the time to engage fully with the various feedback processes which you will encounter during your studies; even if you may not benefit directly, those that come after you will.

6

2

Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes

2.1 The Masters Programme has the following overall aims:

To provide advanced musical training at postgraduate level in which a fundamental emphasis upon practical attainment is complemented by the encouragement of critical self-awareness, a capacity for reflective insight and the ability to formulate discriminating musical judgements;

To offer to graduate musicians—both performers and composers—of proven ability, and with the potential for further development, the opportunity to enhance their skills, broaden their knowledge of repertoire, hone their interpretational and/or creative abilities and thereby to develop their musical talents, both in terms of maturity and of individualisation;

To provide a training whose own internal standards and, where applicable, whose actual characteristics mirror as closely as possible those demanded within the profession. In doing so to seek the fullest involvement of musicians active within the profession, whether professors of the College or visiting individuals and groups;

To acknowledge, and reflect wherever applicable, the leading trends in musical thinking within the profession;

To produce musicians capable of contributing to the development of the profession and of participating in its future shaping through their insights and understanding, as well as their practical abilities.

2.2 The PGDip in Performance and Advanced Performance and MMus in Advanced Performance as well as in Composition and Vocal Performance have been designed to generate the learning outcomes listed below. These outcomes are noted numerically in each of the unit descriptions of the Programme, with each unit generating its own profile of end results:

Skills and other attributes

Practical Skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) Perform or compose at a level expected of a front-rank professional musician in terms of technique, musical interpretation and communication (2) apply personal research, analysis, reflection and listening to the process of forming a musical interpretation (3) use a thorough understanding of the components of music and its underlying structures to inform musical performances (4) memorise and reconstruct sound (5) conceive, manipulate and develop musical ideas and apply aesthetic/stylistic principles to performance

Cognitive (thinking) skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) research, synthesise and evaluate information from a variety of sources, most of them not text-based (e.g. the oral testimony of teachers and fellow-performers, information carried in the sound of performances and recordings) (2) use advanced levels of reasoning and logic to analyse this material and form relevant performing strategies (3) exercise significant judgement and apply artistic/intellectual perspectives (4) carry out extended projects

7

Transferable skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) approach and solve problems in a flexible, open and creative way (2) work as part of a team, often in a leadership role, taking spontaneous decisions and responding to the decisions of others (3) improvise, manage risk and cope with the unexpected (4) be self-motivated and disciplined, and promote projects/performances with self-critical awareness (5) understand work regimes and professional protocols (6) work independently

Knowledge and understanding - on successful completion of the programme, you should have knowledge and understanding of:

(1) the full range of technical and expressive capabilities of your instrument, or as a composer, the full range available to you (2) the instrument’s repertoire and that of its period or modern equivalent and of commonly related instruments, as appropriate (3) how to master less familiar repertoires and the performing conventions associated with them (4) the current state and likely direction of development of the profession, the range of competencies needed to enter it and the ways in which your skills may be continuously enhanced to keep pace with rising challenges in a developing career

(5) as a composer have knowledge and an understanding of relevant repertoire and associated considerations , whether contemporary or from one or more historical periods, that have the capacity to inform and underpin your own creative processes

(6) as a composer be able to familiarise yourself with new repertoires and styles, conventions, and, where appropriate, specialist technical procedures associated with them

2.3

 

These learning outcomes are derived from the Credit and HE Qualifications Guidelines for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and apply to all units and pathways within the Masters Programme. However, students obtaining the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance will have deepened their skills and knowledge in their Principal Study and broadened them in relation to the range of other units taken.

2.4

As noted in 2.2, the unit descriptions later in this handbook refer back to these listed learning outcomes for each unit and attempt to show how they contribute to the overall learning outcomes of the programme. Descriptions for Principal Study show how the second-year units build upon their equivalents in the first year, leading to the higher, Advanced Performance level for the award.

3

Course Structure

3.1

Overall structure:

The overall structure of the courses has already been outlined in the introduction. This section provides greater detail about how each year of study is built up, including diagrams of the various units and how they may be put together.

8

PERFORMANCE

3.2 The Masters Programme contains courses leading to the award of either a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or a Master of Music (MMus). The title of the award received depends upon the pattern of units studied. Students who choose entirely practical units receive a PGDip and those who include within their study certain key academic units receive the MMus. In general, the first year of the programme is designated as being at the Performance level and the second at the Advanced Performance level. Students on the Intensive MMus tackle units at Advanced Performance level as part of a concentrated 12-month programme. The PGDip in Performance and Advanced Performance function as a pair, the course in Advanced Performance following on from that in Performance. The programme and its constituent courses can be represented at its simplest level by the following diagram:

 

Masters Programme (performance)

 

Routes

1

2a

2b

3

4

Sept-

PGDip in

PGDip in

PGDip in

Intensive MMus

PGDip in

June

Performance

Performance

Performance

in Advanced

Performance

(including

Performance

(not including

academic unit)

(including two

academic

academic units)

unit)

July-

     

Aug

Sept-

PGDip in

MMus in

 

Intensive

June

Advanced

Advanced

MMus in

Performance

Performance

Advanced

(including

Performance

further

(including two

academic unit)

academic

units)

July-

 

Aug

Final

PGDip in

PGDip in

MMus in

MMus in

MMus in

Award

Performance

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Title

Performance

Performance

Performance

Performance

9

3.3

Unit structure:

All the courses within the Programme are built from a range of units, with many units shared amongst them. These units are classified as Core Units, Principal Study Units and Elective Units. Your choice of Core Units will determine the award title you receive and the specialist pathway on which you will be studying. In particular, deciding whether or not you take the academic units referred to in the diagram above (Academic Portfolio and Lecture Presentation or Critical Project) will determine whether your course of study will be for an MMus or PGDip. For this reason, these units are referred to as MMus Core Units, as opposed to the other type of core unit – Pathway Core Units.

