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CEQR NO. 06SBS009K
BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
PHASE IA ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT

PART I

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Prepared for: Philip Habib and Associates


Prepared by: Celia J. Bergoffen, Ph.D., R.P.A.
Date: November 27.,2006.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I

LIST OF FIGURES

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARy 6
TABLE I _ ASSESSMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITy 9

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT SITE AND PLANNED DEVELOPMENT 12

3. ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING AND PREHISTORIC PERIODS 16

4. HISTORICAL PERIODS 21

5. LOT HISTORIES; EVALUATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY 30

6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 66

7. BIBLIOGRAPHY 68

PLATES

PART II

LOT HISTORIES - SUMMARY DATA


LIST OF FIGURES

Cover ~Hagstrom map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 1. General aerial view of the project site area under review for archaeological
sensitivity.

Fig. 2. Aerial view of part of block 281 with piers 7 & 8, showing the location
of part of the project site.

Fig. 3. Aerial view of part of block 281 with piers 9A & 9B; showing the location of part
ofthe project site.

Fig. 4. Aerial view of blocks 334,340,346,499 and 500, showing the location of part of
the project site.

Fig. 5. View west on Atlantic Avenue; the project site and pier 7 on the left.

Fig. 6. View from the northeast comer of Columbia Street and Atlantic Avenue looking
towards pier 7

Fig. 7. View from Columbia Street west towards pier 7.

Fig. 8. View from Columbia Street west towards pier 8 on the left.

Fig. 9. View from the comer of Columbia Street at Warren Street looking south
southwest towards the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the New
York Marine Terminals Brooklyn Port Authority Piers Administration buildings.

Fig. 10. View from the east side of Columbia Street at Baltic Street looking west towards
100 Columbia Street, the Waterfront Commission Building.

Fig. 11. View from the east side of Columbia and Baltic Streets towards the southwest.

Fig. 12. View from the northeast corner of Kane and Columbia Streets north on Columbia
Street.

Fig. 13. View from near the corner of Van Brunt and Degraw Streets looking west.

Fig. 14. View from the northwest comer of Van Brunt and Sackett Streets looking south
southwest.

Fig. 15. View from the southeast corner Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenue, looking
northwest along Van Brunt Street (Summit Street on the left).

Fig. 16. Brooklyn piers, proposed parcels, showing the location of the project sites.

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Courtesy Philip Habib & Associates.

Fig. 17. Tax map of block 281, lots 1 and 62.

Fig. 18. Tax map of blocks 334 and 340.

Fig. 19. Tax map of blocks 346, 499 and 500.

Fig. 20. 1836 Colton map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 21. 1845 Coastal Survey map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 22. 1846 Butt map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 23. 1849 Colton map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 24. 1855 Perris map showing the original coastline and the location of the project
sites.

Fig. 25. 1869 Dripps map showing the location of the project sites.

Fig. 26. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Atlantic and Pacific Streets.

Fig. 27. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Pacific and Warren Streets.

Fig. 28. Fig. 1855 Perris map showing the location of part of the project site on block
281, lot 1, between Warren and Harrison (Kane) Streets.

Fig. 29.1855 Perris map showing the location of part of the project site on block 281, lot
1, between Harrison (Kane) and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 30. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on block 334

Fig. 31. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on blocks 346 (left) and
340 (right).

Fig. 32. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on blocks 499 and
500.

Fig. 33. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Atlantic Avenue and Congress Street.

Fig. 34. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Congress and Harrison (Kane) Streets.

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Fig. 35. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Harrison (Kane) Streets and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 36. 1880 Bromley map showing the location ofthe project site on block 334.

Fig. 37. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 340.

Fig. 38. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 346, 499
and 500.

Fig. 39. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Atlantic and Warren Streets.

Fig. 40. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Warren and Sedgwick Streets.

Fig. 41. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lots 1
and 62, between Sedgwick and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 42. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334 and
340.

Fig. 43. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 346, 499,
and 500.

Fig. 44. 1904 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Atlantic and Congress Streets.

Fig. 45. 1904 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Congress and Harrison Streets.

Fig. 46. 1904 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lots 1
and 62, between Harrison and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 47. 1903 Hyde map showing the location of the project site on block 334.

Fig. 48. 1903 Hyde map showing the location ofthe project site on block 340.

Fig. 49. 1903 Hyde map showing the location of the project site on blocks 346 and 499.

Fig. 50. 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Atlantic and Congress Streets.

