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SUSTAINABILITY

& EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT


The State of The Art
By John Davies
VP Senior Analyst, GreenBiz
September 2014
Finding Common Ground with HR language of sustainability (or corporate social asking questions about “environmental and
Sustainability professionals usually think of their responsibility, corporate citizenship, environmental sustainability training” as if it exists in a vacuum
challenges in terms of the physical or fiscal stewardship, or any number of other names we call divorced from social issues.
impact of their efforts, the results measured our programs) continues to change. As terms
in tons of CO2 or dollars saved. But the most change, it becomes more difficult to conduct a What We Talk About
meaningful longitudinal survey.
When We Talk with HR
vexing challenge for the emergent sustainability
When it comes to working with the human
profession may well be its use of language. In For example, we added a new question to our
resources group (HR) at a company, there are
the past we’ve noted that the most apt title for latest survey. We asked whether environmental
significant issues around the use of language
the sustainability executive is Chief Translation and social issues have become more connected
that sustainability executives should understand.
Officer. Nothing has reinforced this more than than five years ago and also whether they
Take “employee engagement.” Sustainability
conducting the third edition of our employee will be more connected in the next five years.
professionals use this term frequently to
engagement survey (previous surveys were Eighty-seven percent of respondents from
describe their attempts to motivate a company’s
conducted in 2008 and 2011). large companies said they have become
employees and further the sustainability or CSR
As researchers, we like to follow trends over more connected and 94 percent said these
program. But HR executives already have a
time, asking the same questions in exactly issues would become even more connected
definition for the term and a way to measure it.
the same words, year over year. But the in the future. That makes it difficult to keep

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CSR professional who noted that he ran into saw in our recent research was how those who
resistance when he met with HR to talk about viewed their programs as “advanced” placed
how to improve employee engagement efforts much more emphasis on activities such as
at the firm. After several frustrating encounters, “harnessing sustainability as a foundation for
he changed the conversation to talk about how innovation, new products, and new markets” than
they could increase the participation numbers those who identified as “beginners” (63 percent
in the company’s sustainability programs. to 37 percent respectively). A slightly smaller
Reframing the language and understanding how but still significant gap exists when it comes to
HR used certain terms broke down the barriers providing job-specific sustainability information
that had prevented them from working together (45 percent to 28 percent respectively).
effectively. When the conversation comes As sustainability programs evolve and companies
around to engaging employees, they now talk make greater commitments, they will need to
about “participation rates.” shift from general education to more formalized
training, and the HR team are best suited to
From Education to Training
support those efforts.
Another potential language gap happens when
HR sees engagement as the employee’s sustainability and HR professionals discuss how Partnering with HR
willingness to apply discretionary effort toward to enlist employees in furthering the sustainability One of the more disconcerting results from our
meeting the company’s goals, to do more than mission. In our research, almost three-fourths survey is the lack of involvement of the HR group
merely meet job requirements and customer of respondents (73 percent) indicate that their in a large majority of corporate sustainability
needs. It is typically measured via an index company is educating employees across the efforts. When we asked which department was
approach using employee answers to survey organization about its corporate sustainability primarily responsible for employee sustainability
questions, such as whether an employee would goals. And yet, in a recent study by The education, only 1 percent of large and mid-
recommend the company as a great place Conference Board, only 5 percent of the S&P
to work or how proud they are to work at the 500 have instituted employee CSR training.
company. This disconnect offers another opportunity to
“According to The Conference
Many who work in the sustainability profession sit down with HR — in this case, to discuss the
measure engagement by employee activity in differences between “education” and “training,” Board, only 5% of the S&P 500
extracurricular programs, with the hope that and where the company should focus its efforts. do employee CSR training.”
this participation has an effect, either causal Education tends to refer to broader and more
or correlative, on the larger measurement of general learning activities whereas training is
employee engagement. We interviewed one more skills based. One of the differences we