3.4 Units are built up into patterns of study that normally occupy the period from September to June (10 months) and correspond to 120 credits. The exception to this is the pattern for the Intensive Masters, which lasts 12 months from September to September and contains 180 credits. The four routes shown in the diagram above are all built from just three basic patterns of annual full-time study:

Pattern A:

Performance Level

120 credits

Pattern B:

Advanced Performance Level

120 credits

Pattern C:

Advanced Performance Level

180 credits

3.5 Adding some detail to the diagram above, the various routes through the programme can be shown in conjunction with the types of units which make them up, the total length of study and number of credits accumulated and patterns of annual study from which they are assembled. This expanded diagram is shown on the next page:

3.6 Pathways:

The pathway within which a student studies is usually determined by his or her Principal Study; for example, a student whose Principal Study is on a period instrument will take the Pathway Core Unit which defines them as being on the Historical Performance pathway. The two pathways that share Principal Study instruments are the Solo/Ensemble Recitalist and the Orchestral Musician pathways. Students of instruments which feature in the modern orchestra choose between these two pathways according to whether or not they wish to give particular emphasis to orchestral performance. The full list of pathways available across the two levels of the programme is as follows:

Performance level

Advanced Performance level

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

Orchestral Musician

Orchestral Musician

Historical Performance

Historical Performance

Accompanist

Accompanist/Repetiteur

Conductor

Conductor

 

Chamber Ensemble (taken as a ensemble)

10

Masters Programme in Performance Overview showing the basic routes through the programme leading to PGDip or MMus qualifications

 

Masters Programme

 

Routes

 

1

 

2a

 

2b

 

3

 

4

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Performance level

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Performance level

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Performance level

Elective

Sept-

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

units

June

(need not

include

(need not

include

at Per-

formance

(must

include

at Per-

formance

(must

include

(not

including

Academic

 

Academic

level

Academic

level

Academic

Academic

 

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio

 

Portfolio)

       

plus one

 

July-Aug

further

MMus

 

core unit)

 

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Performance level

Elective

Sept-

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

at

at

June

(need not

include

any MMus

core unit)

Advanced

Per-

formance

level

(must

include an

MMus

core unit)

Advanced

Per-

formance

level

(must

include

Academic

Portfolio

   

plus one

 

further

July-Aug

MMus

core unit)

Length

I year (10 months)

2 years (22 months)

 

2 years (22 months)

1 year (12 months)

2 years (24 months)

of study

 

Credits

120 Credits at level M

240 Credits at level M

 

240 Credits at level M

180 Credits at level M

300 Credits at level M

Pattern

 

Pattern A

Patterns A + B

   

Patterns A + B

   

Pattern C

 

Patterns A + C

Type

         

Final

       

Award

 

PGDip in

PGDip in Advanced Performance

 

MMus in Advanced Performance

MMus in Advanced Performance

MMus in Advanced Performance

Title

Performance

11

3.7

Related or Second Study:

Because students may or may not elect to take Related or Second Studies, these are grouped with the so-called Elective units of the programme. When taken in its PGDip form, every pathway offers scope for students to elect to undertake Related or Second Study. The Solo/Ensemble pathway retains some of these opportunities even in its MMus form.

3.8 Correspondingly, in the Solo/Ensemble pathway in its PGDip version, there is even scope for combining two of these studies in addition to the Principal Study. Such combinations are only used where the Principal Study instrument has two recognised associated instruments and where an individual professional musician might be expected to be proficient on all three. Examples of this are most common among woodwind instruments (e.g. Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Eb Clarinet; Flute, Piccolo, Baroque Flute) and, to a slightly lesser extent, brass instruments (e.g. Trumpet, Natural Trumpet, Cornet; Trombone, Bass Trombone, Sackbut). Triple combinations are not usually encouraged among string instruments and are not normally available to Principal Study pianists.

3.9 Because one of the primary goals of the entire Masters programme is to achieve the highest possible standard in the Principal Study, students may only select a Second Study option if their mark in the Principal Study at audition is at least 60%. Similarly, students wishing to take a Second Study in Year 2 must achieve at least 60% in their Principal Study repertoire recital at the end of the year. For triple combinations, the Principal Study mark must be at least 65%. In either case, the level already achieved in the proposed Second Study must also be high enough to justify the time and attention allocated to it. This normally means an audition or examination mark of 60%.

