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ChE n372 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Summer 2013

CPE 2.218, T 8:00-10:00am Discussion W 4-5:30pm

Instructor: TA:
Professor Lealon L. Martin Chetan Mahajan
CPE 2.708, 471-3263 CPE 3.472
llmartin@che.utexas.edu cmahajan@che.utexas.edu
Office Hrs: TBD Office Hrs: M 9-11 am

Unique Number:

Text: J.B. Rawlings and J.G. Ekerdt, Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design
Fundamentals, (2012) Nob Hill Publishing, 2012; ISBN 0-615-11884-4.
(see also http://jbrwww.che.wisc.edu/home/jbraw/chemreacfun/ for additional info)

Course Assignments and Announcements: All materials will be posted on Blackboard

Discussion Section: The teaching assistants will come prepared to present an example
problem or lead a discussion on a topic that is of current relevance to the course. They
will also be able to answer any major questions you have from lecture or homework.

Course Objectives: Derive and apply the energy and material balances that are required
to design isothermal and nonisothermal batch, plug flow and continuous stirred tank
reactors. You will learn how to approach and solve variable density and multiple
independent reaction problems. Learn how to tune reaction conditions to maximize
selectivity towards desired products. Understand fundamentals of reaction stoichiometry,
reaction analysis, and simple kinetic analysis of homogeneous and heterogeneously
catalyzed reactions. This course also addresses mixing and covers simple nonideal
reactor models.

Teaching Approach: Chemical reaction analysis and reactor design are unique to
chemical engineering. There are relatively few concepts and design equations that are
needed to describe most situations at the undergraduate level. However, there are many
different reactors and reactor situations. This course starts with a rigorous mathematical
development of the defining design equations and then this set of equations is used to
solve problems in the different reactors and reactor situations. The course strives to show
how the simple and complex problems are solved with the same set of equations and how
the concepts learned on one system are directly applicable to other systems. During this
semester you will need to solve many of the complex (and some of the simple) problems
using MATLAB/POLYMATH. Through the homework exercises you will apply the
concepts presented in the lectures and in the text, and should recognize that problems you
will encounter in the future may be more time consuming to solve, but that they will not
be any more difficult conceptually.

Knowledge, Abilities, and Skills Students Should Have Entering this Course:

1. This course has the following prerequisites: ChE 322, 348 and 354 with a grade of at
least C.

2. A comprehensive knowledge of transport phenomena is essential. This course relies


on shell balances and the constituent equations to develop the material and energy
balances for the various reactors, and to develop the balances in heterogeneous catalysts
that account for diffusion with reaction. Transport phenomena concepts are used to
appreciate the consequences of turbulent flow on velocity, temperature and concentration
profiles that form the basis of the one-dimensional models. (ChE 353)

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ChE n372 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Summer 2013
CPE 2.218, T 8:00-10:00am Discussion W 4-5:30pm

3. Knowledge of heat transfer processes is needed for nonisothermal reactors. (ChE 353
and ChE 354)

4. Understanding of reaction equilibria and heat of reaction is required. (ChE 322)

5. The students need to be able to solve linear differential equations. (M427K)

6. The students need to know matrix multiplication. (ChE 348)

7. The students need to know how to solve ODEs using explicit numerical methods and
to have a working knowledge of how these methods work. (ChE 348)

8. The students need to know how to solve sets of linear and nonlinear algebraic
equations using numerical methods. (ChE 348).

9. The students need an appreciation of numerical optimization procedures. (ChE 348)


10. The students need to have a working knowledge of MATLAB/POLYMATH
numerical software that operates on the Department Learning Resource Center
computers. (ChE 210 and ChE 348)

Knowledge, Abilities, and Skills Students Should Gain from this Course:

1. Ability to derive and apply the energy and material balances that are required to
design isothermal and nonisothermal batch, plug flow, fixed-bed and continuous stirred
tank reactors.

2. Ability to solve problems of variable density and multiple independent reactions.

3. Ability to solve problems of mass transfer with reaction in heterogeneous catalysts.

4. Ability to solve problems incorporating simple, one-parameter nonideal reactor


modeling.

5. Knowledge of chemical reaction analysis concepts and chemical kinetics concepts.

Chemical Engineering Program Outcomes Achieved:

1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, chemistry, physics, computing, safety,


and engineering.

2. An ability to design, analyze, interpret, and report on experiments relevant to chemical


engineering practice.

3. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for the
practice of chemical engineering.

4. An ability to apply and integrate the major elements of chemical engineering to solve
problems of analysis, design, optimization, and control of components, systems, and
processes important in chemical engineering practice.

