You are on page 1of 24

STANDARD PRACTICES - ENGINE

70-00 - (CFMB) - STANDARD PRACTICES - ENGINE - GENERAL


CFMB: CFM56-5B
Engine directional references Clockwise, counterclockwise, clock position and other
directional references apply to the engine in a horizontal position, viewed from the rear, and with
the accessories section at the bottom. When components or struts are numbered in a
circumferential direction the No.1 position is at 12 o'clock, or immediately clockwise from 12
o'clock. The remaining positions increase arithmetically in a clockwise direction.

70-11-00 - (CFMB) - PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES TO BE TAKEN


DURING REMOVAL/INSTALLATION

Special care must be taken each time maintenance operations are performed in engine critical
areas. Extensive damage can result from foreign objects entering the engine (FOD) or from engine
parts that are not properly secured. It is especially important that all critical areas at the engine and
its immediate surrounding area be checked for cleanliness before each engine run.
A. Engine Critical Areas.
(1) Air inlet cowl.
(2) Bleed valve compartments.
(3) Interfaces with customer bleeds.
B. Exposed Hardware Inspection Requirements
It is necessary for an individually licensed technician, or a licensed repair station (if there is no
individually licensed technician), to do a visual inspection of all engine parts that can be seen
before the engine is assembled again.
C. General Precautions.
WARNING: SOME PARTS (MOSTLY LOOP CLAMPS) INSTALLED ON ENGINES MAY
CONTAIN SMALL AMOUNTS OF ASBESTOS. THE P/N OF THESE PARTS IS MARKED
WITH AN ASTERISK IN THE ALPHA/NUMERIC INDEXES OF THE ENGINE
MANUFACTURER'S ILLUSTRATED PARTS CATALOG (IPC). REVIEW THE ENGINE
MANUFACTURER'S IPC TO DETERMINE IF PARTS ON YOUR ENGINE ARE AFFECTED.
IF YOU REPLACE OR HANDLE THESE PARTS, WEAR APPROPRIATE PERSONAL
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT AND STRICTLY OBEY ALL APPLICABLE ENVIRONMENTAL
CONTROLS AND REGULATIONS FOR HANDLING, REPLACING AND DISPOSING OF
ASBESTOS CONTAINING HARDWARE.
(1) Before performing maintenance ensure the following have been accomplished:
(a) Pockets of working clothes have been emptied of their contents.
(b) Soles of footwear are clean.
(c) All critical areas of engine and its immediate surroundings are free of non-essential tools
and materials.
(2) After completion of maintenance ensure the following have been accomplished:
(a) All tools and non-installed engine parts are removed.
(b) All clamps and brackets are secured.
(c) All loose wire (instrumentation and lockwire) are removed.
(d) Check that the vicinity of the air inlet cowl, and customer bleeds are clear of any foreign
bodies. Use a vacuum cleaner to clean zones difficult to reach.
(e) Check that protective covers are installed.

D. Removal of components and accessories.


(1) The practices related to seals are in chapter (Ref. AMM TASK 70-21-00-918-002) .
(2) Protect components and accessories againts mechanical contact with metallic tools before
removal.
(3) Protect openings with clean covers/caps, as required during removal of a component or
accessory.
(4) Protect the electrical connections when electrical systems are disconnected.
(5) Protect all protruding ends such as the gearshafts and connections when removing a
components.

E. Installation of components and accessories.


CAUTION: USE 2 WRENCHES TO REMOVE OR INSTALL THE TUBE COUPLING
NUTS: - ONE WRENCH TO HOLD THE UNION, AND - ONE TO LOOSEN OR TIGHTEN
THE COUPLING NUT. THIS PREVENTS DAMAGE TO THE PARTS.
(1) Record type and serial number before installing a component.
(2) Visually check the general condition of the component and ensure it has not sustained any
damage before installation.
(3) Check that mounting faces and seal grooves are clean and not deteriorated.
(4) Use only the tools designed specifically for the operation.
(5) Check that threaded sections protrude by one thread relative to the nuts and chamfers at
completion of final torquing.
(6) Comply with all the tightening torque values specified in the relevant sequence of operations.
(7) Use gloves to handle bearings and any other parts prone to oxidation.
(8) Cold shrink installation of bearings (chilling in liquid nitrogen or any other medium) is strictly
prohibited.

70-21 - (CFMB) - SEALS

A. Removal of the seal.


Do not remove the seals with a sharp or pointed tool (knife-blade or a scriber) which could
can cause damage to the surface of the parts.
B. Lubrication of the seal.
(1) Lubricate the seals with lubricants recommended in the installation procedure.
(2) Apply a light layer of engine oil to the O-rings.
If you apply too much lubricant, you can prevent the correct seal installation and can cause
contamination.

C. Installation of the seal.


(1) Use only new seals and rubber items during installation operations.
(2) Make sure the seals are in good condition and free from cuts or gouges.
(3) During the seal installation, be careful to install the seal correctly.
Make sure the seal groove (recess) is free from sharp edges.
(4) For O-rings that must be installed over threads or splines, you must use a conical sleeve,
without burrs or sharp edges, to prevent damage to seal.

D. Continued use of the gaskets.


Examine the gaskets with imbedded flexible seal material for the limits that follow:
(a) Examine for nicks, cuts, gouges or openings across the surface of the seal material.
(b) Examine for hard or britted seal material.
(c) Examine the surface of the seal material for deformation that could cause a blockage of
the seal.
(d) Examine the full length of the seal surface.

E. Maintenance of the aluminium gaskets.


(1) Remove the lifted metal in the bolt hole area with a fine polishing stone or equivalent.
Be careful not to cause damage to the seal material.
(2) Cut all thin, lacy, seal material that extends beyond the normal seal material on the aluminium
surfaces.
Be careful not to cut or loosen the bottom of the material.

70-22 - (CFMB) - LOCKING

Locking is closely associated with safety and, therefore, must be accomplished according to
the best shop practices. It must also counteract any untightening load acting on a component.

A. Self-locking, hexagonal and castellated nuts.


(1) New or used nuts must be checked and meet the assembly specifications. Nuts that do not
conform to the specifications must be discarded.
(2) Check that stud and bolt threads protrude through nuts by, at least, one thread (unless
otherwise specified).
(3) Use a suitable torque wrench to apply the prescribed torque values.
B. Cotter pins.
CAUTION: APPLIED TORQUE SHALL ALWAYS REMAIN WITHIN MINIMUM AND
MAXIMUM SPECIFIED TORQUE VALUES. NEW COTTER PINS SHALL BE INSTALLED
DURING EACH ASSEMBLY OPERATION.
(1) After applying the minimum torque to a castellated nut, progressively tighten until one slot on
the nut is brought in line with the hole provided for cotter pin.
(2) If alignment is not possible, unscrew the nut by one halfturn and repeat tightening.
(3) If correct alignment is still not possible, replace nut.