3.10 A Related Study may be chosen without any of these restrictions, provided that it forms part of one of the permitted patterns. None the less, students who wish to undertake a Related Study must first consult the appropriate Head of Faculty. The following table summarises these requirements:

 

Second Study

Triple combination permissible

permissible

Principal Study less than 60%

Principal Study 60%-64%; Second Study less than 60%

Principal Study 60%-64%; Second Study 60%+

Principal Study 65%+; Second Study less than 60%

Principal Study 65%+; Second Study 60%+

12

3.11

To summarise, all units are grouped into one of three overall categories, the first of these, the Core Units, being subdivided into MMus Core and Pathway Core Units. Students choosing their units need to do so by moving in sequence through these categories.

 

Unit Choice Steps

 

1a

MMus Core units

If one of these (two in Intensive Masters) is selected, the pattern of studies will lead to the MMus award. If none is

1b

Pathway Core units

selected, they will lead to a PGDip. There is a Pathway Core unit for every pathway apart from the Solo/Ensemble Recitalist. Students wishing to follow this pathway move straight to step 2

2

Principal Study

All students must choose one of the four different lengths of Principal Study unit

units

3

Elective units

Include Related and Second Study units (see above) and a range of other theoretical and practical units. In some cases, students may take a Pathway Core unit from another pathway as an elective. After a student has made choices in categories 1,2 and 3, there may be no spare credits for elective units (see 3.12 below)

3.12 Unit selection restrictions:

Students may broadly choose units as they wish within the programme. However, there are some overall restrictions that must be followed. These are as follows:

Units for each year of the PGDip or MMus must normally be selected such that they have a total credit value of neither more nor less than 120 (but see 3.14 below)

Units for the Intensive MMus must be selected such that they have a total credit value of neither more nor less than 180

The maximum amount of 1-to-1 practical tuition (Principal, Second and/or Related Study) which may be selected is 120 minutes per week

Units at Advanced Performance level may only be selected in the second year of study or in the Intensive MMus

Related Study units are available in Year Two, but normally at Advanced level only. Where there are compelling reasons why a student did not take a Related Study in Year 1 and where it can be argued that doing so for just one year prior to entry to the profession would be valuable, a student may be permitted to take a Related Study at this stage, using one of the patterns for core units from Year 1 of the pathway

Units already taken in Year One may then be re-taken in Year Two but only if the content of the unit is radically different. The choice of a repeated unit must be authorised by the Head of Graduate School at the Induction sign-up stage. Pathway Core units may be taken in two successive years because the repertoire for these is cycled so as to avoid repetition from one year to the next

The MMus Core unit to be taken in Year One of the two-year MMus is the Academic Portfolio unit

3.13 Elective units include units at Level 3 that form part of the College’s BMus (Hons) programme that may be taken as part of the PGDip or MMus.

13

3.14 Where Level 3 units are chosen, they must not amount to more than 25% of the credits taken. This means that, for 120-credit courses, they must not amount to more than 30 credits and, for the 180-credit Intensive course, not more than 45 credits. Because the Level 3 units are 40-credits units, this means that the overall number of credits when they are chosen as part of a 120-credit course must rise to 130 (i.e. with 90 Level M credits featuring among the minimum of 120 required for the award). No such adjustment is required for the 180-credit Intensive course.

3.15 On the next three pages there are diagrams showing the available units within each of the three pattern types which were described in 3.4 and represented in the diagram at 3.5. In each case, the Routes to which this pattern contributes are indicated. The next three pages show the same patterns in what we hope may be a more accessible version. In Section 8, unit descriptions are provided for each of the units contained in these diagrams.

14

Pattern A :

Represents whole of Route 1 and first year of Routes 2a, 2b and 4

MMus Year One/PGDip in Performance, one year (10 months), 120 credits

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

 

Pathway Core Unit (Level M)

Principal Study Unit (Level M)

 

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or 3)

       

Level M

Academic

Orchestral Performance (Orchestral Pathway)

Principal Study 1 (Performance level)

Major Second Study (21 hrs/yr)

Portfolio

30 credits

30

credits

(39 hrs/yr)

40

credits

(Those electing to do a PGDip only will not have to take an MMus Core Unit).

Historical Performance

(Historical Performance

Pathway)

30 credits

80

credits

Minor Second Study

(14 hrs/yr)

30

credits

Principal Study 2 (Performance level) (33.5 hrs/yr)

Related Study

(7 hrs/yr)

 

20

credits

Accompaniment

70

credits

Collaborative Composition

 

(Accompanist Pathway)

 

10

or 20 credits

30

credits

Principal Study 3

Concerto Competition *

 

(Performance level)

10

credits

Conducting (Conductor Pathway)

(28 hrs/yr)

Contemporary Music in Action

60

credits

10

credits

50

credits

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

Principal Study 4 (Performance level) (21 hrs/yr)

Continuo

10

Historical Performance * 10, 20 or 30 credits Keyboard Improvisation

credits

40

credits

30

credits

   

Performance Case History

10

credits

Pop Song Writing and Production 10, 20 or 30 credits Professional skills

10

credits

Recital Accompaniment *

10

credits

* when not taken as part of Pathway Core or Principal Study

 

Level 3

Alexander Technique

40

credits

Chamber Music

40

credits

Composition

40

credits

Conducting

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Orchestration & Arrangement

40

credits

 

