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Jordan Lawrence

201-835-7979
jlawren8@tulane.edu

My primary focus for most of my life has been performing on stage; how I can be the
center of attention, yet also be able to make people smile and laugh. But how fulfilling can that
be? How does entertaining an audience member for two hours even compare to preparing a
student with life lessons and knowledge? I would never have even imagined becoming a teacher
if I didnt intern in a Kindergarten class for my Senior Service. It was then when I would leave
the school with a smile everyday, truly understanding the impact I was making on these kids. I
found it very important to show a vested interest in the lives of each of the children, to build a
personal connection with each, and also be able to solve certain problems based on how I know
theyve responded in the past to certain scenarios. Kids enjoy standing out as individuals to a
person they look up to, specifically, their teacher. Although I was called Morah (Teacher) Jordan,
I was still a friend to the students. Generally, kids need a disciplinary, as well as someone who
will sit down and eat snack and lunch with them and talk about their playdate adventures. My
childlike personality, abnormally nave mind, humor, ability to sing, patience and just genuine
love for kids all play into my eventual success as an early childhood educator. When I eventually

become a Kindergarten teacher, I hope to incorporate my musical abilities into the classroom
setting. Teaching subjects such as the alphabet and the seasons of the year can be easily enhanced
if taught through song. I will use websites like edhelper.com and scholastic.com for fun lessons
and activities, appropriate for teaching Kindergarteners the alphabet, numbers and math, and
maybe even appropriate ways to act in social interactions. In my Pre-K class at Crocker, the
students love using ABCMouse.com and I feel that its games and puzzles successfully disguise
the fact that the students are actually learning. I would definitely have computers in my classroom
to enable access to that program. This specific computer program allows for students who learn
kinesthetically rather than just visually to thrive. Although my beliefs dont fall under one
particular philosophy of education, I have been able to somewhat mix and match certain aspects
of each to create my utopian education system.
I believe that all American schools should learn the same things. Subjects including:
reading, writing, science, math, history, current events and language are those that are emphasized
by Essentialists and Perennialists. The government should regulate the basic curriculum in every
school so that every student across the country is on the same page, despite possible
socioeconomic disadvantages. This allows everyone to enter college life and the real world at the
same level, giving everyone a fair and equal chance.
There is a vast amount of reasons why students must learn how to read and write. In my
opinion, it is a basic necessity of life, almost at the same level as having a place to live. Kids will
not make it to adulthood unless they can read. The roads would be extremely dangerous if there
were drivers who couldnt read. They would miss an exit or go down the wrong way of a one-way
street. Even if a job appears to not require any reading or writing, it actually does. In order to
qualify for a job, not only do you have to read and complete the actual application forms, but if
you get a job you have to be able to read and sign a contract. If you cant do either of these things
then you wont have a job, which means no food or shelter. Reading and writing are both very
necessary for communication. Even as we move closer to technology and typing, but farther away

from physical hand writing notes and letters, it is still imperative that everyone can spell and
actually create sentences. Moreover, the ability to write means the ability to be creative. Writing
allows for self-expression and self-exploration.
Students always ask, will we need this math in the future? The answer is absolutely yes!
Being able to use even the essentials of math is necessary for paying bills and taxes, receiving
paychecks and maintaining a mortgage. More importantly, it is necessary to be a consumer.
Understanding how to simply add/subtract and multiply/divide can help someone distinguish
what is economically sound to buy. Math isnt just necessary for STEM majors, but even music
majors too. I can personally account to the fact that rhythms and time signatures would absolutely
mean nothing if I didnt understand math.
Many students dread taking science classes, yet they fail to understand its importance. We
need science to understand the world around us and how we became the way we are. It is because
of science that we have made such progress in technology and medicine. We need children to be
exposed to sciences so they can eventually grow up to make a difference in the world with their
scientific intellect.
Social Studies encapsulates history and current events. Studying our history teaches us to
learn from our mistakes and better problem solve. Learning about unnecessarily bloody wars,
failed political campaigns and badly received social discrimination all help us evolve as a society.
It is also important to focus on current events so that students understand what is going on in the
world, which leads to well rounded conversations and discussions, with the exchange of differing
opinions. Understanding the issues will help kids eventually become a major contribution to
society, whether through voting, donations or advocacy.
I also believe in the importance of learning another language, besides English in order to
broaden horizons. It would be helpful to know another language when traveling to foreign
countries, with the intention to open your mind to different cultures. Furthermore, America is not
the center of the world, and even if you believe it is, then you understand the opportunities

available here and why there are so many immigrants. While it is important that they also
somewhat assimilate, you have to be able to speak their language to learn about their culture and
help them learn about ours.
This is not a part of the Essentialist or Perennialist belief systems, but I feel there should
be a focus on verbal skills in schools. It is extremely vital for kids to understand how to interact
with one another and how to react to certain scenarios. Additionally, speaking eloquently, well
versed with confidence, can guarantee the speaker more respect from others. Relating back to
jobs, being able to speak and represent oneself articulately is extremely necessary for job
interviews.
Additionally, teachers must understand that each student learns differently. Whether this
be through lecture or interactive projects and simulations, the teacher should incorporate all of the
possible strategies for each subject, allowing students to succeed. Existentialists seem to stress
individualism. While I do not believe students should determine their own curriculum, they
should be guided by teachers to help understand how they learn the basics best. At a young age, it
is important that kids are taught, maybe even drilled these basic subjects. From ages four to
seven, learning can also be disguised as fun interactive games and activities to captivate the
young mind. As they continue to learn throughout time, they need to understand a lecturenotetaking style where they dictate what is recited. Even so, it is important that once students
understand the basics, they are able to take what they learn into practice. Projects, simulations
and group discussions allow for individuality and creativity. Field trips are always good, if
possible, to engage students in science, history, art and even politics.
As they get older, students need to have a little more leniency and freedom to discover
the facts of life and society on their own, with the help of their teachers. In the earlier years of
education, it makes sense for the teacher to be the main purveyor of information to the students
because they lack life experience and knowledge. However, as they get older, the students should
participate in more discussions to share opinions with their peers. Existentialists seem to believe

this should be done from the beginning of a student's education, however I feel like they need a
common basis to then branch off of later in life. Consequently, sharing opinions with fellow
students broadens the perspectives that would be hindered if the teacher was the only speaker in
class. Additionally, the teacher should provide positive reinforcement when students answer
correctly, or generally just work hard. This gives them incentive to continue putting effort into
their work in the future. Is is also beneficial to teach respect through discipline, providing
appropriate warnings and punishments, to the extent of learning a lesson. Likewise, students have
to be respectful of teachers, as they are to their parents. Teachers not only teach information, but
also life lessons. They take time to make individual connections with each student, so that they
can individualize their methods to deal with certain situations. Overall, kids must understand the
impact their childhood teachers are making on their ultimate successes in life.
My philosophy strings together my past educational experiences, as well as my
interpretation of the importance of education on the world. I can honestly say that the majority of
my teachers ranging from Kindergarten to 3rd grade to 8 th grade to Junior year of high school
have truly changed my life. Their dedication to teaching the essential topics creatively is
admirable and inspiring. Theyve taken an interest in their students lives and how they respond to
their teaching methods. They emphasize diligent notetaking as well as fun learning activities to
appeal to the various types of learners. The constant reinforcement, when appropriate,
incentivizes trying hard to excel in the classroom setting. My personal philosophy includes a
nationwide curriculum rooted in the essential subjects to thrive in society, taught by teachers who
enjoy making a difference in the lives of children, by making personal connections with each
student to find ways to make them successful in whatever they want to pursue.