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Running head: ASSESSMENT 1

Assessment and Evaluation Portfolio

Alexis Lajambe

0522648

Lakehead University

Airin Stephens

EDUC-4490-YI

March 1, 2016
ASSESSMENT 2

Assessment

Assessment for Learning

Assessment for learning is used when teachers want to assess the current abilities of the

students (Drake, 2014; Growing Success, 2010). This kind of assessment is used to set learning

goals and how the class can achieve them. This is an ongoing process that occurs often since the

teachers use this to assess the instructional strategies and whether they need to be adapted or not

(Growing Success, 2010). Assessment for learning can take place by teachers, peers, or the

student him/herself (Drake, 2014). Examples of assessment as learning include: co-creating

success criteria, written questions, exit cards, checklists, questions for higher order thinking, and

diagnostic quizzes (Drake, 2014).

Assessment as Learning

Assessment as learning is the process of developing and supporting student

metacognition (Growing Success, 2010, p. 143). During assessment as learning, students are

often assessing themselves or their peers. Assessment as learning promotes metacognitive

thinking as students are monitoring their own learning through self-assessment and peer

assessment (Growing Success, 2010). They are checking to see if they understand of the

success criteria. Assessment as learning should occur frequently before and during instruction

(Drake, 2014). Examples of assessment as learning are quizzes marked by peers, journals,

reflections, and self-assessments (Drake, 2014).

Assessment of Learning

Assessment of learning is to make summative judgments about performance in relation

to provincial standards, then conduct a final evaluation (Drake, 2014, p. 18). This occurs at the

end of instruction at key points, such as the end of a unit or year (Drake, 2014). During
ASSESSMENT 3

assessment of learning a grade is assigned by the teacher and may be shared with

parents/guardians, other teachers, or the students themselves (Growing Success, 2010).

Examples of assessment of learning include: culminating projects, tests, exams, and

presentations (Drake, 2014).


ASSESSMENT 4

Instruction and Assessment

Instruction, feedback, and assessment are interrelated in a classroom and should all be

aligned for successful learning. Assessment and feedback are related since assessment is a way to

provide feedback in a classroom. Assessment for learning is feedback from the teacher, the

student him/herself or peers and assessment as learning is feedback from the student him/herself

or peers. It is important that feedback be constructive and not be negative as the students may

become discouraged. Feedback delivered throughout the instruction is essential to monitoring the

progress of the students. By doing this, teachers are able to see where instruction needs to begin.

Having assessment for and as learning occur throughout the year allows teachers to determine if

the instruction strategies being used are effective or if there needs to be a change. If the

assessment determines that the instructional strategy is ineffective, then the teacher may need to

teach the same lesson a different way or the pace at which instruction is being delivered.

Assessment helps determine the type of instruction that is effective and should be used in the

classroom.

Just as assessment measures the abilities of the students, it also monitors the success of

the instruction being provided in a classroom. As a teacher, it is important to know if the

instruction is being effective. Assessment is used to set goals in the classroom and to see if these

goals are being met by the students. This is monitoring student achievement. If not, then the

instruction may need to be altered. It is important that the goals set for the class are realistic.

Assessment as learning helps the students develop metacognitive thinking skills. As

metacognition is developed, students will begin to take ownership of their learning as they check

their progress and determine what actions need to be taken next. Assessment supports students in

becoming independent learners.


ASSESSMENT 5

Assessment is essential in the classroom as it determines if the learning goals and success

criteria are being met. As Growing Success (2010, p. 28) states the purpose of assessment is

to improve student learning. Without assessment, teachers and students would not be able to

track their learning. Assessment reflects how well the student is learning the expectations

outlined in the curriculum (Growing Success, 2010). Assessment for learning is an opportunity

for teachers to provide descriptive feedback to help the students set realistic goals and to reach

the goals of the class. Assessment as learning supports the students metacognitively by having

them always checking their own progress and setting goals. Assessment of learning is important

since it is the final assessment to determine what they learned at the end of a learning period.

This kind of assessment measures the achievement in a unit/course. Assessment of learning can

have a major impact on students as it can decide which stream (workplace, applied, academic)

they take in high school which then leads to various career paths. It is important that assessment

take place in a classroom daily, whether it be assessment for, as, or of learning.


ASSESSMENT 6

Assessment FOR Learning Artifacts


ASSESSMENT 7

Diffusion is

Osmosis is

Diffusion is

Osmosis is

Diffusion is

Osmosis is

Designed by Melissa Plug (2016)


ASSESSMENT 8

Exit Cards

These exit cards are used as assessment for learning in the classroom. The ones above

were specifically used for a grade eight science lesson on osmosis and diffusion to assess the

understanding of the key points of the lesson and to monitor their learning. These slips are easily

adapted for any subject and are used during the last five minutes of a class. By reviewing the exit

cards, teachers are able to use this as evidence as to where students are in their learning and to

change the instruction strategy if necessary.


