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Royal College of Music Graduate School INTEGRATED MASTERS PROGRAMME COURSE HANDBOOK 2006 – 2007 PGDip

Royal College of Music

Graduate School

INTEGRATED MASTERS PROGRAMME

COURSE HANDBOOK 2006 – 2007

PGDip in Performance PGDip in Advanced Performance MMus in Advanced Performance

PERFORMERS

If you would like any material from this Handbook in larger print, please contact the Registry Programmes Team E-mail:

registryprogrammes@rcm.ac.uk

2

Contents

1. Introduction……………………………………………………………………

5

Describes how the Integrated Masters Programme fits into the RCM’s Graduate School, names courses and their constituent pathways and provides instruction in the use of the Handbook.

2. Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes ………………………………7

These describe the skills you will expect to have developed, knowledge accrued and understanding gained upon completion of the Programme.

2.2 Descriptors: Skills and other attributes:

Practical Skills …………………………….….8 Cognitive Skills………………………… ……8 Transferable skills……………………………8 Knowledge and understanding…………… 8

3. Course Structure……………………………………………………………….9

Shows available courses, the pathways within them and the units that constitute each pathway.

3.1

Overall structure…………………………….9

3.3

Unit structure………………………………10 Overall PGDip/MMus Route Diagram.…11

3.6

Pathways…………………………………….12

3.7

Related or Second Study………………….12

3.12 Unit selection restrictions………………13 PGDip/MMus Year Route Maps…….15-17

4. Postgraduate Induction and starting the

Programme…………………………………………………………………….18

Describes how you enter your chosen course and determine its nature and units

5. Progression…………………………………………………………………….20

Staying on for a second year, deferred assessments and reassessments

6. Assessment…………………………………………………………………….21

Describes how practical and written examinations are conducted with the RCM and how these results are ratified.

6.2 Practical assessments…………………… 21

6.3 Written assessments…………………… 22

6.4 Assessment teams and panels…………. 22

6.5 External Examiners………………………. 22

6.6 The Masters Programme in Performance Board of Examiners…….…… 22

7. Unit Descriptions…………………………………………………………….23

This is a short introduction to the principles behind the Masters Programme unit structure.

8. Masters Programme Unit Descriptions………………………………

24

These describe the unit content, teaching contact time, modes of assessment, aims and learning outcomes for each unit in the Programme.

8.1 Year 1 Performance Level Units…………………………………

25

8.1.1 MMus Core Unit… …….……….25

8.1.2 Pathway Core Units…….…….….28

8.1.3 Principal Study Core Units…… 33

8.1.4 Elective Units……………….….….40

8.2 Year 2/Intensive Programme Advanced Performance Level Units…………………………………………………………….62

8.2.1 MMus Core Units……………….62

66

8.2.3 Principal Study Units……….… 71

8.2.4 Elective Units………………… …80

8.2.2 Pathway Core Units……… …

3

9.

Integrated Masters Programme Part-time Option

…………………… ………….….…85

10. Programme Management Arrangements………………………………………………….…87

Appendices:

1. Programme Specification for the Integrated Masters Programme…………….……… ……88

2. Regulations and Overall Credit Framework for Taught Postgraduate Programmes………94

3. Procedures for the Submission and Marking of Postgraduate Written Work at the Royal College of Music 2006-2007: A Guide for Professors and Student.………………………….106

4. The RCM Guide to the Presentation of Written Work……………………………………… 117

5. General Regulations for Students and Important Sources of Information…………………121

6. Integrated Masters Programme Team Biographies……………………………………………130

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1

Introduction

Welcome to the Royal College of Music Graduate School.

1.1 The Graduate School contains seven programmes:

Integrated Masters Programme in Performance for instrumentalists and conductors (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications);

Integrated Masters Programme in Composition including pathways in Composition and Composition for Screen (incorporating PGDip and MMus qualifications);

PGDip Programme in Vocal Performance including specialist opera training;

PGDip in Creative Leadership

Artist Diploma in Performance;

Doctor of Music Programme;

Royal College of Music/Royal Holloway University of London Joint MMus in Performance Studies.

1.2 The School has been conceived as the conceptual home for RCM postgraduates with the idea that, within its framework, the many diverse activities undertaken by advanced students should all provide paths for exploring new ideas in performance, composition and practice-based research. We believe that this is most easily achieved in an environment that facilitates the exchange of knowledge and skills, underpinned by programmes that give you flexibility and inspire you to work to your full potential.

1.3 The Graduate School has as one of its central precepts the idea of the ‘informed performer’ and it aims to nurture not only students’ ability but also their musical intelligence. It is based on the premise that students at postgraduate level are best served by programmes that can be adjusted to individual needs. Accordingly, you will find that you have several choices to make in the devising of your course of study. This Handbook is specifically designed as your guide in that process for the Masters Programme in Performance. Other programmes within the Graduate School have their own designated handbooks. These may be obtained from the Registry or from the RCM Intranet information resource.

1.4 The Masters Programme in Performance has a range of course options designed to enable you to employ your time at the RCM in ways that you feel most appropriate. The Masters Programme comprises the Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Performance and Advanced Performance, the two-year Masters Degree in Advanced Performance (MMus) and the one year Intensive Masters Degree in Advanced Performance (MMus). There are part-time patterns for all but the Intensive MMus.

1.5 The Masters Programme in Performance contains a number of pathways:

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

Orchestral Musician

Early Music Performer

Accompanist/Repetiteur

Conductor

Chamber Ensemble

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1.6

These pathways operate as free-standing one- or two-year programmes of study. The two exceptions to this are the Repetiteur strand of the Accompanist/Repetiteur pathway and the Chamber Ensemble pathway that are only available within the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance.

1.7 All the pathways of the Masters Programme in Performance are practical in their focus and designed to help you reach the highest standards. They also aim to help you to become self- sufficient and self-critical and seek to equip you for the profession as it is now and to prepare you for the changes that you will undoubtedly encounter in your career. If you choose a pattern of study that leads to an MMus qualification, the practical focus of your study will be complemented by relevant scholarly aspects.

1.8 Students normally enter Year One of the Masters Programme, electing to work towards a PGDip or MMus following a process of induction. You will have to apply to stay on for a second year of study, regardless of which qualification you are working toward. Once your application is lodged, you will also need to complete the first year successfully to progress to the second. Further details of this process appear later in the Handbook. If you are now entering your second year, you will have a good idea of how the programme works and what to expect from the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance.

1.9 At the end of each year of study, you will receive a transcript showing the units you have successfully completed. If you complete sufficient units successfully, your transcript will record you as gaining the PGDip in Performance after the first year and the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance after the second. For the Postgraduate Diploma, the actual award title, PGDip, is therefore the same in the second year, but the transcript will show not only the greater number of units gained after two years but also the fact that at least one of those taken in the second year is specifically designated as being at the Advanced Performance level.

1.10 You will be studying on one of the pathways available, as listed above in 1.5. Depending on which pathway you are following, you may be taking a specialist unit as part of your core study. In addition, you will take some form of Principal Study to which you may apply to add one, or in some cases two, additional studies. These are called Second Studies in the case of more substantial provision, Related Studies where the provision is less, and Electives.

