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D800003X162

December 2008

Fieldbus Installations in a

DeltaV Digital Automation System

TM

1996 - 2008 Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication, in whole or in part,
is prohibited.
Printed in the Republic of Singapore.
Emerson, Emerson Process Management, the Emerson Process Management Design, DeltaV, the DeltaV design,
and PlantWeb are marks of one of the Emerson Process Management group of companies. All other marks are
property of their respective owners. The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes
only, and while every effort has been made to ensure their accuracy, they are not to be construed as warranties or
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All sales are governed by our terms and conditions, which are available on request. We reserve the right to modify
or improve the design or specification of such products at any time without notice.

Contents
Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix

Chapter 1 Overview to Fieldbus Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11


Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Redundant Series 2 H1 Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Fieldbus Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Redundant Fieldbus Power for Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Terminators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Wiring Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Topologies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Design Considerations, Restrictions, and Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Cable Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Cable Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Spur Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Selection Decisions and Trade-Offs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Geographic Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Control Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Types of Field Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Recommendations for Installing a Fieldbus System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Grounding and Shielding of Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Overview to Installing a Fieldbus Segment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Installing Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Chapter 2 High Availability Fieldbus Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27


Relcom Fieldbus Power System for Redundant Fieldbus Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
DC Power Considerations for High Availability Applications Using the Fieldbus Power System . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Short Circuit Protection with Megablocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Designing an Application for Short Circuit Protection Using Megablocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Installing and Connecting Megablocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Verifying the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
High Availability Application Example for the Fieldbus Power System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub for Redundant Fieldbus Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Contents

iii

DC Power Considerations for High Availability Applications Using the Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . 42
Short Circuit Protection with Segment Protectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Designing an Application for Short Circuit Protection Using a Segment Protector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Segment Protector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Verifying the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
High Availability Application Examples for the Fieldbus Power Hub. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Chapter 3 Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51


DC Power Considerations for Intrinsically Safe Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Field Barrier for Intrinsically Safe Applications in Hazardous Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Installing and Connecting the Field Barrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Verifying the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Intrinsically Safe Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Chapter 4 Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57


DC Power Considerations for Non-Incendive Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Short Circuit Protection with Segment Protectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Segment Protector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Verifying the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Non-Incendive Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Appendix A Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63


Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Checkout Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Fieldbus Segment Checkout Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Appendix B MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications. . .71
DC Power Considerations for IS Power Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Host Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Installing the MTL Intrinsically Safe Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Intrinsically Safe Application Example with an MTL9122 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Appendix C MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications. . . . .79


DC Power Considerations for Non-Incendive Power Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Host Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
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Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Installing the Non-Incendive Power Supplies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82


Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Non-Incendive Application Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Application Example with two MTL9111-NI Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Application Example with one MTL9112-NI Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Appendix D Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89


Troubleshooting with the H1 Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Troubleshooting with the DeltaV Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Troubleshooting with DeltaV Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Troubleshooting Common Fieldbus Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Device or Segment Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
The H1 Card is not Communicating with the DeltaV System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Communication Error or Incorrect Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Problems Commissioning Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Missing Values in Resource or Transducer Block. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Simulate not Working in Control Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Trouble-Shooting Q and A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Fieldbus Third Party Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103


References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

Contents

vi

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Welcome
Welcome to the Emerson Process Management DeltaV digital automation system.
The DeltaV system offers easy-to-install hardware and powerful, user-friendly
software for advanced process control scaled to the system size you need.

About This Manual


This manual provides an overview of the fieldbus technology and presents a
simplified approach to installing and using a fieldbus system with the DeltaV
software. For complete information on the fieldbus protocol, refer to the Fieldbus
Foundation. This manual contains the following sections:

Chapter 1, Overview to Fieldbus Technology, provides general information on fieldbus


components and design considerations and an overview on installing a fieldbus
segment.

Chapter 2, High Availability Fieldbus Applications, provides instructions for


installing fieldbus components for applications requiring redundant Series 2 H1
cards, redundant fieldbus power, and short circuit protection.

Chapter 3, Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications, provides instructions for installing


fieldbus components for applications requiring Intrinsically Safe protection.

Chapter 4, Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications, provides instructions for installing


fieldbus components for applications requiring Non-Incendive protection.

The Appendices include a fieldbus segment checkout procedure, a


troubleshooting guide, and additional Non-Incendive and Intrinsically Safe
application examples.

Other sections contain references for locating recommended third party products
references for additional information on the fieldbus protocol.

Refer to the DeltaV Release Notes KBA enclosed with your system shipment for the
latest information updates. Note that the content of this manual might be different
from the online information; use the most recently dated material. The release date
for this manual is December 2008. The Release Notes KBA has important updates for
the DeltaV system and the Installing Your DeltaV Digital Automation System manual
contains complete information on installing a DeltaV system.

Welcome

vii

This manual documents the use of Third Party Products for fieldbus installations. The
reader should understand that this indicates only that the product has been tested for
interoperability with the DeltaV system. EMERSON PROCESS MANAGEMENT
PROVIDES NO WARRANTY OF DESIGN, MATERIAL, WORKMANSHIP,
PERFORMANCE, FITNESS, MERCHANTABILITY OR OTHERWISE IN
CONNECTION WITH SUCH PRODUCTS. Warranties for Third Party Products
may be obtained only from the applicable manufacturer.

viii

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Assumptions
It is assumed that you have read the Site Preparation Guide for DeltaV Automation Systems
and have followed the instructions for properly preparing your site for electrical
power and grounding before installing your DeltaV System. It is also assumed that
you have read the Installing Your DeltaV Digital Automation System manual and have
correctly installed your DeltaV system. Contact your Emerson Process Management
sales office for these documents.
This manual, Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System, shows factory
tested and supported wiring connections. If your system requires a different
configuration, contact your Emerson Process Management representative or sales
office for help with design or review. It is assumed that all installation and
maintenance procedures described in this document are performed by qualified
personnel and that the equipment is used only for the purposes described.

Conventions
Warnings, cautions, notes and procedures are used in this manual to emphasize
important information.

Warning

A warning describes a critical procedure that must be followed to prevent a


safety risk or equipment damage.

Caution

A caution describes a procedure that must be followed to prevent equipment


malfunction.

Note

A note is a procedure, condition, or statement that will help you understand and operate
your system.

Itemizes steps necessary to execute installation procedures.

Welcome

ix

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Chapter 1

Overview to Fieldbus Technology


This document provides the information required to select components from
Emerson Process Management and third party suppliers to design and install a
working fieldbus segment. It presents a simplified approach and covers a variety of
applications.

DeltaV Workstation

Redundant
Series 2 H1 Cards
s

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

A1 A2

FPS-RCI

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

A
Power In
B

IPM

IPM

Redundant
Fieldbus
power supply

Fieldbus

H1 Fieldbus
Segment

Figure 1

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

Fieldbus Segment

11

Several documents exist that cover the technical aspects of fieldbus in great detail. For
the purposes of this discussion, fieldbus technology allows devices from multiple
manufacturers to connect to a communications bus. The communications protocol is
designed to allow multiple devices to share information based on a schedule that is
executed by a Link Active Scheduler (LAS).
A Link Master device controls when devices access the fieldbus and executes the link
schedule which synchronizes communications with function block execution on the
fieldbus. The H1 card or any field device that supports Link Master functionality can
function as a Link Master device. Only one Link Master device can be active at a time
on the fieldbus segment. This device is called the LAS. The DeltaV system can
configure one Link Master device to function as the primary Link Master device.
When the primary Link Master device is attached to the fieldbus, it takes over as the
LAS. The H1 card always functions as the primary Link Master. When the H1 card is
redundant, the secondary H1 functions as the primary Link Master if the primary H1
card fails. All other Link Master devices are backup Link Master devices that can take
over as LAS only if the primary Link Master device fails. One backup Link Master
field device is supported per fieldbus segment. The fieldbus devices communicate on
a schedule (executed by the LAS) as required to implement the control strategy.
A key benefit of fieldbus technology is interoperability the ability to operate
multiple devices, independent of manufacturer, in the same system, without loss of
functionality.
This document is based on the following assumptions about a fieldbus application or
installation:

Each device has an average load of 20 mA.

Devices are connected at one end of the segment and the fieldbus power supply is
connected at the other end of the segment.

Spur lengths are short 10 meters.

If these assumptions are incorrect for your application, this document attempts to
provide information that will help you to resolve the issues and design a suitable
solution. For complete information on the fieldbus protocol, refer to the Fieldbus
Foundation.
The applications in this document make use of redundant Series 2 H1 cards,
redundant fieldbus power supplies, and device connection blocks with short circuit
protection. For applications that do not require this level of high availability, simplex
H1 cards, simplex fieldbus power supplies, and device connection blocks without
short circuit protection are also available.

12

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Components
The following sections describe the primary components in a fieldbus segment:

Redundant Series 2 H1 card

Fieldbus power supply

Terminators

Wiring components

Redundant Series 2 H1 Card


The DeltaV Series 2 H1 interface card is the starting point for the communications on
a fieldbus segment. The DeltaV system provides initialization, diagnostics, and runtime monitoring for a fieldbus segment. Depending on the control strategy, the
DeltaV system either executes the control algorithm or, if control resides in the
fieldbus devices, displays the ongoing parameters.
The Series 2 H1 card supports redundancy. A Series 2 H1 card reports its operating
mode (simplex or redundant) to the DeltaV controller (MD controller for Series 2 H1
in redundant mode) based on the type of terminal block on which it is installed. When
a redundant pair (an Active and a Standby Series 2 H1 card) is installed on the
Redundant H1 terminal block, it reports itself as operating in redundant mode. When
a single Series 2 H1 card is installed on the Series 2 H1 terminal block, it reports itself
as operating in simplex mode.
For redundant applications, the redundant Series 2 H1 cards ensure uninterrupted
communications between a fieldbus segment and the DeltaV system. For applications
requiring protection such as high availability applications, the redundant Series 2 H1
card can be used in conjunction with redundant power and short circuit protection.
Figure 7 on page 38 and Figure 10 on page 49 show the use of Series 2 redundant H1
cards in high availability applications. Figure 2 shows a redundant Series 2 H1 card.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

13

Figure 2

Series 2

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

Redundant Series 2 H1 Card

The Series 2 H1 card requires 12 mA of fieldbus power in simplex mode and an


additional 12 mA of fieldbus power (24 mA total) in redundant mode. Be sure to
account for the additional power requirements in your segment design.
The Installing Your DeltaV Digital Automation System manual contains specifications and
wiring and pinout diagrams for the H1 card and the Series 2 H1 card (in both Simplex
and Redundant modes). In addition, the manual contains specifications and pinout
diagrams for the H1 terminal block, the Series 2 H1 terminal block, and the
Redundant H1 terminal block.

Note

14

The H1 card is the only primary Link Master allowed on the fieldbus segment. The
DeltaV system supports one backup Link Master device on each fieldbus segment.

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Fieldbus Power Supplies


The fieldbus specifications call for a power supply on the segment to provide power
to all devices that are not self-powered. A standard DC power supply connected
directly to the segment would attempt to regulate out the digital communications
between devices on the segment. To prevent this, a power supply with power
conditioning that contains a specific impedance profile must be installed between the
bulk power supply and the fieldbus segment. A fieldbus power supply provides the
required conditioning and powers the individual field devices. Fieldbus power
supplies are available for simplex, redundant, Intrinsically Safe, and Non-Incendive
applications.

Important

In addition to the conditioning requirement, neither signal on the segment can be


connected directly to ground. The power supplied to the segment must be isolated from
ground and from any other uses.
The power requirements for fieldbus devices differ, but the average is 20 mA per
device. The DeltaV system supports 16 field devices on a segment.

Redundant Fieldbus Power for Applications


Emerson Process Management recommends the use of redundant fieldbus power in
conjunction with short circuit protection for the following types of fieldbus
applications:

High Availability

Intrinsically Safe

Non-Incendive

When redundant fieldbus power is used, the process remains in control if one supply
fails because the other supply continues to provide power to the devices on the
segment.
High Availability Fieldbus Applications

For information on high availability applications refer to High Availability Fieldbus


Applications on page 27.
Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

For information on Intrinsically Safe fieldbus applications for use in both entity and
FISCO (Fieldbus Intrinsically Safe COncept) IS applications, refer to Intrinsically
Safe Fieldbus Applications on page 51.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

15

Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

For information on Non-Incendive applications refer to Non-Incendive Fieldbus


Applications on page 57.

Terminators
A fieldbus segment acts as a transmission line for data communications between the
various devices. A terminator balances the impedance at each end of a transmission
line to ensure reliable communications. Fieldbus power supplies and device
connection blocks may provide a fixed or switchable terminator for one end of the
segment. Ensure that each segment is terminated in two places.

Wiring Components
Emerson Process Management recommends a family of connection blocks and cable
components for use in installing your fieldbus segment. These components include
standard junction blocks, junction blocks with short circuit protection, and
terminators. These components can be used with fieldbus cable that you can purchase
from recommended suppliers. All of these components are selected to not degrade
the communications between devices.

16

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Topologies
A simple view of a fieldbus segment is shown below. This picture shows a bulk power
supply, fieldbus power supply, two terminators, two field devices, and an H1 host. The
fieldbus power supply provides the power required for the devices and contains the
conditioning element.
T

T
Fieldbus
power
supply

H1 host

Bulk power
supply

In this document, the wire or cable between the two terminators is referred to as the
trunk, and any connections that branch off from the trunk are referred to as spurs. In
the image above, the fieldbus power supply, the H1 host, and field devices, are shown
connected between the terminators. Any of these three devices can be connected as
spurs between the terminators or as spurs beyond the main trunk.
There are several ways to design a fieldbus segment topology: point-to-point, chickenfoot, daisy chain, trunk with spurs, and tree. This document focuses on a trunk with
spurs topology and takes into account the different types of wiring that are available
for fieldbus segments, wire distribution issues, length restrictions, and power issues.

Note

Daisy chaining from device to device is not recommended. The wiring strategy detailed
within this document does not lend itself to daisy-chaining from one device to the next
within the spur.
To minimize the possibility of communication problems, Emerson Process
Management recommends that the trunk be a continuous run of the same type of
cable. Fieldbus Type A cable is recommended. Devices can be connected anywhere
along the trunk, following the rules associated with spur length.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

17

Fieldbus was designed to operate properly on a variety of existing plant wiring and it is
possible that your specific application could operate on existing runs of instrument
cable. However, as the cable length and number of devices increase, it is possible to
exceed the reliable operating margins of the fieldbus segment if you do not keep the
application-specific requirements in mind when you design the segment.
The following sections describe the restrictions on the total length of spurs on a
segment, the number of devices allowed on individual spurs, and the impact on that
individual spurs length.

