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WEEK

TOPIC
1
Introduction: Materials (Processing, microstructure and properties)
Metals

1-6

Characteristics and applications of common metals


Structures of metals
Metallic alloys and phase diagrams
Case studies in phase diagrams
Driving force for structural change
Kinetics of structural change (diffusive & displacive/diffusionless)
Case studies in phase transformation
Light alloys and their (solution, precipitation & work) hardening
Steels and their heat treatment and properties
Case studies in steels

Reference
CES

Chs 1-14,
16.3/4

6-8

Ceramics Introduction on ceramics


Ceramic structures
Mechanical properties of ceramics
Case studies in ceramics

Chs 17-19, 21

9-10

Polymers Polymers and polymer structures


Mechanical properties of polymers
Case studies in polymers

Chs 23-25, 27

10-11

11-12

Composites Mechanical of properties of composites


Wood structures and properties
Case studies in composites
Material Selection
Material selection strategies
Material dependence & resource consumption
The materials life cycle
Eco-informed material selection

Note: Fracture mechanics & failure analysis 4th yr paper

Chs 28-30

CES

Copyright 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Chapter 09 - Kinetics 3--Displacive


Transformations
Heat Treatment of Steels
Austenitizing Quenching Tempering
M (& retained ) +Fe3C (& retained M &
precipitation of carbides of Cr, Ni, Co, Mo, W, etc for hardening)
Hardenability ability of an alloy to form martensite
M is diffusionless transformation

2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Fig. 7.6 v TS/L during solidification

2/
=

Figure 8.1 Homogenous nucleation rate


2013, 2010 David B. Kirk/NVIDIA Corporation and Wen-mei
Hwu. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Figure 9.1 Diffusive fcc bcc Fe

910

908

910

908

2/
=

914 + 273
914 910
914 + 273
914 908

= 1.53 = 3.4
Figure 9.1 Diffusive fcc bcc Fe, vs

Then if 910
100 atoms, 908
30 atoms
2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Figure 9.4

Figure 9.5 TTT of fcc to bcc Fe


Figure 9.3 Growth of bcc Fe from fcc Fe
2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones.
Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Figure 9.6

>

( )

Figure 9.7

105

/, no fcc bcc,

but to martensite
2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Figure 9.8 Growth with least distortion

Figure 9.9 bcc martensite


2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones.
Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Figure 9.10 fcc bcc in Fe

> ( ) 105 C/, no fcc bcc


2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

> ( )c 200 C/, no fcc bcc

Figure 9.11 fcc bcc in Fe-0.8C

Figure 9.12 Body-centered Tetragonal


2013 Michael F. Ashby and David R. H. Jones.
Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Martensite

Diffusionless transformation of if quenched rapidly enough, C diffusion


prevented, forming a nonequilibrium phase (martensite).
FCC body-centred tetragonal (can be viewed close to bcc)
C atoms strain the lattice tremendously (hence very hard)

Figs. P19.13/10.12 Martensite transformation: -FCC, (b) -tetragonal, (c) M-tetragonal,


(d) BCC. Right: martensite & retained austenite.
Ass 2.1 & 2.2

Textbook Example 9.3 & 9.5

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