1.11 If you are undertaking MMus study, you will find three MMus Elective units, (Academic Portfolio, Lecture Recital and Critical Evaluation Project), two of which must be successfully completed to gain the degree, and one of which, the Academic Portfolio, is mandatory for all MMus candidates. The Academic Portfolio is normally taken in the first year of study. If you are on the Intensive MMus, you must take the Academic Portfolio, and either the Lecture recital or the Critical Evaluation Project during your one calendar year of study.

1.12 Once your pathway-core units and necessary MMus Elective elements have been settled upon, you may have some space left to take further units to bring you up to your full quota (normally 120 credits for each year of the PGDip or the MMus and 180 credits for the one-year Intensive MMus). If so, you will choose from a range of other Elective units. When choosing Electives for second-year study, these are normally different from those taken in Year 1, though differentiated content in specific Electives may fulfil this requirement.

1.13 At the back of the handbook are six appendices. The first of these is what is known as a Programme Specification. It is a useful summary of the programme, written in a standard format used by many UK universities, including conservatoires. You may find it a useful ‘portrait’ of your studies; when you have finished your studies, it will also enable you to show someone

6

unfamiliar with the programme what you had to do to get the award and what kinds of qualities they should expect to find in you.

1.14

The second appendix contains the regulations by which the programme operates. You will probably only refer to them for specific information – for example, how your overall result is calculated or what happens if you fail a unit. All the same, it is a good idea to look through them at an early stage so that they are not completely unfamiliar when you may need them urgently.

1.15

In the sections of the main handbook that follow, you will find the aims and learning outcomes of the programme stated, its structure set out and the arrangements for induction, progression and assessment described. Then there are descriptions of each of the units from which the programme is made up. The final section deals with the management of the programme.

1.16

Included in this last section are details of how feedback about the programme is obtained. Your views as a student are very important in this and can help to influence how the programme develops and improves. Therefore, please take the time to engage fully with the various feedback processes which you will encounter during your studies; even if you may not benefit directly, those that come after you will.

2

Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes

2.1

The Masters Programme has the following overall aims:

To provide advanced musical training at postgraduate level in which a fundamental emphasis upon practical attainment is complemented by the encouragement of critical self-awareness, a capacity for reflective insight and the ability to formulate discriminating musical judgements;

To offer to graduate musicians of proven ability, and with the potential for further development, the opportunity to enhance their skills, broaden their knowledge of repertoire, hone their interpretational and/or creative abilities and thereby to develop their musical talents, both in terms of maturity and of individualisation;

To provide a training whose own internal standards and, where applicable, whose actual characteristics mirror as closely as possible those demanded within the profession. In doing so to seek the fullest involvement of musicians active within the profession, whether professors of the College or visiting individuals and groups;

To acknowledge, and reflect wherever applicable, the leading trends in musical thinking within the profession;

To produce musicians capable of contributing to the development of the profession and of participating in its future shaping through their insights and understanding, as well as their practical abilities.

2.2

The PGDip in Performance and Advanced Performance and MMus in Advanced Performance have been designed to generate the learning outcomes listed below. These outcomes are noted numerically in each of the unit descriptions of the Programme, with each unit generating its own profile of end results:

7

Skills and other attributes

Practical Skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) perform at a level expected of a front-rank professional musician in terms of technique, musical interpretation and communication (2) apply personal research, analysis, reflection and listening to the process of forming a musical interpretation (3) use a thorough understanding of the components of music and its underlying structures to inform musical performances (4) memorise and reconstruct sound (5) conceive, manipulate and develop musical ideas and apply aesthetic/stylistic principles to performance

Cognitive (thinking) skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) research, synthesise and evaluate information from a variety of sources, most of them not text- based (e.g. the oral testimony of teachers and fellow-performers, information carried in the sound of performances and recordings) (2) use advanced levels of reasoning and logic to analyse this material and form relevant performing strategies (3) exercise significant judgement and apply artistic/intellectual perspectives (4) carry out extended projects

Transferable skills – on successful completion of the programme, you should be able to:

(1) approach and solve problems in a flexible, open and creative way (2) work as part of a team, often in a leadership role, taking spontaneous decisions and responding to the decisions of others (3) improvise, manage risk and cope with the unexpected (4) be self-motivated and disciplined, and promote projects/performances with self-critical awareness (5) understand work regimes and professional protocols (6) work independently

Knowledge and understanding - on successful completion of the programme, you should have knowledge and understanding of:

(1) the full range of technical and expressive capabilities of your instrument (2) the instrument’s repertoire and that of its period or modern equivalent and of commonly related instruments, as appropriate (3) how to master less familiar repertoires and the performing conventions associated with them (4) the current state and likely direction of development of the profession, the range of competencies needed to enter it and the ways in which your skills may be continuously enhanced to keep pace with rising challenges in a developing career

2.3 These learning outcomes are derived from the standard Credit and HE Qualifications Guidelines for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and are taken as applying to all units and pathways within the Masters Programme. However, students obtaining the PGDip in Advanced Performance or the MMus in Advanced Performance will have deepened their skills and knowledge in their Principal Study area and broadened them in relation to the range of other units taken.

8

2.4

As noted in 2.2, the unit descriptions later in this handbook refer back to these listed learning outcomes for each unit and attempt to show how they contribute to the overall learning outcomes of the programme. Descriptions for Principal Study show how the second-year units build upon their equivalents in the first year, leading to the higher, Advanced Performance level for the award.

3

Course Structure

3.1

Overall structure:

The overall structure of the courses has already been outlined in the introduction. This section provides greater detail about how each year of study is built up, including diagrams of the various units and how they may be put together.

3.2

The Masters Programme contains courses leading to the award of either a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or a Master of Music (MMus). The title of the award received depends upon the pattern of units studied. Students who choose entirely practical units receive a PGDip and those who include within their study certain key academic units receive an MMus. In general, the first year of the programme is designated as being at the Performance level and the second at the Advanced Performance level. Students on the Intensive MMus tackle units at Advanced Performance level as part of a concentrated 12-month programme. Although two separate courses, the PGDip in Performance and Advanced Performance function as a pair, the course in Advanced Performance following on from that in Performance. The programme and its constituent courses can be represented at its simplest level by the following diagram:

 

Masters Programme

 

Routes

1

2a

2b

3

4

Sept-

PGDip in

PGDip in

PGDip in

Intensive

PGDip in

June

Performance

Performance

Performance

MMus in

Performance

(including

Advanced

(not including

academic unit)

Performance

academic

(including two

unit)

academic units)

July-

     

Aug

Sept-

PGDip in

MMus in

 

Intensive

June

Advanced

Advanced

MMus in

Performance

Performance

Advanced

(including

Performance

further

(including

academic unit)

two academic

July-

 

units)

Aug

Final

PGDip in

PGDip in

MMus in

MMus in

MMus in

Award

Performance

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Advanced

Title

Performance

Performance

Performance

Performance

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3.3

Unit structure:

All the courses within the Programme are built from a range of units, with many units shared amongst them. These units are classified as Core Units, Principal Study Units and Elective Units. Your choice of Core Units will determine the award title you receive and the specialist pathway on which you will be studying. In particular, deciding whether or not you take the academic units referred to in the diagram above (Academic Portfolio and Lecture Recital or Critical Evaluation Project) will determine whether your course of study will be for an MMus or PGDip. For this reason, these units are referred to as MMus Core Units, as opposed to the other type of core unit – Pathway Core Units.