C. Lockwire
(1) General Recommendations and Typical Locking Method.
(a) The lockwire must be fitted so that its tension increases if the locked component tends to
loosen.
(b) Unless otherwise specified, lockwiring must be performed using lockwire 0.032 in. (0.8
mm) dia (Material No. CP8001 ) or lockwire 0.032 in. (0.8 mm) dia (Material No. CP8002 ) or
lockwire 0.6 mm (0.0236 in.) dia (Material No. CP8004 ) or lockwire 0.6 mm (0.0236 in.) dia
(Material No. CP8005 ) .
(c) The lockwire is to be double twisted, without excessive tension. Do not exceed 15 turns
per inch. Use special twisting pliers.
(d) The wire must be free of impact damage, folds or any other deterioration which could
reduce locking efficiency.

D. Safety cable
Safety cable is an alternative to safetywire unless specifically prohibited by the installation
procedure. Safety cable is installed through two or more parts in such a way that as the fastener or
part loosens the safety cable will tighten. When the safety cable tightens it will not permit the
fastener or part to turn. The cable process uses two parts:
a cable with a fitting already crimped to one end,
a ferrule to set.
(1) General recommendations and Typical Locking Method.
(2) safety cable 0.032 in. (0.8 mm) dia. (Material No. CP8006 ) is available in one size, 0.032 in.
(0.8mm). When the safety cable is installed the ferrule will be crimped on the open end of the
cable.
(3) The hand operated crimping tool comes in different lenghts. The crimping pressure of the tool
is set by the manufacturer. The primary parts of the crimping tool are the crimping head,
tensioning wheel, slotted wheel and handles. This tool is used to crimp the ferrule on the end of
the safety cable. The CRIMPING TOOL 46447 will cut the safety cable even with the ferrule at
the same time the ferrule is crimped.
(4) The AIR, HYDRAULIC TOOL KIT - ALL FLUID operates in one direction only and has a
cycle end dead stop to tell the operator when the ferrule is fully crimped. The crimping pressure of
the tool is set by the manufacturer. If necessary, the crimping pressure can be adjusted with
standard hand tools. The snap-on tool has a spring loaded crimp rod to hold the ferrule in place
during the crimping procedure. Cable tension is done automatically by the internal retraction
mechanism.
(5) Bergen process (Safety cable)
CAUTION: DO NOT USE SAFETY CABLE IF THE HOLES ARE MORE THAN 0.100
INCH (2.54 MM) DIAMETER. IF YOU DO, THE FERRULES ON THE END OF THE CABLE
WILL PULL THROUGH THE LARGER HOLES. CAUTION: SAFETY CABLE MUST NOT
BE USED INSIDE OIL SUMPS OF ENGINE (FWD AND AFT) AND INSIDE AGB AND TGB
CONTAINING BEARINGS AND GEARS.
(a) Do not install safety cable in such a way as to cause the wire to be subjected to chafing,
fatique through vibration, or additional tension other than the tension imposed on the wire to
prevent disengagement.
(b) In all cases, safety cable must be installed through the holes provised. When no holes is
provided, attach the safety cable to a neighboring part so as not to interfere with the function of
the parts, and in accordance with the recommendations. (Ref. Fig. Safety Cable
Practices SHEET 1)
(c) The maximum span of safety cable cable between tension points shall be 6 in. (152.4
mm), unless otherwise specified. Where several fasteners form a group to be safetywired together,
the maximum number of units in a series shall be limited to the number of units that can be
safetywired by a 24 in. (609.6 mm) length of cable.
(d) Tools and Equipements (Ref. Fig. Safety Cable System Components
(Manuel) SHEET 1) (Ref. Fig. Safety Cable System Components (Hydraulic) SHEET 1)
TEST BLOCK SAFETY CABLE
TESTER SAFETY CABLE
CRIMPING TOOL BERGEN C10-148 or CRIMPING TOOL SNAP-ON C10-148 CUTTER
C10-149 - WIRE, SIDE CUSHIONED
(e) Consomables
(6) Procedure for safety cable process
Check the safety cable holes of the parts to be secured for proper alignment. If a part has
been tightened to the proper torque, but is impropertly aligned, replace it with another part. Unless
specified differently in the engine manual:
1 The maximum length of the safety cable between cabled parts is 6.0 in. (152.4 mm).
2 Do not safety more than three bolts with one safety cable.
3 Do not use safety cable on titanium fasteners.
(7) Verification with CRIMP VERIFICATION EQUIPMENT

70-23 - (CFMB) - TIGHTENING TORQUES

The information given in the following paragraphs is generally applicable to all threaded
fasteners, such as bolts, nuts and fittings. The torque values are given in the next whenever needed
and at the location where needed.

A. Tightening torques.
(1) When tightening nuts, specified torque values must be applied. These torque values are given
to ensure an optimum tightening for safety purposes.
(2) On flanges where there are a great number of bolts and nuts, the tightening sequence must be
performed in pairs of bolts diametrically opposed.
(3) On these same flanges, it is recommended to proceed to a final check, clockwise, to ensure
that all the nuts have been tightened to the specified torque values.
(4) Tighten at a uniform rate until the specified torque is obtained. In some cases, where gaskets or
other parts cause a slow permanent set, be sure to recheck the torque at the desired value after the
material is seated.
(5) Do not tighten to the final torque value during the first draw-down; uneven tension can cause
distortion or over-stressing of parts. Seat mating parts by drawing down the bolts in gradual
increments until the parts are firmly seated. Complete the tightening procedure by loosening each
fastener separately, then tighten to the specified torque value. Do not exceed the maximum torque
values specified by this manual.
B. Double-torque procedure.
(1) Tighten at a uniform rate, in a criss-cross sequence if necessary, to the specified torque value.
(2) Loosen by 1/4 to 1/2 turn, and re-tighten, one by one in sequence to the specified torque value.
Do not tighten more than the specified torque value.
(3) Clean unwanted lubricant, if necessary.
(4) Make sure that you get the specified torque value with the torque wrench already used.