Total of 120 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

 

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 30 credits (25%) to the 120 credits of the PGDip. Therefore total credits when these are chosen will be 130

15

Pattern B:

credits. Represents second year of Routes 2a and 2b

MMus Year Two/PGDip in Advanced Performance, one year (10 months), 120

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

Pathway Core Unit (Level

Advanced Principal Study

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or 3)

 

M)

Unit (Level M)

Lecture Presentation OR Critical Project 30 Credits

Orchestral Performance (Orchestral Pathway)

Principal Study 1 (Performance level)

Level M Major Second Study (21 hrs/yr)

30

credits

(39 hrs/yr) credits

80

40

Minor Second Study

credits

Historical Performance

(14 hrs/yr)

(Those electing to do a PGDip only will not have to take an MMus Core Unit).

(Historical Performance

Pathway)

30 credits

Principal Study 2 (Performance level) (33.5 hrs/yr) credits

30

Related Study

(7 hrs/yr)

credits

70

20

credits

Accompaniment (Accompanist Pathway)

Collaborative Composition

   

10

or 20 credits

30

credits

Principal Study 3 (Performance level) (28 hrs/yr) credits

 

Concerto Competition *

 

10

credits

Orchestral or Choral Conducting (Advanced Conductor Pathway)

60

Contemporary Music in Action

10

credits

Continuo

 

10

credits

Principal Study 4 (Performance level) (21 hrs/yr) credits

 

Historical Performance *

50

credits

40

10, 20 or 30 credits Keyboard Improvisation

Repetiteur Experience (Repetiteur Training Pathway)

30

credits

 

Performance Case History

10

credits

30

credits

Pop Song Writing and Production 10, 20 or 30 credits Professional skills

10

credits

Chamber Music (Group Chamber Music Pathway)

50

credits

Recital Accompaniment *

10

credits

 

Studio Experience

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

10

credits

* when not taken as part of Pathway Core or Principal Study

 

Level 3 Alexander Technique

40

credits

Chamber Music

40

credits

Composition

40

credits

Conducting

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Orchestration & Arrangement

40

credits

 

Total of 120 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

 

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 30 credits (25%) to the 120 credits of the PGDip. Therefore total credits when these are chosen will be 130

16

Pattern C:

Represents whole of Route 3 and second year of Route 4

Intensive MMus in Advanced Performance, one year (12 months)

 

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

Pathway Core Unit (Level

 

Advanced Principal

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or

 

M)

Study Unit (Level M)

 

3)

Academic Portfolio

Orchestral Performance

Principal Study 1 (Performance level)

Level M Major Second Study (21 hrs/yr)

30

credits

(Orchestral Pathway)

Lecture

Presentation

OR Critical Project

30

Credits

30

credits

Historical Performance

(Historical Performance

Pathway)

30 credits

(39 hrs/yr)

80

credits

Principal Study 2 (Performance level) (33.5 hrs/yr)

40

Minor Second Study

(14 hrs/yr)

credits

30

Related Study

(7 hrs/yr)

credits

20

credits

Accompaniment

70

credits

Collaborative Composition

(Accompanist Pathway)

 

10

or 20 credits

30

credits

Principal Study 3

Concerto Competition *

 

(Performance level)

10

credits

Orchestral or Choral

(28 hrs/yr)

Contemporary Music in Action

60

credits

10

Continuo

credits

 

Conducting (Conductor Pathway)

50

credits

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

Principal Study 4 (Performance level) (21 hrs/yr)

10

Historical Performance * 10, 20 or 30 credits Keyboard Improvisation

credits

40

credits

30

credits

 

Performance Case History

 

10

credits

Pop Song Writing and Production 10, 20 or 30 credits Professional skills

10

credits

Recital Accompaniment *

10

credits

Studio Experience

10

credits

* when not taken as part of Pathway Core or Principal Study

 

Level 3

Alexander Technique

40

credits

Chamber Music

 

40

credits

Composition

 

40

credits

Conducting

 

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Orchestration & Arrangement

40

credits

 

Total of 180 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

   

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 45 credits (25%) to the 180 credits total.

17

3.16

Completing an MMus by taking the second MMus Core Unit separately

Because it integrates the practical, PGDip, elements of postgraduate provision with those specifically related to MMus study – the MMus Core units - the Integrated Masters is able to accommodate to a certain extent students who wish to change emphasis during the course of their studies from PGDip to MMus or vice-versa.

If a student begins by focussing only on the practical elements, they will arrive at the end of the first year without having taken the normal first-year MMus Core Unit, the Academic Portfolio. This may be part of a pre-planned decision to focus first on the practical and then turn to the theoretical. Alternatively, a student who had not previously been interested in a Masters degree might at this point decide that they do, after all, wish to work towards the MMus qualification. In either case, there are two ways in which the student may proceed.

The first option is to take the Intensive version of the MMus in their second year – ie to do both MMus Core Units along with Principal Study Advanced Performance Level and additional units adding up to 180 credits. Entry to the Intensive MMus is subject to the approval of the Head of Graduate School and the course carries a higher fee because of the extra units taken.