3.4 Units are built up into patterns of study that normally occupy the period from September to June (10 months) and correspond to 120 credits. The exception to this is the pattern for the Intensive Masters, which lasts 12 months from September to September and contains 180 credits. The four routes shown in the diagram above are all built from just three basic patterns of annual study:

Pattern A:

Performance Level

120 credits

Pattern B:

Advanced Performance Level

120 credits

Pattern C:

Advanced Performance Level

180 credits

3.5 Adding some detail to the diagram above, the various routes through the programme can be shown in conjunction with the types of units which make them up, the total length of study and number of credits accumulated and patterns of annual study from which they are assembled. This expanded diagram is shown on the next page:

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Masters Programme in Performance Overview showing the four basic routes through the programme leading to PGDip or MMus qualifications

 

Masters Programme

 

Routes

 

1

 

2a

 

2b

 

3

 

4

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Performance level

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Performance level

Elective

Core

Principal Study unit at Performance level

Elective

Sept-

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

unit(s)

units

June

(need not

include

(need not

include

at Per-

formance

(must

include

at Per-

formance

(must

include

(not

including

Academic

 

Academic

level

Academic

level

Academic

Academic

 

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio)

Portfolio

 

Portfolio)

       

plus one

 

July-Aug

further

MMus

 

core unit)

 

Core

Principal

Elective

Core

Principal

Elective

 

Core

Principal Study unit at Advanced Performance level

Elective

Sept-

June

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

Study unit

units

unit(s)

units

(need not

include

at

Advanced

(must

include an

at

Advanced

(must

include

 

any MMus

Per-

MMus

Per-

Academic

core unit)

formance

core unit)

formance

Portfolio

 

level

level

plus one

   

further

July-Aug

MMus

core unit)

Length

I year (10 months)

2 years (22 months)

 

2 years (22 months)

1 year (12 months)

2 years (24 months)

of study

 

Credits

120 Credits at level M

240 Credits at level M

 

240 Credits at level M

180 Credits at level M

300 Credits at level M

Pattern

 

Pattern A

Patterns A + B

   

Patterns A + B

   

Pattern C

 

Patterns A + C

Type

         

Final

       

Award

 

PGDip in

PGDip in Advanced Performance

 

MMus in Advanced Performance

MMus in Advanced Performance

MMus in Advanced Performance

Title

Performance

11

3.6

Pathways:

The pathway within which a student studies is usually determined by his or her Principal Study; for example, a student whose Principal Study is on a period instrument will take the Pathway Core Unit which defines them as being on the Early Music Performer pathway. The two pathways that share Principal Study instruments are the Solo/Ensemble Recitalist and the Orchestral Musician pathways. Students of instruments which feature in the modern orchestra choose between these two pathways according to whether or not they wish to give particular emphasis to orchestral performance. The full list of pathways available across the two levels of the programme is as follows:

Performance level

Advanced Performance level

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

Solo/Ensemble Recitalist

Orchestral Musician

Orchestral Musician

Early Music Performer

Early Music Performer

Accompanist

Accompanist/Repetiteur

Conductor

Conductor: Choral or Orchestral

 

Chamber Ensemble (taken as a group)

3.7 Related or Second Study:

Because students may or may not elect to take Related or Second Studies, these are grouped with the so-called Elective units of the programme. When taken in its PGDip form, every pathway offers scope for students to elect to undertake Related or Second Study. The Solo/Ensemble pathway retains some of these opportunities even in its MMus form.

3.8 Correspondingly, in the Solo/Ensemble pathway in its PGDip version, there is even scope for combining two of these studies in addition to the Principal Study. Such combinations are only used where the Principal Study instrument has two recognised associated instruments and where an individual professional musician might be expected to be proficient on all three. Examples of this are most common among woodwind instruments (e.g. Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Eb Clarinet; Flute, Piccolo, Baroque Flute) and, to a slightly lesser extent, brass instruments (e.g. Trumpet, Natural Trumpet, Cornet; Trombone, Bass Trombone, Sackbut). Triple combinations are not usually encouraged among string instruments and are not normally available at all to Principal Study pianists.

3.9 Because one of the primary goals of the entire Masters programme is to achieve the highest possible standard in the Principal Study, students may only select a Second Study option if their mark in the Principal Study at audition is at least 60% (similarly, students wishing to take a Second Study in Year 2 must achieve at least 60% in their Principal Study repertoire recital at the end of the year). For triple combinations, the Principal Study mark must be at least 65%. In either case, the level already achieved in the proposed Second Study must also be high enough to justify the time and attention allocated to it. This normally means an audition or examination mark of 60%.

3.10 Related Study may be chosen without any of these restrictions, provided that it forms part of one of the permitted patterns. The following table summarises these requirements:

12

 

Second Study

Triple combination permissible

permissible

Principal

Study

less

than

60%

Principal Study 60%-64%; Second Study less than

60%

Principal Study 60%-64%; Second Study 60%+

Principal Study 65%+; Second Study less than

60%

Principal Study 65%+; Second Study 60%+

 

3.11 To summarise, all units are grouped into one of three overall categories, the first of these, the Core Units, being subdivided into MMus Core and Pathway Core Units. Students choosing their units need to do so by moving in sequence through these categories.

 

Unit Choice Steps

 

1a

MMus Core units

If one of these (two in Intensive Masters) is selected, the pattern of studies will lead to an MMus award. If

1b

Pathway Core

none is selected, they will lead to a PGDip. There is a Pathway Core unit for every pathway apart from the Solo/Ensemble Recitalist. Students wishing to follow this pathway move straight to step 2

units

2

Principal Study

All students must choose one of the four different lengths of Principal Study unit

units

3

Elective units

Include Related and Second Study units (see above) and a range of other theoretical and practical units. In some cases, students may take a Pathway Core unit from another pathway as an elective. After a student has made choices in categories 1,2 and 3, there may be no spare credits for elective units (see 3.12 below)

3.12 Unit selection restrictions:

Students may broadly choose units as they wish within the programme. However, there are some overall restrictions that must be followed. These are as follows:

Units for each year of the PGDip or MMus must normally be selected such that they have a total credit value of neither more nor less than 120 (but see 3.14 below)

Units for the Intensive MMus must be selected such that they have a total credit value of neither more nor less than 180

The maximum amount of 1-to-1 practical tuition (Principal, Second and/or Related Study) which may be selected is 120 minutes per week

Units at Advanced Performance level may only be selected in the second year of study or in the Intensive MMus

13

Related Study units are available in Year Two, but normally at Advanced level only. Where there are compelling reasons why a student did not take a Related Study in Year 1 and where it can be argued that doing so for just one year prior to entry to the profession would be valuable, a student may be permitted to take a Related Study at this stage, using one of the patterns for core units from Year 1 of the pathway

Units already taken in Year One may then be re-taken in Year Two but only if the content of the unit is radically different. The choice of a repeated unit must be authorised by the Head of Graduate School at the Induction sign-up stage. Pathway Core units may be taken in two successive years because the repertoire for these is cycled so as to avoid repetition from one year to the next

The MMus Core unit to be taken in Year One of the two-year MMus is the Academic Portfolio unit

3.13 Elective units include units at Level 3 that form part of the College’s BMus (Hons) programme but may be taken as part of the PGDip or MMus.