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sized companies said that HR was leading the Employee Engagement Survey Results
efforts. The same percentage held when we
The GreenBiz Group Employee Engagement survey, conducted in March 2014, examines aspects
asked which department championed corporate
of corporate environmental and sustainability education initiatives at companies at varying stages
sustainability education efforts.
of program development. This survey builds on the GreenBiz Group and National Environmental
Failing to partner with HR for sustainability Education Foundation (NEEF) 2008 and 2011 survey findings featured in “The Engaged Organization”
education and training or to increase and “Toward Engagement 2.0” and provides a quantitative understanding of the evolution of employee
participation in other aspects of a well-rounded engagement.
sustainability program is a missed opportunity.
Finding a common language to discuss how to What’s New and Interesting Since the Last Survey
fix this is imperative. Wharton finance professor
• “Sustainability” remains the established phrase to describe a company’s environmental
Alex Edmans evaluated the stock performance
sustainability initiatives. “Greening” for many years was the second-most-used term but is
of organizations named to Fortune’s “Best
now almost the least used to describe these initiatives.
Companies to Work For.” He determined that
• Social and environmental activities converge. As companies begin to address more
companies making the list from 1984 to 2009
complex supply-chain issues, those surveyed see environmental and social issues becoming
outperformed peers by 2 to 3 percent per year.
more connected.
Other research by the Corporate Executive Board
• Has sustainability knowledge become less important or have we “arrived”? In large
found that employees most committed to their companies, those surveyed see less of an increase in the value placed on a job candidate’s
organizations put in 57 percent more effort on sustainability knowledge than in years past, while mid-sized and small companies still see this
the job — and are 87 percent less likely to resign as increasing.
— than employees who consider themselves • Organizations with “advanced” programs are focused on operationalizing their initiatives.
disengaged. Greening the supply chain and harnessing sustainability as a foundation for innovation, new
products, and new markets are seen as competitive differentiators.
Sustainability is only one of many topics identified
by HR professionals as important for employee • Education methods focus on personal interaction. In 2008, consultants and online training
attraction and retention. It sits lower on the modules led the way. This year, more organizations are focusing on green teams and employee
networks.
list than compensation, healthcare, and other
benefits. That means it’s up to the sustainability • The biggest hurdles cited by beginners are the key factors for an advanced program’s
professional to work with HR on their terms success. Beginners cited executive commitment, education, and communications as the
biggest hurdles to moving their sustainability programs forward, while those with more
and let them help measure participation in the
advanced programs cited those very same factors as key to their success.
company’s sustainability program and connect the
dots to improving overall employee engagement.
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Participant Overview but some areas still need improvement) or very
The GreenBiz Employee Engagement survey advanced (high level of employee awareness “Half of surveyed companies
participants were recruited from the GreenBiz that supports aligned values, strategy and opera- considered their employee
Group’s GreenBuzz mailing list, which has a tions). The largest group of respondents (44 per-
engagement programs to
broad audience. Participants represent a diverse cent) consider themselves to be improving, with
range of industry sectors. There were 1,334 sur- some level of employee awareness but still a be either advanced or very
vey respondents, with approximately 34 percent need to change company culture and employee advanced.”
from small companies (fewer than 99 employ- behavior. Only 6 percent identified themselves
ees), 40 percent from medium-size companies as “taking first steps.” The smaller company respondents were more
(100 to 9,999 employees) and 26 percent from Breaking this down further provides some in- frequently located in marketing and sales or
large companies (more than 10,000 employees). sight into both the GreenBiz audience and how “other” functions, while respondents from large
The results represent a purposeful sample of they view their company’s efforts. Respondents and medium-size companies primarily were
those interested in business and environmental from three times as many small companies view located in marketing and sales, environment,
issues. Respondents were a mix of mainstream, their programs as very advanced compared to health and safety (EHS), facilities, corporate
environmentally progressive large companies those from either mid-size or large companies. social responsibility (CSR) and “other” functions
and smaller, self-identified “green” companies. More than half of those mid-size and large com- (see Chart 2).
panies view their programs as “improving” There are two significant shifts in terms of the
In a self-assessment of their programs, 50 per-
while only 26 percent of respondents from small departments where respondents reported. In
cent considered themselves either advanced
companies saw their organizations in that way. 2014, respondents located in the EHS department
(high employee awareness and engagement,
(see Chart 1).