Fig. 51. 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Congress and Harrison Streets.

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Fig. 52 . 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lots 1
and 62, between Harrison and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 53. 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334 and
340.

Fig. 54. 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 346, 499
and 500.

Fig. 55. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281,
lot 1, between Atlantic and Congress Streets

Fig. 56. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281,
lot 1 between Congress and Kane Streets.

Fig. 57. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281,
lots 1 and 62 between Kane and Sackett Streets.

Fig. 58. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334,340,
346,499 and 500.

Fig. 59. Plan of block 281, lot 1 showing the location of the old lots containing areas of
archaeological sensitivity.

Fig. 60. Plan of blocks 334 and 340 showing the location of the lots containing areas of
archaeological sensitivity.

Fig. 61. Plan of blocks 346,499 and 500 showing the location ofthe lots containing areas of
archaeological sensitivity.

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1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This report is a study of specific parts of the Brooklyn Piers 7-12 site north of the
Atlantic Basin that were flagged by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) as
warranting further study and assessment for their potential sensitivity to yield remains of
archaeological and historical significance. The specific blocks and lots concerned are block
281, lots 1 and 62; block 334 lots 1,2, 7, 14,40,50 to 59, and 61 to 65, and all of blocks 340,
346,499 and 500 (Figs. 17-19). Only these blocks and lots and the streets that either presently
or formerly bordered them are included in the "project site" referred to in this report.
The conclusions presented in this report are based on primary sources such as historic
maps, tax assessments, sewer connection records, city directories, government documents (i.e,
Acts of the State Legislature), and contemporary newspaper articles. Secondary sources
consulted are histories of Brooklyn compiled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
The entire area under consideration is composed of landfill that was deposited in the
1840s following the creation of the Atlantic Basin. (This port is located in the southern part of
the Brooklyn Piers 7-12 site, and is not included in the present assessment). It is likely that the
wharf area, block 281, lot 1, and possibly also the other blocks under consideration in this
report, were built of cribwork with earth deposited over it. In general, the uses of the blocks
and lots on the project site were primarily commercial, consisting of large warehouses on
block 281, lot 1; coal and lumber yards, and stores throughout the study area. There were also
some industrial uses: lime production in the earliest period of occupation, meat packing, and a
large chemical manufacturer on block 334. Residential uses, never very extensive, were best
attested in the mid-19th century and declined in the 20th
Since the project site is built on landfill, there will not be any in situ remains of
prehistoric occupation in this material. But excavations for the Atlantic Basin revealed that in
prehistoric times the water level was lower, and consequently, the shoreline was formerly
further out (west). This means that the project site area might have once been dry land and
therefore a location potentially attractive to the indigenous populations for harvesting
shellfish. Accordingly, should future development involve excavation below the river bed,
archaeological monitoring would be recommended.
As for the historic periods, none of the sites of former commercial and industrial

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buildings has been judged historically significant or archaeologically sensitive. The
businesses or processes that were conducted in these buildings for the most part did not utilize
built-in structures or installations that could contribute to a better understanding of the
functioning of the enterprises concerned, and, in any case, the businesses in question have
been described in the literature and are well documented. Some industrial furnishings that
might have been of interest, such as the lime kilns on a part of block 281, lot I, are located on
sites that no longer exist (the old piers), or that have been negatively impacted by subsequent
construction. There remain, however, a number of locations, formerly the backyards of mid-
19th century dwellings, which have not been disturbed by later building episodes and that may
contain the remains of privies associated with the earliest occupants on the project site, some
of whom moved in as early as 1850. Water pipes were laid in almost all the streets
surrounding the project site in the late 1850s, but some of the dwellings were erected already
by 1850, and these buildings may have had cisterns at the rear. By 1855, a number of stores
and dwellings had been erected on the project site, but sewer service was not available until
ca. 1860, leaving residents without sanitary facilities - unless they dug a privy in their yard.
The contents of these privies, should the structures be discovered intact, would indeed be of
historic and archaeological interest as both the privies and the residential occupation of the
sites themselves were short-lived. This means that the artefactual assemblages from these
installations would correspondingly belong to a more narrowly defined period of time than is
usually the case, making these privies' contents more like the "time capsule" that can indeed
provide a window on a particular era in the past, rather than mere garbage pits containing
seventy-five years worth of debris. We do not expect to find cisterns associated with these
dwellings: water was available from the 1850s on most of the project site blocks, thanks to the
water pipes that were laid in the street already in that decade. These early water pipes,
however, are of historic interest, and since the streets, whether mapped or demapped, may be
impacted either by construction or by future excavation for utilities, some of the street beds
are considered potentially archaeologically sensitive.
Table 1, on the following pages, summarizes the results of this assessment. The blocks
and lots listed by the LPC are listed individually in this table, but note that Block 281, lot 1,
was formerly divided up into a number of "old blocks" each of which contained a number of
"old lots". Similarly, the only lot on block 499, lot 1, was formerly composed of a number of