70-30 - (CFMB) - LIST OF MATERIALS


Refer to the AMM

70-51 - (CFMB) - FLUORESCENT PENETRANT INSPECTION -


PORTABLE - WATER WASHABLE

1JOB SET-UP
A. Fluorescent-penetrant inspection - General.
(1) This is water washable fluorescent-penetrant inspection process intended for inspections at
remote locations. Portable fluorescent-penetrant inspection is a localized process, limited to small
areas or spot inspection of specific areas of parts. It is not intended for normal inspection. It is
convenient to use for inspection of welded or other localized repair areas. The penetrant is applied
only to a local area that needs to be inspected.
(2) If visible non-fluorescent color dye penetrant has been used on parts which are to be
subsequently inspected with fluorescent penetrants, the contamination by the dye may prevent
reliable fluorescent-penetrant inspection. Any color dye indications evident by white light visual
inspection shall be considered valid indications even if not detectable by ultraviolet light.
(3) Titanium alloy parts are subject to stress corrosion cracking when residues of halogen
containing compounds remain on a part that is subsequently subjected to elevated temperatures
typical or welding, heat treating, or engine operation. These parts must be thoroughly cleaned with
halogen-free compounds after exposure to any halogen containing compound to prevent the
cracking and possible failure of parts. When using water for processing parts made of titanium or
titanium alloy, de-ionized water must be used.
(4) Observe the Following:
(a) Parts must be cleaned before being subjected to the inspection process.
(b) Plug or cap all tubes or holes in parts in the area being inspected with penetrant to prevent
penetrant or other material becoming entrapped.
(c) Fluorescent-penetrants and developers used together in an inspection system should be
products of one manufacturer, except when using solvent (non-aqueous) wet developer. It is
permissible to use the approved solvent-wet developer, Tracer-Tech D499C with any product
system.
B. Equipment.
(1) Inspection booth or darkroom or black cloth hood (for remote locations) which prevents
excessive admission of white light.
NOTE: Excessive white light will interfere with detection of a rejectable size indication. A test
part having a know defect can be used to evaluate effectiveness of white light shielding.
(2) Compressed air supply for drying parts. Air supply must have filters to remove oil and
moisture which can contaminate parts or inspection materials.
(3) Ultraviolet lamp to detect fluorescent indications.
CAUTION: THE USE OF HIGH INTENSITY (125 WATT) ULTRAVIOLET BULBS
WHICH EMIT AN EXCESS AMOUNT OF WHITE LIGHT WILL AFFECT THE
SENSITIVITY OF THE FLUORESCENT-PENETRANT PROCESS. USE ONLY BULBS
CERTIFIED BY THE NDT ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER AS HAVING
PASSED THEIR IN-HOUSE INSPECTION. IN ADDITION, THESE HIGH INTENSITY
BULBS SHOULD BE PERIODICALLY TESTED FOR WHITE LIGHT EMISSION PER CFM
STANDARD PRACTICES MANUAL 70-00-06.
The ultraviolet (black) light source used for the detection of indications shall have an
intensity no less than 800 microwatts/cm2 measured at a distance of 15 in. (380 mm).
(4) White light lamp for visual inspection of parts.
(5) Time piece for timing operations.
(6) Tools for inspection personnel. Tools should consist of at least the following:
Three-power and 10-power magnifying lenses.
(7) Assortment of adjustable mirrors.
(8) Gages to measures size of fluorescent indications.
(9) Cotton swabs or small fine-hair art brush to apply solvent for evaluating questionable
indications.

C. Materials.
Refer to the AMM.
NOTE: All materials are used at ambient temperature.

2PROCEDURE
A. Fluorescent-penetrant inspection - Procedure.
NOTE: Parts must be cleaned before their inspection process. Plug or cap tubes and holes in
the area to be inspected to prevent inspection materials from being entrapped.
(1) Application of Penetrant.
WARNING: PENETRANT IS FLAMMABLE. THE FLASH POINT OF PENETRANT IS
CONSIDERABLY LOWERED WHEN USED AS A FINE SPRAY. TAKE PRECAUTIONS
AGAINST FIRE.
(a) Apply penetrant by spraying or brushing.
(b) Allow 20 to 60 minutes for penetration.
(2) Removal of excess penetrant.
(a) Remove excess penetrant by wiping with a clean dry cloth.
(b) Remove background fluorescence by wiping with a clean cloth dampened with water or
solvent.
(c) Observe part under ultraviolet light to make sure excess penetrant has been removed.
(d) If excess background fluorescence persists, spray rinse using water from a squeeze bottle.
NOTE: Care must be taken to apply minimum amount of water because excess water will
remove penetrant indications.
(e) Alternate: Remove excess penetrant with a hydrophilic remover provided it belongs to
the same family as the penetrant used. Do not exceed 90 seconds contact time. If remover is
applied manually, do not scrub the suface of the part with the applicator. Use applicator only to
deliver fluid to the part surface.
(3) Application of Developer.
WARNING: AVOID BREATHING OF VAPORS.
(a) Apply developper by spray only to a dry part at ambient temperature. Apply a fine thin
coating by holding spray nozzle about 8-10 inches (200-250 mm) from part surface.
Normally 2 passes are adequate. Coverage should be uniform and a metallic background
should be visible through the developer. NOTE: When using aerosol container, follow the
manufacturer's directions.
(b) Allow 10 minutes for developer to absorb penetrant.
(4) Inspection of Parts.
CAUTION: THE USE OF HIGH INTENSITY (125 WATT) ULTRAVIOLET BULBS
WHICH EMIT AN EXCESS AMOUNT OF WHITE LIGHT WILL AFFECT THE
SENSITIVITY OF THE FLUORESCENT-PENETRANT PROCESS. USE ONLY BULBS
CERTIFIED BY THE NDT ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER AS HAVING
PASSED THEIR IN-HOUSE INSPECTION. IN ADDITION, THESE HIGH INTENSITY
BULBS SHOULD BE PERIODICALLY TESTED FOR WHITE LIGHT EMISSION PER CFM
STANDARD PRACTICES MANUAL 70-00-06.
(a) Direct ultraviolet light on part while in inspection booth or darkroom or under a black
cloth hood.
(b) Inspect to limits specified for the parts.
(c) Inspect questionable indications as follows:
WARNING: CLEANING SOLVENTS ARE FLAMMABLE, VOLATILE AND TOXIC.
THEY SHOULD BE USED WITH ADEQUATE VENTILATION. AVOID PROLONGED
BREATHING OF VAPORS AND REPEATED OR PROLONGED CONTACT WITH THE SKIN,
OR CLOTHING.
1 Wipe area once with solvent listed in paragraph 3, using a cotton swab or fine-hair art
brush.
2 Apply developer to suspected area after solvent has dried.
3 Inspect under ultraviolet light. Indications that reappear within 2 minutes shall be
considered as valid indications.
4 If indications do not reappear, inspect part under white light using a 10-power magnifying
lens.
(d) Identify location of defects using an approved marking method.
(5) Cleaning of Parts after Inspection.
CAUTION: ALL RESIDUAL PENETRANTS AND DEVELOPER MATERIAL MUST BE
REMOVED FROM PARTS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. UNREMOVED MATERIAL CAN
CAUSE SEVERE CORROSION OF PARTS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. WHEN
CLEANING PARTS MADE OF TITANIUM OR TITANIUM ALLOYS WITH SOLVENT, USE
ONLY SOLVENTS THAT DO NOT CONTAIN HALOGENS. WHEN CLEANING PARTS
MADE OF TITANIUM OR TITANIUM ALLOYS WITH WATER, USE ONLY DEIONIZED
WATER.
(a) Remove developer and penetrant by water spray washing or scrubbing the part with brush
and water.
WARNING: CLEANING SOLVENTS ARE FLAMMABLE, VOLATILE AND TOXIC.
THEY SHOULD BE USED WITH ADEQUATE VENTILATION. AVOID PROLONGED
BREATHING OF VAPORS AND REPEATED OR PROLONGED CONTACT WITH THE SKIN,
OR CLOTHING.
(b) Remove penetrant residue by spraying or by soaking in solvent listed in paragraph 3.C.(2)
(c) Make sure that all internal passages and recesses are completely cleaned and dry. Blow
out passages and recesses with dry air. Subtask
B. Quality assurance.
(1) Check part under ultraviolet light to make sure all penetrants and developer materials have
been removed.
(2) Assure that the residues of processing compounds are completely removed from titanium and
titanium alloy parts.