3.14 Where Level 3 units are chosen, they must not amount to more than 25% of the credits taken. This means that, for 120-credit courses, they must not amount to more than 30 credits and, for the 180-credit Intensive course, not more than 45 credits. Because the Level 3 units are 40-credits units, this means that the overall number of credits when they are chosen as part of a 120-credit course must rise to 130 (i.e. with 90 Level M credits featuring among the minimum of 120 required for the award). No such adjustment is required for the 180-credit Intensive course.

3.15 On the first three pages which follow, there are diagrams showing the available units within each of the three pattern types which were described in 3.4 and represented in the diagram at 3.5. In each case, the Routes to which this pattern contributes are indicated. The next three pages show the same patterns in what we hope may be a more accessible version. In Section 8, unit descriptions are provided for each of the units contained in these diagrams.

14

Pattern A :

Represents whole of Route 1 and first year of Routes 2a, 2b and 4

PGDip in Performance: One year(10 months), 120 credits

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

 

Pathway Core Unit (Level M)

Principal Study Unit (Level M)

 

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or 3)

       

Level M

Academic

Orchestral Performance (Orchestral Pathway)

Principal Study 1 (Performance level)

Major Second Study (45 min/week)

Portfolio

30 credits

30

credits

(90 min/week)

40

credits

(Those electing to do a PGDip only will not have to take an MMus Core Unit).

Historical Performance (Early Music Pathway)

80

credits

Minor Second Study (30 min/week)

Principal Study 2

30

credits

30

credits

(Performance level)

Related Study

 

(75 min/week)

(15 min/week)

Accompaniment

70

credits

20

credits

 

(Accompanist Pathway)

 

Contemporary Music in Action

30

credits

Principal Study 3 (Performance level) (60 min/week)

 

10

credits

Conducting

Continuo

 

(Conductor Pathway)

60

credits

10

credits

50

credits

 

Concerto Competition *

 

Principal Study 4 (Performance level) (45 min/week)

10

credits

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

Performance Case History

10

credits

40

credits

Professional skills

   

10

credits

Songwriting and Pop Music

Production 10, 20 or 30 credits Recital Accompaniment *

10

credits

Historical Performance * 10, 20 or 30 credits * when not taken as part of Pathway Core or Principal Study

 

Level 3

Alexander Technique

40

credits

Chamber Music

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Conducting

40

credits

Composition

40

credits

Orchestration &

Arrangement

40

credits

Choral Singing

20

credits

 

Total of 120 credits

 
 

Pathway Core units plus Principal Study units may not add up to more than 100 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

 

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 30 credits (25%) to the 120 credits of the PGDip. Therefore total credits when these are chosen will be 130

15

Pattern B:

120 credits Represents second year of Routes 2a and 2b

MMus Year Two/PGDip in Advanced Performance: One year (10 months),

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

Pathway Core Unit (Level

Advanced Principal Study

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or 3)

 

M)

 

Unit (Level M)

Lecture Recital

Orchestral Performance (Orchestral Pathway)

Principal Study 1 (Advanced Performance

Level M Major Second Study (45 min/week)

OR

Critical Evaluation

30

credits

level) (90 min/week)

40

credits

Project

 

Minor Second Study

30 Credits

Historical Performance (Early Music Pathway)

80

credits

(30 min/week)

 

30

credits

(Those electing to do a PGDip only will not have to take an MMus Core Unit).

30

credits

Principal Study 2 (Advanced Performance level) (75 min/week)

Related Study

 

(15 min/week)

Accompaniment (Accompanist Pathway)

20

credits

Contemporary Music in Action

 

30

credits

70

credits

10

credits

   

Continuo

Orchestral or Choral Conducting (Advanced Conductor Pathway)

Principal Study 3

10

credits

(Advanced Performance level) (60 min/week)

Concerto Competition *

10

credits

Performance Case History

50

credits

60

credits

10

credits

   

Professional skills

Repetiteur Experience (Repetiteur Training Pathway)

Principal Study 4 (Advanced Performance level)

10

credits

Songwriting and Pop Music

Production 10, 20 or 30 credits

30

credits

(45 min/week)

 

40

credits

Recital Accompaniment *

Chamber Music (Group

 

10

credits

Chamber Music Pathway)

Historical Performance * 10, 20 or 30 credits * when not taken as part of Pathway Core/ Principal Study

50

credits

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

Level 3 Alexander Technique

 

40

credits

Chamber Music

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Conducting

40

credits

Composition

40

credits

Orchestration & Arrangement

40

credits

Choral Singing

20

credits

 

Total of 120 credits

 
 

Pathway Core units plus Principal Study units may not add up to more than 100 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

 

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 30 credits (25%) to the 120 credits of the PGDip. Therefore total credits when these are chosen will be 130

16

Pattern C:

Represents whole of Route 3 and second year of Route 4

Intensive MMus : One year (12 months)

MMus Core Unit (Level M)

 

Pathway Core Unit (Level M)

Advanced Principal Study Unit (Level M)

 

Elective Unit(s) (Level M and/or 3)

Academic

Orchestral Performance (Orchestral Pathway)

Principal Study 1

Level M Major Second Study (45 min/week)

Portfolio

30

(Advanced

credits

30

credits

Performance level)

40

credits

 

(90 min/week)

Minor Second Study

Lecture Recital

Historical Performance (Early Music Pathway)

80

credits

(30 min/week)

OR Critical

 

30

credits

Evaluation Project

30

credits

Principal Study 2 (Advanced Performance level) (75 min/week)

Related Study

30 Credits

 

(15 min/week)

Accompaniment (Accompanist Pathway)

20

credits

Contemporary Music in

30

credits

70

credits

Action

   

10

credits

Orchestral or Choral Conducting (Conductor Pathway)

Principal Study 3

Continuo

(Advanced

10

credits

Performance level)

Concerto Competition *

50

credits

(60 min/week)

10

credits

 

60

credits

Performance Case History

(Solo/Ensemble Pathway candidates do not take a Pathway Core Unit).

 

10

credits

Principal Study 4

Professional skills

(Advanced

10

credits

 

Performance level)

Songwriting and Pop Music Production

(45 min/week)

40

credits

10, 20 or 30 credits

 

Recital Accompaniment *

10

credits

Historical Performance * 10, 20 or 30 credits * when not taken as part of Pathway Core/Principal Study

Level 3 Alexander Technique

40

credits

Chamber Music

40

credits

Duo Performance

40

credits

Conducting

40

credits

Composition

40

credits

Orchestration &

Arrangement

40

credits

Choral Singing

20

credits

 

Total of 180 credits

 
 

Pathway Core units plus Principal Study units may not add up to more than 100 credits

 
 

Total 1-to-1 provision (Principal Study unit plus Second and/or Related Study units) may not add up to more than 2 hours/week)

 

Level 3 Units taken as electives may only contribute 45 credits (25%) to the 180 credits total.