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"old lots". Since these old blocks and old lots no longer exist and were not listed individually
by the LPC, the table flags only those old lots on block 281, lot 1, considered sensitive for
potential archaeological remains. The street beds are also not listed in the table. Their
potential archaeological sensitivity is evaluated in Chapter 6 and recommendations regarding
these locations, as for the other archaeologically potentially sensitive sites, are made in the
conclusions, Chapter 7.

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TABLE 1
ASSESSMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY - SUMMARY

BLOCK LOT OLD BLOCK OLD LOT(S) SENSITIVE NOT SENSITIVE Comments

281 62 X
1 4 X
3 X
2 X
1 23 X 51 Warren St.
24 X 53 Warren St.
28 X 70 Columbia St.
29 X 68 Columbia St.
30 X 66 Columbia St.
31 X 64 Columbia 8t.
35 X 48 Congress St,
37 X 44 Congress St.
39 X 40 Congress St.
40 X 38 Congress St.
20 3 X Baltic St.
19 6 X 59 Harrison St.
33 & 34 X
35 7 X 58 Van Brunt St.
8 X 60 Van Brunt St.
13 X 47 Degraw St.
14 X 45 Degraw St.
47 6-17 X 23-1 Beach PI.
47A 1-12 X 24-2 Beach PI.
15-22 X 1-8 Degraw St.
24 X 72 Van Brunt St.
29 X 28 Sackett St.
30 X 30 Sackett St.
31 X 32 Sackett St.
32 X 34 Sackett St.
334 1 X
2 X
7 X
14 10 X
11 X
12 X
13 X
14 X

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BLOCK LOT OLD LOT(S) SENSITIVE NOT SENSITIVE

(334) 40 30 X
31 X
32 X
33 X
34 X
35 X
36 X
37 X
38 X
39 X
51 X
52 X
53 X
54 X
55 X
56 X
57 X
58 X
59 X
61 X
62 X
63 X
64 X
65 X
340 1 X
2 X
3 X
4 X
5 X
6 X
7 X
8 X
9 X
10 X
14 X
15 X
16 X
17 X
19 X
20 X
21 X
22 X
23 X
24 X
25 X
26 X
28 X

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BLOCK LOT OLD LOT(S) SENSITIVE NOT SENSITIVE

(340) 29 X
30 X
31 X
32 X
33 X
35 23 X
24 X
38 X
39 X
40 X
41 X
42 X
43 X
44 X
45 X
46 33 X
34 X
48 35 X
36 X
37 X
51 X
346 1 X
2 X
3 X
5 X
6 X
7 X
9 X
10 X
11 X
21 X
22 X
23 X
25 X
26 X
29 X
499 9 X
10 X
11 X
12 X
13 X
14 X
15 X
16 X
17 X
500 X

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2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT SITE AND PLANNED DEVELOPMENT

The City of New York ("City") proposes to acquire portions of an approximately 120
acre site in Brooklyn Community District 6 including 1.1 miles of waterfront frontage
between piers 7 and 12, the area of the Atlantic Basin and adjacent upland tracts, and would
subsequently dispose of most of that property for future development. Part of this property is
to be acquired from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey ("Port Authority"), and
some is City owned. The program of improvements will involve mapping and demapping
streets and easements, and portions of the property and adjacent areas would be rezoned to
permit a wider range of accessory uses. Modifications would accordingly be made to the Red
Hook Peninsula Urban Renewal Plan. On the southern portion of the area, where the Atlantic
Basin is located, and for which no archaeological review is required, the proposed action
would result in the expansion of cruise terminal and complementary uses, as well as improve
public access to the waterfront.
This report is an assessment of the potential archaeological sensitivity of the northern
portion of the 120 acre site, which was flagged by the Landmarks Preservation Commission
(LPC) as requiring further study (Report cover and Figs. 1 to IS). Here, maritime commercial
uses would be maintained, with new opportunities for commercial development. This area is
located along the shore between Atlantic and Hamilton Avenues. Its eastern boundary,
between Atlantic Avenue and Kane Street is Columbia Street (Fig. 12). From Kane Street to
Hamilton Avenue, it is bounded on the east by Van Brunt Street (Fig. 15). The blocks and lots
concerned are: block 281, lots 1 and 62; block 334, lots 1,2, 7, 14,40,50 to 59, and 61 to 65,
and all of blocks 340, 346, 499 and 500 (Figs. 17-19). These blocks and lots, and adjacent
streets are referred to collectively as the "project site" in the present report.
There are no designated historic resources within the project site. Immediately North
of it, however, is the Brooklyn Heights Historic District, whose southern border runs along
Atlantic Avenue from just east of Furman Street to Court Street. One to two blocks east ofthe
project site, beginning mostly along the line of Hicks Street between Atlantic Avenue and
Degraw Street, is the Cobble Hill Historic District and Extension. This eastern border of this
district is Court Street. The Atlantic Avenue Tunnel, also listed on the StatetNational Register