Design Considerations, Restrictions, and Limitations


There are some restrictions around cable type, cable and spur length and DC power
that you should be aware of when planning a fieldbus segment.

Cable Type
The fieldbus specifications recommend that new fieldbus Type A cable be used
whenever possible. The standard fieldbus Type A cable provides a maximum distance
of 1900 meters for a single segment. Before using any other type of cable, verify the
cable characteristics to determine its suitability and the maximum distances associated
with its use.
When upgrading a system to fieldbus devices, you can use existing instrument wiring
such as multi-conductor cable if you require a significantly reduced cable length.
Where it is required, we recommend at a minimum the use of Type B cable which has
multiple twisted pairs with an overall shield. This type still provides reasonable
distance at 1200 meters.
Since the DeltaV Controller and I/O can be remotely mounted, there should be
minimal need for the multi-conductor cables.

Note

18

For new and upgrade installations, Emerson Process Management highly recommends
only new fieldbus Type A cable for the trunk and spurs.

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

At a minimum, use new fieldbus Type A cable for all trunk portions of the segment,
and use existing field wiring only for spurs of short length. Table 1 provides
information on fieldbus Type A cable.
Table 1 Specifications for Fieldbus Type A Cable
Item

Specification

Cable

SP50 fieldbus Type A 18 AWG


1 twisted pair with foil shield and stranded
drain wire tinned stranded conductors
105 C

Approvals

UL CSA or C(UL)

Max Distance Meters/


(Feet)

1900/(6270)

Characteristic
impedance

100

Resistance Ohms/km

22 (loop resistance is 44 ohms/km)

Attenuation db/km

3 attenuation @ 39K Hz

For further information on types of cable, distances, and other specifications, contact
the Fieldbus Foundation.

Cable Lengths
The length of the cable is calculated as the overall length of the main trunk cable plus
the length of all of the spur cables. This document assumes short spur lengths of 10
meters and the calculation for the main trunk should be sufficient in many cases. If
you are using longer spur cables, include their length in the overall calculation. Refer
to the next section for more information on spur length.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

19

Spur Lengths
A spur is a drop off of the main trunk (the cable between the two terminators). If you
have a choice about spur length, shorter is better. The total spur length is limited
according to the total number of devices on the segment.

20

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Selection Decisions and Trade-Offs


The plan and design of the individual segments depend upon several criteria. Some of
the things that need to be taken into account are:

Geographic distribution of the field devices

Control strategy

Types of field devices

Geographic Distribution
Generally speaking, you can connect a maximum of 16 field devices plus one H1 card
(simplex or redundant) to a fieldbus segment. Geographic distribution of the fieldbus
devices can reduce the number of devices when the length of the cable exceeds 400 to
500 meters. In general, short spurs that allow longer trunk lengths are recommended.
For additional information on distances for:

High availability applications, refer to Table 5 on page 43.

Intrinsically Safe applications, refer to Table 6 on page 53

Non-Incendive applications, refer to Table 7 on page 59.

Control Strategy
When you design your control strategy, consider loop execution rates, the number of
function blocks running on the segment, and pre and post processing calculations. An
H1 card can support two independent fieldbus segments. Refer to Books Online for
more information on designing a fieldbus control strategy.

Types of Field Devices


Be sure to verify that the field devices you intend to connect to the segment are
supported by the DeltaV system and account for increased power if they draw more
than the assumed 20 mA from the bus.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

21

Recommendations for Installing a Fieldbus System


This section provides recommendations for installing the system, a brief description
of the steps required, and includes detailed instructions and diagrams for installation.

Warning

This installation procedure contains steps that are to be performed in nonhazardous or safe locations only. For installations in hazardous locations,
follow your plant's procedures to make the area safe during installation.

Note

It is highly recommended that you follow the segment checkout procedure in


Appendix A prior to system startup.

Tools
Installing fieldbus devices and segments is similar to installing other types of devices
or products. Many of the standard electrical tools are required for the installation.
However fieldbus is also a communications network. In addition to the standard
electrical tools (voltmeter, wire cutter, wire stripper, pliers, and screwdrivers) you will
need the following tools for troubleshooting communications networks:

Fluke 123 or 124 Digital Scope Meter or equivalent scope with resistance, DC
voltage, and capacitance measurement capability. (Most capacitance meters
measure components only and may not provide the expected results when
measuring a complete segment.)

Grounding and Shielding of Cable


Important

22

Fieldbus segments should never have either conductor grounded. The shield for the
segment wiring should be continuous and connected to ground in only one place: either at
the shield bar beneath the H1 card or at the fieldbus power supply. Making more than
one connection to ground on the shield can cause a ground loop to form and the unexpected
current flow could disrupt communications.

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Overview to Installing a Fieldbus Segment


This section lists the basic steps for installing a fieldbus segment.
1. Route the fieldbus cable and ensure that each segment is properly terminated.
2. Install the Series 2 H1 card(s), connect the card(s) to the segment, and enable the
appropriate ports.
Remember to allow for 12 mA of fieldbus power for the Series 2 cards: (12 mA in
simplex mode and 24 mA total in redundant mode).
3. If the devices have previously had their device tags assigned:
connect all the devices to the segment.
commission the devices, following the instructions in the DeltaV Explorer
online help.
or
4. Most devices ship with a label on which is printed the devices serial number and
device ID. The label is used to identify the device in the field. Assign the device
tags based on the labels, and then:
connect all the devices to the segment.
commission the devices, following the instructions in the DeltaV Explorer
online help.
or
5. If the devices have not had their device tags assigned or there is no label with
device ID and serial number:
connect the devices to the segment one at a time.
verify that each device appears in the de-commissioned devices list for the
port.
commission the devices, following the instructions in the DeltaV Explorer
online help.
6. Perform the installation checkout in Appendix A.

Tip

Without knowing the device ID, it is difficult to determine which device you are
attempting to commission if you connect several devices of the same type to the segment at
the same time.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

23

Figure 3 provides an overview of cable connections between a redundant Series 2 H1


card, redundant fieldbus power supply, megablock, and terminator. The terminator in
the power supply and external terminator are used in this application.
Redundant
Series 2 H1 Card
Series 2

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

Port
1

Port
2

A1 A2

FPS-RCI

A
Power In
B

IPM

IPM

S
Fieldbus

Megablock
MB 8-SG
1

Power

Trunk

FCS-MB8-SG

Trunk
S

S
S
Relcom Inc.
Terminator

FCS-MBT

Ground

GND

Figure 3

24

Installation Overview

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Installing Cable
Installing cable to the H1 Card

Refer to Figure 3 on page 24.


Wire the segment paying close attention to the signal wiring positive (+) and negative
(-) connections.
Installing cable to the power supply

For general information, refer to Figure 3 on page 24.

For applications using the Relcom Fieldbus Power System, refer to Installing
and Connecting the Fieldbus Power System on page 35.

For applications using the Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub, refer to


Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub on page 46

Installing cable for short circuit protection

Short circuit protection can be provided by Megablocks, Segment Protectors, and


Field Barriers.

Important

For general information, refer to Figure 3 on page 24.

For applications using Megablocks, refer to Installing and Connecting


Megablocks on page 36.

For applications using Segment Protectors, refer to Installing and Connecting


the Fieldbus Segment Protector on page 47.

For applications using Field Barriers, refer to Installing and Connecting the Field
Barrier on page 55.

If using ferrules on the wires, use ferrules with an uninsulated shaft of adequate length
to prevent the ferrule insulator from interfering with the connectors.

Overview to Fieldbus Technology

25

Installing cable to the terminators

Refer to Figure 3 on page 24.


Once the segment layout is determined, a terminator must be used at both the power
supply side and the field side of the main trunk cable. The segment layout will
determine the location of the terminators and whether or not the integrated
terminator on the power supply or device connection block is used. Remember that
spur cables are not part of the main trunk and are normally not considered in the
placement of the terminators.
Installing cable to shield ground

For general information, refer to Figure 3 on page 24.

For applications using Megablocks, refer to Installing and Connecting


Megablocks on page 36.

For applications using Segment Protectors, refer to Installing and Connecting


the Fieldbus Segment Protector on page 47.

For applications using Field Barriers, refer to Installing and Connecting the Field
Barrier on page 55.

Refer to Checkout Procedure on page 63 after installing the cable to ensure that the
cable is correctly installed and that the segment is properly grounded, powered, and
isolated.

26

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Chapter 2

High Availability Fieldbus Applications


This chapter provides information about fieldbus applications that require high
availability. A high availability application includes a redundant Series 2 H1 card and
redundant fieldbus power. In addition, a high availability application includes short
circuit protection for the segment.
The first application shown in this chapter uses the Redundant Fieldbus Power
System (FPS-Series) and Megablock with SpurGuards from Relcom, Inc. The second
application uses the FieldConnex Fieldbus Power Hub and FieldConnex Segment
Protector from Pepperl+Fuchs. The Relcom power supply is a redundant fieldbus
power supply for a single segment with options for multi-segment use. The
Pepperl+Fuchs power supply is a redundant fieldbus power supply for up to four
segments with options for single-segment use.
Refer to the Relcom and Pepperl+Fuchs documentation and/or visit the DeltaV
website (www.easydeltav.com) and follow the links to Relcom and Pepperl+Fuchs for
additional information on their products.

Relcom Fieldbus Power System for Redundant Fieldbus


Power
The FPS-I connects to one or two +24 VDC input power supplies and provides
redundant fieldbus power to a single fieldbus segment. A single FPS-I consists of:

A Redundant Coupler (RC)

Two isolated fieldbus power modules (IPMs)

Table 2 shows the FPS-I specifications.


Table 2 Fieldbus Power System Specifications
FPS-I

Specification

Input voltage

24 VDC (18-30 VDC)

Fieldbus output current

350 mA @ 25-28 VDC

Maximum power dissipation

4.5 W max @ rated output

Dimensions

4.9 cm. x 10.1 cm. x 13.3 cm. (1.95 in. x 4 in.


x 5.25 in.)

Operating temperature range

-40 to 60 C

Alarm contact rating

1 A max @ 30 VDC max

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

27

H1 Connection

s
Redundant
coupler

FPS-RCI
A1 A2

Alarm

Terminator

Alarm jumper

24 V A

A
Power In
B

24 V B

IPM

Jumper
connections

IPM
Isolated Power
Modules

Fieldbus
Segment
Connection

Fieldbus

Figure 4

Fieldbus Power System

The FPS-I consists of two isolated power modules (IPM) that plug into each
Redundant Coupler (RC). The IPMs are removable under power. The RCs are
mounted on a DIN rail. One RC is used for each fieldbus segment. RCs can be
connected together with pre-made jumpers to add additional fieldbus segments as
shown in Figure 5 on page 30. One fieldbus terminator is built into each RC.
Remember that each segment must have two terminators.

28

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Refer to Figure 4. Each RC has:

Two, 3-position pluggable connectors. One connector is intended for the H1 host
and the other for the fieldbus segment.

Two 6-position pluggable connectors for two nominal 24 VDC input power
sources and an alarm circuit. When the FPS-I is powered and functioning within
its specifications, the alarm circuit provides a closed contact circuit. A failure in
either input power supply, either IPM, or an over-current or short on any fieldbus
output, opens the alarm circuit. The alarm circuit is galvanically isolated from the
fieldbus segments and input power supplies. Connect the alarm pins together to
complete the circuit. When using multiple Fieldbus Power Systems, connect
together the last alarm pins in the group as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5 shows multiple Fieldbus Power Systems connected together with pre-made
jumpers. To add RCs without removing power to the other units when using multiple
Fieldbus Power Systems, wire the two power sources to both ends of the group.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

29

H1 Connections

Jumper Connections

FPS-RCI

24 V A

A1 A2

FPS-RCI
A1 A2

Alarm

A1 A2

FPS-RCI

A
Power In
B

24 V B

IPM

IPM

A
Power In
B

IPM

Fieldbus

Last alarm jumper


A
Power In
B

IPM

IPM

Fieldbus

24 V A
24 V B

IPM

Fieldbus

Fieldbus
Segment
Connections

Figure 5

Multiple Fieldbus Power Systems

Refer to Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power System for installation
information.

30

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

DC Power Considerations for High Availability Applications


Using the Fieldbus Power System
The available power to a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable. The formula for the calculations in Table 3 on
page 32, which shows the maximum distance for a given load on the Fieldbus Power
System, is based on the following assumptions:

Power Supply Voltage = 25.0 VDC @ 350 mA

Minimum Device Voltage = 9 VDC (calculations use 9.5 VDC)

Maximum Voltage drop from cable = 15.5 VDC

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km (44 ohms/km loop resistance) at


22C

Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the Fieldbus Power System is
connected on the other end of the cable

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on the segment. Refer to the
device documentation for information on current requirements for the device.
When referring to Table 3, remember that the H1 card requires 12 mA of fieldbus
power in simplex mode and an additional 12 mA of fieldbus power (24 mA total) in
redundant mode. Table 3 includes the maximum distance, in meters, for applications
with and without Megablocks with SpurGuards. The distance is reduced to allow for
an application design that uses a Megablock with SpurGuards to prevent a short on
the spur from disrupting the trunk.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

31

.
Table 3 Distance per Load on the Fieldbus Power System with and without Megablocks with SpurGuards
Number of
Devices / Load
(mA)

Power Supply Load (mA)

Series 2 H1
Simplex

32

Series 2 H1
Redundant

Maximum Distance

Maximum Distance

without Megablock
with SpurGuards

with Megablock
with SpurGuards

(meters)

(meters)

1 / 20

32

44

1900

1900

2 / 40

52

64

1900

1900

3 / 60

72

84

1900

1900

4 / 80

92

104

1900

1900

5 / 100

112

124

1900

1850

6 / 120

132

144

1900

1670

7 / 140

152

164

1900

1520

8 / 160

172

184

1855

1395

9 / 180

192

204

1725

1290

10 / 200

212

224

1570

1200

11 / 220

232

244

1440

1120

12 / 240

252

264

1330

1050

13 / 260

272

284

1240

990

14 / 280

292

304

1155

N/A

15 / 300

312

324

1085

N/A

16 / 320

332

344

1020

N/A

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Short Circuit Protection with Megablocks


The Relcom Megablocks with SpurGuards (SG) connect field devices to the fieldbus
segment cable and provide short circuit protection to the segment. Figure 6 shows an
FCS-MB8- SG for eight devices. The Megablock mounts on a DIN rail and requires a
connection to a terminator (+, -, and S) from one of the trunk connectors. To connect
multiple Megablocks together, use a short jumper cable between the trunk connectors
on the Megablocks.