17

4

Postgraduate Induction and starting the Programme:

4.1 All Postgraduate students, new and returning, are urged to make the most of the RCM Postgraduate Induction.

4.2 In order to help new students to become full participants in College life, and to help all students on the Integrated Masters Programme to make the best possible course choices for the year, the first term will begin with a six-week period of Induction. During this time, students will be able to attend a series of lectures providing a grounding for the year’s work, receive advice about designing the course of study from Pathway Leaders and the Head of Graduate School, meet with Faculty Heads and Pathway Leaders for orientation and practical activities, hear Lunchtime Concerts which will show what returning students in both Undergraduate and Postgraduate Programmes have accomplished in their Principal Study work in the first year, learn about RCM resources such as the Woodhouse Centre and engage in social activities run by the RCM Student Association.

4.3 The Induction Lecture Series is important for all students in the instruction provided for writing of Programme Notes and delivery of spoken introductions to performances; the completion and delivery of one or the other of these is now an obligatory Principal Study performance requirement for all PGDip and MMus candidates. The Induction Lecture Series is also intended to help those students who are undecided about the PGDip or MMus option, by providing a sense of the issues that are current in practice-based scholarship, working with the ideas that emerge in discussion, debate and study and contextualising these through performance.

4.4 The Induction Lecture Series for Performers and Composers will be organised in the following way:

AUTUMN TERM 2006

Induction Lecture Series for Performers and Composers

Monday 18 Sept. 2006 The Integrated Masters Programme Darla Crispin and Ingrid Pearson (Recital Hall)

Thursday 21 Sept. 2006 Writer’s Workshop I: Musicians and Research: Some Whys and Hows Natasha Loges (Recital Hall)

Monday 25 Sept. 2006 Tools of the Trade I: Research Craft in Music Meredith McFarlane

Thursday 28 Sept. 2006 Writer’s Workshop II: Style in Essays: Content and Details Natasha Loges

18

Monday 2 Oct. 2006 Tools of the Trade II: Research Resources in Music Meredith McFarlane and CPH (Jenny Nex and Paul Banks)

Thursday 5 Oct. 2006 Programme Notes I Meredith McFarlane

Monday 9 Oct. 2006 Programme Notes II and Spoken Introductions Ingrid Pearson

Thursday 12 Oct. 2006 Authority in Source Materials Ingrid Pearson

Monday 16 Oct. 2006 The Unanswered Question: Practice-based Research Ivan Hewett and Stephen De Pledge

Thursday 19 Oct. 2006 Diagnostic Portfolio (and assignment) Clinic Darla Crispin and Ingrid Pearson

Diagnostic Portfolio Due: Friday 20 October 2006, 12 noon

NO LECTURES: P&R Week 23 Oct. 2006 + 26 Oct. 2006

Thursday 26 October 2006 Diagnostic Portfolio Marking Session

Autumn Lecture Series for Performers and Composers

Interdisciplinary Perspectives (combined cohort of composition and performance students)

Monday 30 Oct. 2006 Writing about Composition v. Writing about Performance Ingrid Pearson

Thursday 2 Nov. 2006 Writing in Context Ivan Hewett

Monday 6 Nov. 2006 Issues in Contemporary Discussions on the Musical Canon: What Might This Mean for Performers Today? Darla Crispin

Thursday 9 Nov. 2006 Virtuosity Ivan Hewett

Thursday 16 Nov. 2006 Concepts of Notation I Jeremy Cox

19

Monday 20 Nov. 2006 Concepts of Notation II Jeremy Cox

Thursday 23 Nov. 2006 It’s All in the Notes Ivan Hewett

Monday 27 Nov. 2006 Perspectives and Approaches in Music Psychology Aaron Williamon

Thursday 30 Nov. 2006 A Few Thoughts about Music Analysis Darla Crispin

Assignment One Due: Friday 8 December, 12 noon

In the Spring and Summer terms, lectures will be continued, and may include external guest speakers. Academic Portfolio assignments will also be generated from these discipline-specific lectures, for inclusion in the end of year Academic Portfolio.

4.5

All students on the Masters Programme, whether opting for the PGDip of MMus, are urged to attend this series, as this will comprise the formal training for the required programmes notes or spoken introductions for Repertoire Recitals.

4.6

Having completed the Induction, students will be required to complete a Masters Programme Declaration form, to be returned to the Registry Programmes Team by the last day of Planning & Review Week of Term 1. This form will confirm the choice of qualification sought, the Pathway selected, the type of Principal Study selected, and the choice of Electives. The form must be signed by the Head of Graduate School and the Pathway Leader. Individual sessions to advise on the completion of the form will be provided.

5

Progression:

5.1

Students enrolled upon the PGDip in Performance must inform the Registry by November of their first term if they wish to stay on for a second year, progressing to the PGDip or MMus in Advanced Performance, through filling out a designated form of notification. On submitting this notification, they are given a conditional offer of a place. To fulfil the conditions of this conditional offer, they must successfully complete the PGDip in Performance. If they do so with a mark in the Principal Study unit of 60% or above, their place will be confirmed; if their Principal Study mark is between 50% (the pass mark) and 59%, they will be offered a reserve place in their chosen course.

5.2

Immediately after the June Board of Examiners, when results for the PGDip in Performance are known, students in the 50-59% category are considered and a decision reached upon whether they can be given a confirmed place or must remain on the reserve list. The students are then informed of their progression outcome along with their results for the PGDip in Performance. As a result, some students with Principal Study marks of 50-59% will nevertheless be given

20

confirmed places straight away. For those who are placed on a reserve list, a final decision will be made by the second week in July.

5.3

Students wishing to progress who fail a unit or who have to defer assessment in a unit until September must pass the unit before the start of the new academic year. Provided that they do pass, they are then treated as above. Those with a mark of 60% or over in the Principal Study will have their place for the Advanced Performance year confirmed immediately; those with a mark between 50% and 59% will be offered a reserve place. This place will be confirmed or otherwise as soon as possible, and by Monday of Induction Week at the latest, so as to permit the student to register for the PGDip/MMus in Advanced Performance in the normal way if successful.

5.4

The Regulations at Appendix 2 contain further statements about progression, deferred assessments and reassessments.

6

Assessment

6.1

Each unit of the Masters Programme has its own assessment element associated with it. In each case, the mode of assessment is tailored to the activity with which the unit is concerned. The majority of units are assessed by a single assessment event.

6.2

Practical assessments:

Where units are of a practical nature, assessments also take the form of practically- based events. These range from specially-organised repertoire examinations to public performance events at which an examining panel is present. In the latter case, normal performance conditions and normal expectations of performance presentation apply. These same conditions are replicated as closely as possible in the various repertoire examinations that take place.

6.3

Written assessments:

Some units employ written submissions for their assessed component. These may take the form of portfolios or a single extended assignment. The Performance Case History unit is assessed by a written submission for which a template is available to students in electronic format.