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of Historic Places runs underground along Atlantic Avenue between Columbia Street and
Boerum Place.
Block 281 lot I, which borders Atlantic Avenue, encompasses piers 7, 8, 9A and 9B.
Piers 7 and 8 are currently being used as a general import/export cargo area, while the upland
portion of piers 8, 9A and 9B is leased by the Port Authority to American Stevedoring Inc.,
which operates the Red Hook Marine Terminal. This container port is an off-loading cargo
facility for both containerized and break-bulk cargo of raw materials. The lease with
American Stevedoring Inc. is due to expire in 2007 and, as the container port is unable to
compete with New Jersey's terminals, the City aims to redevelop the area in order to facilitate
its reuse.
The project site is contained within five of the twelve proposed parcels defined in the
DEIS prepared by Philip Habib and Associates (Fig. 16):
Parcel A is wholly included in the project site. It comprises most of block 281 with an
area of approximately 49 acres. It would be occupied by maritime industrial uses and cargo
operations, and dedicated to industrial and manufacturing uses. A brewery and an associated
40,000 sf beer garden are anticipated, to be sited on Pier 7. On piers 8, 9A and 9B there would
be maritime warehouse and distribution areas for general cargo; containers, break bulk cargo
and other similar uses. It is expected that the three pier sheds currently located on the piers,
containing approximately 623,200 sf of floor area, will be reused. The remainder of the lot
area will continue to be devoted to maritime industrial uses, container and storage activities.
The upland portion of Parcel A, along Columbia Street between Kane and Warren Streets,
contains the "Port Authority of New York and New Jersey New York Marine Terminals
Brooklyn Port Authority Piers Administration Building" and the "Waterfront Commission
Building", at 90 and 100 Columbia Street, respectively. These offices, estimated to consist of
approximately 61,700 sf., would remain.
Parcel C is a small part of block 281 that is slated for light industrial, warehousing and
office uses.
Parcel B includes parts of the project site on block 281, lots 1 and 62, and parts of
blocks 334 and 340. The larger portion of this parcel, lying outside the area being reviewed
for archaeological sensitivity in this report, will contain the passenger cruise ship terminal on
pier 10, retail, light industrial and warehousing uses, and approximately two acres of open

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space.
Parcel D is the western part of block 334, It is assumed that this small parcel of
approximately 24,000 sfwill be occupied by artists' space and galleries.
Parcel E includes part of block 340, and all of blocks 346 499, and 500. Assumptions
for this parcel consist of approximately 34,700 sf of retail uses and a total of 152,400 sf of
light industrial, warehousing and office uses,
Proposed rezonings on the project site are on:
Proposed parcel C, located on block 1, from M2-1 to Ml-4
Proposed parcel D and part of B, on block 334, from M2-1 to Ml-4
Proposed parcel E, on blocks 340, 346, 499 and sao, from M2-1 to Ml-4,
Part of proposed parcel B, on blocks 281,334 and 340 from M2-1 to Ml-4.
Most of block 281, which is largely contained within disposition parcel A, will remain
zoned MI-1 and M2-1.
These rezonings maintain manufacturing zoning classifications and would not increase
the maximum floor area ratio permitted.
Proposed changes to the city map within the project site area are as follows.
Columbia Street, between Atlantic Avenue and Kane Street will be widened from its
existing 70 feet to 100 feet on its west side, that is, within the area of the project site. A 30-
foot wide greenway would be established in the right-of-way of the remapped Columbia
Street. The area of this remapping, which traverses old building lots, may be subject to
potential impacts from possible future excavations for utilities.
Block 281: Pacific, Amity and Congress Streets, currently mapped at widths of 50, 70
and 60 feet respectively, will be demapped west of Columbia Street and may therefore be
impacted by future building construction. A new lOS-foot wide segment of Degraw Street
would be mapped between Van Brunt Street and the newly established Conover Street
(following the line of the proposed widening of the section between Columbia and Van Brunt
Streets, which is not contained in the project site reviewed in this assessment). This would
allow for a new 30-foot-wide green wayan the north side of the street. The area of this street
widening, which traverses old building lots, may be subject to potential impacts from possible
future excavations for utilities.
Blocks 28],334,340; a new, 85-foot wide segment of Conover Street will be mapped