70-52 - (CFMB) - EDDY CURRENT INSPECTION OF FAN BLADE


LEADING EDGE

Job Set-up
A. Eddy-Current Inspection of the Fan Blade Leading Edge
(1) This procedure describes the general equipment, techniques and procedures required to
conduct high frequency MHz manual Eddy-current inspection of the fan blade leading edge.
(2) The following requirements shall be met by inspection personnel:
(a) Personnel performing this inspection must be certified to one of the following: NAS 410 /
EN4179 level 2 minimum or any equivalent standard as recognized by the Airworthiness
Authority of the personnel.
(b) Personnel performing this inspection should receive practical training in the use of this
procedure and must demonstrate proficiency in the calibration and evaluation routines before
accept/reject authority is delegated.
(c) Training per this procedure does not imply personnel certification per NAS 410 / EN4179
level 2 minimum or any equivalent standard as recognized by the Airworthiness Authority of the
personnel.
(3) The following documents shall form a part of this procedure to the extent specified herein.
Unless a specific issue is specified, the latest revision shall apply.
(a) Appropriate equipment instruction manuals.
(b) NAS 410 / EN4179 or any equivalent standard as recognized by the Airworthiness
Authority of the personnel.
(c) Appropriate Manual procedure.
B. Equipment
(1) Eddy-current instruments.
(a) Nortec Model NDT-19, 19e, 19eII, 24 or -3000 Eddyscope.
(b) Rohmann Elostest B1 SDM Eddy current instrument.
NOTE: Any equivalent equipment approved by Snecma/CFM can be used instead of listed
above.
(2) Tools and Equipments.
(a) Special Tools.
(b) Standard Tools and Equipment.
NOTE: This tooling will be contained in a CFMI inspection kit. The inspection kit number
shall be identified in the applicable manual procedure. A complete inspection kit containing all
required tooling can be obtained from CFMI
(3) Consumable Materials.

Procedure
A. Eddy-Current Inspection - Procedure
(1) Preparation of the edge.
(a) Clean the edge of the blade with Methyl Ethyl Ketone (Material No. CP1040)
(b) If necessary, lightly remove the small surface defects with a thin abrasive cloth (Material No.
CP2189) or (Material No. CP2191).
(2) Calibration.
(a) Initial Calibration
(b) Calibration procedure with the 9970 958 389P01 or 9970 958 390P01 probe.
CAUTION: MAKE SURE THAT THE PROBE IS IN GOOD CONDITION. LOOK FOR
DAMAGED PROBE HEAD OR PROBE WIRE.
1 Install the probe on the Eddy-current instrument.
CAUTION: TAKE CARE TO LET FREE THE MOBILE PART OF THE PROBE. CAUTION:
MAKE SURE THAT THE TEFLON IS CHANGED AT REGULAR TIME.
2 Apply a new small piece of Teflon tape on the coil of each probe.
3 Calibration.
CAUTION: YOU MUST DO THE CALIBRATION AT THE BEGINNING AND THE END
OF THE INSPECTION, EVERY FITH BLADE, AND AT ANY CHANGE OF ANY
COMPONENT. YOU MUST PERFORM THE CALIBRATION IF THE INSTRUMENTATION
HAS BEEN TURNED OFF.
a Put the coil away from the notch of the Electro Discharge Machining (EDM) on the non-
blended area.
b Set the EDM to zero.
NOTE: The point is in the middle of the screen.
c Examine the surface along the non-blended area with the probe and adjust the gain and
rotation to have a peak to peak on full screen with a vertical indication when the coil touches the
EDM notch. (Ref. Fig. Indications (Typical) on the Screen SHEET 1)
d Keep the same parameters and put the coil away from the notch of the EDM.
e Set the EDM to zero on the blended area.
f Examine the bottom of the blended area with the EDM notch.
g If the indication is equal or less than a half of full screen, adjust these following
parameters : hand position, movement of examination, gain and rotation to have a full screen
indication on the EDM notch of the non-blended area and more than a half full screen in the
blended area. (Ref. Fig. Indications (Typical) on the Screen SHEET 1)
(3) Eddy-current inspection procedure.
CAUTION: YOU MUST PERFORM TWO INSPECTIONS WITH TWO DIFFERENT
PROBES BECAUSE OF THE DESIGN OF THE BLADE (SHAPE AND DIFFERENT
THICKNESSES) ESPECIALLY IN THE BLENDED AREAS.
(a) Do a first inspection of the leading edge of the blade with the 9970 958 389P01 probe.
1 Put the probe in position with its coil in contact with the pressure face with the same
adjustment than for calibration. (Ref. Fig. Positioning of the Probes SHEET 1)
CAUTION: MAKE SURE THAT THE COIL IS ALWAYS IN CONTACT WITH THE
INSPECTED AREA.
2 Move the probe to examine the surface along the leading edge.
NOTE: You can perform this inspection a second time if it is not sufficient.
3 Put the probe in position with its coil in contact with the suction face with the same
adjustment than for calibration. (Ref. Fig. Positioning of the Probes SHEET 1)
CAUTION: MAKE SURE THAT THE COIL IS ALWAYS IN CONTACT WITH THE
INSPECTED AREA.
4 Move the probe to examine the surface along the leading edge.
NOTE: You can perform this inspection a second time if it is not sufficient.
NOTE: You can move the probe three times or more across the blade section to make sure
that the indication is not a malfunction.
5 Set to zero each time the probe touches a blended area.
(b) Do a second inspection of the leading edge of the blade with the 9970 958 390P01 probe.
1 Put the probe in position with its coil in contact with the pressure face with the same
adjustment than for calibration.
2 Move the probe to examine the surface along the leading edge.
NOTE: You can perform this inspection a second time if it is not sufficient.
3 Put the probe in position with its coil in contact with the suction face with the same
adjustment than for calibration. (Ref. Fig. Positioning of the Probes SHEET 1)
CAUTION: MAKE SURE THAT THE COIL IS ALWAYS IN CONTACT WITH THE
INSPECTED AREA.
4 Move the probe to examine the surface along the leading edge.
NOTE: You can perform this inspection a second time if it is not sufficient.
NOTE: You can move the probe three times or more across the blade section to make sure
that the indication is not a malfunction.
5 Set to zero each time the probe touches a blended area.
(4) Inspection Criteria.
(a) If you measure in a blended or non-blended area an indication equal to or more than 25
percent of full screen, you must do the evaluation of the default. (Ref. Fig. Indications (Typical)
on the Screen SHEET 1)
(b) If you measure in a blended or non-blended area an indication equal to or more than 50
percent of full screen, you must discard the part. (Ref. Fig. Indications (Typical) on the
Screen SHEET 1)
(5) Evaluation of the Default.
(a) Make sure that the calibration procedure was done correctly.
(b) Make sure that two checks were done with the two probes, on suction and pressure faces
around the area you examine.
(c) If the indication is equal to or more than 25 percent of full screen, discard the part.
(Ref. Fig. Indications (Typical) on the Screen SHEET 1)
(d) If you have no indication or an indication less than 25 percent of full screen, the part is
acceptable.

70-60 - (CFMB) - STANDARD PRACTICES - NACELLE/ENGINE


BUILD-UP UNIT (EBU)
WARNING: BE CAREFUL WHEN YOU USE CONSUMABLE MATERIALS. OBEY
THE MATERIAL MANUFACTURER'S INSTRUCTIONS AND YOUR LOCAL
REGULATIONS.

This section contains standard practices for use in maintenance and repair tasks on the engine
nacelle. Read the applicable section of this manual to become acquainted with the items to be
installed and the procedures to be followed before work is done on the engine.