Where the Intensive option does not seem appropriate, the alternative route to the MMus qualification consists of taking the Academic Portfolio as part of the pattern of Year-Two units and then taking the second MMus Core Unit separately, after full-time study at the College has been completed. In this scheme, the student initially graduates with a PGDip in Advanced Performance and then converts this qualification into the MMus in Advanced Performance at such point as they successfully complete the remaining MMus Core unit. There is an additional charge for the second MMus Core Unit over and above that for the PGDip.

Because it is taken on its own and after full-time study has ceased, the remaining MMus Core unit may be taken at a distance, attending the College only for stipulated parts of the delivery of the unit chosen – Lecture Presentation or Critical Project. If you are a student who chooses to study at a distance in this way, everything will be done to make your learning experience and what is required of you equivalent to the situation of students taking the unit as part of their full-time study. There are some special aspects and safeguards that therefore need to be observed. These are outlined in the paragraphs that follow.

When you start your study, you will be given a clear schedule for the delivery of written work, where appropriate, and for the assessment of your work. The Head, or Deputy Head, of Graduate School will also explain to you what is expected from you as a distance learner, especially the level of autonomy you will need to demonstrate. This will be set out in writing for further clarity.

If you are going to be sending and/or receiving material by email or post, you must agree with your supervisor a method that is secure and reliable and a means of confirming safe receipt. You must also agree contingency plans in case the agreed method of delivery should fail for any reason.

You will receive a timetable of learning activities taking place at the College which you would be welcome to attend, if in London at that time. This timetable would also include any web-based conferences or other e-learning activities taking place at specific times which you might access.

18

You should discuss with your supervisor the learning resources that may be available to you where you are based and those of the RCM that may be available to you remotely. Both of you should be confident that your study needs will be met by some combination of these.

Your supervisor will be available for contact by agreed means - email, telephone, or post - and will be able to give you constructive feedback within a reasonable timescale on your academic performance, and authoritative guidance on your academic progression.

Where appropriate, you will be offered opportunities to participate in student-student discussions about the programme, both to facilitate collaborative learning and to enable you to participate in the quality assurance of the programme. You will also be given appropriate opportunities to provide formal feedback on your experience of the unit when delivered in this way.

The Head of Graduate School will ensure that work you submit for formal assessment is properly attributed to you. For your part, you will be required to sign the College’s normal declarations confirming that any material you submit to be assessed is your own original work.

The educational aims and intended learning outcomes of the MMus Core Unit when delivered at a distance, and its associated study materials, will be subject to the College’s usual approval, monitoring and review processes.

19

VOCAL PERFORMANCE

3.17 Patterns of study in Vocal Performance

There are three overall courses available to students in Vocal Performance.

Graduate Diploma (Singer)

Integrated Masters Programme in Vocal Performance (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications)

Artist Diploma in Opera

At audition and at the end of the year advice will be given on the best routes forward for all students. The following descriptions outline the scope and level of the four overall courses available.

All postgraduate vocal courses provide:

One-to-one singing lessons totalling 42 hours per year from one of the RCM’s team of singing professors

Opera and repertoire coaching totalling between 25 and 30 hours per year (depending on which course you follow)

Classes in acting and stagecraft

French, German and Italian Language coaching

Stylistic Classes in French and English song, Lieder, oratorio and recitative

Special projects in Spanish and Russian Song

Opportunities to appear in opera scenes

Opportunities to audition for roles in the RCM’s full-scale productions

3.18 Graduate Diploma (Singer)

This is primarily designed for those who have not previously studied at a conservatoire and serves as a bridge between undergraduate and postgraduate study. If you complete the course successfully, with a sufficiently high Principal Study mark, the expectation is that you may progress directly to the Integrated Masters Programme in Vocal Performance.

3.19 Integrated Masters Programme in Vocal Performance

This covers an initial one-year Postgraduate Diploma Course, and two options building on this in Year Two.

A PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance

An MMus

For students taking the MMus the programme differs from the MMus for Instrumentalists and Conductors in that no academic course units are taken in the first year of study. There are three options for taking the academic units required for the award of the MA:

They may be taken intensively during the second academic year, adhering to the same deadlines for submission as for the Instrumentalists and Composers.

They may be taken intensively during the second academic year, but submitted at the end of a 12 month period, (in September).

They may be taken after completion of the Advanced PGDip as a top-up unit.

20

The following diagrams show the patterns of study available on the Integrated Masters Programme in Vocal Performance:

Year 1 – all students - PGDip in Vocal Performance. One year only (10 months)

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

Principal Study 1-to-1 Units (Level M)

Supporting Classes

 

Singing Lesson

 

Repertoire Lessons

 
   

Opera Coaching

Classes in the Singer’s Craft (several classes across year) 30 credits

Not applicable in Year One. Students take first MMus Core unit in

Year Two (see next diagrams)

Principal Study

(15 hours/year)

(Performance level)

20

credits

Acting, Movement, Stagecraft, Italian Recitative or Italian Song (according to streaming)

(42 hours/year)

 

60 credits

Repertoire Coaching

French, Italian and German language

 

(10 hours/year)

10

credits

German song, French song, English song/Oratorio, (Russian/Spanish delivered on a project-specific basis)

 

Total of 120 credits

 

21

Year 2 – students taking PGDip route to PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance. One year only (10 months)