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beginning at the western end of Degraw Street and running south through the middle of
blocks 334 and 340, approximately, and past the western end of block 346. The area of this
new street, which traverses old building lots, may be subject to potential impacts from
possible future excavations for utilities.
Blocks 281 and 334: a new segment of Sackett Street will be mapped from a point
approximately 90 feet west of Van Brunt Street to the newly established Conover Street. The
area of this street may be subject to potential impacts from possible future excavations for
utilities.
Blocks 334 and 340: a new segment of Union Street will be mapped from a point
approximately 146 feet west of Van Brunt Street to the newly established Conover Street. The
area of this street may be subject to potential impacts from possible future excavations for
utilities.
Block 499: a new, 70-foot segment of Summit Street would be mapped between Imlay
and Conover Streets. The continuation of Summit Street to the east is currently mapped at 60
feet. The additional 10 feet would run over the south side of block 499. The area of this new
street, which traverses old building lots, may be subject to potential impacts from possible
future excavations for utilities.

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3. ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING AND PREHISTORIC PERIODS

The project site is composed of landfill between the former low and high water lines
on the western shore of Long Island, facing the Buttermilk Channel (Report cover). The
Channel is an arm of the East River that flows between Long Island and Governors Island. It
was scoured out by the river before the last glacial advance over 10,000 years ago and
therefore predates human settlement in the area. The stories of farmers crossing with their
cows to Governor's Island at low tide are apocryphal, according to Stiles (1870, 576, n.1),
who noted that, looking down from the heights at Hicks Street over the broad marshes, it
might have appeared that the cows were on their way across the channeL During the dredging
for the Atlantic Basin, tree roots were found at a depth of approximately twenty feet below
surface, suggesting that in prehistoric times the water level was lower. Thus, remains of the
Native American presence, specifically, shell middens, might well be found on the project site
under the fill or under the floor of the river bed adjacent to the present coastline (Cammisa
1995, 2). Should future actions in the project site area involve excavation below the fill layer
or below the river bed floor, archaeological monitoring would be recommended. The current
development plan does not however involve such actions, and therefore no potentially
negative impacts on possible submerged archaeological resources are anticipated.
Before the shoreline was filled to its present line, the area was a tract of low-lying salt
marsh submerged during high tide and exposed in low. The area of the salt marsh is shown on
the 1845 Coastal Survey map (Fig. 21). It is the dotted area between the actual shoreline and
the water. The flat coastal area continued eastward until approximately the line of present-day
Hicks Street, where the upland began. There was also a rather large, steep-sided hill whose
summit rose between Henry and Clinton Streets, south of Summit Street (Colton 1836). This
hill was leveled during the development of the area in conjunction with the creation of the
Atlantic Basin.
The course of the shoreline in the early 19th century and the episodes of filling, largely
during the 18405, that resulted in its present appearance, may be reconstructed by consulting
city records, directories, secondary sources (histories), and historic maps. The 1836 Colton,
1845 Coastal Survey, 1855 Perris, 1846 Butt maps, and 1875-6 Board of Health map
representing the "original high and low grounds ..." as they existed in 1776-7 are very useful