Power

Trunk
S

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

Figure 6

Trunk
S

FCS-MB8-SG

Megablock Spur Guard for 8 Devices

33

Designing an Application for Short Circuit Protection Using


Megablocks
When designing an application that uses a Megablock for short circuit protection,
allow an additional 60 mA in the design to give the power supply the additional
current capability to support a short circuit in one device (should it occur) and
continue to power the segment without interruption. Normally a 0.5 voltage drop
(assuming a 20 mA device) occurs across the Megablock to the device. An additional
voltage drop occurs during a short circuit condition. To prevent devices from
dropping off the segment because of reduced voltage, be sure that the application
design allows for the voltage drop in both the normal and short circuit condition. Use
the following calculation to calculate the short circuit voltage drop to the farthest
device:
.060A X (44 ohms/km) X distance in km

The following example calculates the voltage drops on 0.5 km segment to the farthest
device:
Normal voltage drop = 0.5 Volts
Short circuit voltage drop =.060A X (44 ohms/km) X.5 km = 1.32 Volts
Total voltage drop = normal voltage drop + short circuit voltage drop = 1.82 volts.

This calculation is based on a design that allows for one short circuit in a running
segment. For example, a situation in which an inadvertent shorting of a device occurs
during routine replacement on an operating system. The calculation does not allow
for multiple short circuit conditions in a new installation that has not been verified
with the segment checkout procedure. Table 3 includes maximum distances when the
application uses a Megablock with SpurGuards.

34

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power System

To install the Redundant Coupler and connectors

1. Attach the top latch of the Redundant Coupler onto the DIN rail and push the
unit into place.
2. Plug the IPMs, H1 connector, fieldbus segment connector, and the input power/
alarm circuit connector into the Redundant Coupler.

To connect the Fieldbus Power System (FPS-I)

Refer to Figure 4 on page 28.


1. Connect the primary 24 VDC input positive (+) to the 24 V A + terminal and the
primary 24 VDC input negative (-) to the 24 V A - terminal.
2. Connect the secondary 24 VDC input positive (+) to the 24 V B + terminal and
the secondary 24 VDC input negative (-) to the 24 V B - terminal.
3. For a single unit, connect the alarm wires and short the alarm pins on the
opposite side of the fieldbus power system.
4. Connect the segment positive (+) wire to the fieldbus segment + and the
segment negative (-) wire to the fieldbus segment -.
5. Connect the segment shield wire (S) to the fieldbus segment S.
6. Connect the H1 card positive wire (+) to the H1 + and the H1 card negative
wire (-) to the H1 -.
7. Connect the H1 card shield wire (S) to the H1 S.

Note

Ground the shield at only one point usually at the H1 card on the shield ground bar.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

35

To connect additional Fieldbus Power Systems

Refer to Figure 5 on page 30.


1. Install the second Redundant Coupler (RC 2) onto the DIN Rail next to RC 1 and
plug in the IPMs, H1 connector, and fieldbus segment connector.
2. Insert one end of the pre-made jumper into the right-hand side power and alarm
wiring connector on RC1 and the other end into the left-hand side power and
alarm wiring connector on RC 2.
3. Connect the segment wiring and H1 cards.
4. Follow steps 1-3 for each additional RC.
5. Connect the last alarm pins in the group together to complete the circuit.
A maximum of eight Fieldbus Power Systems can be connected together in a group.

Installing and Connecting Megablocks


Refer to Figure 6 on page 33.

To install and connect a Megablock

Notice that the Trunk connectors are black and the spur connectors for the devices
are gray.
1. Attach the top latch of the Megablock onto the DIN rail and push the unit into
place.
2. For the Trunk connector (black): connect the positive (+) segment wire to the
positive, connect the negative (-) segment wire to the negative, and connect the
segment shield (S) to the S.
3. For each device connector (gray): connect the positive (+) spur wire to the
positive, connect the negative (-) spur wire to the negative, and connect the
shield wire (S) to the S.
4. If this Megablock is the end of the segment, connect a terminator (Relcom FCSMBT) at the end of the Trunk and at a ground connection. Use a properly sized
ground wire to reduce the risk of a surge affecting the segment.

36

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

5. If the segment continues and connects to another Megablock, continue the


Trunk by connecting it to the next Megablock and make the connections
described in steps 2 and 3.
6. At each device, ensure that the shield is isolated and not connected to the device.
7. If this Megablock is the end of the segment, connect a terminator (Relcom FCSMBT) at the end of the Trunk and at a ground connection. Use a properly sized
ground wire to reduce the risk of a surge affecting the segment.

Verifying the Installation


Use the segment checkout procedure on page 63 to measure resistance, capacitance,
DC voltage, and the AC waveform (steps 1, 2, 4, and 5) with only one of the IPMs
installed. Then, measure DC voltage and the AC waveform (steps 4 and 5) again with
both IPMs installed. Verify that the measured DC voltage allows for the additional
voltage drop if a short circuit should occur.

High Availability Application Example for the Fieldbus Power


System
Figure 7 shows an application that uses a redundant pair of Series 2 H1 cards with
redundant fieldbus power for both segments and short circuit protection for devices
on a long (0.5 km) trunk cable. If a failure occurs on an H1 card, a 24 V power supply,
or a fieldbus power supply, the segments continue to operate as expected. A status
indication on connected alarms alerts the operator that an error has occurred. It is
assumed that the application design follows the criteria specified in Designing an
Application for Short Circuit Protection Using Megablocks. Therefore, if a short
occurs when a device is installed or removed from the segment, only that device is
affected; the rest of the segment is unchanged.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

37

Devices

Redundant
Series 2 H1
cards

H1

H1

MB8 - SG
Megablock

GND

Shielded pair
with drain wire
Carrier
shield bar
Alarm
contacts
Port 1
Primary
24 VDC

Shielded
pair with
drain wire

Fieldbus
power supplies
Jumper
Port 2
Primary
24 VDC
Secondary
24 VDC

IPM

Port 1

Figure 7

38

IPM

IPM

Port 2

Terminator
MB8 - SG
Megablock

GND
Surge
protection
ground

Secondary
24 VDC
IPM

Devices

0.5 km Cable

High Availability Application Example

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub for Redundant Fieldbus


Power
The Fieldbus Power Hub connects to one or two +24 VDC input power supplies and
provides redundant fieldbus power to up to four fieldbus segments. A Fieldbus Power
Hub system includes:

Fieldbus Motherboard - MB-FB-4R

Galvanically Isolated Fieldbus Power Supply Modules - FBPS-1.500 (two per


segment for four segments maximum)

Fieldbus Diagnostic Module - DM-B

Table 4 shows specifications for the Fieldbus Power Hub with the FBPS-1.500
Isolated Power Supply module.
Table 4 Fieldbus Power Hub with FBPS-1.500 Isolated Power Supply Module Specifications
Fieldbus Power Hub with FBPS-1.500

Specification

Input voltage

24 VDC (19.2-35 VDC)

Fieldbus output current FBPS-1.500

500 mA @ 28-30 VDC

Typical power dissipation

2.5 W per segment

Dimensions

22.1 cm. x 24.6 cm. x 16.2 cm. (8.7 in. x 9.7


in. x 6.4 in.)

Operating temperature range

-40 to 60 C

Alarm contact rating - Diagnostic Module

1 A max @ 50 VDC max

Figure 8 shows a Fieldbus Power Hub installed with redundant power supplies for
four segments and a Diagnostics module.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

39

Host connectors
A & B for
segments 1-4
Host power
switches for
segments 1-4

Host A
S

Host B
SEG1
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host A

Host B
SEG2
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host B
SEG3
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host B
SEG4
+ S --- +

PRI
PWR

SEC
PWR

Primary and secondary


power connectors

OFF

ON

Alarm

Alarm contacts

Diagnostic Bus

Diagnostic bus

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
DMB

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

Redundant
power supplies
for segments 1-4

Termination switches
for segments 1-4

PEPPERL-FUCHS

FieldConnex

Shield ground connection

Fieldbus Power Hub


Fieldbus Motherboard
S
OFF +
Segment 1

Trunk connectors for


segments 1-4

S
S OFF +
OFF +
S OFF +
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4

Diagnostics module

Figure 8

Fieldbus Power Hub with Four Redundant Segments and a Diagnostics


Module

The Fieldbus Power Hub consists of a DIN rail-mounted Motherboard which


supports plug-in modules that provide redundant power for up to four fieldbus
segments plus one Diagnostic Module. Two FBPS-1.500 Isolated Power Supplies plug
into the Motherboard to power each segment. The Diagnostic Module provides
diagnostic monitoring and relay contacts for the segments. The plug-in modules are
removable under power. A fieldbus terminator on the motherboard can be switched
on for each segment. Each segment must have exactly two terminators.

40

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Refer to Figure 8 on page 40. The Fieldbus Power Hub has:

Two, 2-position pluggable connectors for Primary and Secondary 24 VDC input
Power.

Three, 4-position pluggable connectors for the alarm contacts and the Diagnostic
Bus.

Four, 3-position pluggable connectors for connection to the H1 host (Host A);
one for each of the four segments.

Four, 3-position pluggable connectors for connection to a second host (Host B,


not used); one for each of the four segments.

Four redundant host power switches for connecting host power to each of the
four segments. All switches must be in the On position.

Four, 3-position pluggable connectors for connection to the fieldbus segment,


one for each of the four segments.

Four termination switches for connecting an integrated fieldbus terminator to


each of the four segments.

One connection for connecting the cable shields to ground.

When the Fieldbus Power Hub is powered and functioning within its specifications
the alarm circuit provides a closed-contact circuit. A failure in either input power
supply, any fieldbus power supply module, or an over-current or short on any fieldbus
output, opens the alarm circuit. The alarm circuit is galvanically isolated from the
fieldbus segments and input power supplies. The alarm pins at the last unit must be
connected together to complete the circuit.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

41

DC Power Considerations for High Availability Applications


Using the Fieldbus Power Hub
The available power to a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable. The formula for the calculations in Table 5 on
page 43, which shows the maximum distance for a given load on the Fieldbus Power
System, is based on the following assumptions:

Power Supply Voltage = 28.0 VDC @ 500 mA

Minimum Device Voltage = 9 VDC (Calculations use 9.5 VDC)

Maximum Voltage drop from cable = 18.5VDC

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km (44 ohms/km loop resistance) at


22C

Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the Fieldbus Power Hub is
connected on the other end of the cable

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on the segment. Refer to the
device documentation for information on current requirements for the device.
When referring to Table 5, remember the Series 2 H1 card requires 12 mA of fieldbus
power in simplex mode and an additional 12 mA of fieldbus power (24 mA total) in
redundant mode. There are distance columns for applications both with and without
segment protectors. The distance associated with the segment protector is reduced
due to the possible condition of a short on a spur which would increase the current on
the trunk and also reduce the voltage to the other devices.

42

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Table 5 Distance per Load on the Fieldbus Power Hub with and without Segment Protectors
Number of
Devices / Load
(mA)

Power Supply Load (mA)


Series 2 H1
Simplex

Series 2 H1
Redundant

Maximum Distance
without Segment
Protector (meters)

Maximum Distance with


Segment Protector
(meters)

1 / 20

32

44

1900

1900

2 / 40

52

64

1900

1900

3 / 60

72

84

1900

1900

4 / 80

92

104

1900

1900

5 / 100

112

124

1900

1900

6 / 120

132

144

1900

1900

7 / 140

152

164

1900

1855

8 / 160

172

184

1900

1695

9 / 180

192

204

1900

1565

10 / 200

212

224

1875

1450

11 / 220

232

244

1720

1350

12 / 240

252

264

1590

1265

13 / 260

272

284

1480

1190

14 / 280

292

304

1380

1120

15 / 300

312

324

1295

1060

16 / 320

332

344

1220

1005

16 / 340

352

364

1155

960

16 / 360

372

384

1090

915

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

43

Short Circuit Protection with Segment Protectors


The Pepperl+Fuchs Segment Protector connects field devices to the fieldbus
segment cable and provides short circuit protection to the segment. Figure 9 shows a
Segment Protector for eight devices.
Trunk
connections
Jumper
S to T and
Gnd to Gnd
S1
terminator
switch

Spur connections

S1
1+ 1

1s 2+ 2

2s 3+ 3

3s 4+ 4

4s

5+ 5

5s 6+ 6

6s 7+ 7

7s 8+ 8

8s Ti+ Ti Tis To+To Tos

Off

PEPPERL+FUCHS
F2-JBSC-8-CGB

FieldConnex

Trunk connections 1-2

Spur connections 1-8

Figure 9

44

Segment Protector for Eight Devices

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Designing an Application for Short Circuit Protection Using


a Segment Protector
When designing an application that uses a Segment Protector for short circuit
protection, allow an additional 50 mA in the design to give the power supply the
additional current capability to support a short circuit in one device (should it occur)
and continue to power the segment without interruption. Normally a 1.0 voltage drop
(assuming a 20 mA device) occurs across the Segment Protector to the device. An
additional voltage drop occurs during a short circuit condition. To prevent devices
from dropping off the segment because of reduced voltage, be sure that the
application design allows for the voltage drop in both the normal and short circuit
condition. Use the following calculation to calculate the short circuit voltage drop to
the farthest device:
.050A X (44 ohms/km) X distance in km

The following example calculates the voltage drops on 0.5 km segment to the farthest
device:
Normal voltage drop = 1.0 Volt
Short circuit voltage drop =.050A X (44 ohms/km) X.5 km = 1.1 Volts
Total voltage drop = normal voltage drop + short circuit voltage drop = 2.1 volts.

This calculation is based on a design that allows for one short circuit in a running
segment. For example, a situation in which an inadvertent shorting of a device occurs
during routine replacement in an operating system. The calculation does not allow for
multiple short circuit conditions in a new installation that has not been verified with
the segment checkout procedure.
Table 5 on page 43 provides the maximum distance when the application includes the
Segment Protector.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

45

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub

To install the Fieldbus Motherboard, Power Supply Modules, and Diagnostic Module

1. Attach the top latch of the Fieldbus Motherboard onto the DIN rail and push it
into place. Tighten the two DIN rail latching screws until the Motherboard is held
securely onto the rail.
2. Plug the Fieldbus Power Supply Modules (FBPS-1.500) and the Diagnostic
Module on to the Motherboard. Secure the modules to the Motherboard by
depressing the two latching levers on each module.

To connect the Fieldbus Power Hub

Refer to Figure 8 on page 40.