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

 

Principal Study 1-to-1 Units (Level M)

 

Supporting Classes

   

Singing Lesson

 

Repertoire Lessons

 
     

Classes in the Singer’s Craft

(several classes across year)

Opera Coaching

30

credits

Principal Study

(15 hours/year)

 

Not applicable if PGDip is being taken

(Advanced

20

credits

Acting, Movement, Stagecraft, Italian Recitative

Performance level)

 
 

(42 hours/year)

 

60

credits

   

French, Italian and German language

Repertoire Coaching

(10 hours/year)

German song, French song, English

10

credits

song/Oratorio, Russian/Spanish

 

Total of 120 credits

 

Year 2 – students taking MMus route - PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance. One year only (10 months) Plus second MMus Core Unit, will give MMus in Advanced Vocal Performance

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

 

Principal Study 1-to-1 Units (Level M)

 

Supporting Classes

   

Singing Lesson

 

Repertoire Lessons

 
   

Opera Coaching

Acting, Movement, Stagecraft, Italian Recitative

(15 hours/year)

20

credits

French, Italian and German language

Principal Study

 

10

credits

Academic Portfolio

(Advanced

   

30 credits

Performance level)

 

Or

 

Or

(42 hours/year)

   
   

60

credits

 

Repertoire Coaching

German song, French song, English song/Oratorio, Russian/Spanish

(15 hours/year)

20

credits

French,

Italian and German

 

language

10

credits

 

Total of 120 credits

 

22

Year 2 – students taking Intensive MMus route - MMus in Advanced Vocal Performance. One calendar year (12 months)

 

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

Principal Study 1-to-1 Units (Level M)

Supporting Classes

 

Singing Lesson

 

Repertoire Lessons

 

Academic Portfolio

 

Opera Coaching

Classes in the Singer’s Craft (several classes across year) 30 credits

30

credits

(15 hours/year)

 

Principal Study

(Advanced

20

credits

Acting, Movement, Stagecraft, Italian Recitative

 
 

Performance level)

Critical Project/

Lecture Presentation

30

Credits

(42 hours/year)

60 credits

Repertoire Coaching

(10 hours/year)

French, Italian and German language

10

credits

German song, French song, English song/Oratorio, Russian/Spanish

 

Total of 180 credits

 

3.20 Artist Diploma in Opera

This is the most advanced level of study within the portfolio of postgraduate programmes. Applicants with suitable previous experience may enter directly on the Artist Diploma in Opera. In addition to normal postgraduate vocal provision students receive:

Individual sessions with coaches from the major British companies and the National Opera Studio

Further coaching with senior staff from the major London opera houses

Masterclasses in audition technique and talks on career promotion and professional skills

In each year of this course students are assessed either on the basis of a role in one of the RCM’s opera productions, or through a substantial contribution to one or more of the opera scenes performed during the year. The final award will normally be made on the basis of the latest major role undertaken before completion of studies.

23

Routes through an Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance and Artist Diploma in Opera

Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance Additional MMus Unit MMus in Advanced Vocal Performance Second MMus unit taken on its own – either directly after Year 2 or after the Artist Diploma in Opera when the student has already taken the PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance including the first MMus unit

Artist Diploma in Opera 1-2 years

Not credit rated Assessment for award based on major role(s) undertaken in a production before the student completes the programme; feedback provided on any other roles or scenes undertaken.

Progression to second MMus unit, taken on its own and potentially at a distance from RCM, to complete MMus in Advanced Vocal Performance

Direct admission to Artist Diploma in Opera from Year 1 of the Integrated Masters

Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance Year 2 PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance

120 credits – at least 90 at level M; maximum of 30 at Level 3 The student chooses to take a second year of purely practical study

Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance Year 2 PGDip in Advanced Vocal Performance

120 credits – at least 90 at level M; maximum of 30 at Level 3 The student chooses to take a second year combining practical study with the first of 2 MMus units

Integrated Masters in Vocal

Performance

Year 2 Intensive MMus in Advanced Vocal Performance

180 credits – at least 135 at level M; maximum of 45 at Level 3 The student chooses to take an intensive second year combining practical study with both MMus units and therefore obtains an MMus after 2 calendar years

Integrated Masters in Vocal Performance Year 1 PGDip in Vocal Performance 120 credits – at least 90 at level M; maximum of 30 at Level 3 All students pursue a pattern of practical units (1-to-1 identical for every student) whether intending to proceed to Opera, PGDip Year 2 or an MMus

24

COMPOSITION

3.21 The Masters Programme in Composition has a range of course options designed to enable you to employ your time at the RCM in ways that you feel most appropriate. The Masters Programme comprises the Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Composition and Advanced Composition, the two-year Masters Degree in Advanced Composition (MMus) and the one year Intensive Masters Degree in Advanced Composition (MMus).

3.22 The Masters Programme in Composition contains two pathways:

Composition

Composition for Screen

3.23 These pathways operate as free-standing one- or two-year programmes of full-time study. Part-time patterns of study are also available.