2014 Sustainability EducationEducation


Program Program
Level (Chart Company Respondents’ Department (Chart 2)
2014 Sustainability
Small Medium
Level1)
Large Medium
Company
Large
Respondents’ Department
Small
540=
530=

53% 54% 38% 37%

760=
33%

740=
660=
340=

340=

25%
320=

34% 34%
290=

21%
500=

32%
260=

29%
420=

26% 16% 15%


14%
12%
320=

11% 11%
300=
280=

9% 8% 9%
240=

7% 7%
220=

220=
5% 4% 5%
100=
100=

180=

180=
160=
80=

140=

140=

1% 2%
60=

10% 10% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 1% 1% 1% 1%
100=

100=
80=
40=

6% 8%

40=
20=
20=
20=

20=
20=

20=
20=
20=
4%

0=
0=
Marketing and Communications Corporate Environment, Facilities/ Human Legal Procurement Public Affairs Other
Very advanced Advanced Improving Taking first steps Sales Social Health and Operations Resources (please specify)
Responsibility Safety
5
Small Medium Large
Company Respondents’ Title
Company Respondents’ Title
(Chart 3)
this year. A more precipitous drop has occurred
for “greening,” which dropped from 15 percent
Small Medium Large
to just 2 percent.
41%
We began to track another trend this year: the
33%

410=
32%
28%25% convergence of social and environmental issues.
330=

320=

280=
18% 17% 18% 19%

250=
15% We asked to what extent environmental and

190=
180=
180=
8% 9% 7%

170=
8% 6%

150=
social issues are being linked, compared to five
2% 0% 4% 2% 4% 3%

90=
80=

80=
70=
60= years ago and in the next five years. In a trend we
40=

40=
30=
20=

20=
0=

President, Vice President Director Officer Manager Staff Other have noted in other research, environmental and
Owner, CEO (please specify) social issues are becoming more intertwined,
regardless of the size of company (see Chart 5).
Small Medium Large
decreased from 21 percent in medium sized identifying that term, up from 49 percent in Is There Value in Knowledge?
companies and 22 percent in large companies 2011 and 34 percent in 2008 (see Chart 4). In our past two reports, we’ve highlighted
to 16 percent and 15 percent, respectively. While most other terms have held their own the fact that close to 50 percent or more of
Conversely, in 2011, 10 percent of respondents in in the single digits, two terms have lost their companies (depending upon their size) place
medium-sized company and 14 percent in large cachet in describing corporate sustainability at least some or a great deal of value on a job
company were based in the CSR department, efforts. One is the term “environmental, health candidate’s sustainability knowledge. That may
whereas by 2014 those numbers increased to and safety,” which has fallen from 8 percent of have reflected more of a desire to see the glass
14 percent and 21 percent, respectively. respondents citing it in 2008 to just 4 percent

Respondents from small companies were most


likely to be the president, owner, or CEO, while Company
Company Termterm to “Environmental”
to Describe describe “environmental” (Chart 4)
large and midsized company respondents were 49% 51%
and “sustainability”
and “Sustainability” Activities activities
1,00=
980=

managers, directors, or staff (see Chart 3).


Small Medium Large
34%
The Name of the Game
680=

As in years past we asked respondents to tell


us the term used at their company to describe 15%
12%

300=
“sustainability” activities. Over the course 10% 10%
8% 8% 6% 8% 6% 6% 4% 4% 5% 8% 7% 4% 8%
240=

7%
200=

200=

5% 5% 5%
160=

160=
160=

160=

160=
1% 2% 3% 2% 2% 3% 2%
140=

140=
of the last six years, the term “sustainability” 2% 1%
120=

120=
120=
100=
100=

100=

100=
80=
80=

80=

60=

60=
40=

40=
40=
40=
40=
20=

20=
has become the standard for describing these
Sustainability Corporate Social Sustainable Triple Bottom Environmental Corporate Environmental Sustainable Greening Corporate Corporate
activities, with just over half (51 percent) Responsibility Development Line Stewardship Responsibility Health and Growth Citizenship Environmental
(CR) Safety Responsibility
(CER) 6
Small Medium Large
How Much Value Does Your Company Place On Job (Chart 6)
Candidates’ Sustainability
How much value doesKnowledge?
your company place on job
Social & Environmental Converge (Chart 5)
Social & Environmental Converge Small candidates’
Medium sustainability
Large knowledge?