1. Connect the primary 24 VDC input to the PRI PWR connector.
2. Connect the secondary 24 VDC input to the SEC PWR connector.
3. Connect the alarm wires and short the alarm pins on the opposite side of the
Fieldbus Motherboard. If multiple Motherboards share the same alarm circuitry,
short the alarm pins on the last one in the chain.
4. Connect the H1 segment wire to the Host A connector for each segment that is
used.
5. Ensure that Host B is not connected.
6. Ensure that the redundant host power switch is On for each segment.
7. Connect each field segment wire to the appropriate terminal on the
Motherboard for each segment that is used.
8. If the Fieldbus Power Hub is on the end of each segment, switch the terminator
for each segment On.
9. Connect the shield ground connection on the Motherboard with an adequately
sized grounding wire to an appropriate grounding location. Ensure that all
segment shields are connected to ground at this one location only. Do not
connect the shields to ground at the 8-wide carrier shield bar or at any device in
the field.

46

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Segment Protector


Refer to Figure 9 on page 40.

To install and connect a Fieldbus Segment Protector

1. Securely attach the Fieldbus Segment Protector at the desired location. Choose a
location that minimizes the length of the spur cables.
2. For the Trunk segment connection: connect the positive (+) segment wire to the
positive; connect the negative (-) segment wire to the negative; and connect the
segment shield (S) to the S.
3. For each device connection: connect the positive (+) spur wire to the positive,
connect the negative (-) spur wire to the negative, and connect the shield wire (S)
to the S.
4. The two shorting jumpers must be repositioned so that the Trunk (T) and Spur
(S) shields are connected together and not connected to case. Jumper T to S and
Gnd to Gnd.
5. If this Segment Protector is at the end of the segment, the terminator switch S1
should be in the On position. If it is not at the end of the segment, ensure that
terminator switch S1 is in the Off position.
6. If the segment continues and connects to another Segment Protector, continue
the Trunk segment by connecting the Trunk Out connections to the next
Segment Protector and proceed with the connections described in steps 2, 3, and
4.
7. For all Segment Protectors, ensure that the two shorting jumpers are
repositioned so that the Trunk (T) and Spur (S) shields are connected together
and not connected to case. Jumper T to S and Gnd to Gnd.
8. At each device ensure that the shield is isolated and not connected to the device.
9. If this Segment Protector is at the end of the segment, ensure that the terminator
switch S1 is in the On position.

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

47

Verifying the Installation


After the segment is installed with all devices connected, use the segment checkout
procedure on page 63. First measure resistance, capacitance, DC voltage, and the AC
waveform (steps 1, 2, 4, and 5) with only one of the power supply modules installed.
Then, measure DC voltage and the AC waveform (steps 4 and 5) again with both
power supply modules installed. Verify that the measured DC voltage allows for the
additional voltage drop if a short circuit occurs on one spur.

High Availability Application Examples for the Fieldbus Power


Hub
Figure 10 shows an application that uses a redundant pair of Series 2 H1 cards with
redundant fieldbus power for both segments and short circuit protection for devices
on a long (0.5 km) trunk cable. If a failure occurs on an H1 card, a 24 V power supply,
or a fieldbus power supply, the segments continue to operate as expected. A status
indication on connected alarms alerts the operator that an error has occurred. It is
assumed that the application design follows the criteria specified in Designing an
Application for Short Circuit Protection Using a Segment Protector. Therefore, if a
short occurs when a device is installed or removed from the segment, only that device
is affected; the rest of the segment is unchanged.

48

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

GND

Port 1

Segment Protector

Redundant
Series 2 H1
cards

Series 2

PEPPERL+FUCHS
F2-JBSC-8-CGB
Segment Protector

Txvbo
Tufxup
Lsnrtpm

3x\88 - wxb8m
ty w foclex

rupt K serup o 6x
sorulx Bxup 02x
Ibex ywqv 09x

TU 81 x buk
b2 xul 4- 8m
fx q 03-3v

T - OFF

FieldConnex

TM

TERMINATOR ON

GND

OFF

Carrier
shield bar

Port 2
Primary
24 VDC

Host A
S

Alarm
contacts

Host B
SEG1
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host A

Host B
SEG2
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host B
SEG3
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host B
SEG4
+ S --- +

PRI
PWR

SEC
PWR

Alarm
jumper

Alarm
Diagnostic Bus

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
DMB

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

FieldConnex

PEPPERL-FUCHS
Fieldbus Power Hub
Fieldbus Motherboard

S
OFF +
Segment 1

Secondary
24 VDC

Segment Protector

OFF

ON

HD2
FBPS1.500

T - ON
PEPPERL+FUCHS
F2-JBSC-8-CGB
Segment Protector

Txvbo
Tufxup
Lsnrtpm

3x\88 - wxb8m
ty w foclex

rupt K serup o 6x
sorulx Bxup 02x
Ibex ywqv 09x

TU 81 x buk
b2 xul 4- 8m
fx q 03-3v

FieldConnex

TM

TERMINATOR ON

OFF

GND

Shielded pair
with drain wire

GND

S
S OFF +
OFF +
S OFF +
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4

T - ON

Figure 10

High Availability Fieldbus Applications

0.5 km Cable

High Availability Application with 16 Devices Using the Fieldbus Power Hub
and Segment Protectors

49

50

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Chapter 3

Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications


This chapter provides information about fieldbus applications that provide
Intrinsically Safe (IS) power to fieldbus devices located in hazardous areas. The
Pepperl+Fuchs FieldConnex Fieldbus Power Hub and FieldConnex FieldBarrier
provide Intrinsically Safe power for both Intrinsically Safe entity applications and
FISCO (Fieldbus Intrinsically Safe COncept)applications. Refer to the
Pepperl+Fuchs (P+F) documentation and/or visit the DeltaV website
(www.easydeltav.com) and follow the links for additional information on these
products.
Ensure that the fieldbus devices and all components used in the application are rated
and certified for IS applications.

Warning

In any hazardous area installation it is important to read and follow the device
manufacturer's design and installation documents. Failure to follow the
documentation could result in an unapproved and unsafe application.
Additionally, in hazardous locations follow your plant's procedures for making
the area safe during installation and maintenance operations.

DC Power Considerations for Intrinsically Safe Applications


The basic IS application uses the Fieldbus Power Hub with the FBPS-1.500 Isolated
Power Supply Module to provide power to field devices connected through one or
more IS Field Barriers.
The available power to a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable to each Field Barrier and the output characteristics
of the Field Barrier to the field device. The P+F segment calculator tool was used to
make the example calculations in Table 6 on page 53. The calculations show the
maximum distance for a given load on the Fieldbus Power Hub for applications using

Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

51

2, 3, and 4 Field Barriers to connect up to 16 field devices. The calculations are based
on the following assumptions:

Power Supply Voltage = 28.0 VDC @ 500 mA

Minimum Voltage at last Barrier = 16 VDC

Minimum Device Voltage = 9 VDC

Maximum Voltage drop from cable to last barrier = 12 VDC

Redundant H1 connected at a load of 24 mA

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Ensure that any device load on a spur output from the field barrier is 30 mA or
less

Each Barrier spur has a maximum of one device connected.

Barriers and Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the Fieldbus
Power Hub is connected on the other end of the cable

Each device is connected on a 10 meter maximum spur cable.

Barriers are inter-connected on a 10 meter maximum trunk cable.

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km (44 ohms/km loop resistance) at


22C

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on the segment. Refer to the
device documentation for information on current requirements for the device.
When referring to Table 6, remember the Redundant Series 2 H1 card requires 24 mA
of fieldbus power.
The loads listed are the normal loads required by the barriers and devices. However,
the numbers take into account the additional current required if the smallest load on
one barrier is accidentally shorted (during a maintenance operation) to protect the
segment from being affected.
If these assumptions do not properly represent your specific application, it is
recommended that a calculation be completed to verify that the segment design
adequately meets your process requirements.

52

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Table 6 Distance per Load on the Fieldbus Power Hub with Field Barriers
Number of
Devices / Load
(mA)

Distance (meters) and Power Supply Load (mA)

Max
Distance
with 2
Barriers

Power Supply
Load
with 2 Barriers

Max
Distance
with 3
Barriers

Power Supply
Load with 3
Barriers

Max
Distance
with 4
Barriers

Power Supply
Load with 4
Barriers

1 / 20

1875

75

1850

103

1575

131

2 / 40

1850

94

1625

123

1400

151

3 / 60

1675

112

1425

143

1250

171

4 / 80

1500

130

1275

161

1125

192

5 / 100

1325

149

1150

180

1025

211

6 / 120

1200

163

1050

198

950

231

7 / 140

1000

184

975

218

875

250

8 / 160

1000

208

900

237

800

267

9 / 180

N/A

N/A

825

256

750

288

10 / 200

N/A

N/A

775

274

700

307

11 / 220

N/A

N/A

725

290

650

325

12 / 240

N/A

N/A

725

316

625

346

13 / 260

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

600

366

14 / 280

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

550

378

15 / 300

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

525

395

16 / 320

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

525

422

16 / 340

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

475

429

16 / 360

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

425

433

Fieldbus Power Hub


Refer to Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub for Redundant Fieldbus Power on
page 39 for information on the Fieldbus Power Hub system.

Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

53

Field Barrier for Intrinsically Safe Applications in Hazardous


Locations
The Field Barrier connects up to four field devices located in hazardous locations to
the fieldbus segment and provides short circuit protection to each device. Ensure that
any device load on a spur output from the field barrier is 30 mA or less. Figure 11
shows a Field Barrier for four devices.
S1 terminator switch
Spur connections

Trunk connections

10+ 11 12s 13+ 14 15s 16+ 17 18s 19+ 20 21s

ON
_
S1 BUS
TERM.
OFF

PWR

1B

3+ 4- 5s 6s
2B 14

7- 8+

1
2
3
4

Trunk connections 1-2

Spur connections 1-4

Figure 11

Field Barrier for Four Devices

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub


Refer to Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub on page 46 for
information on installing the Motherboard, Power Supply Modules, and Diagnostics
Modules and connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub.

54

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Installing and Connecting the Field Barrier


Refer to Figure 11 on page 54.

To install and connect a Field Barrier

1. Securely attach the Field Barrier at the desired location.


2. For the Trunk segment connection: connect the positive (+) segment wire to the
positive, connect the negative (-) segment wire to the negative, and connect the
segment shield (S) to the S.
3. Remove the shorting jumpers (1B, 2B) so that the Trunk (S) shields are isolated
from, not connected to the Field Barrier case.
4. For each device connection: connect the positive (+) spur wire to the positive,
connect the negative (-) spur wire to the negative, and connect the shield wire (S)
to the S.
5. The Spur (S) shields must be connected to the Field Barrier case and isolated at
the device in the field. The best way to ground the output shields at the barrier is
with a mechanical connection through a metal gland or bar at the barrier.
6. If this Field Barrier is at the end of the segment, the terminator switch S1 should
be in the On position. If this is not the end of the segment, ensure that the
terminator switch S1 is in the Off position.
7. If the segment continues and connects to another Field Barrier, continue the
Trunk segment by connecting the Trunk Out connections to the next Field
Barrier and proceed with steps 3, 4, and 5.
8. Ensure that the shorting jumpers (1B, 2B) are removed on all Field Barriers, so
that the Trunk (S) shields are isolated from not connected to the Field Barrier
case.
9. If this Barrier is the end of the segment, ensure that the terminator switch S1 is
in the On position.

Verifying the Installation


Refer to Verifying the Installation on page 48.

Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

55

Intrinsically Safe Application Example


Figure 12 shows an application that uses a redundant pair of Series 2 H1 cards with
redundant fieldbus power and intrinsic safety barrier protection for 16 devices on a
long (0.5 km) trunk cable. If a failure occurs on an H1 card, a 24 V power supply, or a
fieldbus power supply, the segments continue to operate as expected. A status
indication on connected alarms alerts the operator that an error has occurred. It is
assumed that the application design follows the criteria specified in DC Power
Considerations for Intrinsically Safe Applications on page 51. Therefore, if a short
occurs when a device is installed or removed from the segment, only that device is
affected; the rest of the segment is unchanged.
T - OFF
Field Barrier
Series 2

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

PEPPERL+FUCHS

Redundant
Series 2 H1
cards

F2D0-FB-Ex4

TERMINATOR
ON
OFF

GND

T - OFF
Field Barrier

GND

PEPPERL+FUCHS

F2D0-FB-Ex4

TERMINATOR
ON
OFF

Carrier
shield bar
Port 1

Host A
S

Alarm
contacts

Host B
SEG1
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Port 2

Host A
S

Host A

Host B
SEG2
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Primary
24 VDC
Secondary
24 VDC

Host B
SEG3
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host B
SEG4
+ S --- +

PRI
PWR

T - OFF

SEC
PWR

Field Barrier

OFF

ON

PEPPERL+FUCHS

Alarm
jumper

Alarm
Diagnostic Bus

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
DMB

HD2
FBPS1.500

GND

HD2
FBPS1.500

HD2
FBPS1.500

F2D0-FB-Ex4

TERMINATOR
ON
OFF

GND

HD2
FBPS1.500

T - ON
Shielded pair
with drain wire

Field Barrier
PEPPERL+FUCHS

F2D0-FB-Ex4

FieldConnex

PEPPERL-FUCHS
Fieldbus Power Hub
Fieldbus Motherboard

OFF +
S
Segment 1

GND

GND

S
S OFF +
OFF +
S OFF +
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4

T - ON

Figure 12

56

TERMINATOR
ON
OFF

0.5 km Cable

IS Application with 16 Devices Using the Fieldbus Power Hub and Field Barrier

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Chapter 4

Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications


This chapter provides information about fieldbus applications that provide NonIncendive (NI) power to fieldbus devices located in hazardous areas.
The Pepperl+Fuchs FieldConnex Fieldbus Power Hub and FieldConnex
Segment Protector provide Non-Incendive power for Non-Incendive applications.
Refer to the Pepperl+Fuchs documentation and/or visit the DeltaV website
(www.easydeltav.com) and follow the links for additional information on these
products.
Ensure that the fieldbus devices and all components used in the application are rated
and certified for Non-Incendive applications.

Warning

In any hazardous area installation it is important to read and follow the device
manufacturer's design and installation documents. Failure to follow the
documentation could result in an unapproved and unsafe application.
Additionally, in hazardous locations follow your plant's procedures for making
the area safe during installation and maintenance operations.

DC Power Considerations for Non-Incendive Applications


The basic NI application uses the Fieldbus Power Hub with the FBPS-1.23.500
Isolated Power Supply Module to provide power for field devices connected through
one or more Segment Protectors. Other options are available for NI applications:

When all devices are certified for NI applications and rated at 32 volts or above,
the FBPS-1.500 Power Supply Module can be substituted for 21 volts. This allows
for the longer trunk lengths indicated in High Availability Fieldbus
Applications on page 27.