Attendance: There is a direct correlation between developing an understanding of the

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ChE n372 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Summer 2013
CPE 2.218, T 8:00-10:00am Discussion W 4-5:30pm

course material and participating in the lectures and discussion sections. You decide why
you are enrolled in the chemical engineering program. Regular attendance in classes is
essential for high standards of academic and professional achievement. It is the policy of
this department that each student should attend every class meeting unless valid reasons
prevent doing so. I expect you to attend the lectures and I expect you to prepare for the
lectures by reading the assigned material.

Grading Procedure:
You may select one of two grading schemes [choice should be indicated in writing on the
last day of class]:

Scheme A Scheme B
Best 5 of 6 Quizzes 25% Best of 5 of 6 Quizzes 25%
Computational Project 15% Computational Project 15%
Exams (2) 60% Exams (Best of 2) 40%
Final Exam 0% Final Exam 20%

1. Midterm Exams: Two 180-minute exams will be given during the semester in the
evening. The exams are closed book. Any needed equations and integrals will be
provided. No graphing / programmable calculators will be allowed, only basic
scientific calculators. Be sure it has exponential and logarithmic functions and you
know how to use them. If you need to miss an exam due to an interview, etc., it is
advantageous to use Scheme B. However, there is incentive to taking all three exams as
you can use your best two in Scheme B with your final exam grade, but there is not a
significant penalty if you need to miss an exam due to an interview / conflict. NO
MAKE-UP EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN! If you must miss more than one exam, please
see the Deans Office (ECJ 2.200) regarding dropping the course. You can bring exam
grading questions to the TA or Dr. Martin. We will not consider a regrade of your exam
if it is more than 48 hours past the time that you received it graded. Also, graded exams
submitted for review will be regraded in their entirety.

2. Quizzes: 6 short quizzes will be given that cover recent homework or lecture material.
The average of your 5 best quizzes will count for 25 % of the grade. NO MAKE-UP
QUIZZES WILL BE GIVEN. You can bring quiz grading questions to the TA or Dr.
Martin. We will not consider a regrade of your quiz if it is more than one week past the
time that you received it graded.

3. Final Exam: The final exam is comprehensive and counts 20 % of the grade if you
select Scheme B. You can bring final exam grading questions to the TA or Dr. Martin.
We will not consider a regrade of your final exam if it is more than 48 hours past the date
of the final exam.

4. Final project: The purpose of this mini-project is to provide an opportunity for you to
apply multiple concepts learned in ChE n372 in a reactor design simulation. This
computation project will count for 15% of your course grade. Final project deliverables
must be uploaded to BB by Friday July 19, 2013 by 10 a.m.

5. Final grades will be determined according to Scheme A or Scheme B. Please note that
Scheme A is the default scheme for computing final grades. Scheme B will be applied by
written request via email only. Requests must be made no later than the last official class
day, Monday July 29, 2013 by 10 a.m.

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ChE n372 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Summer 2013
CPE 2.218, T 8:00-10:00am Discussion W 4-5:30pm

Exam Schedule: The 180-minute exams will be given by this schedule:


1. Exam 1 Tuesday June 25th, 7-10 pm CPE 2.220
2. Exam 2 Tuesday July 23rd, 7-10 pm CPE 2.220
3. Final Exam Thursday August 1, 2-5 pm; location dictated by Registrar

The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic


accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. For more information contact
the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

Scholastic Dishonesty: The official University policies can be found at


http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/scholdis.php. Any form of academic dishonesty will
be taken very seriously and will not be tolerated.

Course Outline:
Topic Reading
1 Introduction Chap 1
2 Reaction Stoichiometry Chap 2
4 Batch Reactor Chap 4, Sec 4.1, 4.2
5 Reaction Rate Expressions Chap 4, Sec 4.2
6 CSTR Chap 4, Sec 4.3- 4.5
7 Plug Flow Reactor Chap 4, Sec 4.6
8 Multiple Reactions Chap 4, Sec 4.6.6
9 Comparison of CSTR and PRF performance Chap 4, Sec 4.7
10 Elementary Reactions and Reaction Kinetics Chap 5, Sec 5.1-5.5
11 Data Modeling and Analysis Chap 9, Sec 9.2
12 Introduction to Catalysis Chap 7, Sec 7.1, 7.2
13 Heterogeneous Reaction Kinetics Chap 5, Sec 5.6
14 Diffusion in Porous Catalysts Chap 7, Sec 7.2
15 Transport with Reaction in Permeable Catalysts Chap 7, Sec 7.3-7.6
16 Fixed Bed Reactors Chap 7, Sec 7.7
17 Nonisothermal Batch Reactor Chap 6, Sec 6.1, 6.2
18 Nonisothermal CSTR Chap 6, Sec 6.3
19 Nonisothermal PFR Chap 6, Sec 6.5
20 Nonideal Reactor Modeling Chap 8, Sec 8.3
21 Particulate Reactor Design Chap 10, sections TBD

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