520=
114=
113=

113=
52%
90=

88=

87=
93% 93% 94%

380=
90% 88% 87%

360=
340=
38% 36%

300=

300=
34%
30% 30%

220=
Small Medium Large
22%

160=
140=
130=
16%

110=
Environmental and social issues have become more connected than 5 years ago 13% 14%
Environmental and social
and socialissues
issues willhave become more
the nextconnected than 5 years ago 11%

40=
Environmental be more connected in 5 years
4%
Environmental and social issues will be more connected in the next 5 years
A great deal Some Very little None

half full, and it certainly is with small companies, where 52 percent place in Chart 1, only 10 percent of respondents from large companies view
Small Medium Large
a great deal of value in a candidate’s sustainability knowledge (see Chart 6) their programs as very advanced, a drop from 17 percent in 2008. The

When it comes to larger organizations, though, the glass is more than half percentage of those in large companies who see their programs as

empty: 52 percent of mid-sized and large firms place very little or no value improving rose from 45 percent in 2008 to 54 percent in 2014.

in a job candidate’s sustainability knowledge. Looking at the next five years, For respondents from mid-sized companies, there is a similar change in
only 1 percent anticipates that the value of job candidates’ sustainability the percentage of those who saw their programs as improving in 2014
knowledge or interest will decrease as a hiring factor (see Chart 7). The (53 percent) than in 2008 (42 percent). But that change did not come as
number of small and mid-sized firms that anticipate that the value of
HowHow
Do YoudoAnticipate That the Value
you anticipate that oftheJobvalue
Candidates’
of jobSustainability
candidates’
sustainability knowledge will increase in the next five years has remained
Knowledge or Interest Will Change as a Hiring Factor in the Next Five Years?
relatively constant since 2008 at 78 percent and 63 percent, respectively. sustainability knowledge or interest will change as a hiring
(Chart 7)
The biggest shift has come in large organizations, where the number Small factor in the next five years?
Medium Large
of respondents anticipating the value to increase has dropped from 67
percent in 2008 to 59 percent in 2014. Conversely, the percentage of those 78%
63% 59%
156=
anticipating it staying the same rose from 32 percent in 2008 to 41 percent
41%
126=
118= 37%
in 2014. 21%

82=
74=
1% 1% 0%

42=
It is not clear if this marks a plateau in the value of sustainability knowledge
2=
2=
0=
at large companies based upon already achieved success, or a decrease in
the importance of sustainability knowledge as a hiring factor. As depicted It will increase It will decrease It will stay about the same
7

Small Medium Large


In both small and large companies, this number was as high as 80 percent.

(Chart 8) For those not communicating their sustainability efforts to their employees,
only 27 percent plan to do so in the future and more than half (55 percent)
Does your company educate employees across Does your company plan to start educating just aren’t sure.

��
the organization about its corporate employees about its sustainability goals

� Yes
73%
sustainability goals?

No
27% Yes
within the next two years?

No
18%
The size of a company definitely determines who the champion is for their
sustainability efforts. While 26 percent of respondents with advanced programs
cited the founder, CEO, or president as the champion, the majority of those (19
percent) came from small businesses (see Chart 9). In 2011, 32 percent cited
the senior executive. The two other big champions for those with advanced
27% programs were the CSR department (18 percent, up from 11 percent in 2011)

Not sure and the EHS group (13 percent, down from 14 percent in 2011).
55%
The story is different for those beginning their efforts. The CSR (24 percent)
and EHS (16 percent) groups are their biggest champions. A senior executive
the result of any change in those viewing themselves as very advanced (either the founder, CEO, or president) was identified by only 13 percent of
and in some ways benefitted from a decrease in those taking first steps respondents, more than half of who are from small companies.
from 13 percent in 2008 to 8 percent in 2014.

Anecdotally, we are often asked by both students and professionals What department has most championed the company’s
how to get a job in corporate sustainability. Our answer is that sustainability
What Department Has education
Most Championed efforts?
the Company’s (Chart 9)
candidates should scour a prospective employer’s web site and read
Sustainability Education Efforts?
the sustainability report (if there is one) to determine whether and how
much the company values sustainability. The applicant may not get that Small Advanced Medium Advanced Large Advanced
“sustainability” job, but at least he or she will know that they’re dealing
with a company that shares their values. They may also find out what 3%
+ =
+ 60

160+160+120=
parts of the company are most engaged in the sustainability agenda 4%
38080
6%
and find jobs there that connect to their passion. 19%
+ =
8%
+ 160
8%
Championing Corporate Sustainability Education
Companies may not be hiring employees as much based upon applicants’
+ 100+ = 5%