When all devices are certified for FNICO (Fieldbus Non-Incendive COncept)
Non-Incendive applications and rated at 17.5 volts or above, the FBPS-1.17.500
Power Supply Module can be substituted for 21 volts. This allows for shorter
trunk lengths.

An application using the Fieldbus Power Hub and Segment Protector offers nonincendive field wiring outputs to the devices. Therefore, live maintenance at the field
device is possible.

Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

57

The available power to a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable. The formula for the calculations in Table 7 on
page 59, which shows the maximum distance for a given load on the Fieldbus Power
Hub, are based on the following assumptions:

Power Supply Voltage = 21.0 VDC @ 500 mA

Each device is certified Non-Incendive at 24 VDC or greater

Minimum Device Voltage = 9 VDC (Calculations use 9.5 VDC)

Maximum Voltage drop from cable = 11.5VDC

Maximum Voltage drop from Segment Protector = 1.0 VDC

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Each device is connected on a 10 meter maximum spur cable

Each spur has a maximum of one device connected.

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km (44 ohms/km loop resistance) at


22C

Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the Fieldbus Power Hub is
connected on the other end of the cable

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on the segment. Refer to the
device documentation for information on current requirements for the device.
When referring to Table 7, remember that the Series 2 H1 card requires 12 mA of
fieldbus power in simplex mode and an additional 12 mA of fieldbus power (24 mA
total) in redundant mode. The distance associated with the segment protector
accounts for the possibility of a short on a spur which would increase the current on
the trunk and also reduce the voltage to the other devices.

58

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Fieldbus Power Hub


Use the Fieldbus Power Hub with the FBPS-1.23.500 Isolated Power Supply Module
and the Segment Protector for NI applications. Refer to Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus
Power Hub for Redundant Fieldbus Power on page 39 for information on the
Fieldbus Power Hub system. Table 7 provides specifications for the Fieldbus Power
Hub with the Isolated Power Supply Module.

Table 7 Fieldbus Power Hub with FBPS-1.23.500 Isolated Power Supply Module Specifications
Fieldbus Power Hub with FBPS-1.23.500

Specification

Input voltage

24 VDC (19.2-35 VDC)

Fieldbus output current FBPS-1.23.500

500 mA @ 21-23 VDC

Typical power dissipation

2.5 W per segment

Dimensions

22.1 cm. x 24.6 cm. x 16.2 cm. (8.7 in. x 9.7


in. x 6.4 in.)

Operating temperature range

-40 to 60 C

Alarm contact rating - Diagnostic Module

1 A max @ 50 VDC max

Short Circuit Protection with Segment Protectors


Refer toShort Circuit Protection with Segment Protectors on page 44

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub


Follow the instructions in Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Power Hub on
page 46. Be sure to use the FBPS-1.23.500 Power Supply Modules rather than the
FBPS-1.500.

Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Segment Protector


Follow the instructions in Installing and Connecting the Fieldbus Segment
Protector on page 47.

Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

59

Verifying the Installation


Refer to Verifying the Installation on page 48.

60

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Non-Incendive Application Example


Figure 13 shows an application that uses a redundant pair of Series 2 H1 cards with
redundant fieldbus power and short circuit protection for devices on a long (0.5 km)
trunk cable. If a failure occurs on an H1 card, a 24 V power supply, or a fieldbus
power supply, the segments continue to operate as expected. A status indication on
connected alarms alerts the operator that an error has occurred. It is assumed that the
application design follows the criteria specified in DC Power Considerations for
Non-Incendive Applications on page 57. Therefore, if a short occurs when a device
is installed or removed from the segment, only that device is affected; the rest of the
segment is unchanged.

Series 2

Series 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Power/Active
Error
Port 1
Port 2

Fieldbus
H1

Fieldbus
H1

GND

Port 1

Segment Protector

Redundant
Series 2 H1
cards

PEPPERL+FUCHS
F2-JBSC-8-CGB
Segment Protector

Txvbo
Tufxup
Lsnrtpm

3x\88 - wxb8m
ty w foclex

rupt K serup o 6x
sorulx Bxup 02x
Ibex ywqv 09x

TU 81 x buk
b2 xul 4- 8m
fx q 03-3v

T - OFF

FieldConnex

TM

TERMINATOR ON

GND

OFF

Carrier
shield bar

Port 2
Primary
24 VDC

Host A
S

Alarm
contacts

Host B
SEG1
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host A

Host B
SEG2
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host B
SEG3
+ S --- +

OFF

ON

Host A
S

Host B
SEG4
+ S --- +

PRI
PWR

SEC
PWR

Alarm
jumper

Diagnostic Bus

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

PWR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

ERR

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
FBPS1.23.500

HD2
DMB

FieldConnex

PEPPERL-FUCHS
Fieldbus Power Hub
S
OFF +
Segment 1

Segment Protector

OFF

ON

Alarm

Fieldbus Motherboard

Secondary
24 VDC

T - ON
PEPPERL+FUCHS
F2-JBSC-8-CGB
Segment Protector

Txvbo
Tufxup
Lsnrtpm

3x\88 - wxb8m
ty w foclex

rupt K serup o 6x
sorulx Bxup 02x
Ibex ywqv 09x

TU 81 x buk
b2 xul 4- 8m
fx q 03-3v

FieldConnex

TM

TERMINATOR ON

OFF

GND

Shielded pair
with drain wire

GND

S
S OFF +
OFF +
S OFF +
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4

T - ON

0.5 km Cable

Figure 13 NI Application with 16 Devices Using the Fieldbus Power Hub and Segment
Protectors

Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

61

62

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Appendix A Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure


Use this procedure to check each segment for proper power, grounding, and isolation
before you commission field devices on the segment. Record the readings for steps 15 on the Fieldbus Segment Checkout Form on page 69. Make one copy of the form
for each segment that you are checking.

Tools
You will need the following tools to perform the segment checkout procedure:

Fluke 123 or 124 Digital Scope Meter or equivalent scope with resistance, DC
voltage, and capacitance measurement capability. (Most capacitance meters
measure components only and will not provide the expected results when
measuring a complete segment.)

Small screwdriver

Fieldbus Segment Checkout form (on page 69)

Checkout Procedure
Before performing the checkout procedure:

Ensure that you have the correct tools to perform the procedure. Refer to the
previous topic for a list of the required tools.

Ensure that the field wiring is completed and properly terminated and that all
field devices are attached.

Remove the Fieldbus segment cable (+, -, and shield) at the connector locations
from the fieldbus power supply.

Remove only the connector to the field wiring; it is not necessary to remove any
connector to the H1 card. Removing the connector to the field wiring isolates the
field wiring from the H1 card and power supply, isolates the shield from ground, and
enables you to make the resistance and capacitance measurements in the checkout
procedure. If your field wiring connections differ from the connections described
here, isolate the field wiring from both the H1 card and the power supply, and isolate
the shield from ground.

Important

Make sure that your bare hands do not come in contact with meter leads or segment
wiring. The body acts as capacitor and body contact with leads or wiring could result in
false readings.

Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure

63

Step 1: Measure resistance on the H1 segment conductors at the removed connector


coming in from the field.
Measure resistance from the:

Expected result

+ signal conductor to - signal conductor

> 50 K ohms 1 (increasing)

+ signal conductor to drain/shield wire

open circuit >20 M

- signal conductor to drain/shield wire

open circuit > 20 M

+ signal conductor to instrument ground bar

open circuit > 20 M

- signal conductor to instrument ground bar

open circuit > 20 M

drain/shield wire to instrument ground bar

open circuit > 20 M

Step 2: Measure capacitance on the H1 segment conductors at the removed connector


coming in from the field.
Measure capacitance from the:

Expected result

+ signal conductor to - signal conductor

1 F (0.80 to 1.20 F
acceptable)2

+ signal conductor to drain/shield wire

< 300 nF

- signal conductor to drain/shield wire

< 300 nF

+ signal conductor to instrument ground bar

< 300 nF3

- signal conductor to instrument ground bar

< 300 nF3

drain/shield wire to instrument ground bar

< 300 nF3

1. This value will change due to the capacitor charging in the termination RC circuit and the capacitance
in the fieldbus cables.
2. A reading of <.5 F indicates no terminator on the segment. A reading of a nominal 2 F indicates a
second terminator on the segment. The acceptable values assume that the power supply terminator is
used as the second terminator and only one additional terminator is connected in the field. Otherwise,
the expected result would be 2 F. Note: The values for this measurement will be invalid on the
Pepperl+Fuchs FieldConnex Field Barrier (for I.S. applications).
3. An actual reading that is much greater or varies in a capacitor charging manner to a high capacitance
value (>1 F) indicates a poor quality noisy ground on the shield ground bar. Be sure to correct this
ground problem to prevent communication errors on the fieldbus segment. A reading of 300 nF indicates
noise on the ground system. Field data has shown that readings of up to 500 nF can be acceptable providing the fieldbus signal waveform and voltage compare to that shown in Figure 14.

64

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Step 3: Verify the terminator switch.


Procedure

Expected Result

Verify if the power supply has a terminator switch.


Switch On or Off depending upon application.

2 terminators total per segment

Verify if the device connection block has a


terminator switch. Switch On or Off depending upon
application.

2 terminators total per segment

Step 4: Measure DC voltage at the connector going to the field.


Procedure

Expected Result

Reconnect the previously removed terminal


block connectors to the power supply. Tug on
the wire to verify that wiring at the connectors
is secure.
Measure the output DC voltage at the power
supply terminals and verify that the voltage is
appropriate for the fieldbus power supply
installed.
Relcom Fieldbus Power System
P+F Fieldbus Power Hub

25-28 VDC
28-30 VDC, 21-23 VDC, or 15-17 VDC,

Step 5: Measure the AC waveform at the connector going to the field.


Procedure

Expected Result

Set the scope to AC, 200 mV/division, 10


micro seconds/division for best results and
press HOLD to capture the waveform.

500 mV and 900 mV peak to peak

Verify the waveform against the expected


waveform shown in Figure 14. Note the
differences in the signals with 1 terminator
(Figure 15) and with 3 terminators
(Figure 16).

Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure

65

Figure 14 shows a waveform with two terminators and a 1000 feet of cable. This is the
expected waveform.

800 mV

Figure 14

66

Waveform with Two Terminators and 1000 ft Cable

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Figure 15 shows a waveform with one terminator and a 1000 feet of cable.

1400 mV

.
Figure 15

Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure

Waveform with One Terminator and 1000 ft Cable

67

Figure 16 shows a waveform with three terminators and a 1000 feet of cable.

650 mV

Figure 16

68

Waveform with Three Terminators and 1000 ft Cable

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Fieldbus Segment Checkout Form


Company/Location...........................................................................Unit/Description..............................................
Controller No.............................................................................................Fieldbus Card No...........................Port No...............
Step 1: Resistance measurement at the H1 segment conductors coming in from the field
(+) to (-) signal

Expected = > 50 K ohm (increasing)

Actual =.........................................

(+) to shield

Expected = open circuit >20 M

Actual =.........................................

(-) to shield

Expected = open circuit > 20 M

Actual =.........................................

(+) to ground bar

Expected = open circuit > 20 M

Actual =.........................................

(-) to ground bar

Expected = open circuit > 20 M

Actual =.........................................

Shield to ground bar

Expected = open circuit > 20 M

Actual =.........................................

Step 2: Capacitance measurement at the H1 segment conductors coming in from the field
(+) to (-) signal

Expected = 1 F( 20%)

Actual =.........................................

(+) to shield

Expected = < 300 nF

Actual =.........................................

(-) to shield

Expected = < 300 nF

Actual =.........................................

(+) to ground bar

Expected = < 300 nF

Actual =.........................................

(-) to ground bar

Expected = < 300 nF

Actual =.........................................

Shield to ground bar

Expected = < 300 nF

Actual =.........................................

Step 3: Terminator switch verification


Terminator (Power Supply)
Terminator (Connection block)

Expected = Application dependent


Expected = Application dependent

Actual = On.......Off......N/A..........
Actual = On.......Off......N/A..........

Step 4: DC voltage measurement at power supply


(+) to (-) signal

Expected = 25-28 VDC for Relcom


Fieldbus Power Supply or 28-30
VDC for P+F Fieldbus Power Hub

Actual =.........................................

Step 5: AC measurement (waveform) power supply


(+) to (-) signal

Expected = 500 - 900 mV pp

Technician................................................................................................................................

Actual =.........................................

Pass..............................Fail.........................

Date......................................................................................

Fieldbus Segment Checkout Procedure

69

70

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Appendix B MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe


Fieldbus Applications
The MTL9121 IS and the MTL9122 IS Power Supplies can be used to power field
devices in hazardous areas for FISCO (Fieldbus Intrinsically Safe COncept) IS
applications. The MTL9121 IS power supply can power up to five (5) 20 mA devices
in Gas Group IIC and the MTL9122 IS power supply can power up to twelve (12), 20
mA devices in Gas Group IIB. Ensure that the fieldbus devices and all components
used in the application are rated and certified for IS applications in these Gas Groups.
With the exception of the IS power supplies, many fieldbus components (H1 card,
terminators, and wiring components) are the same for IS and non-IS installations.
The MTL9122 IS and 9121 IS power supplies have a host side terminator switch and
a host side power switch on the front of the unit. The terminator on the IS side is
permanently connected. Both power supplies are fieldbus repeater power supplies
that repeat the fieldbus signal from the field to the host and power both the fieldbus
segment and the host.
This chapter addresses FISCO IS applications with devices in Class I Division 1 or
Zone 1 EExib locations. If a field device in your application is not certified for FISCO
IS, an MTL Fieldbus Entity Spur Adapter can be used. Similarly, if a field device in
your application is located in a Zone 0 Hazardous area, an MTL Fieldbus IS EExia
Spur Adapter can be used.
Refer to the MTL documentation and/or visit the DeltaV website
(www.easydeltav.com) and follow the links to MTL for additional information on their
products.

Note

The Series 2 H1 card requires a power supply for each port in IS applications. The
MTL9121 and 9122 IS Power Supplies can provide this power.

MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

71

DC Power Considerations for IS Power Applications


The available current to power a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable. Table 8 shows the maximum distances in meters
for a given load on the 9121 IS power supply and Table 9 shows the same information
for the 9122 IS power supply. The following assumptions are made:

MTL9121 IS Power Supply voltage is 12 VDC at 110 mA at 0 C

MTL9122 IS Power Supply Voltage is 12.8 VDC at 250 mA at 0 C

Minimum Device Voltage = 9.5 VDC (.5V device margin)

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km is used

Cable Resistance (Type A) = 22 Ohms/km x 2 (loop) = 44 Ohms/ km

Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the fieldbus power supply is
connected on the other end of the cable

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on that segment.
Table 8 Distance per Load on 9121 IS Power Supply

72

Number of field
devices

Power Supply Load


(mA)

Maximum
Distance
(meters)

20

1000

40

1000

60

940

80

710

100

560

110

510

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Table 9 Distance per Load on 9122 IS Power Supply

Warning

Number of field
devices

Power Supply Load


(mA)

Maximum Distance
(meters)

20

1900

40

1870

60

1250

80

930

100

750

120

620

140

530

160

460

180

410

10

200

370

11

220

340

12

240

310

12

250

300

In any hazardous area installation it is important to read and follow the device
manufacturer's design and installation documents. Failure to follow the
documentation could result in an unapproved and unsafe application.
Additionally, in hazardous locations follow your plant's procedures for making
the area safe during installation and maintenance operations.

Host Power
Both the MTL9121 IS and 9122 IS power supplies can provide power to the host in
the safe area. The supplies are rated at 30 mA and are capable of providing host power
for either the simplex or redundant Series 2 H1 cards. The distance between the host
and the IS power supply can exceed 1000 meters.

MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

73

Installing the MTL Intrinsically Safe Power Supplies


The MTL9121 and 9122 Intrinsically Safe power supplies install on a DIN Rail and
are powered by a typical bulk 24 VDC power supply. The IS power supplies connect
to the segment wiring to power the fieldbus devices that are not self-powered. On the
top of each supply is a 3 pin connector for connection to the safe area host fieldbus
and a 3 pin connector for connection to the safe area 24 V power. On the bottom of
each supply is a 3 pin connector for connection to the IS area. The following figure
shows the connectors.
Power

+1 -2 +3 -4

Host
S
5 6

Host Pwr

On

Host

Safe
Area
Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

IS

9122-IS

8 9
S
IS

Hazardous
Area

Figure 17 Connectors on the MTL 9122 IS Power Supply

74

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Note

The hazardous area wiring must remain separated from the safe area wiring. This
includes the shield drain wires as they must be separate wires all the way to the ground
connection.

To wire the safe area

The 24 VDC power input and host connectors are on the top of the power supply.
1. Connect the primary power supply positive (+) wire to pin 1.
2. Connect the primary power negative (-) 24 V return to pin 2.
3. Connect a secondary power supply positive (optional) (+) wire to pin 3.
If using a primary and secondary 24 VDC power supply, be sure to connect the power
supply returns together.
4. Connect the host segment negative (-) to pin 4.
5. Connect the host segment shield to pin 5.
6. Connect the host segment positive (+) to pin 6.

To wire the hazardous area

The IS connector is on the bottom of the power supply.


1. Connect the IS area fieldbus segment positive (+) wire to pin 7.
2. Connect the IS area fieldbus segment shield (S) wire to pin 8 and to a shield
ground connection.
3. Connect the IS area fieldbus segment negative (-) wire to pin 9.

MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

75

Switches
The power supplies have a switchable host side terminator and host power switch.
(The field side terminator is permanently connected.)

Host terminator ON is the upper position; host terminator OFF is the lower
position

Host power ON is the upper position; host power OFF is the lower position

T
Host

Host Pwr
On

Figure 18 Terminator and Power Switches

The segment layout determines the location of the terminator and if the switchable
terminator on the power supply is used. Be sure that two terminators are on the host
side and two terminators are on the fieldbus side of each power supply. Similarly, the
use of the switchable power capability is dependent upon the needs of the particular
IS application. The Series 2 H1 card requires power; therefore, the host power switch
should be ON. If more than one IS power supply is connected to the same segment
(as in Figure 19), host power should be provided by one unit only. Be sure the
additional units host power switches are in the OFF position.

76

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Intrinsically Safe Application Example with an MTL9122


The following figure shows an IS application that allows up to 16 devices on the
segment. The maximum cable length on the MTL9122 portion of the segment is 1900
meters and the maximum total cable length per segment is 1900 meters.
H1

H1

Redundant
Series 2
H1 cards

Terminator
Red
24 V
power
supply

Carrier
shield bar
Ground

+ 24 V
Power

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

On

Host

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

+1 -2 +3 -

9122-IS

T=ON
HP=ON

On

Host

Power Supply - IIB

Port 1

T=ON
HP=OFF

Host Pwr

On

Host

Surge
protection
ground

Shielded
pair with
drain wire
T=ON
HP=ON

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

IS

Terminator
MB8
Megablock

IS

9122-IS

9122-IS

8
S

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

Host Pwr

Power

Host
S
4 5 6

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

IS

Power

Host Pwr

MB8
Megablock

8
S

8
S

Surge
protection
ground

Port 2
0.4 Km cable

Figure 19 16 IS Devices on a Segment

Note

Ensure that all components are rated and certified for IS applications.

MTL Power Supplies for Intrinsically Safe Fieldbus Applications

77

78

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Appendix C MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive


Fieldbus Applications
The MTL9111-NI and the MTL9112-NI Power Supplies can be used to power field
devices in Zone 2 / Division 2 hazardous areas for conventional Non-Incendive and
FNICO (Fieldbus Non-Incendive COncept) applications. The MTL9111-NI power
supply can power up to nine (9) 20 mA devices in Gas Group IIC/Groups A-D and
the MTL9112-NI power supply can power up to sixteen (16), 20 mA devices in Gas
Group IIB/Groups C and D. Ensure that the fieldbus devices and all components
used in the application are rated and certified for Non-Incendive applications in these
Gas Groups. With the exception of NI power supplies, many fieldbus components
(H1 card, terminators, and wiring components) are the same for Non-Incendive
installations and other types of fieldbus installations.
The MTL9111-NI and 9112-NI power supplies can be used in either of the following
applications:

Conventional Non-Incendive circuits. For Non-Incendive/ExnL applications in


which the wiring is energy limited; cable parameters must be considered.

FNICO circuits in which cable parameter calculations are not required. FNICO is
similar to FISCO and is described in MTL Application Note AN9027.

The MTL9111-NI and 9112-NI power supplies have a host side terminator switch
and a host side power switch on the front of the unit. The terminator on the field side
is permanently connected. Both power supplies are fieldbus repeater power supplies
that repeat the fieldbus signal from the field to the host and power both the fieldbus
segment and the host.
Refer to the MTL documentation and/or visit the DeltaV website
(www.easydeltav.com) and follow the links to MTL for additional information on their
products.

Note

The Series 2 H1 card requires a power supply for each port in Non-Incendive
applications. The MTL9111-NI and 9112-NI Power Supplies can provide this
power.

MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

79

DC Power Considerations for Non-Incendive Power


Applications
The available current to power a field device depends on the length and resistance
characteristics of the fieldbus cable. Table 10 shows the maximum distances in meters
for a given load on the 9111-NI power supply and Table 11 shows the same
information for the 9112-NI power supply. The following assumptions are made:

MTL9111-NI Power Supply voltage is 12 VDC at 180 mA at 0 C

MTL9112-NI Power Supply Voltage is 12.8 VDC at 320 mA at 0 C

Minimum Device Voltage = 9.5 VDC (.5V device margin)

Each device has an average load of 20 mA

Fieldbus Type A 18 AWG cable @ 22 ohms/km is used

Cable Resistance (Type A) = 22 Ohms/km x 2 (loop) = 44 Ohms/ km

Devices are connected on one end of the cable and the fieldbus power supply is
connected on the other end of the cable

Maximum Distance (km) = (Allowed Loop V drop / Loop current) / Loop


resistance per km

There will be different restrictions and limitations on your segment if these


assumptions do not hold for your segment layout. If your devices average more than
20 mA per device, reduce the maximum cable length indicated in the table for that
number of devices or reduce the number of devices on that segment.
Table 10 Distance per Load on 9111-NI Power Supply
Number of field
devices

80

Power Supply Load


(mA)

Maximum
Distance
(meters)

20

1000

40

1000

60

940

80

710

100

560

120

470

140

400

160

350

180

310

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Table 11 Distance per Load on the 9112-NI Power Supply

Warning

Maximum Distance
(meters)

Number of field
devices

Power Supply Load


(mA)

20

1900

40

1870

60

1250

80

930

100

750

120

620

140

530

160

460

180

410

10

200

370

11

220

340

12

240

310

13

260

280

14

280

260

15

300

250

16

320

230

In any hazardous area installation it is important to read and follow the device
manufacturer's design and installation documents. Failure to follow the
documentation could result in an unapproved and unsafe application.
Additionally, in hazardous locations follow your plant's procedures for making
the area safe during installation and maintenance operations.

MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

81

Host Power
Both the MTL9111-NI and 9112-NI power supplies can provide power to the host in
the safe area. The supplies are rated at 30 mA and are capable of providing host power
for either the simplex or redundant Series 2 H1 cards. The distance between the host
and the NI power supply can exceed 1000 meters.

Installing the Non-Incendive Power Supplies


The MTL9111-NI and 9112-NI power supplies install on a DIN Rail and are powered
by a typical bulk 24 VDC power supply. The power supplies connect to the segment
wiring to power the fieldbus devices that are not self-powered. On the top of each
supply is a 3 pin connector for connection to the safe area host fieldbus and a 3 pin
connector for connection to the safe area 24 V power. On the bottom of each supply
is a 3 pin connector for connection to the NI area. The following figure shows the
connectors.

82

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Power

+1 -2 +3 -4

Host
S
5 6

Host Pwr

On

Host

Safe
Area
Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

NI

9111-NI

8
S
NI

Hazardous
Area

Figure 20 Connectors on the MTL 9111 and 9112-NI Power Supplies

Note

The hazardous area wiring must remain separated from the safe area wiring. This
includes the shield drain wires as they must be separate wires all the way to the ground
connection.

MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

83

To wire the safe area

The 24 VDC power input and host connectors are on the top of the power supply.
1. Connect the primary power supply positive (+) wire to pin 1.
2. Connect the primary power negative (-) 24 V return to pin 2.
3. Connect a secondary power supply positive (optional) (+) wire to pin 3.
If using a primary and secondary 24 VDC power supply, be sure to connect the power
supply returns together.
4. Connect the host segment negative (-) to pin 4.
5. Connect the host segment shield to pin 5.
6. Connect the host segment positive (+)

To wire the hazardous area

The NI field connector is on the bottom of the power supply.


1. Connect the NI area fieldbus segment positive (+) wire to pin 7.
2. Connect the NI area fieldbus segment shield (S) wire to pin 8 and to a shield
ground connection.
3. Connect the NI area fieldbus segment negative (-) wire to pin 9.

Switches
The power supplies have a switchable host side terminator and host power switch.
(The field side terminator is permanently connected.)

84

Host terminator ON is the upper position; host terminator OFF is the lower
position

Host power ON is the upper position; host power OFF is the lower position

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Host Pwr

Host

On

Figure 21 Terminator and Power Switches

The segment layout determines the location of the terminator and if the switchable
terminator on the power supply is used. Be sure that two terminators are on the host
side and two terminators are on the fieldbus side of each power supply. Similarly, the
use of the switchable power capability is dependent upon the needs of the particular
NI application. The Series 2 H1 card requires power; therefore, the host power switch
should be ON. If more than one NI power supply is connected to the same segment
(as in Figure 22), host power should be provided by one unit only. Be sure the
additional units host power switches are in the OFF position.

Non-Incendive Application Examples


The following two figures show the use of the MTL9111-NI and MTL9112-NI power
supplies in NI applications. If a Megablock with short circuit protection is used, the
number of devices and total cable length may have to be reduced to ensure that only a
single device is affected if a short circuit condition occurs.

Application Example with two MTL9111-NI Power Supplies


The following figure shows an NI application that uses two MTL9111-NI power
supplies to power up to 16 devices on the segment. The maximum cable length on the
MTL9111-NI portion of the segment is 1900 meters and the maximum total cable
length per segment is 1900 meters.

MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

85

H1

H1

Redundant
Series 2
H1 cards

Terminator
Red
24 V
power
supply

Carrier
shield bar
Ground

+ 24 V
Power

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

On

Host

Power

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

T=ON
HP=ON

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

IS

9111-NI

On

Host

Port 1

T=ON
HP=OFF

Host Pwr

On

Host

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

IS

Surge
protection
ground

Shielded
pair with
drain wire
T=ON
HP=ON

Terminator
MB8-SG
Megablock

IS

9111-NI

9111-NI

8
S

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

Host Pwr

Power

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

Host Pwr

MB8-SG
Megablock

8
S

8
S

Surge
protection
ground

Port 2
0.3 Km cable

Figure 22 16 Non-Incendive Devices on a Segment with two MTL9111-NI Power Supplies

Note

Ensure that all components are rated and certified for Non-Incendive applications.

Application Example with one MTL9112-NI Power Supply


The following figure shows an NI application that uses one MTL9112-NI power
supply to power up to 16 devices on the segment. The maximum cable length on the
MTL9112-NI portion of the segment is 1900 meters and the maximum total cable
length per segment is 1900 meters.

86

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

H1

H1

Red
24 V
power
supply

Redundant
Series 2
H1 cards

Ground

+ 24 V
Power

Power

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

On

Host

Host
S
4 5 6

+1 -2 +3 -

Host Pwr

MB8 - SG
Megablock

Carrier
shield bar

T=ON
HP=ON

Host Pwr

On

Host

Shielded
pair with
drain wire
T=ON
HP=ON

Terminator

Terminator
Power Supply - IIB

Power Supply - IIB

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

Pwr
Fault
Host
IS

NI

NI

9112-NI

9112-NI

MB8 - SG
Megablock

8
S

Port 1

Surge
protection
ground

8
S

Surge
protection
ground

Port 2

0.2 Km cable

Figure 23 16 Non-Incendive Devices on a Segment with one MTL9112-NI Power Supply

Note

Ensure that all components are rated and certified for Non-Incendive applications.

MTL Power Supplies for Non-Incendive Fieldbus Applications

87

88

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Appendix D Troubleshooting
This section provides information on how to use the DeltaV Explorer, Diagnostics
and the H1 card to troubleshoot fieldbus applications and provides information on
troubleshooting common fieldbus problems. Refer to Books Online for information
on troubleshooting fieldbus loops.

