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University Physics Volume 2

Senior Contributing Authors

Samuel J. Ling, Truman State University Jeff Sanny, Loyola Marymount University Bill Moebs, PhD

Contributing Authors Samuel J. Ling, Truman State University Jeff Sanny, Loyola Marymount University Bill Moebs, PhD

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Table of Contents

. Unit 1. Thermodynamics

Preface .

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Chapter 1: Temperature and Heat .

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1.1 Temperature and Thermal Equilibrium

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1.2 Thermometers and Temperature Scales

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1.3 Thermal Expansion

 

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1.4 Heat Transfer, Specific Heat, and Calorimetry

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1.5 Phase Changes

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1.6 Mechanisms of Heat Transfer

 

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Chapter 2: The Kinetic Theory of Gases

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2.1 Molecular Model of an Ideal Gas

 

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2.2 Pressure, Temperature, and RMS Speed

 

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2.3 Heat Capacity and Equipartition of Energy

 

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2.4 Distribution of Molecular Speeds

 

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Chapter 3: The First Law of Thermodynamics .

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3.1 Thermodynamic Systems

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3.2 Work, Heat, and Internal Energy

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3.3 First Law of Thermodynamics .

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3.4 Thermodynamic Processes

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3.5 Heat Capacities of an Ideal Gas

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3.6 Adiabatic Processes for an Ideal Gas .

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Chapter 4: The Second Law of Thermodynamics

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4.1 Reversible and Irreversible Processes

 

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4.2 Heat Engines

 

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4.3 Refrigerators and Heat Pumps

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4.4 Statements of the Second Law of Thermodynamics

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4.5 The Carnot Cycle

 

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4.6 Entropy

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4.7 Entropy on a Microscopic Scale .

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Unit 2. Electricity and Magnetism

 

Chapter 5: Electric Charges and Fields

 

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5.1 Electric Charge

 

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5.2 Conductors, Insulators, and Charging by Induction .

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5.3 Coulomb's Law

 

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5.4 Electric Field

 

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5.5 Calculating Electric Fields of Charge Distributions

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5.6 Electric Field Lines

 

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. 215

5.7 Electric Dipoles

 

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Chapter 6: Gauss's Law

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6.1 Electric Flux

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. 238

6.2 Explaining Gauss’s Law .

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6.3 Applying Gauss’s Law

 

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6.4 Conductors in Electrostatic Equilibrium

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Chapter 7: Electric Potential

 

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7.1 Electric Potential Energy

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7.2 Electric Potential and Potential Difference

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7.3 Calculations of Electric Potential

 

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7.4 Determining Field from Potential

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7.5 Equipotential Surfaces and Conductors .

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7.6 Applications of Electrostatics

 

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Chapter 8: Capacitance

 

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8.1 Capacitors and Capacitance

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8.2 Capacitors in Series and in Parallel .

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8.3 Energy Stored in a Capacitor

 

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8.4 Capacitor with a Dielectric .

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8.5 Molecular Model of a Dielectric

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Chapter 9: Current and Resistance .

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9.1 Electrical Current

 

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9.2 Model of Conduction in Metals

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9.3 Resistivity and Resistance

 

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