12020+ 20+ =
5%
100100
1%
5%

+ =
8%
60100
sustainability knowledge, but these institutions are interested in 1%
6% 3%

6060
educating employees across the organization about their corporate 5% 1% 1% 1%

40=
2020+0 =
2020+ =
0+2020+ =
3% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1%
sustainability goals. Almost three-fourths of respondents (73 percent) Founder, CEO CSR EHS Marketing and Individual Human Procurement Employee Internal Other
or President Sales champion Resources volunteer Communications (please specify)
indicated that their company was providing this education (see Chart 8).
8
Establishing the Program this has risen from 14 percent of respondents “The topics of employee
In some cases, the size of a company determines in 2011 to 22 percent in 2014, while in beginner
companies the increase has been from 19
sustainability education programs
which department is responsible for employee
sustainability education. For 22 percent of all percent to 28 percent. haven’t changed much in the past
advanced companies, this job rests with the CSR When it comes to the topics on which departments six years.”
department and for 12 percent of respondents focus for employee sustainability education
the job is located in the EHS department (see the organization’s sustainability program. For
programs, there hasn’t been much change over
Chart 10). When considering small companies, example, there is a 26 percentage point gap
the past six years. The top five have remained the
however, the responsible department could just between advanced and beginner companies
same (see Chart 11) and there’s been little change
as easily be marketing and sales (6 percent), when it comes to harnessing sustainability as
further down the list. For the most part, these
HR (6 percent), or communications (3 percent). a foundation for innovation, new products, and
topics are broad and somewhat general in nature.
Since 2011, there’s been one major change new markets. The gap is only slightly smaller for
Further down the list, however, there are
for both advanced and beginner companies. greening the supply chain and presenting job-
some very big gaps when it comes to topics
In both cases, the CSR department is most specific sustainability information.
prioritized by advanced companies versus
likely responsible for conducting employee Respondents at the advanced program level
beginners (see Chart 12). These topics tend to
sustainability education. In advanced companies use a variety of education methods. In 2008,
be less general and more about operationalizing

Which Department is PrimarilyisResponsible


Which department primarilyfor
responsible
(Chart 10)
for Top 5 Topics for Sustainability Education (Chart 11)

Employee Sustainability Education? Top 5 Topics forBeginner


Sustainability Education
employee sustainability education? Advanced
+ =
Small Advanced Medium Advanced Large Advanced 4%
80

770=
750=

750=
740=
77% 75%

720=
11% 74% 75%
300220

72%

670=
+ =

630=
67%

600=
8% 63%
+ 160

60%

520=
520=
52% 52%

15%
+
+ =

6%
160120

4%
+ 80

5%
60+6040+ =
12020+ 20+ =
+ =

1%
120=

8% 4% 2%
8080

3% 1%
60+2060

4020+ 20+ =

3% 6% 6%
4% 1% 1%
3% 3% 1%
2%
General information The company’s Actions at work to Environmental footprint Volunteer programs
CSR EHS Communications Facilities/Operations Human Relations Marketing I don’t know Other about sustainability sustainability successes conserve or protect of the company.
and Sales (please specify)
issues. and accomplishments. resources.

9
Advanced Beginner
Small Advanced Medium Advanced Large Advanced
Biggest Topic Gaps Between Advanced (Chart 12)
Biggest Topic Gaps Between Advanced Education Methods (Preferred by Advanced Programs)
and Beginning Programs (Chart 13)
and Beginning Programs
Advanced Beginner Education
2008 2011 Methods
2014 (preferred by advanced programs)
630=

3.66

590=

590=
63% 3.44 3.39 3.42 3.42 3.37 3.3 3.39 3.38 3.35 3.32 3.36 3.35 3.31 3.35
3.52
3.66 3.18
3.54