Troubleshooting

89

Troubleshooting with the H1 Card


The H1 card provides a great deal of information for troubleshooting fieldbus
segments. Once communication has been established, use the LEDs to monitor
communication between the card and fieldbus devices. The bottom two LEDs on the
H1 card reflect communication between the port and fieldbus devices on that port.
Table 12 H1 Fieldbus Card LEDs
LED

Correct Operating
Condition

Green Power

H1 On

Green Power/
Active

Series 2 Simplex H1- On

Fault Indicator
Off

Probable Cause
H1 card does not
have power.

Corrective Action
1. Verify that H1 card
is receiving power.
2. Replace H1 card if it
has power.

Series 2 Redundant H1
Active On
Standby Flashing

Red - Error

Off

On

H1 card is not
communicating
with the DeltaV
controller.

1. Be sure that other


I/O cards are
communicating with
the controller.
2. If no I/O cards are
communicating with
the controller, replace
the controller or
replace the H1 card.

Yellow - Ports 1
and 2

90

On

Port is disabled
or the H1 card is
not
communicating
with any devices
on the port.

1. Enable and
download the port.

Flashing Yellow
(device
configuration
not
downloaded)

No fieldbus
configuration on
the segment.

Create and download


configuration.

Flashing Yellow
(device
configuration
downloaded)

Port is
communicating,
but problems
exist with a
device.

Check communication
statistics for each
fieldbus device on the
port.

Off

2. Create and
download
configuration.

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Use the DeltaV Explorer to enable and download the port and Control Studio to
create and download configuration. A solid yellow LED indicates that good
communication exists between the port and devices on that port and that at least one
function block is configured on the segment. Remember that each fieldbus device
should contain at a minimum either an AI or AO function block.

Troubleshooting with the DeltaV Explorer


Indicators in the DeltaV Explorer tell you if an H1 port or a fieldbus device needs to
be downloaded or commissioned.
The blue triangle ( ) on an H1 port or device means that the port or device needs to
be downloaded. Select the port or device, click the right mouse button, and then select
Download to open a dialog box that lists the fieldbus configuration information to be
downloaded.
The yellow exclamation point ( )on a device means that the device needs to be
commissioned. To commission the device, select it from the Decommissioned device
list and drag it to either the port or device placeholder.

Troubleshooting

91

Troubleshooting with DeltaV Diagnostics


Remember that the Diagnostics online help contains descriptions of all fieldbus
parameter values. To access the descriptions, select the parameter, click the right
mouse button, and select What's This.
Use DeltaV Diagnostics to:

Determine if the device is commissioned

Check integrity on the H1 card, backup link master device, and ports

Check overall port statistics and communication statistics for each device

Open DeltaV Diagnostics and click View | Details or View | Compare to quickly see
the device state. If the device is not commissioned, open the DeltaV Explorer and
commission the device. Then, download the port and the device. If the device is
commissioned, check integrity on the port and then check port and device
communication statistics.
Port Integrity
Typically, integrity problems originate below the node and then "bubble up" to the
node level. Integrity problems are indicated by the overlay. Start by looking for a
controller with the overlay and if found, expand the controller hierarchy until you
find the root cause of the problem. If a fieldbus card has an integrity problem, expand
the card to see which port has the problem. Select each port and look at the port's
status. Possible port status values are:

92

Good good basic communications with all devices on this port.

Link Error possible card problem. Reseat the H1 card to verify the card's selftest. If the problem persists, replace the H1 card, and notify Technical Support.

Duplicate Address on Link another device is currently communicating at this


port's address.

No Communications on Link.

H1 Card Problem Reseat the H1 card to verify the card's self-test. If the
problem persists, replace the H1 card, and notify Technical Support.

One or more function block problems on link or device problems expand the
port and check the state of each fieldbus device on the port. Any state other than

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Commissioned indicates a potential problem with that fieldbus device. Refer to


the DeltaV Explorer help for assistance on commissioning fieldbus devices.

A configuration error indicated by the device state "Device Class Mismatch" a


backup link master is functioning as a basic device or a basic device is functioning
as a link master device.

A download error indicated by the device state "Schedule Download Failure"


the Link Active Scheduler's (LAS) download of the schedule to this device failed.

Port Communication Statistics


The Port Statistics command provides a broad view of communication activity on the
port. Click the right mouse button on the port and select Port Statistics. In the Port
Statistics dialog look for:

Troubleshooting

Retries Total Dll Retries is the total number of data link packets that the H1
card had to retry. If this statistic is steadily increasing, check the communication
statistics for each device to see which device is causing the problem. To check
communication statistics on a device, click the right mouse button on the device
and select Display Communication Statistics. The number of retries to a fieldbus
device generally should be much less then 1% of the total requests sent to the
device. If this is not the case, either the device is bad or there is a segment
problem.

Invalid responses Total Invalid Responses is the total number of fieldbus


requests that failed due to a fieldbus device returning an error. If this statistic is
steadily increasing, check the communication statistics for each device to see
which device is causing the problem. To check communication statistics on a
device, click the right mouse button on the device and select Display
Communication Statistics.

Stack errors Total Local Stack Errors is the total number of fieldbus
request that failed because the local communication stack returned a response
that indicated an error. The H1 card might need to be replaced if this statistic is
steadily increasing. Total Stack Rejected Request is the total number of
fieldbus requests that failed because the local communication stack did not accept
the request. The H1 card might need to be replaced if this statistic is steadily
increasing.

Timeouts Total Request TimeOut is the total number of fieldbus request


that failed because the fieldbus device did not return a response. If this statistic is
steadily increasing, check the communication statistics for each device to see
which device is causing the problem. To check communication statistics on a
device, click the right mouse button on the device and select Display
Communication Statistics.

93

Tip

Clicking the Reset Stats button resets all values to 0 and makes it easier to read the
statistics. Click the Help button on any of the Port Statistics dialog boxes for
information on the status values.
Next, look at detailed port statistics. Click the right mouse button on the port and
select Display Port Detail Statistics. The FMS prefix in some of the detailed port
statistics refers to the Fieldbus Message Specification services. These services allow
user applications to send messages to each other across the fieldbus using a standard
set of message formats. The SM prefix refers to System Management. System
Management handles many functions on the fieldbus including automatically
assigning fieldbus device addresses and searching for tags. In the Detailed Port
Statistics dialog look for:

Identifies FMS Identifies is the number of fieldbus FMS (Fieldbus Message


Service) identify requests that were sent on this port. SM Identifies is the
number of fieldbus requests that were sent to identify a field device. This request
is sent whenever a device has been attached to this port or changed addresses. If
this statistic is incrementing after all field devices on this port have been
commissioned, either a segment or a field device problem could exist. To isolate
the problem, view the communication statistic on each field device on this port.

Initiates FMS Initiates is the number of fieldbus connection requests that


were sent on this port. If this statistic steadily increments after all devices are
commissioned and downloaded, either the fieldbus segment is noisy or a problem
exists with a fieldbus device. To isolate the problem, check the communication
statistics on each fieldbus device attached to this port. To check communication
statistics on a device, click the right mouse button on the device, and select
Display Communication Statistics.

Aborts FMS Aborts is the number of fieldbus disconnection requests that


were sent on this port. If this statistic steadily increments after all devices have
been commissioned and downloaded, there could be a problem with a fieldbus
device or a noisy segment. To isolate the problem, check the communication
statistics on each fieldbus device attached to this port. To check communication
statistics on a device, click the right mouse button on the device, and select
Display Communication Statistics.

Device Communication Statistics


Finally, look at communication statistics for each device. Click the right mouse button
on each device, select Display Communication Statistics, and look for:

94

Aborts received and sent AbortsRxd is the total number of disconnects


received from the function blocks in this device. If this statistic is steadily
increasing for this field device only, the device could have a problem. If this
Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

statistic is steadily increasing with several field devices, a segment problem could
exist. AbortsSent is the total number of disconnects sent to the function blocks
in this device. If this statistic is steadily increasing with this field device only, the
field device could have a problem. If this statistic is steadily increasing with
several field devices, a segment problem could exist.

Troubleshooting

Initiates received and sent InitsSent is the total number of connects sent to
the function blocks in this device. If this statistic is steadily increasing for this field
device only, the field device could have a problem. If this statistic is steadily
increasing for several field devices, a segment problem could exist.

Pcr Timeouts PcrTimeoutsRxd is the total number of fieldbus requests


sent to the function blocks that failed because the field device did not return a
response. The device might have a problem, if this statistic is steadily increasing.

Livelist appearances NumLiveListAppearances is the number of times


the device left the segment and was brought back online. If this statistic is
incrementing, there is either a problem with this device, or a segment problem.

95

Troubleshooting Common Fieldbus Problems


Device or Segment Error
The device's Resource and Transducer blocks are good starting places for diagnosing
device problems. Open DeltaV Explorer, select the Resource or Transducer block for
the device, and view the status and mode. The status should be clear, with no errors
and the mode should be AUTO. Refer to the device documentation for more
information.
Next use DeltaV Diagnostics.
1. Click Start | DeltaV | Operator | Diagnostics to open DeltaV Diagnostics.
Typically, integrity problems originate below the node and then "bubble up" to
the node level. In DeltaV Diagnostics, integrity problems are indicated by the
overlay. Expand the Control Network hierarchy in the left pane of DeltaV
Diagnostics and look for any instances of the
subsystem.

overlaid over a node or

2. Look for a controller with this overlay and if you find one:
3. Expand the controller hierarchy until you find the root cause of the problem.
The problem could be improper wiring causing noise if:
There is a communication error on the device.
The H1 card port shows bad integrity.
Diagnose the Problem with an Oscilloscope
1. Connect an oscilloscope to the segment across the positive and negative leads.
2. Take a snapshot of the signal to determine the noise level.
The actual signal amplitude should be between 0.5 and 0.9 V peak to peak. The
noise should be less than 75 mV peak to peak.
3. Take the noise measurement at several different points on the segment such as
the H1 card, the power supply, the field junction box, and at any of the field
devices.
If the signal magnitude and noise exceed the ranges listed above, fix the field
wiring and cable shielding.

96

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

To fix field wiring

1. Ground the shield only in one place, preferably the DeltaV system cabinet. Use
shielded, twisted-pair cable.
2. Cut and tape the shield inside the instrument housing to prevent the shield from
contacting the instrument housing and possibly causing a ground loop.
3. Wire all spurs in parallel (individually or as a group in a junction box, including
the shield). If the wiring between the H1 card and the power supply uses
untwisted, unshielded power cable, excessive noise can occur.
4. Continue the twisted, shielded pair all the way back to the H1 card and ground
the shield at the ground bus bar on the 8-wide I/O carrier.
5. Check all junction boxes and tape or tie into place any exposed shielding or drain
to ensure that they do not become grounded to the junction box.

The H1 Card is not Communicating with the DeltaV System


If the ports are enabled but you cannot see devices with DeltaV Explorer or
Diagnostics, the H1 card may not be functioning properly. Be sure to allow enough
time for a newly installed H1 card to go through a self-check and establish
communication with the devices on the ports. Use the following list to verify that the
H1 card initializes properly:

Plug in green power light and red error light ON.

10 12 seconds later, the red error light goes OFF. The green power LED stays
ON.

About 5 seconds later, both port lights flash then go OFF.

About 5 seconds later, both port lights begin flashing.

About 15 seconds later, port 1 light comes ON solid.

About 15 seconds later, port 2 light comes ON solid.

Next, look at the LEDs on the front of the card.


1. Check the red fault indicator LED on the H1 card.
If it is lit, it is possible that there are problems with the DeltaV system and the H1
card may have failed.

Troubleshooting

97

2. Check the port LED on the H1 card.


The LED should be solid yellow. If the LED is:
Off it is possible that the port is not configured or not enabled
Flashing it is possible that there is no configuration on the segment.
Put the H1 card in other slots and see if the card receives power in that slot and
powers up.
If the card will not power up or communicate at all, verify that the H1 card does not
work by replacing the card with a card that you know works.
Check the Port and Segment Configuration
If the port LED is:

Off it is possible that the port is not enabled and cannot talk to the device. All
ports must be configured, enabled, and downloaded, before they can function.

Flashing it is possible that no configuration exists for the fieldbus devices.


Fieldbus devices must contain a valid configuration before they can work. Each
fieldbus device should contain at a minimum either an AI or AO function block.

To enable the port

1. Open the DeltaV Explorer.


2. Expand the I/O subsystem and navigate to the fieldbus port.
3. Select the port, click the right mouse button, and select Properties.
4. Enable the port.
5. Download the port.

To add configuration

1. Open Control Studio and create the configuration for the devices.
2. Download the devices.

98

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Communication Error or Incorrect Communication


Symptoms that you might see in Diagnostics such as communication errors,
commissioning failures, commissioned devices transitioning to decommissioned or
disappearing and reappearing on the segment can be caused by:

Improper firmware revision for the H1 card. Run the DeltaV Controller
Upgrade Utility to upgrade the controller and correct this problem.Click Start |
All Programs | DeltaV | Installation | Controller Upgrade Utility and follow the
instructions to upgrade I/O and controllers.

Terminator switches set incorrectly. Correct the termination. Remember that


there must be only two terminators per segment.

Improper wiring or incorrectly installed terminators. Correct the wiring and


termination.

Ground the shield only in one place, preferably the DeltaV system cabinet.
Use shielded, twisted-pair cable.
Cut and tape the shield inside the instrument housing to prevent the shield
from contacting the instrument housing and possibly causing a ground loop.
Wire all spurs in parallel (individually or as a group in a junction box,
including the shield). If the wiring between the H1 card and the power supply
uses untwisted, unshielded power cable, excessive noise can occur.
Continue the twisted, shielded pair all the way back to the H1 card and
ground the shield at the ground bus bar on the 8-wide I/O carrier.
A faulty power supply. Replace the unit.

Problems Commissioning Devices


A device that does not commission correctly or shows up as decommissioned in
Diagnostics could be lacking its necessary DD (device description) files. The DeltaV
system includes built-in support for a number of fieldbus devices from device
manufacturers. The files necessary to support these devices are included in the DeltaV
install image. If a Fieldbus device is not included in the DeltaV install image, you must
install a set of device files for that device. The device files are specific to the device's
type and revision. Download the DD files from www.easydeltav.com to a disk, CD, or
directory on your system. Emerson Process Management has tested the device files
on the website with the DeltaV system. Use the Add Device Type command in
DeltaV Explorer to add the device files to the DeltaV system. Refer to Books Online
for more information on commissioning devices.

Troubleshooting

99

Missing Values in Resource or Transducer Block


Missing values in the Resource or Transducer block could indicate a database or
device error. If any of the necessary parameters values in the Resource or Transducer
block are blank, try:

Closing and restarting DeltaV Explorer.