Procedure
A. Lubrication
(1) Lubricate packings with petrolatum or the fluid contained in the system that is being serviced
(i.e. hydraulic fluid for the hydraulic system) before installation if not specified.
(2) Apply grease or anti-seize compound to fasteners as specified.
(3) Lubricate all pneumatic duct couplings with MIL-L-23398.
B. Electrical Connector Cleaning
(1) Clean the electrical connector pins and connector face as follows:
WARNING: ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL (CP 1041) IS TOXIC AND FLAMMABLE. USE
PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT. USE IN A WELL-VENTILATED AREA.
CAUTION: CLEAN THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS ONLY WITH ISOPROPYL
ALCOHOL (CP 1041). SOLVENT OTHER THAN ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL WILL DAMAGE
THE CONNECTOR AND CAUSE POSSIBLE DAMAGE TO THE MATING COMPONENT.
(a) Flush the electrical connector with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) to remove
contamination and other unwanted materials.
(b) Clean the electrical connector pins and connector face with isopropyl alcohol (Material No.
CP 1041 ) and a natural BRUSH - BRISTLED .
(c) Flush the electrical connector again with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) to
remove the remaining contamination and other unwanted materials. If heavily contaminated,
repeat the steps as necessary to remove all contamination.
(d) Remove the remaining isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) from the connector.
(e)Dry the electrical connector.
WARNING: USE EYE PROTECTION WHEN YOU USE COMPRESSED AIR TO
CLEAN, COOL OR DRY PARTS OR TOOLS. PARTICLES CAN CAUSE AN INJURY TO
YOUR EYES. DO NOT USE MORE THAN 30 PSIG (200 KPA). DO NOT POINT
COMPRESSED AIR AT YOURSELF OR OTHER PERSONS.
Allow the electrical connector to fully dry. If necessary, blow the electrical connector dry
with clean, filtered air at a maximum pressure of 30 psi (2.07 bar).
(2) Clean the electrical connector socket contacts and connector face as follows:
WARNING: ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL (CP 1041) IS TOXIC AND FLAMMABLE. USE
PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT. USE IN A WELL-VENTILATED AREA.
CAUTION: CLEAN THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS ONLY WITH ISOPROPYL
ALCOHOL (CP 1041). SOLVENT OTHER THAN ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL WILL DAMAGE
THE CONNECTOR AND CAUSE POSSIBLE DAMAGE TO THE MATING COMPONENT.
(a) Flush the electrical connector with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) to remove
contamination and other unwanted materials from the socket contacts and connector face. (b)
Clean the electrical connector.
WARNING: ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL (CP 1041) IS TOXIC AND FLAMMABLE. USE
PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT. USE IN A WELL-VENTILATED AREA.
CAUTION: MAKE SURE YOU USE THE CORRECT SIZE MINIATURE NYLON
BRUSH TO CLEAN THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR SOCKET CONTACTS. USE A
MINIATURE NYLON BRUSH THAT IS SIZED FOR THE SPECIFIC SOCKET CONTACT.
OTHERWISE, DAMAGE TO THE SOCKET CONTACT CAN OCCUR OR THE SOCKET
CONTACTS WILL NOT BE SUFFICIENTLY CLEANED.
Clean the electrical connector socket contacts with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP
1041 ) and a miniature BRUSH - NYLON . Use a miniature nylon brush that is sized for the
specific socket contact. Use a 0.031 in. (0.79 mm) brush for 20 gauge socket contacts and a 0.062
in. (1.57 mm) brush for 16 gauge socket contacts.
(c) Clean the electrical connector face with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) and a
natural BRUSH - BRISTLED .
(d) Flush the electrical connector again with isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) to
remove the remaining contamination and other unwanted materials. If heavily contaminated,
repeat the steps as necessary to remove all contamination.
(e) Remove the remaining isopropyl alcohol (Material No. CP 1041 ) from the connector.
(f) Dry the electrical connector.
WARNING: USE EYE PROTECTION WHEN YOU USE COMPRESSED AIR TO
CLEAN, COOL OR DRY PARTS OR TOOLS. PARTICLES CAN CAUSE AN INJURY TO
YOUR EYES. DO NOT USE MORE THAN 30 PSIG (200 KPA). DO NOT POINT
COMPRESSED AIR AT YOURSELF OR OTHER PERSONS.
1 Allow the electrical connector to fully dry. If necessary, blow the electrical connector dry
with clean, filtered air at a maximum pressure of 30 psi (2.07 bar).
C. Check of the Connector Socket Tension
(1) (Preferred method) Do a check of the connector socket tension using a spring scale capable of
measuring 0.6 oz (17.01 g) to 1.5 oz (42.52 g) and a locally-manufactured pin.
(a) Locally manufacture the pin. (Ref. Fig. Electrical Connector Socket Tension SHEET 1)
(b) Install the locally-manufactured pin in the female connector.
(c) Attach the spring scale to the pin. (Ref. Fig. Electrical Connector Socket Tension SHEET 1)
(d) Pull upward on the pin with the spring scale.
(e) Measure the force required to pull the pin out of the female connector.
1 The force must be more than 1.5 oz (42.52 g) for a no. 16 wire pin.
2 The force must be more than 0.6 oz (17.01 g) for a no. 20 wire pin.
(f) Replace the female connector if the force necessary to remove the pin is less than the limits in
step (1).(e). above.
(2) (Alternate method) Do a check of the connector contact tension using a weight of 0.6 oz (17.01
g) to 1.5 oz (42.52 g) and a locally-manufactured pin.
NOTE: Use this method if you do not have a spring scale.
(a) Locally manufacture the pin. (Ref. Fig. Electrical Connector Socket Tension SHEET 1)
(b) Attach a weight to the pin with a WIRE - SOFT, FLEXIBLE . 1 Attach a 1.5 oz (42.52 g)
weight for a no. 16 wire pin. 2 Attach a 0.6 oz (17.01 g) weight for a no. 20 wire pin.
(c) With the female connector facing down, install the locally-manufactured pin in the female
connector. Let the weight hang free below the connector.
(d) Replace the connector if the weight pulls the pin out of the female connector.
(3) Replace the wiring harness if defects cannot be repaired. See the applicable
removal/installation procedure for each wiring harness.
D. Electrical Wire Harness Installation
(1) Make sure there is a sufficient drop in the wire harness to prevent tightness on the wire harness
connectors and receptacles.
(2) Make sure there is maximum clearance between adjacent wire harnesses.
(3) Make sure there is maximum clearance between wire harnesses and engine components.
(4) Make sure there is maximum clearance between wire harnesses and hot sections of the engine.
(5) Install protective covers over the open ends of connectors and receptacles.
(6) Install connectors carefully to prevent damage to connector pins.
(7) Tighten self-locking electrical connectors as follows:
(a) Make sure that the electrical connector is clean and in satisfactory condition.
(b) Align the master-key (largest key) on the connector with the master-key in the receptacle.
(c) Use light hand pressure and push the connector into the receptacle. Turn the coupling nut of
the connector in a clockwise direction to engage the connector threads.
(d) Tighten the connector.
CAUTION: YOU MUST NOT STOP AT THE COLORED COUPLING INDICATOR LINE
ON THE RECEPTACLE WHEN YOU TIGHTEN THE CONNECTOR. IF YOU STOP AT THE
COLORED LINE THE CONNECTION WILL NOT BE TIGHT. THIS CAN CAUSE
MECHANICAL AND/OR ELECTRICAL FAILURE. IN ORDER TO ENSURE THAT
MAINTENANCE TASKS HAVE BEEN COMPLETED AS DEFINED.
With the threads correctly engaged, continue to turn the coupling nut clockwise with your
hand until the connection is tight. Make sure that the colored coupling indicator line on the
receptacle cannot be seen when the connection if fully tight.
NOTE: If you move the connector from side to side when you turn the coupling nut it will
make it easier to tighten.
(e) Tighten the connector.
CAUTION: YOU MUST NOT USE PLIERS WITH METAL JAWS TO TIGHTEN OR
LOOSEN THE CONNECTOR. THE METAL JAWS WILL CAUSE DAMAGE TO THE
CONNECTOR. 1 Turn the connector ring 1/8 to 1/4 turn with PLIERS - CONNECTOR, JAW,
SOFT or a WRENCH - STRAP to ensure the connector is tight. Stop before the PLIERS -
CONNECTOR, JAW, SOFT or WRENCH - STRAP slip on the connector ring.
(8) Remove oil, grease, dirt, and other surface contaminants with a clean cotton cloth dampened
with Non Aqueous Cleaner-General - - (Material No. 08-BAA9 ) .
(9) Remove paint and primer coatings from attach hole areas before installation of jumpers.
(10) Clamp sizes needed for installation can change from those given in a procedure.
(a) Differences in wire diameter between different vendors'wire, as well as differences in the
position of the wire bundle, can change the bundle size at any given point.
(b) Installation of a wire bundle can require a different clamp size, either one size larger, or one
size smaller than the size shown.
(c) If necessary, wind tape (material No. CP2208) around the harness at the location where the
clamp is to be installed to make sure the clamp fits correctly.
(11) Make sure that the installation reference markers are in the correct position before you tighten
the line blocks or clamps. To permit adjustment of the harness routing, the installation reference
markers can be +/- 0.5 inch (12.7 mm) off-center in the clamp.
E. Tubes Installation
(1) Correctly align tubes between tube components to make sure the threaded parts are connected
correctly.
(2) Install protective covers over open ends of tubes.
F. Dissimilar Metals Protection
(1) Clean touching surfaces
CAUTION: DO NOT USE CHLORINATED SOLVENTS ON TITANIUM PARTS.
Clean mating surfaces with a clean cloth and ethyl acetate, and make dry immediately with
clean, dry cloth.
(2) Apply one coat of primer to the mating surfaces of the bracket and the structural surface, and
install.
(3) Apply wet coat of primer to bolts before installation.
G. Lockwire
Use double-twist lockwire procedure in accordance with the operator's standard practices.
H. Engine Flange Identification
J. Engine Flange Hole Identification
(1) This manual contains numerous equipment items and brackets that are installed on engine
flanges at numbered bolt holes. (Ref. Fig. Engine Flange Hole Location SHEET 1)
(2) Some fan case flanges have "absent" bolt holes. The distance from one bolt hole to another
bolt hole will be double the average bolt hole distance. The absent hole must be counted as if it
were an actual hole.
(3) Some flanges have two holes at the same location. The hole number is the same for each of
these holes. (Ref. Fig. Engine Flange Hole Location SHEET 1)
(4) To find the location of a hole used in an installation procedure, do the following:
(a) Count down from the first hole on the flange to the right or left of the top centerline of the
engine.
(b) Count the equally spaced holes until the correct hole is reached.
K. Torque Value Tables
Refer to the AMM