3.24 All the pathways of the Masters Programme in Composition are practical in their focus and designed to help you reach the highest standards. They also aim to help you to become self-sufficient and self-critical and seek to equip you for the profession as it is now and to prepare you for the changes that you will undoubtedly encounter in your career. If you choose a pattern of study that leads to an MMus qualification, the practical focus of your study will be complemented by relevant scholarly aspects.

3.25 Students normally enter Year One of the Masters Programme, electing to work towards a PGDip or MMus following a process of induction. You will have to apply to stay on for a second year of study, regardless of which qualification you are working toward. Once your application is lodged, you will also need to complete the first year successfully to progress to the second. Further details of this process appear later in the Handbook. If you are now entering your second year, you should now have a clear idea of how the programme works and what to expect from the PGDip in Advanced Composition or the MMus in Advanced Composition.

3.26 At the end of each year of study, you will receive a transcript showing the units you have successfully completed. If you complete sufficient units successfully, your transcript will record you as gaining the PGDip in Composition after the first year and the PGDip in Advanced Composition or the MMus in Advanced Composition after the second. For the Postgraduate Diploma, the actual award title, PGDip, is therefore the same in the second year, but the transcript will show not only the greater number of units gained after two years but also the fact that at least one of those taken in the second year is specifically designated as being at the Advanced Composition level.

3.27 You will be studying on one of the pathways available, as listed above in 3.22 Depending on which pathway and which year you are following, you may be taking a specialist unit as part of your core study. In addition, you will take some form of Principal Study to which you may apply to add one, or in some cases two, additional studies. These are called Second Studies in the case of more substantial provision and Related Studies where the provision is less.

3.28 If you are undertaking MMus study, you will find four MMus Core units, (Academic Portfolio, Composition Commentary, Critical Project and Lecture Presentation (Composition) or Critical Studies Portfolio (Composition for Screen). Two of these must be successfully completed to gain the degree, and one of which, the Academic Portfolio, is mandatory for all MMus candidates. The Academic Portfolio is normally taken in the first year of study. All composers on the Intensive MMus must take the Academic Portfolio. In addition, if you are following the Composition pathway, you will choose between the Composition Commentary or Critical Project or Lecture Presentation, during your one

25

calendar year of study. If you are following the Composition for Screen pathway, you are required to complete Critical Studies Portfolio during your one calendar year of study.

3.29

Once your pathway-core units and necessary Principal Study elements have been settled upon, you may have some space left to take further units to bring you up to your full quota (normally 120 credits for each year of the PGDip or the MMus and 180 credits for the one-year Intensive MMus). If so, you will choose from a range of other Elective units.

3.30

At the back of the handbook are six appendices. The first of these is what is known as a Programme Specification. It is a useful summary of the programme, written in a standard format used by many UK universities, including conservatoires. You may find it a useful ‘portrait’ of your studies; when you have finished your studies, it will also enable you to show someone unfamiliar with the programme what you had to do to get the award and what kinds of qualities they should expect to find in you.

3.31

The second appendix contains the regulations by which the programme operates. You will probably only refer to them for specific information – for example, how your overall result is calculated or what happens if you fail a unit. All the same, it is a good idea to look through them at an early stage so that they are not completely unfamiliar when you may need them urgently.

3.32

In the sections of the main handbook that follow, you will find the aims and learning outcomes of the programme stated, its structure set out and the arrangements for induction, progression and assessment described. Then there are descriptions of each of the units from which the programme is made up. The final section deals with the management of the programme.

3.33

Included in this last section are details of how feedback about the programme is obtained. Your views as a student are very important in this and can help to influence how the programme develops and improves. Therefore, please take the time to engage fully with the various feedback processes which you will encounter during your studies; even if you may not benefit directly, those that come after you will. You are also welcome to speak to the Head of Graduate School and Head of Composition at any point during the academic year if you have issues to discuss.

3.34

Overall Course Structure

The overall structure of the courses has already been outlined in the introduction. This section provides greater detail about how each year of study is built up, including diagrams of the various units and how they may be put together.

3.35

The Masters Programme contains courses leading to the award of either a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or a Master of Music (MMus). The title of the award received depends upon the pattern of units studied. Students who choose entirely practical units receive a PGDip and those who include within their study certain key academic units receive the MMus. In general, the first year of the programme is designated as being at the Composition level and the second at the Advanced Composition level. Students on the Intensive MMus tackle units at Advanced Composition level as part of a concentrated 12- month programme. Although two separate courses, the PGDip in Composition and Advanced Composition function as a pair, the course in Advanced Composition following on from that in Composition. The programme and its constituent courses can be represented at its simplest level by the following diagram:

26

 

Masters Programme (Composition)

 

Routes

1

2a

2b

3

4

Sept-

PGDip in

PGDip in

PGDip in

Intensive

PGDip in

June

Composition

Composition

Composition

MMus in

Composition

(including

Advanced

(not including

academic unit)

Composition

academic

(including two

unit)

academic units)

July-

     

Aug

Sept-

PGDip in

MMus in

 

Intensive

June

Advanced

Advanced

MMus in

Composition

Composition

Advanced

(including

Composition

further

(including

academic unit)

two academic

July-

 

units)

Aug

Final

PGDip in

PGDip in

MMus in

MMus in

MMus in

Award

Composition

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Title

Composition

Composition

Composition

Composition

27

Masters Programme in Composition Overview showing the basic routes through the programme leading to PGDip or MMus qualifications