6.4

Assessment teams and panels:

Written assessments usually have two markers. Major practical assessments usually have three examiners, a generalist Chair and two specialists. Usually one of the two specialists is internal and one external. Where this is not the case, two external specialists are employed.

6.5

External Examiners:

The Masters Programme in Performance shares two External Examiners with the PGDip in Vocal Performance. These External Examiners moderate the work of the examining panels, rather than participating directly in the examining process.

6.6

The Masters Programme in Performance Board of Examiners:

Results are ratified, and any necessary moderating adjustments made by the Masters Programme in Performance Board of Examiners. This meets in full session twice a year, in June for the main set of results and in September to consider

21

deferred assessments, re-assessments and October for assessments submitted at the end of the Intensive Masters. In addition to these meetings, there are various interim and internal meetings of the Board to consider interim results and students’ proposals for various elements of the course.

6.7 A student’s result in each unit is weighted according to the credit volume of the unit and the results combined to arrive at an overall mark. Where a 40-credit Level 3 unit has been taken as part of a 120-credit course, all the available Level M credits (90) are calculated first and the mark for the Level 3 unit is weighted by the number of credits left out of 120 (i.e. 30). The surplus credits show on the student’s transcript but do not influence the overall mark.

6.8 The College’s Regulations and Overall Credit Framework for Taught Postgraduate Programmes (see Appendix 2) describe the three routes by which a student may obtain an overall Distinction. Essentially, they are as follows:

An aggregate mark of 70% or above

A mark of 70% or above in 75% of the credits for the award

A mark of 70% or above in 50% of the credits for the award and an overall aggregate mark of at least 68%

22

7

Unit Descriptions

7.7 On the pages that follow are unit descriptions for each of the units that make up the PGDip in Performance, the PGDip/MMus in Advanced Performance and the Intensive MMus in Advanced Performance. They are set out in the following order:

Year 1 Performance Level Units

" MMus Core Unit

" Pathway Core units

" Principal Study Units

" Elective units

Year 2/Intensive Programme Advanced Performance Level Units

" MMus Core Unit

" Pathway Core units

" Principal Study Units

" Elective units

7.8 Where a unit description has been provided before, it is cross-referenced, rather than being repeated.

7.9 Each unit description begins with statistics about the unit. It then provides brief details of unit objectives and learning outcomes, content and assessment. Unit descriptions are deliberately broad in their description of content. The information that they contain is supplemented, where appropriate, by syllabus booklets that enable the detail of the unit content and, for 1-to-1 practical units, the examination requirements (repertoire, etc) to be varied from year to year within the parameters defined by the unit description.

23

8

Masters Programme Unit Descriptions

Contents

8.1

Year 1 Performance Level Units

8.1.1

MMus Core Unit

25

8.1.2

Pathway Core Units

28

8.1.3

Principal Study Units

33

8.1.4

Elective Units

40

8.2

Year 2/Intensive Programme Advanced Performance Level Units

8.2.1

MMus Core Units

62

8.2.2

Pathway Core Units

66

8.2.3

Advanced Principal Study Units

71

8.2.4

Elective Units

80

24

8.1

Year 1 Performance Level Units

8.1.1 MMus Core Unit

If you are planning to study for an MMus over two years you will select this MMus core unit as part of your first year’s study. Similarly, if you are taking the Intensive Masters course, you will take this unit along with one of the two Advanced Performance Level MMus core units.

The Performance Level MMus core unit takes the form of a Lecture Series and is assessed through the submission of an Academic Portfolio. Details of the unit are given in the Unit Description which follows.

The first five weeks of study on this unit take the form of an Induction Course. The course consists of three weeks containing two lectures per week, tutorial sign ups and an initial diagnostic task requirement to be submitted by Friday of the fifth week.

All first year students are encouraged to attend at least this element, whether or not they have selected this MMus core unit. The induction course addresses issues such as the preparation of programme notes or spoken introductions for recitals – tasks that all students on the Masters programme will need to fulfil. Taking the induction course may also help you to decide whether a programme of study leading to an MMus is right for you or whether a PGDip would be more appropriate. You may alter your selection of units at any time up to the Planning

& Review week of the Autumn Term. All students receive counselling about

continuing with MMus core unit choices around the sixth week of the Autumn

Term.

The shape of the lecture series across the remainder of the academic year consists

of topic-based, twice weekly lectures rounded off by tutorial sign ups on the essay

topics. In the Spring Term, some of your weekly sessions will consist of attending sessions at which Advanced Performance level students deliver the Lecture Recitals which they are preparing for assessment. If you are studying on the Intensive Masters and have selected the Lecture Recital as your Advanced Performance level MMus core unit, you yourself will actually be giving one of these presentations.

A plan of the year for the lecture series is provided on the next page. This plan

also includes the scheme for the Lecture Recital and the other Advanced Performance level MMus core unit, the Critical Evaluation Project, to show how these are coordinated. If you are studying on the Intensive MMus and have selected the Critical Evaluation Project as your Advanced Performance level MMus core unit, you will follow the pattern for this along with pursuing the lecture

series.

25

 

Autumn Term

 

Spring Term

 

Summer Term

 

Teaching

P&R Week

Teaching

Teaching

P&R

Teaching

Teaching

 

weeks

 

weeks

 

weeks

Week

 

weeks

weeks

(usually 5)

(usually

(4-6)

(4-5)

(3-6)

 

5)

   
 

Total of 24 teaching weeks

   
 

Lecture Series

 

Induction lectures (2 sessions per week) followed by tutorial. Diagnostic portfolio submitted by 12 pm Friday October 20th 2006

Evaluation of Diagnostic portfolio. Counselling to students about continuation. Choices determined by Week 6

Weeks 7-11

 

Weeks 13-17 Normally

 

Weeks 19-24

End of Week

Normally

 

5

weeks of

26

5

weeks of

5 weeks of lectures with tutorial sign ups/e mail

lectures with

Submission

lectures with

 

tutorial sign

of portfolio

tutorial sign

ups/email

(September

ups/e mail

 

for students

   

on Intensive

Weeks 7-12

 

Weeks 13-18

 

Weeks 19-24

programme)

5

weeks of

Attendance

Themed strand.

Check

lectures with

 

at Lecture

5

weeks of

Syllabus and

 

tutorial sign

Recital dry-

lectures with tutorial sign ups

PG

ups/e mail

 

runs (see

Noticeboard

 

below)

 

for date.

 

Lecture Recital

 

5

weeks of

Evaluation of topics. Counselling of students about continuation. Choices determined by Week 6

2

hours

2

hours

 

2

hours

 

tutorials

followed by ½ hour 1-to-1 to prepare topic. Topic abstract submitted by 12 pm Friday

20th

1-to-1

1-to-1

1-to-1

 

Weeks 13-18

 

LR

Lecture

exams

Recital dry

in

runs plus

Spring

tutorial

Term

 

feedback

Exam

 

week

October

2006

 

Critical Evaluation Project

 

5

weeks of

Evaluation of topics. Counselling of students about continuation. Choices determined by Week 6

2

hours

2

hours

 

2

hours

2 hours

End of Week

tutorials followed by ½ hour 1-to-1 to prepare topic. Topic abstract submitted

1-to-1

1-to-1

1-to-1

1-to-1

26

CEP

CEP

Submission

group

group

of CEP.

session

session

Check

11

22

Syllabus and

January,

March 2-

PG Notice

2-4pm

4pm

board for

Room 90

Room 90

date.