70-71 - (CFMB) - POWER PLANT WIRING STANDARD PRACTICES - ATA


INDEX

1. General
This repair procedure has been prepared to define wire repair limits for temporary on-wing
repairs to damaged electrical harnesses. The procedure also defines the repair methods for the
various types of harness construction.
When it is not possible to remove a damaged wire from a harness this procedure may be used to
join the damaged wire by splicing.
This procedure has been prepared as a temporary on wing repair. The repair must be monitored
at 750 Flight Hours / 750 Flight Cycles / 4 calendar months (whichever the earliest) and a
permanent repair must be incorporated at the next available time period, but not later than the next
7500 Flight Hours / 5000 Flight Cycles / 24 calendar months (whichever the earliest) check.
Wire splice repairs are considered allowable temporary repairs. The defective wire or wires must
be replaced as specified in the repair limits shown in step 5. Wires which cannot be repaired
within the limits of step 5 must be replaced.
2. Tools and Equipment
Refer to the AMM
3. Consumable Material
Refer to the AMM
4. Reference Information
70-71-46 Engine Harness Continuity and Resistance Tests
5. Splice Repair Limits
A. Procedure
(1) A permanent repair must be incorporated at the next available time period, but not later than
the next C-Check.
(2) Splices are not allowed in the Generator Power Feeder Circuits from the Integrated Drive
Generator (IDG) the Pylon.
(3) Splices are not allowed in both primary and backup system circuits: If one circuit is spliced the
other circuit must not be spliced.
(4) Splices in critical engine circuits
(a) Splices in critical engine circuits are not recommended.
(b) If it becomes necessary to splice a wire in critical engine circuits, use these repair limits.
(c) The critical engine circuits are listed below:
1 Channels A and B of the Engine Control Unit.
2 Engine Fire Detection System.
3 All Fuel Control and Monitoring circuits.
4 All Oil Metering and Monitoring circuits.
5 All Hydraulic Fluid Metering and Monitoring circuits.
(5) Maximum number of splices
(a) Single conductor wire:
one splice per conductor.
(b) Two conductor cable:
one splice per conductor.
(c) Three conductor cable:
one splice per conductor.
(d) Four conductor cable:
one splice per conductor.
(6) Splices may not be closer than 6 in. (152.3997 mm) to a conductor backshell.
(7) Splices must be offset from each other by at least 0.12 in. (3.0480 mm) when splicing more
than one wire in a bundle.
(8) The splice must not change the clamping or routing of the wire harness.
6. Preparation for wire repair (Ref. Fig. Harness Outer Jacket and Overbraid
Removal SHEET 1)
A. Procedure
WARNING: BEFORE YOU USE CHEMICALS, READ, UNDERSTAND, AND OBEY ALL
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CHEMICALS. THESE INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDE
INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURER, THE MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
(MSDS), AND GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS. CHEMICALS MAY CAUSE INJURY TO
YOU OR MAKE YOU SICK WHEN SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT OBEYED. AN
MSDS GIVES INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW YOU MUST SAFELY USE, KEEP AND DISCARD
CHEMICALS. GET INSTRUCTIONS FROM YOUR EMPLOYER ON HOW YOU MUST
SAFELY USE, KEEP, AND DISCARD CHEMICALS.
(1) Clean the repair area with isopropyl alcohol.
(2) If installed, remove a piece of the harness outer jacket to access the damaged wire.
(a) Measure an equal distance on each side of the damaged area and mark it.
(b) Use a utility knife or scissors to cut around the outer jacket at the marks. Do not damage the
metal overbraid.
(c) Cut the outer jacket down the center from one mark to the other and remove the piece of the
outer jacket.
(3) If installed, remove a piece of the metal overbraid to access the damaged wire.
(a) Measure an equal distance on each side of the damaged area and mark it.
(b) Use scissors or wire cutters to cut the metal overbraid around the harness at the marks. Do not
damage the inner protective sleeve.
(c) Cut the overbraid down the center from one mark to the other and remove the piece of metal
overbraid.
(4) Remove a section of the inner protective sleeve to access the damaged wire.
(a) Measure an equal distance on each side of the damaged area and mark it.
(b) Use scissors to cut the inner protective sleeve around the harness at the marks.
(c) Cut the inner protective sleeve down the center from one mark to the other and remove the
section of the protective sleeve.
(5) If required, remove any tape which is wound around the wires to access the damaged wire.
7. Unshielded Wire Repair (Ref. Fig. Single Conductor Unshielded Wire Repair SHEET 1)
A. Procedure
(1) Determine the size of the damaged area.
(a) If the wire is damaged or broken in one place, cut the wire at the center of the damaged area
and repair as shown below.
(b) If a section of the wire/cable is damaged:
1 Cut and remove the damaged section from the harness.
NOTE: See AWL Section 92-90 for wire type, gauge and length.
2 Cut a piece of replacement wire/cable to extend to both ends of the damaged area and repair
as shown below.
(2) Select the correct type of splice for the wire to be repaired:
322325 Splice, regular insulated for 16-22 AWG wire,
322326 Splice, thermocouple, parallel type, nickel,
2-323876-2 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, alumel,
2-323876-3 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, chromel.
(3) Select the correct crimp tool for the wire to be spliced:
MR8-89-1 Crimp tool, regular wire splices,
46447 Crimp tool, thermocouple wire splices.
(4) Prepare the wire to be spliced.
(a) Measure the splice crimp barrel for the correct wire strip length.
(b) Examine the wire stripper to make sure the blades are sharp and aligned.
(c) Strip the insulation from the wire.
(d) Cut the conductor to the correct length.
NOTE: The maximum space allowed between the splice and the wire insulation is 0.12 in.
(3.0480 mm).
(5) Crimp the splice onto the wire.
(a) Put the splice into the crimp tool.
(b) Put one end of the wire into the splice, the wire must be visible through the inspection hole in
the splice.
(c) Close the handles of the crimp tool with an even pressure to crimp the splice onto the wire.
(d) Examine the splice to make sure the wire is correctly attached.
(6) Repeat steps 7.A.(2) thru 7.A.(5) for the other end of the wire.
(7) Do a continuity test on the repaired wire. Refer to 70-71-16. The wire must have continuity
from end to end.
(8) Wind insulating tape around the splice until the tape is level with the wire insulation.
(9) Wind insulating tape around the splice area again for abrasion protection and to produce a
moisture resistant seal.
(a) Wind the splice area with a layer of insulating tape.
(b) Each wind must overlap the last wrap by 50 percent.
(c) Wind another layer of insulating tape over the splice area in the opposite direction of the first
wrap.
(d) The wind should extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm) beyond the end of the splice on both sides.
(e) Tie the ends of the insulating tape with the tying tape. For the tie use a clove hitch and a
square knot.
8. Single Conductor Shielded Wire Repair (Ref. Fig. Single Conductor Shielded Wire
Repair SHEET 1)
A. Procedure
(1) Determine the size of the damaged area.
(a) If the wire is damaged or broken in one place, cut the wire at the center of the damaged area
and repair as shown below.
(b) If a section of the wire/cable is damaged:
1 Cut and remove the damaged section from the harness.
NOTE: See AWL Section 92-90 for wire type, gauge and length.
2 Cut a piece of replacement wire to extend to both ends of the damaged area and repair as
shown below.
(2) Remove the insulated jacket for 2.5 in. (63.4999 mm) from the end of the wire to make the
wire shield show.
(3) Cut a piece of the wire shield to cover the damaged area.
(a) Use the wire shield from the same type of wire.
(b) Cut a piece of repair wire shield to cover the splice area and to extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm)
beyond on both sides.
(4) Make the repair wire shield large and install it over one end of the damaged wire. Then move it
away from the splice repair area.
(5) Select the correct type of splice for the wire to be repaired:
322325 Splice, regular insulated for 16-22 AWG wire,