Power cycling or master restarting the device.

Repairing or replacing the device.

Note

In general, power cycling or master restarting a device can often correct device errors that
do not respond to other actions.

To power cycle a device

1. Decommission the device.


2. Disconnect the device from the segment.
3. Wait 10 15 seconds and then reconnect the device.
For four wire transmitters such as MicroMotion, disconnect the power source and the
segment connection and reconnect the segment wiring after reconnecting the power
source (usually the AC power source).

To do a master restart

1. Right-click the Resource block and select the Reset/Restart option. (Sometimes
this option is available in the Transducer block.)
If the device still shows an error:
2. Select the Defaults option. This sets all parameter or sensor configurations to the
defaults.
3. Re-enter the device setup data in the Transducer and Resource blocks.

100

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Simulate not Working in Control Studio


If Simulate is enabled in Control Studio but not working, the problem could be that
the jumper or dip switch that allows simulation for the device is not set. For
simulation to work, it must be enabled in Control Studio and the jumper or switch
must also be set on the device.

To set the jumper or dip switch

1. Locate the jumper or dip switch on the side opposite the wiring connections.
2. Set the jumper or switch.

Troubleshooting

101

Trouble-Shooting Q and A
The following sections provide answers to commonly asked questions.

Has the H1 Card Failed?


If the H1 card fails, the DeltaV system loses visibility on the fieldbus segments. On a
segment that does not support a backup Link Active Scheduler (LAS), if the H1 card
fails, all communication on the attached fieldbus segment stops.
To recover from an H1 card failure, replace the card. The H1 card is automatically
downloaded and resumes functioning as the LAS. Startup of the loop depends on
how the loop is configured.

What Happens to Control When the H1 Card Fails?


On a segment that does not support a backup link master, if the H1 card goes down,
all communication on the fieldbus segment stops. Depending on the configuration,
output blocks might go to a Fault State state.

What Happens to Control When the Controller Fails?


If the control loop is running completely on the fieldbus segment (that is, the control
is running in the devices and not in the controller), the loop keeps running. However,
if the loop is getting input from the controller, the loop performs its configured error
processing.
To recover from a controller failure, replace the controller and then commission and
download it. If the controller failure affected the fieldbus loop, startup of the loop
depends on how the loop is configured.

How Does the User Know if there is a Problem with the Backup Link
Master?
View the integrity of the backup link master device in DeltaV Diagnostics.

102

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Fieldbus Third Party Products


This section provides recommended sources for fieldbus components. Visit the
DeltaV website (www.easydeltav.com) for recent updates to this list and for links to
third party websites.

Fieldbus Segment Cable


Belden
Fieldbus Cable 3076F or equivalent

Fieldbus Power Supplies


Pepperl+Fuchs
MB-FB-4* 4 Segment Simplex Power Hub with HD2-FBPS.1.500 Power
Supplies & HD2-DM-B Diagnostic Module
MB-FB-4R* 4 Segment Redundant Power Hub with HD2-FBPS.1.500 Power
Supplies & HD2-DM-B Diagnostic Module
KLD2-STR-1.24.400.IEC (STR400) (FieldConnex Branded) Fieldbus Power
Supply (Manufactured March, 2004 or later)
Relcom, Inc.
Relcom FPS-I, 2 Redundant Fieldbus Power Supply
Relcom FPS-DT, D Dual Fieldbus Power Supply
Hawke International
Hawke Routemaster Series 100 with RM114/118 Device Couplers Fieldbus IS
Power Supply. Refer to Knowledge Base Article #NA-0300-0050 for application
specific information.
Measurement Technology Limited
MTL9121-IS-PS Fieldbus FISCO IS Power Supply
MTL9122-IS-PS Fieldbus FISCO IS Power Supply
MTL9111-NI-PS Fieldbus FNICO NI Power Supply
MTL9112-NI-PS Fieldbus FNICO NI Power Supply

Fieldbus Third Party Products

103

Spur Adapters and Surge Protectors


Measurement Technology Limited
9321-SC Fieldbus IS Entity Adapter (9121-IS use only). See
Application_MTL_IS.
9322-SC Fieldbus IS EExia Spur Adapter. See Application_MTL_IS.
9323-SC Fieldbus IS Entity Adapter (9121/22-IS use only). See
Application_MTL_IS.
FP32 Fieldbus Surge Protector (Rail Mount). See Application Note TAN1010.
TP32* Fieldbus Surge Protector (Threaded). See Application Note TAN1010.
TP32*-NDI Fieldbus Surge Protector (Threaded). IS See Application Note
TAN1010.

Fieldbus Terminators
Measurement Technology Limited
FBT-1 Fieldbus Terminator
FBT1-IS Fieldbus IS Terminator
Relcom, Inc.
FCS-MBT Fieldbus Terminator with Surge Protection
Turk/InterlinkBT
RSEV 49 TR Eurofast Fieldbus Terminator
RSV 49 TR Minifast Fieldbus Terminator
Pepperl+Fuchs
F*-FT-Ex1.D.IEC Threaded Fieldbus Terminator
F*-FT-Ex1.I.IEC Threaded Fieldbus IS Terminator

Fieldbus Segment Protectors and Field Barriers


Relcom, Inc.
FCS-MB* 2, 4, 8, 10 device Megablock
FCS-MB*-SG 2, 4, 8, 10 device Megablock with device short circuit protection
F240*-F261* 2, 4, 8, 10 device IS Megablock with and without short circuit
protection

104

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Pepperl+Fuchs
F2-JBSC-*.FF.* 4,6,8 spur with connectors and device short circuit protection
F2-JBSC-* 4,6,8 spur with cable glands and device short circuit protection
F6-JBSC-*.FF.* 4,6,8 spur with connectors and device short circuit protection
F6-JBSC-* 4,6,8 spur with cable glands and device short circuit protection
R-JBSC-* 4,6,8 spur DIN rail mounted with device short circuit protection
R-SP-N12 12 spur DIN rail mounted with device short circuit protection
For the Segment Protectors and Field Barriers, the trunk and spur shields (T-S) must
be jumpered together and isolated (remove jumpers) from case ground.
F2D0-FB-Ex4* FieldConnex FISCO/Entity IS FieldBarrier 4 device IS
barrier with short circuit protection.
F6D0-FB-Ex4* FieldConnex FISCO/Entity IS FieldBarrier, SST 4 device IS
barrier with short circuit protection
RD0-FB-Ex4* FieldConnex FISCO/Entity IS FieldBarrier (DIN rail mounted)
4 device IS barrier with short circuit protection
The IS field barriers must have a manufacture date of June, 2003 or later.
The segment must be powered by either a Relcom or Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power
Supply listed above or a Pepperl+Fuchs KLD2-PC-1.1 IEC Rev 2 FieldConnex
Power Conditioner (manufactured June, 2004 or later). Refer to Knowledge Base
Article # NA-0300-0048 for application specific information.
Turk/InterlinkBT
JBBS-49-E413,613,813 Eurofast 4, 6, 8 Device Junction Block (no short
circuit protection)
JBBS-49-M413,613,813 Minifast 4, 6, 8 Device Junction Block (no short
circuit protection)
JBBS-49SC-E413,613,813 Eurofast 4, 6, 8 Device Junction Block (with device
short circuit protection; manufactured Nov. 2004 or later)
JBBS-49SC-M413,613,813 Minifast 4, 6, 8 Device Junction Block (with device
short circuit protection; manufactured Nov. 2004 or later)

Fieldbus Repeaters
SMAR
RP302

Fieldbus Third Party Products

105

106

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

References
IEC 61158-2; 2003, Fieldbus Standard for Use in Industrial Control Systems Part 2:
Physical Layer Specification and Service Definition
ISA-S50.02-1992, Fieldbus Standard for Use in Industrial Control Systems Part 2:
Physical Layer Specification and Service Definition
DS50.02 Part 2 [Draft Standard] 1995, Fieldbus Standard for Use in Industrial
Control Systems Part 2: Physical Layer Specification and Service Definition,
Amendment to Clause 22 (Formerly Clause 11 and Clause 24), This document has
been re-released in 1996 as Draft 2.

References

107

108

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Digital Automation System

Index

A
About This Manual vii
AC waveform
measuring 65
Alarm contacts
on the Fieldbus Power Hub 41
Applications
FISCO 15
high availability 15, 37
Intrinsically Safe 15, 56
Intrinsically Safe with MTL power supply
71
IS 15, 56
NI 16, 61
Non-Incendive 16, 61
B
Blocks
resource and transducer 96
C
Cable
grounding and shielding 22
lengths 19
specifications for fieldbus Type A 19
types 17
Capacitance
measuring 64
Checkout procedure 63
Chicken-foot
See Topologies
Commissioning fieldbus devices 99
troubleshooting 99
Communication statistics
for fieldbus devices 94
for H1 card ports 93
Components
fieldbus power supply 15
H1 card, See also Redundant Series 2 H1

card 13
primary link master 13
spur adapters 71
terminators 16
wiring 16
Contacts
alarm 41
Control strategy
designing 21
Conventions
caution ix
note ix
procedures ix
warning ix
D
Daisy chain
See Topologies
DC power 20
high availability applications using the
Fieldbus Power Hub 42
high availability applications using the
Fieldbus Power System 31
Intrinsically Safe applications using the
Fieldbus Power Hub 51
Non-Incendive applications using the
Fieldbus Power Hub 57
DeltaV Diagnostics
troubleshooting with 92
viewing H1 port status values with 92
DeltaV Explorer
troubleshooting with 91
Device errors
troubleshooting 96
Devices
See fieldbus devices
Diagnostic Module 39
F
FBPS-1.23.500 isolated power supply module
Index-1

specifications 59
FBPS-1.500 isolated power supply module
specifications 39
Field Barrier 51, 55
installing 55
Fieldbus devices
commissioning 99
communication statistics for 94
geographic distribution of 21
master restart for 100
number supported on a segment 15
power cycling 100
power requirements for 15
troubleshooting errors with 96
Fieldbus Diagnostic Module 39
Fieldbus H1 card
See H1 card
Fieldbus Motherboard - MB-FB-4R 39
Fieldbus Power Hub
for high availability applications 39
for IS applications 51
for NI applications 57
installing 46
specifications 39
Fieldbus power supply 15
See Power supply, Fieldbus Power Hub,
Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power
Hub, Fieldbus Power System, Relcom Fieldbus Power System
Fieldbus Power System 27
for high availability applications 27
installing 35
specifications 27
Fieldbus segment
checkout procedure for 63
measuring AC waveform on 65
measuring capacitance on 64
measuring DC voltage on 65
Index-2

measuring resistance on 64
planning criteria for 21
troubleshooting 89
Fieldbus technology
interoperability 12
overview 11
Fieldbus Type A cable 18
specifications for 19
FieldConnex FieldBarrier 51
FieldConnex Segment Protector 44, 57
FISCO 15, 51
FNICO 79
G
Ground connections 22
H
H1 card
port status values 92
redundant 13
See also Series 2 H1 card and Redundant
Series 2 H1 card 13
Series 2 redundant 13
troubleshooting 90, 97
H1 card ports
communication statistics 93
communication status values 92
enabling 97
High availability applications
DC power for 31
example using Fieldbus Power Hub 49
example using Fieldbus Power System 38
installing segment protector and power
supply 31
I
Installing
field barrier 55
Fieldbus Power Hub 46
Fieldbus Power System 35
fieldbus segment 23
Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Automation System

Megablocks 36
MTL9111-NI power supplies 82
MTL9112-NI power supplies 82
MTL9121 and 9122 IS power supplies 74
Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub 46
redundant power supplies 35
Relcom Fieldbus Power System 35
segment protector 47
terminators 26
Interoperability 12
Intrinsically Safe applications 51
DC power for 51
example of 56
installing field barrier and power supply 54
Intrinsically Safe applications with MTL power supply 71
L
LAS 12
Link Active Scheduler
See LAS
Link master 13
M
Master restart 100
Megablock
installing 36
MTL Fieldbus Entity Spur Adapter 71
MTL Fieldbus IS EExia Spur Adapter 71
MTL Intrinsically Safe power supplies
installing 74
MTL9111-NI power supply
installing 82
MTL9112-NI power supply
installing 82
MTL9121 IS power supply
installing 74
MTL9122 IS power supply 74
N
Non-Incendive applications 57

DC power for 57
example of 61
installing power supply and segment protector 59
Non-Incendive applications with MTL power
supply 82
P
Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Diagnostic Module 39
Pepperl+Fuchs Fieldbus Power Hub 39
Pepperl+Fuchs FieldConnex FieldBarrier 51
Pepperl+Fuchs FieldConnex Segment Protector 57
Point-to-point
See Topologies
Power supply 15
Fieldbus Power Hub 39
Fieldbus Power System 27
installing Fieldbus Power Hub 46
installing Fieldbus Power System 35
installing MTL9111-NI 82
installing MTL9112-NI 82
installing MTL9121 and 9122 IS 74
Primary Link Master 12
R
Redundant Fieldbus Power System
about 27
specifications 27
Redundant H1 card 13
Redundant power 15
using in high availability applications 48
using in Intrinsically Safe applications 56
using in Non-Incendive applications 61
Redundant Series 2 H1 card
figure showing 38
using in high availability applications 38
using in Intrinsically Safe applications 56
using in Non-Incendive applications 61
Relcom Megablock 33
Index-3

Relcom Redundant Fieldbus Power System


about 27
Resistance
measuring 64
Resource blocks 96
troubleshooting 100
S
Segment errors
troubleshooting 96
Segment Protector 44, 57
installing 47
Series 2 H1 card
redundant 13
See also Redundant Series 2 H1 card 13
simplex 13
Short circuit protection 27, 44
designing an application for 34
Pepperl+Fuchs Segment Protector 44
Relcom Megablock 33
Specifications
FBPS-1.23.500 isolated power supply
module 59
FBPS-1.500 isolated power supply module
specifications 39
redundant Fieldbus Power System 27
Spur adapters
recommendations for using 71
Spur lengths 20
T
Terminator switches
MTL9111-NI power supply 84
MTL9112-NI power supply 84
Terminators 16
determining types to use 26
installing 26
Relcom FCS-MBT 33
Topologies 17
Transducer blocks 96
Index-4

troubleshooting 100
Tree
See Topologies
Troubleshooting
device commissioning 99
device error 96
fieldbus segment 89
H1 card 90
resource and transducer blocks 100
segment errors 96
with DeltaV Diagnostics 92
with DeltaV Explorer 91
Trunk with spurs
See Topologies
V
Voltage
measuring 65
W
Wiring components 16

Fieldbus Installations in a DeltaV Automation System