 

(September

by 12 pm, Friday

for students

on Intensive

20th

programme)

October

2006

 

26

 

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO Unit Leader: MMus Pathway Leader

Level

Credit Rating

Core/Elective

Prerequisite

M

30

MMus Core

N/A

Delivery

Availability

 

Unit Code

5 x 1.5 hour Induction Lectures with 1 tutorial, followed by 25 x 1.5 hour MMus themed lectures with sign up tutorial support, and attendance at Lecture Recital ‘dry-runs’

Each year

 

M3A01

Unit objectives and learning outcomes

Successful completion of this unit means that you will have:

enhanced your research and writing skills, broadened your knowledge of repertoire, honed your interpretational abilities, and related these to specific issues in music scholarship

enriched your understanding of musical structure and style and of the ways in which these impinge upon the formation of a performance

developed your identity as an ‘informed performer’

deepened your awareness of the current state of the profession and developed your contacts with your future professional colleagues.

This unit contributes to the following learning outcomes of the programme (see programme specification):

Practical skills

2, 3 and 5

Cognitive skills

1, 2, 3, and 4

Transferable skills

2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

Knowledge and understanding

2, 3 and 4

Indicative content

Participation in MMus Lecture series

group tutorial support on MMus Academic Portfolio projects

independent research to support all these activities

auditing of Lecture Recital rehearsal events and feedback sessions.

Method of assessment

Satisfactory completion of Diagnostic Portfolio at end of induction course

Completion of minimum 4 assignments generated from the MMus Lecture Series

Selection of three of these assignments to be submitted as an Academic Portfolio, together with programme notes for the Principal Study Recital

30 credits

TWO COPIES of the Academic Portfolio must be submitted to the Registry by the published deadline.

See also Appendix 3: Procedures for the Submission and Marking of Postgraduate Written Work for further guidance on the preparation, submission and assessment of this unit.

27

8.1.2

Pathway Core Units

These units have been specially designed to provide opportunities for advanced study, usually in a small group situation, of repertoire or performance situations particularly associated with a given instrument or genre. They complement the 1-to-1 Principal Study that all students undertake, covering ground directly relevant to the Principal Study but in ways that are felt to be more effective. For example, ensemble-based work for Early Music specialists develops a range of skills fundamental to the repertoire in ways that independent 1-to-1 study cannot.

In general terms, students taking a Pathway Core Unit are likely to take one of the lower credit-weighted Principal Study Units. This is partly for the reasons outlined above but also because of what may be accommodated within the available credits. In particular,

a student wishing to take and MMus Core Unit and a Pathway Core Unit will find that

60 of the 120 credits available are taken up by this choice. They will therefore select the Principal Study 3 (60 credits) to make up the remaining credits.

If a student does not choose any Pathway Core Unit, this effectively means that they are

designated as being on the Solo/Ensemble Pathway. Solo/Ensemble Pathway students have more credits available either for the Principal Study itself or for Elective Units.

Accompanists, conductors and instrumentalists specialising in a period instrument will be expected to select the relevant Pathway Core Unit for their specialism. Similarly, solo pianists, organists, guitarists and some others are almost certainly going to take the Solo/Ensemble pathway. The only area where there is real choice concerns modern instrumentalists whose Principal Study is a mainstream orchestral instrument. These students need to choose whether they wish to take the Pathway Core Unit in Orchestral Performance or not. Doing so will categorise them as being on the Orchestral Pathway; otherwise they will be designated as being on the Sole/Ensemble Pathway. Neither pathway entirely excludes students from activity in the other area.

Because of the intensive nature of the training in the Orchestral Performance Pathway Core Unit and the need to provide sufficient orchestral opportunities for all students on this pathway, entry by string, wind and brass instrumentalists has to be strictly controlled. Every effort will be made to accommodate such students wishing to take this pathway but it may be necessary from time to time to limit numbers. Under these circumstances, a student accepted onto the programme is free to choose the Solo/Ensemble pathway option.

As Pathway Core Units are assessed through examinations of a practical nature, the assessment criteria for these are to be found in Practical Examinations Procedure at the Royal College of Music 2006-07, available from the Registry.

28

PATHWAY CORE UNIT: ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE Unit Leader: Orchestral Musician Pathway Leader

Level

Credit Rating

Core/Elective

Prerequisite

M

30

Core

N/A

Delivery

Availability

Unit Code

10 x 2 hour seminar plus general College ensemble and orchestral activity (sectionals, performance platforms, concerts)

Each year

M3B01

Unit objectives and learning outcomes

Successful completion of this unit means that you will have:

enhanced your skill and confidence as a performer in some breadth and depth

studied the orchestral repertoire of your instrument in some breadth and depth

developed your rehearsal skills and ability to work quickly and professionally with conductors, section coaches and performing colleagues.

This unit contributes to the following learning outcomes of the programme (see programme specification):

Practical skills

1, 3 and 4

Cognitive skills

1, 2, 3 and 4

Transferable skills

1, 2, 4, 5 and 6

Knowledge and understanding

1, 2, 3 and 4

Indicative content

The core content of this unit is provided through repertoire seminars, usually in small groups, where orchestral repertoire is explored and the necessary interaction between and within orchestral sections discussed and practised.

In addition to this, students are expected to draw upon the more general activities organised by Performance Management to develop their experience and understanding of orchestral performance. In a given year, these might include the following, or equivalent, provision:

Sectional coaching sessions and orchestral rehearsals

Side-by-side, sit-in or outreach experiences with professional musicians

College orchestral concerts

Method of assessment

Assessed Orchestral Rehearsal early in Summer Term

30 credits

(NB: Pending Approval by the Graduate School Committee, the Assessed Orchestral rehearsal may alternate with a Mock Audition examination, with each form of examination taking place every other year – the mode of assessment will be advertised at the end of the Autumn Term).

Note: This unit is also taken by students on the Orchestral Musician pathway of the PGDip in Advanced Performance. The repertoire studied in the seminars is arranged in a two-year cycle so that students taking both years do not duplicate repertoire.

29

PATHWAY CORE UNIT: HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE Unit Leader: Early Music Performer Pathway Leader

Level

Credit Rating

Core/Elective

Prerequisite

M

30

Core

N/A

Delivery

Availability

Unit Code

2 x 15 hours project work and attendance at Early Music classes

Each year

M3B02

Unit objectives and learning outcomes

Successful completion of this unit means that you will have:

enhanced your skill and confidence as an ensemble performer of early music, especially the Baroque repertoire

studied this repertoire in some breadth and depth, including discussion of sources, editions and performance treatises

developed your rehearsal skills and ability to work quickly and professionally, directed or undirected, with performing colleagues.