322326 Splice, thermocouple, parallel type, nickel,
2-323876-2 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, alumel,
2-323876-3 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, chromel.
(6) Select the correct crimp tool for the wire to be spliced:
MR8-89-1 Crimp tool, regular wire splices,
46447 Crimp tool, thermocouple wire splices.
(7) Prepare the wire to be spliced.
(a) Measure the splice crimp barrel for the correct wire strip length.
(b) Examine the wire stripper to make sure the blades are sharp and aligned.
(c) Strip the insulation from the wire.
(d) Cut the conductor to the correct length.
NOTE: The maximum space allowed between the splice and the wire insulation is 0.12 in.
(3.0480 mm).
(8) Crimp the splice onto the wire.
(a) Put the splice into the crimp tool.
(b) Put one end of the wire into the splice, the wire must be visible through the inspection
hole in the splice.
(c) Close the handles of the crimp tool with an even pressure to crimp the splice onto the
wire.
(d) Examine the splice to make sure the wire is correctly attached.
(9) Repeat steps 8.A.(5) thru 8.A.(8) for the other end of the wire.
(10) Do a continuity test on the repaired wire. Refer to 70-71-46. The shield must have continuity
from end to end.
(11) Cut the wire jacket and shield. Make sure that 1 in. (25.4000 mm) of the wire shield is shown.
(12) Move the piece of the repair wire shield over the splice area.
(13) Make sure the repair wire shield touches the shield of the wire.
(14) Wind the repaired wire shield for abrasion and moisture protection.
(a) Wind the repair wire shield with a layer of insulating tape.
(b) Each wind must overlap the last wrap by 50 percent.
(c) Wind another layer of insulating tape over the repaired wire shield in the opposite
direction of the first wrap.
(d) The wind should extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm) beyond the end of the repair area on both
sides.
(e) Tie the ends of the insulating tape with the tying tape. For the tie use a clove hitch and a
square knot.
(15) Do a continuity test on the repaired wire shield. Refer to 70-71-46. The shield must have
continuity from end to end.
9. Multi-Conductor Shielded Wire Repair (Ref. Fig. How to Strip Wire and Position
Splices SHEET 1) (Ref. Fig. Multi-Conductor Wire Repairs SHEET 1)
NOTE: Multi-conductor means wires with more than one conductor. Two, three, and four
conductor cables are multi-conductor wires. A. Procedure
(1) Determine the size of the damaged area.
(a) If the wire is damaged or broken in one place, cut the wire at the center of the damaged
area and repair as shown below.
(b) If a section of the wire/cable is damaged:
1 Cut and remove the damaged section from the harness.
NOTE: See AWL Section 92-90 for wire type, gauge and length.
2 Cut a piece of replacement wire to extend to both ends of the damaged area and repair
as shown below.
(2) For both the damaged and replacement cables.
(a) Remove the insulated jacket from the wires for 4 in. (101.5998 mm) to 6 in. (152.3997
mm) from the ends.
(b) Cut the wires 3.75 in. (95.2498 mm) from the insulated jacket.
(c) Cut the wires so that the conductor ends are offset by 1.875 in. (47.6249 mm).
(3) Cut a piece of wire shield to cover the damaged area.
(a) Use the shield from the same type of wire.
(b) Cut a piece of repair wire shield to cover the splice area and to extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm)
beyond on both sides.
(4) Make the repair wire shield large and install it over one end of the damaged wire. Then move it
away from the splice repair area.
(5) Select the correct type of splice for the wire to be repaired:
322325 Splice, regular insulated for 16-22 AWG wire,
322326 Splice, thermocouple, parallel type, nickel,
2-323876-2 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, alumel,
2-323876-3 Splice, thermocouple, butt type, chromel.
(6) Select the correct crimp tool for the wire to be spliced:
MR8-89-1 Crimp tool, regular wire splices,
46447 Crimp tool, thermocouple wire splices.
(7) Prepare the wires to be spliced.
(a) Measure the splice crimp barrel for the correct wire strip length.
(b) Examine the wire stripper to make sure the blades are sharp and aligned.
(c) Strip the insulation from the wires.
(d) Cut the conductor to the correct length.
NOTE: The maximum space allowed between the splice and the wire insulation is 0.12 in.
(3.0480 mm).
(8) At both ends of the damaged cable, crimp one splice onto each of the wires.
(a) Put the splice into the crimp tool.
(b) Put one end of the wire into the splice. The wire must be visible through the inspection
hole in the splice.
(c) Close the handles of the crimp tool with an even pressure to crimp the splice onto the
wire.
(d) Examine the splice to make sure the wire is correctly attached.
(9) At both ends of the replacement cable crimp the colored wire to the wire of the same color on
the damaged cable.
(a) Put the splice into the crimp tool.
(b) Put one end of the wire into the splice, the wire must be visible through the inspection
hole in the splice.
(c) Close the handles of the crimp tool with an even pressure to crimp the splice onto the
wire.
(d) Examine the splice to make sure the wire is correctly attached.
(10) Do a continuity test on the repaired wire. Refer to 70-71-46. The wire must have continuity
from end to end.
(11) Wind the splices with insulating tape until the tape is level with the wire insulation.
(12) Double wind the splice area with insulating tape.
(a) Wind the splice area with a layer of insulating tape.
(b) Each wind must overlap the last wrap by 50 percent.
(c) Wind another layer of insulating tape over the splice area in the opposite direction of the
first wrap.
(d) The wind should extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm) beyond the end of the splice on both sides.
(13) Move the piece of repair wire shield over the splice area. Make sure the repair wire shield
touches the shield of the wire.
(14) For abrasion protection and to provide a moisture proof seal, wind the repair area with two
layers of insulating tape.
(a) Wind the repair wire shield area with two layers of insulating tape.
(b) Each wind must overlap the last wrap by 50 percent.
(c) Wind another layer of insulating tape over the repair area in the opposite direction of the
first wrap.
(d) The wind should extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm) beyond the end of the repair area on both
sides.
(e) Tie the ends of the insulating tape with the tying tape. Use a clove hitch and a square knot.
(15) Do a continuity test on the repaired wire. Refer to 70-71-46. The shield must have continuity
from end to end.
10. Metal Overbraid Repair
A. Procedure
(1) Cut a piece of the metal overbraid to cover the splice area.
(a) The overbraid should extend 1.5 in. (38.0999 mm) beyond the end of the splice area on
each side.
(b) Cut the metal overbraid down the center and fold the edges under.
(c) Remove any loose wires from the metal overbraid so that they will not go into the wire
shield or the wire insulation.
(2) Wind the piece of metal overbraid around the splice area:
(a) The overbraid should be wound around the harness so that the end of the wind overlaps
the start.
(b) Tie the ends of the piece of overbraid with tying tape:
1 Make two ties 0.5 in. (12.7000 mm) apart.
2 For the ties use a clove hitch and a square knot.
(3) Do a continuity test on the repaired metal overbraid. Refer to 70-71-46. The overbraid must
have continuity from end to end.
(4) Wind the piece of the metal overbraid with insulating tape.
(a) Wind the metal overbraid with a layer of insulating tape.
(b) Each wind must overlap the last wrap by 50 percent.
(c) Wind another layer of insulating tape over the metal overbraid in the opposite direction of
the first wind.
(d) The wind should extend 1 in. (25.4000 mm) and 1.5 in. (38.0999 mm) beyond the end of
the repair area on both sides.
(5) Tie the insulating tape with tying tape.
(a) The ties should be spaced 0.5 in. (12.7000 mm) apart and extend across the repair area.
(b) For the tie use a clove hitch and a square knot.
11. Harness Outer Jacket Repair (Ref. Fig. How to Wrap the Repair Area SHEET 1)
A. Procedure
(1) Tie the harness outer jacket at the open end near the repair area with tying tape.
(2) Add at least two ties at each end.
(3) The ties should be spaced 0.5 in. (12.7000 mm) apart.
(4) For the tie use a clove hitch and a square knot.