732=
59% 59% 3.18 3.13 3.23 3.13

708=
704=
688=

684=
684=
678=

678=
3.01 2.95

676=
674=

674=
672=
670=

670=

670=
2.94 2.97 2.78

664=

664=
662=
660=

646=
2.83

636=
2.72

626=

626=
2.69
470=

2.65

602=
2.61

594=
2.56

590=

588=
450=

566=

556=
554=
2.34 2.4

538=
47%

530=

522=
512=
45%

480=
468=
380=
370=

37%
350= 35%
38%

280=
28%
230=

23%

Internal Internal “green Employee Award and Community Partnership with Incentives Hiring a consultant Product design Online training Competition Employee
communications teams” networks recognition volunteer nonprofits guidelines modules among handbooks or
campaign (multiple programs programs departments, policy
Harnessing sustainability How the company is Sustainability attributes Greening the Job-specific media) facilities or documents
as a foundation for addressing climate of the company’s supply chain. sustainability business units
innovation, new p change. products and services. information
roducts, and new
markets. 2008 2011 2014
Advanced Beginner

respondents found online training modules to be In Your Opinion, What Motivates Employees to Engage in (Chart 14)
most effective, followed closely by hiring a consultant In your
Corporate opinion,activities
Sustainability what(Advanced)?
motivates employees to engage in
and competitions (see Chart 13). By 2014, those
showed the biggest drop-off in terms of preferred
2011 corporate
2014 sustainability activities (advanced)?
methods for educating employees. Two of the three
78% 76%
biggest gainers are based upon human interaction 72%69%
780=
760=

65%
720=

60%63%
690=
with internal green teams and employee networks 60%
650=

630=
600=

600=
50% 49% 51%
ranking highly alongside internal communications 46% 46% 46% 43%

510=
40% 41%

500=
41%

490=

460=

460=
460=
430=
31% 34%

410=

410=
400=
campaigns via multiple media.

340=
25%25%

310=
18%20%

250=
250=
For companies at the advanced program levels,

200=
180=
respondents report the most important factors
motivating employees to incorporate sustainability Concern for the
environment and
Evident CEO
support or
Sustainability goals
included in
Job
satisfaction
Improved company
reputation
Internal
peer champions
Success stories
about other
General Competition, either
sustainability within the company
Financial
rewards
Regulatory
requirement
Customer
loyalty
society mandate performance employees’ information or with direct
dimensions into their job are concern for the evaluation accomplishments related to competitors
corporate practices
environment and society, CEO support or mandate,

2011 2014

10
What Are the Biggest Internal Hurdles to Sustainability (Chart 15)
“Small, midsized and large companies
Education in the Company?
all cited a lack of time as a hurdle to WhatMedium
are the biggest internal hurdles to
Small Large
sustainability education in their company.” sustainability education in the company?

550=
55%

370=
350=
and job satisfaction (see Chart 14). Rated much higher than in 37%
35%

290=
2008 is the use of sustainability goals included in performance
29%

230=
evaluations, which increased 15 percentage points from 2008 to

200=

200=
23%

170=
160=
20% 20%

140=
2014. 16% 17%
14%

80=

80=
We asked respondents from beginner companies to share their 8% 8%
views as to the biggest hurdles to sustainability education in their
Executive Education & Budget, Resources & Time
company. Rather than provide a list to choose from, we asked Commitment Communication Competing Priorities
them to describe these hurdles in their own words. Small, mid-
Small Medium Large
sized, and large companies all cited a lack of time as a hurdle (23,
20, and 17 percent, respectively). Along with a need for increased
Top 3 Critical Factors to Have in Place for Success (Chart 16)
budget and resources, the two other common themes in their
replies were a lack of education and communication about the
Top 3 Small
Critical Factors
Medium
to haveLarge
in place for success
topic of sustainability, and a lack of executive commitment (see

530=
Chart 15).

520=
52% 53%

450=
Not surprisingly, when we asked those with more advanced
45%
programs to identify the top three critical factors that should be 360=

340=
36%

300=
in place for success, education, communication, and executive 34%

280=
270=
30% 28%
commitment rose to the top (see Chart 16). 27%

180=
18%

Executive Education & Strategy & Goals


Commitment Communication

Small Medium Large 11


ACKNOWLEDGMENT
GreenBiz Group would like to thank the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) and PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC)
for their support of this year’s Sustainability & Employee Engagement report.

We would also like to thank the more than 5,600 members of the GreenBiz Intelligence Panel who take time out of their busy days
to respond to our surveys. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel consists of executives and thought leaders in the area of corporate
environmental strategy and performance. Panel members participate in brief monthly surveys, providing their expertise and
perspective on corporate initiatives, laws and regulations, and scientific advances that are shaping the sustainability agenda.

© 2014 GreenBiz Group Inc. (www.greenbiz.com). May be reproduced for noncommercial purposes only, provided credit is given to GreenBiz Group Inc. and includes this copyright notice.

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