ASSESSMENT 9

Traffic Lights meet Bump It Up Wall (2011). @mistercookes teaching blog. Retrieved
February 27 from https://bossysmile.wordpress.com/tag/traffic-light/
ASSESSMENT 10

Traffic Lights

A traffic light is used as assessment for learning in the classroom. Students choose what

level of comfort they have with the content. If a student chooses a red light to represent their

understanding, it means that he/she needs some more assistance understanding the material. A

yellow light means that the student believes he/she understands the content, but may need some

help. Students who choose the green light have an understanding with the content and feel

comfortable working on their own. This is a great tool for teachers as it lets them know the level

of understanding of the students in the class and which students may need more assistance in

class or if the instructional strategy is working or not.


ASSESSMENT 11

Assessment AS Learning Artifacts


ASSESSMENT 12

Self-Assessment of Volleyball Overhand Serve


Name: _________________________
Skill: Overhand Serve
Check the following that you can perform correctly.
Preparation:
_____ Athletic position
_____ Ball in opposite of serving hand.
_____ Be aware of end line.

Force Producing Movement:


_____ Toss, step, lean swing.

Critical Instance:
_____ Toss made above the head so that it would land just in front of opposite serving hand and
foot.
_____ Contact made in front of the body.
_____ Swing with shoulder.
_____ Aim for above the net.
_____ Pick target on opposite side of the net and hit target.

Follow through Recovery:


_____ Follow through in the direction of the ball.
_____ Wrist extends through the ball.
ASSESSMENT 13

Peer Assessment of Overhand Serve


Name: __________________________
Partner: _________________________
Skill: Overhand Serve
Check the following that your partner can perform correctly.
Preparation:
_____ Athletic position
_____ Ball in opposite of serving hand.
_____ Be aware of end line.

Force Producing Movement:


_____ Toss, step, lean swing.

Critical Instance:
_____ Toss made above the head so that it would land just in front of opposite serving hand and
foot.
_____ Contact made in front of the body.
_____ Swing with shoulder.
_____ Aim for above the net.
_____ Pick target on opposite side of the net and hit target.

Follow through Recovery:


_____ Follow through in the direction of the ball.
_____ Wrist extends through the ball.
ASSESSMENT 14

Self-Assessment of Passing/Throwing in Football


Name: _________________________
Skill: Passing/Throwing
Check the following that you can perform correctly.
Preparation:
_____ Feet shoulder width apart
_____ Knees slightly bent
_____ Shoulders square to target
_____ Eyes on target
_____ Hold ball fingers over laces

Force Producing Movement:


_____ Apply force in direction of target
_____ Move flexed elbow forward
_____ Extend from shoulder and snap wrist

Critical Instance:
_____ Ball released at point where it will hit target in the chest

Follow through Recovery:


_____ Snap wrist down
_____ Fingers point down
_____ Remain in balanced athletic position
ASSESSMENT 15

Peer Assessment of Passing/Throwing in Football


Name: __________________________
Partner: _________________________
Skill: Passing/Throwing
Check the following that your partner can perform correctly.
Preparation:
_____ Feet shoulder width apart
_____ Knees slightly bent
_____ Shoulders square to target
_____ Eyes on target
_____ Hold ball fingers over laces

Force Producing Movement:


_____ Apply force in direction of target
_____ Move flexed elbow forward
_____ Extend from shoulder and snap wrist

Critical Instance:
_____ Ball released at point where it will hit target in the chest

Follow through Recovery:


_____ Snap wrist down
_____ Fingers point down
_____ Remain in balanced athletic position
ASSESSMENT 16

Self-Assessment and Peer Assessment of Skills in Physical Education

Both self-assessment and peer assessment are examples of assessment as learning. The

above assessments were developed for a high school physical education class. These assessments

are completed after the skill has been taught and the students have had time to practice the skill.

By having the phases of the skill clearly outlined, the students have a clear understanding of

what is expected of them when performing the skill. These assessment forms help increase

responsibility and autonomy in the class and lead to critical reflection by the students. Self-

assessment and peer assessment allow the students to monitor their own learning to see where

improvement is still needed to become efficient at a skill.