70-71-31 (CFMB) HARNESS GENERAL 70-71-31 PB 001 CONF 06 -


HARNESS GENERAL - DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION
1. Description
A. Introduction:
(1) The engine harnesses interconnect the airframe with the electrical components mounted on the
engine. These harnesses provide electrical power to the various components. They also provide
circuits for the transmission of signals for engine monitoring functions.
(2) Some of the harnesses are named for engine functions and others are named for the engine or
thrust reverser to which they apply.
(3) New generation computer controlled engines and increased use of composite materials
significantly impacted the make of the electrical harnesses built by Rohr Inc. for the various
Nacelle systems.
(4) The more severe requirements for today's harnesses require:
(a) A high degree of extremely reliable lightning and electromagnetic interference (EMI)
protection,
(b) Operation in sustained higher temperature environments,
(c) Line replacement and connector replacement capability.
(5) These requirements along with fluid resistance and chafe constructions have resulted in the
current band/boot make approved. This type of construction results in a highly reliable harness
assembly.
B. Harness Construction: (Ref. Fig. Harness Construction SHEET 1)
(1) The electrical harnesses have wires with one, two, or three conductors which are shielded. The
wire shields are grounded by being attached to the connector backshell. The wires are then
covered with a metal shield.
(2) The metal overbraid prevents the wires from lightning hits:
The metal overbraid is put on the harness by a machine
The overbraid is made of nickel plated copper
The overbraid is attached to the connector adapter by a tie-dex band.
(3) The connectors on the harnesses have backshell adapters:
The backshell adapters provide a metal surface for the ground of the wire shields and the metal
overbraid.
The backshell attaches to the connector.
The connector is attached to the equipment.
The equipment is grounded by touching the aircraft structure or by bonding straps.
(4) The outer jacket of the harness prevents the harness from fluid contamination and wear. The
outer jacket is sealed at each connector with a protective boot. Where the wires of the harness go
in a different direction, the jacket is sealed with a transition fitting.
(5) Each connector on the harness is identified with a Functional Identification Number (FIN).
The FIN is on an identification sleeve which is located near the connector:
(6) The harness also has an identification sleeve. The harness identification includes the harness
part number and the harness FIN number.