 

Masters Programme

 

Routes

 

1

 

2a

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Composition level

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Composition level

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Composition level

Elective

Sept-

June

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

units

(need not

include

(need not

include

at Com-

position

(must

include

at Com-

position

(must

include

(not

including

 

Academic

 

Academic

level

Academic

level

Academic

Academic

 

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio

 

Portfolio)

plus one

                         
     

further

 

July-Aug

MMus

core unit)

 

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Composition level

Elective

Sept-

June

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

(need not

include

at

Advanced

(must

include an

at

Advanced

(must

include

 

any MMus

Com-

MMus

Com-

Academic

core unit)

position

core unit)

position

Portfolio

 

level

level

plus one

further

   

MMus

 

July-Aug

core unit)

Length

I year (10 months)

2 years (22 months)

 

2 years (22 months)

1 year (12 months)

2 years (24 months)

of study

 

Credits

120 Credits at level M

240 Credits at level M

 

240 Credits at level M

180 Credits at level M

300 Credits at level M

Pattern

 

Pattern A

Patterns A + B

   

Patterns A + B

   

Pattern C

 

Patterns A + C

Final

         

Award

 

PGDip in

PGDip in Advanced Composition

 

MMus in Advanced Composition

MMus in Advanced Composition

MMus in Advanced Composition

Title

Composition

28

4

Integrated Masters Programme Part-time option

4.1 The Integrated Masters Programme already offers students the choice of studying for the MMus over 12 months (Intensive Programme) or 2 academic years. In this sense, those students attracted to part-time study as a means of spreading out the timescale over which they need to complete the various elements of the course already have this option built into the structure. However, the 2-year programme is still predicated on students being able to devote themselves to their studies full time. It also carries a fee that is commensurate with this.

4.2 Some students may not be able to afford to study full-time, or others may wish to balance studies with existing commitments. For these students, a part-time option gives the possibility of combining study and other activities, because they are taking fewer lessons and classes per year. This also means that their annual costs are less than those for full- time students. With this in mind, the College has designed a part-time configuration for its 2-year programme. Rather than making this literally half-time, it has been found more practical to configure the elements over 3 years, producing ‘two-thirds of full-time’ course.

4.3 Although this configuration reduces the overall level of weekly commitment and lowers the annual fee, the individual units taken are delivered identically as they would be to full- time students and, pro rata, are charged at the same level.

Arrangements for part-time study:

4.4 Students take units totalling 80 credits in each of the three years of study. This totals 240 credits – the same as the 2-year full-time course.

4.5 Non-Principal Study units totalling at least 30 credits must be taken in at least two of the three years.

4.6 A Principal Study unit should normally be taken in each year. The first Principal Study unit must be at Performance level; the second Principal Study unit is taken in the third year at the full-time weekly lesson allocation and must be at Advanced Performance Level.

4.7 The first Principal Study unit is assessed by a diagnostic examination at the end of the first year and by the examination pattern laid out in the syllabus at the end of the second year. The credits associated with the Principal Study type chosen (1, 2 or 3) are apportioned equally between the two years (for PS 2, the allocation is 30 credits to Year 1 and 40 to Year 2). They are awarded on successful completion of the examination at the end of the second year. For this reason, the diagnostic exam, although it does not affect the final mark gained, is important because it will be used to judge whether it is in the student’s interests to proceed to the second year of study.

4.8 Students wishing to achieve the MMus qualification must take the Academic Portfolio unit in their first year of study and must take either the Lecture Presentation or the Critical Project in one of the other two years.

29

4.9

Part-Time Study

Typical plans of part-time study for an MMus student:

Year

MMus Core unit

Principal Study unit

Other

 

Credits

 

units

 

1

Academic

PS 1 Performance Level (40 credits allocated to Year

   

80

Portfolio

10

credits

(40 awarded at end of

(30 credits)

1)

   

year)

2

Lecture

PS 1 Performance Level (40 credits allocated to Year

   

80

Presentation/

10

credits

(120 awarded at end of year including remaining

Critical Project

2)

 

(30 credits)

40

from Year 1)

3

not applicable

PS 1 Advanced Performance Level (80 credits)

n/a

 

80

Year

MMus Core unit

Principal Study unit

Other

 

Credits

 

units

 

1

Academic

PS 2 Performance Level (30 credits allocated to Year

   

80

Portfolio

20

credits

(40 awarded at end of year)

(30 credits)

1)

 

2

Lecture

PS 2 Performance Level (40 credits allocated to Year

   

80

Presentation/

10

credits

(110 awarded at end of

Critical Project

2)

 

year including remaining

(30 credits)

30

from Year 1)

3

n/a

PS 2 Advanced Performance Level (70 credits)

10

Credits

 

80

Year

MMus Core unit

Principal Study unit

Other units

 

Credits

1

Academic Portfolio (30 credits)

PS 3 Performance Level (30 credits allocated to Year 1)

   

80

10

credits

(50 awarded at end of year)

2

Lecture Presentation/ Critical Project (30 credits)

PS 3 Performance Level (40 credits allocated to Year 2)

   

80

10

credits

(110 awarded at end of

 

year including remaining