ASSESSMENT 17

Assessment OF Learning Artifacts


ASSESSMENT 18

Monologue Rubric

Criteria Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4


the monologue the monologue the monologue the monologue
rarely reveals occasionally interprets the effectively
the thoughts, reveals the thoughts, elaborates the
Purpose feelings, and thoughts, feelings, and thoughts,
context of the feelings, and context of the feelings, and
speaker context of the speaker context of the
speaker speaker
point of view point of view point of view point of view and
and person are and person are and person are person are
inconsistent; an clear and clear, focused, integrated; an
Elements implied listener consistent; an and consistent; implied listener is
is seldom implied listener an implied evident
evident is evident listener is throughout the
established monologue
lacks behaviors, gestures or
involvement; no gestures, or movements are natural gestures
Physical movement or movements do fine, but may and movement
Delivery gestures not fit the have omitted enhance message;
character obvious fit character or
character role
behaviors
uses volume, uses volume, uses volume,
tone, and pace tone, and pace tone, and pace adjusts volume,
inappropriately somewhat to appropriate to tone, and pace to
or ineffectively; suit the content the content and achieve a special
limited use of and purpose; purpose; effect or for
Speaking nonverbal nonverbal nonverbal impact; nonverbal
Techniques gestures and gestures and gestures and gestures and
facial facial facial facial expression
expressions expressions are expression suit enhance
occasionally the character characterization
distracting or
inappropriate to
the character
is not able to needs constant is able to is able to perform
Knowledge perform without prompting to perform with successfully with
of Script script perform little prompting no prompting

Comments:

Source: Monologue Rubric (n.d.). Retrieved December 2, 2016 from


cl.k12.md.us/crhs/portfolio/monolouoge.doc
ASSESSMENT 19

Monologue Rubric

As the culminating project for my grade seven drama unit, students had to complete a

cross-curricular monologue. Prior to receiving the culminating activity, students completed

tableaux, the Mannequin Challenge, and monologues on familiar characters, such as the Grinch,

Wayne Gretzky, and SpongeBob. For this assignment, students were able to choose a historical

figure from the War of 1812 that we learned about and were provided time to research their

character. The students were given the success criteria prior to beginning the assignment.

Throughout the preparation phase of the monologue, students were provided with feedback by

the teachers. Students videotaped their monologues since many students were shy in front of

their peers. After the monologues were reviewed by the teacher, the students were assigned a

final mark for the drama unit using the rubric.

Success Criteria
- Students are expected to become their character by feeling what he/she was feeling
during the war.
- Students are to complete research, using class notes, the internet, and help from the
teachers, on their character and represent the characters beliefs and thoughts throughout
the monologue.
- Students have to choose an implied listener who would their character be talking to
during the war?
- Students have to act out their character by representing their emotions and gestures.
- Students have to be aware of how they talk speed, volume, tone
- Students can perform the monologue without a script
ASSESSMENT 20

Model Cell Rubric

Source: Joseph, A. (2016). Model Cell Rubric. Personal Communication.


ASSESSMENT 21

Model Cell Rubric

The culminating activity for a grade eight science unit on cells was for the students to

make a model of either a plant cell or an animal cell. Prior to receiving the assignment, students

completed a unit on cells. During this unit, they drew animal and plant cells and labeled them.

They also found the function for each part of the cell. Students were provided with an

assignment outline and the rubric (see next page for outline). As a class, we reviewed the

assignment and the rubric prior to starting the assignment.


ASSESSMENT 22

Model Cell (Adapted from Aubrey Joseph)

Goal: To make a model cell to demonstrate an understanding of the basic structure and function
of plant and animal cells. It must include a legend that explains the basic function of each part of
the cell.

Part A The Incredible Cell


1. Choose either to make a model of a plant or animal cell. Decide on the items you will use
to create the model. All models must be made out of materials that will not spoil unless
making the day or two prior (do not want you to be working with food that will be rotten
by the due date).
2. Your project must be labelled. You may label each organelle or put the names in the
legend.
3. Each model must include the following organelles plus cell specific parts:
a. Nucleus e. Cytoplasm
b. Cell membrane f. Mitochondria
c. Nuclear membrane g. Vacuole
d. Golgi membrane h. Ribosomes
4. Your project must include a legend that explains the basic function of each part of the
cell. Example:
Cell Structure Representative Material Chosen Cell Function
Nucleus Balloon The nucleus holds all the
information needed to make every
cell in the body.
5. Use the following questions to help you develop a good project.
_____ Is your name on the front of the project?
_____ Is the cell type identified? Tell if it is a plant or animal cell.
_____ Is the model a 2D/3D representation of a plant or animal cell?
_____ Are all the organelles included (10 for plant cells, 9 for animal cells)?
_____ Are the organelles correctly labelled? Each organelle must be labelled with its
name.
_____ Have you included a legend with each organelles name and function?
_____ Are the relationships between the parts shown correctly? Plant cell are the
chloroplasts around the vacuole?
_____ Are the materials acceptable? The materials cannot be food products that will
spoil before the due date.

Part B Presentation:
Use the following points to assist you during your presentation.
_____ Did you equally share the talking between you and your partner?
_____ Did you use a loud voice during your presentation so your audience could hear
you?
_____ Did you act mature throughout your presentation (i.e., not fooling around)?
_____ Did you use technical vocabulary and terminology.
ASSESSMENT 23

References

Drake, S. M. (2014). Interweaving curriculum and classroom assessment: engaging the 21st

century learner. Don Mills, Ontario: Oxford University Press.

Growing Success (2010). Ontario Ministry of Education. (1st ed.) Toronto.