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Oregon

State University
Examining Project Work
MA X A D A MIT IS
RQ16
Overview
Institutional Demographics

Workplan

Narrowing in on a Project
Teachable Content

Theory to Practice

Learning Outcomes
Oregon State University

Mission

Highlights

Location

My Experience
Workplan Process
I had never worked at a large, public,
research intensive institution prior to
this experience

I saw myself working in housing and


residential life in the future

I felt as though my current experience


was focused on the day-to day
The Internship
Collaborative Duties
LLC Evaluation
Upper Division Residential Experience Project
Student Conduct Survey Creation
RD Training and Student Conduct Manual Revision
Other Duties

Supervision
Drew Morgan
Other Supervisors (Benjamin Medeiros)
TALK ABOUT: Upper Division Students

How does your work inform your


understanding of upper division students?

How might this intersect with residential education?


Examining the Upper Division Experience
Understanding Frameworks
High Impact Practices (Kuh, 2008)
Helping Sophomores Succeed (Hunter et al., 2010)

Identifying Peer Schools


NWACUHO
PAC-12

Creating and Distributing an E-mail Survey

Contacting Interested Schools


What We Found - Themes
Connection to Resources

Academic Partnerships

Interest or Need Based

Different Types of Engagement

Marketing
Teachable
Content

Two Frameworks
from High Impact Practices
1. First Year Seminar or Experience 6. Undergraduate Research

2. Common Intellectual Experiences 7. Diversity and Global Learning

3. Learning Communities 8. Service Learning and Community Based Learning

4. Writing Intensive Courses 9. Internships

5. Collaborative Assignments and Projects 10. Capstone Courses and Projects


from Helping Sophomores Succeed

Commitment
Tentative
Choices

Focused
Exploration

Random
Exploration

Schaller, 2005
Theory to Practice, Professional Principles
Schlossberg (as cited in Evans, 2010)
Transition Theory

Baxter Magolda (as cited in Evans, 2010)


Self-Authorship

Collaboration Across Functional Areas


Learning Outcome Highlights
Learning Outcome #5
Adapting student services to specific environments and cultures
Learning Outcome #6
Developing and demonstrating skills in leadership and collaboration
Learning Outcome #7
Utilizing assessment, evaluation, technology, and research to improve practice
Learning outcome #8
Communicating effectively in speech and writing
Learning Outcome #10
Establishing and enhancing professional identity
In closing...

Oregon State

Upper Division Residential Education and


Intersections

Two Frameworks

Reflection
THANK YOU
References
Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F. M., Patton, L. D., & Renn, K. A.
(2010). Student development in college: Theory, research, and
practice. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Hunter, M. S., Tobolowsky, B. F., Gardner, J. N., Evenbeck, S. E.,
Pattengale, J. A., Schaller, M., et al. (2010). Helping sophomores

Questions?
succeed: Understanding and improving the second year experience.
San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Kuh, G. D. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they
are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington,
DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.
Schaller, M. A. (2005) Wandering and wondering: Traversing the
uneven terrain of the second year of college. About Campus,10(3),
17 - 20.
Student Development Administration Program at Seattle
University. (n.d.) Learning outcomes. Retrieved on 01/22/2016
from https://www.seattleu.edu/education/sda/learning-
outcomes/