This unit contributes to the following learning outcomes of the programme (see programme specification):

Practical skills

1, 3 and 4

Cognitive skills

1, 2, 3 and 4

Transferable skills

1, 2, 4, 5 and 6

Knowledge and understanding

1, 2, 3 and 4

 

Indicative content

Repertoire classes where 17 th and 18 th century repertoire is explored and the necessary interaction between instruments, including the role of continuo, discussed and practised

Preparation of ensemble projects

Side-by-side experiences with visiting professional musicians

College Baroque Orchestra concerts

 
 

Method of assessment

Assessed participation in two performance projects during year

10 credits each

A

1,400–1,600 word written project or spoken presentation on a historical performance

practice topic. (Choice of topic to be approved by the unit leader). 10 credits

30 credits total

This is to be closely based on original sources, and can either be an evaluation and discussion of

a single treatise, or a comparison between two or more treatises dealing with similar material. You should include a bibliography of the primary and secondary source material consulted, and are encouraged to include musical examples, comparative tables, etc.

Note: This unit is also taken by students on the Early Music Performer pathway of the PGDip in Advanced Performance. The repertoire to be studied is arranged in a two-year cycle so that students taking both years do not duplicate repertoire.

30

PATHWAY CORE UNIT: ACCOMPANIMENT Unit Leader: Accompanist/Repetiteur Pathway Leader

Level

Credit Rating

Core/Elective

Prerequisite

M

30

Core

N/A

Delivery

Availability

Unit Code

14 x 3 hour class

Each year

M3B03

Unit objectives and learning outcomes

Successful completion of this unit means that you will have:

enhanced your skill and confidence as an accompanist of singers and instrumentalists

studied the repertoire in some breadth and depth, including developing an understanding of languages in relation to the vocal repertoire

developed your rehearsal skills and ability to work quickly and professionally with performing colleagues, offering guidance and advice where appropriate.

This unit contributes to the following learning outcomes of the programme (see programme specification):

Practical skills

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Cognitive skills

1, 2, 3 and 4

Transferable skills

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

Knowledge and understanding

1, 2, 3 and 4

Indicative content

Repertoire classes, in small groups, where vocal and instrumental repertoire is explored and the necessary interaction between piano and voice or melody instrument discussed and practised

Preparation of themed projects

Participation in Song Classes

Method of assessment

Assessed participation in 2 themed performance projects at various times during year 30 credits

Note: This unit is also taken by students on the Accompanist/Repetiteur pathway of the PGDip in Advanced Performance. The repertoire to be studied is arranged in a two-year cycle so that students taking both years do not duplicate repertoire.

31

PATHWAY CORE UNIT: CONDUCTING Unit Leader: Conductor Pathway Leader

Level

Credit Rating

Core/Elective

Prerequisite

M

50

Core

N/A

Delivery

Availability

Unit Code

28 x 2 hour class

Each year

M5B04

Unit objectives and learning outcomes

Successful completion of this unit means that you will have:

enhanced your skill and confidence as a conductor

studied the orchestral repertoire in some breadth and depth

developed your rehearsal skills and ability to work quickly and professionally with performing colleagues

acquired the ability to prepare scores quickly and reliably.

This unit contributes to the following learning outcomes of the programme (see programme specification):

Practical skills

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Cognitive skills

1, 2, 3 and 4

Transferable skills

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

Knowledge and understanding

1, 2, 3 and 4

Indicative content

Repertoire classes, with piano accompaniment, where orchestral repertoire is explored and feedback offered both by the tutor and by fellow conducting students

Guidance in the preparation of scores

The opportunity to learn from the experiences of fellow students and to offer constructive criticism on their performance

Method of assessment

A performance of one work with a College orchestra or ensemble as part of a public concert 50 credits

32

8.1.3

Principal Study Core Units

Every student on the programme, whether studying for the MMus or PGDip, selects a Principal Study unit. If you have opted for one of the specialist Pathway Core units, you will have already used up some of the credits available to you and this will limit the range of choice you may have among the Principal Study units, especially if you also wish to take an Elective unit.

If you have not selected a Pathway Core unit this effectively defines you as being on the Solo/Ensemble Pathway. You are likely to be able to select any of the four types of Principal Study unit available, although again this may be limited if you wish to take one or more elective units (for example, Related or Second Study)

You will see that the four different types of Principal Study unit are ranged in descending order of credit value. In each case, the amount of weekly provision decreases, as does the length of the examination you are expected to take.

The fourth Principal Study unit is for conductors and follows a slightly different format.

Personal Development Plans (PDP’s) All students on the Integrated Masters Programme are required to complete a Personal Development Plan during the course of study. This is a record of the aims for the academic year and provides a place to systematically log such information as repertoire covered and performances completed. The mandatory Performance Profile is contained within the PDP. Individual assistance in completing PDP’s will be provided by the Programme Team.

Programme Notes/Spoken Presentations in PG Recital Examinations Today’s professional performers are expected to be well-informed about the works they perform and to be able to communicate relevant information about them in writing and, increasingly, through clear and engaging spoken presentations. The RCM expects its postgraduate performers to take these professional standards of presentation as seriously as they do their quest for excellence in their actual performing. All postgraduate recital examinations must therefore be accompanied either by well- prepared programme notes or by accomplished spoken introductions.

Programme notes must be the work of the student and should avoid plagiarism in exactly the same way as other written assignments. They should aim to be informative and may by all means reflect personal scholarship on the part of the student. However, they should be sufficiently accessible in style to facilitate reading as an adjunct to listening. Above all, they should give the reader information which will help to focus and enrich his or her listening experience by contributing to an aural understanding of the works performed.

Spoken introductions should be delivered without a written text and should be clearly communicated in a lively and interesting manner. The tone of a spoken introduction may well be less formal than that of a programme note but what is said should again aim to focus and enrich the listening experience of the audience member.

Tuition for these elements It is assumed that postgraduate students will already have acquired some experience of writing programme notes and/or introducing their recitals. In addition, guidance in programme note writing/delivering spoken presentations is given as part of the induction course of the Induction Lecture Series. The Diagnostic Portfolio undertaken just before Planning & Review Week contains assignments dealing with writing about

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music. Although not every student will take the whole Lecture Series, all are encouraged to take at least these induction sections.

A student who chooses not to attend the induction sessions because he or she knows

they will not be undertaking the whole lecture series and associated Academic Portfolio

must take personal responsibility for their preparation for the production of suitable programme notes/spoken introductions when the time comes for their recital.

Examination of these elements As Principal Study Units are assessed through examinations of a practical nature, the assessment criteria for these are to be found in Practical Examinations Procedures at the Royal College of Music 2006-07, available from the Registry.

Copies of programme notes must be submitted to the Registry Programmes Team at least two weeks before the date of the recital. Where a student has chosen to deliver spoken introductions, a form confirming this must be submitted to the Registry Programmes Team by the same deadline.

The examining panel for the recital will judge the effectiveness of the programme

notes/spoken introductions, setting them in the context of the performances that they are intended to enhance. The panel will award a separate percentage mark for the programme notes/spoken introductions. This mark will be communicated afterwards

to

the student along with the mark for the performance itself.

In

the normal way, the mark awarded for the programme notes/spoken introductions is

not given a distinct weighting within the recit