16
in this regard (Figs. 20, 21, 22, 23 and 2; the evidence from street openings will be detailed in
section 4, below).
The 1845 Coastal Survey map indicates that the original shoreline ran from just south
of the foot of Atlantic Avenue at Furman Street to east of Columbia Street, then continued
south, east of the line of Columbia Street, until just north of Degraw Street, where it swung
out into a small spit of land before turning sharply east again. South of Degraw Street, there
was an extensive marsh occupying the area approximately between later Hicks Street, which
roughly marks the edge of dry land, and the later line of Columbia and Van Brunt Streets. The
shoreline then continued further east, following the landward edge of the Atlantic Dock.
The 1855 Perris and 1869 Dripps maps, both more detailed than the 1845 Coastal
Survey map, show that the shoreline originally ran east of the project site's block 281, east of
Columbia Street. The 1836 Colton map shows that the blocks between Atlantic and Amity
Streets were filled by that date. The shoreline continued south in a fairly straight line as far as
Harrison (Kane) Street, where it swung out into a small point just south of the line of Irving
Street. This is the point where the Red Mill once stood (see Chapter 4, below). The 1836
Colton map records a small inlet at Degraw Street, while the 1855 Perris shows a similar
feature on the line of later Sedgwick Street. No roads have been traced west of the line of
Columbia Street on the 1836 Colton map. From the inlet southward, the shoreline continued
east of Columbia Street and the project site. Both the 1836 Colton and the 1855 Perris map
show a promontory or shoals off the coast. On the earlier map, this sand bar or shoal is
attached to the mainland by a very narrow spit at its southern end, as also on the map
depicting the shoreline on the 1875-76 Board of Health map. The shoal extends northward
approximately to the line of Irving Street. The tidal pond that it enclosed was known as
"Cornets Mill Pond". With the possible exception of a small strip at the eastern end of Block
340, the shoal between Sedgwick and President Streets was not on the project site. On the
1855 Perris map, the spit of land has disappeared and the land directly south of it is also now
divided up into a series of shoals or islands, both features no doubt resulting from coastal
erosion. On a map of 1750, this offshore area was labeled "Flats", while the land at the shore
was "Broken meadows".
The 1846 Butt map outlines streets that were not created or were differently
configured: a Hale Street that was never built appears on the map, but Van Brunt Street does

17
not. Block 346 is shown bisected by the non-existent Hale Street. From these inaccuracies we
may infer that the land south of Harrison (Kane) and west of Columbia Streets was not yet
created. The map does show, in faint outline, the made land and piers between Atlantic
Avenue and Baltic Street west of Columbia Street, as does the 1855 Perris map, much more
clearly. This section, part of block 281 of the project site, was therefore probably built in the
mid 1840s.
The 1849 Colton map indicates that the project site blocks 346, 340, and 334 were
built a little later than the northern part of the project site, but they existed by 1849 and had
been built upon by that date. Blocks 499 and 500, south of Hamilton Avenue, existed by 1849
too, but were still vacant. Block 281 was built up approximately between the mapped western
end of Pacific Street to the end of Sackett Street west of Van Brunt, (see the tax map, Fig. 17,
for the length of the street). Thus, all of block 281 had been created except for the actual piers
beyond the inner edge of the present-day slips. Block 281, lot 62, is the only part of the
project site that was still mostly under water, and remained so throughout its history.
As for the elevation of the project site and adjacent areas, in general, the land still
slopes down quite noticeably towards the shore as one moves west from downtown Brooklyn
along Atlantic Avenue. It also slopes down from north to south. The above-mentioned hill,
located between Henry, Clinton, Summit and Rapelye Streets, seems to have been the closest
elevated area to the project site that might have attracted Indians as a place for a look-out or
fort. Slightly further away was the more famous "Cobleskill", near the intersection of Atlantic
and Pacific Avenues and Court Street. This hill, which gave its name to the Cobblehill
neighborhood, was used in the revolutionary war as an emplacement for the American's
"Corkscrew Fort", one of a line of fortifications that extended from the Wallabout to the Head
of Gowanus Creek (Stiles 1867,252).
The earliest available elevations for the project site date to 1886 (Robinson). A
comparison of these figures with those on later maps to the present time shows no appreciable
variation except what may be expected from slight differences in the location where the
measurement was made, or increases or decreases in the thickness of the street beds, where
the heights were taken. Thus, as far as can be determined from the elevations and from the
evidence of the historic maps, the landfill composing the project site blocks dates to the
1840s. Only the piers and the areas immediately adjacent to the slips were destroyed or

18
disturbed by changes in the configuration of the port area in later decades.
The Indians of the Archaic Period (ca. 8,000-1,000 B.C.) favored coastal locations on
islands, at the head of estuaries, or by the seashore, particularly elevated, well-drained tracts
of land. Marshlands, rivers and bays offered plentiful supplies of shellfish, fish and wild fowl.
With the development of agriculture during the Woodland Period (ca. I,OOO~I,600A.D.) the
Indians created large, permanent or semi-permanent palisaded settlements although they still
traveled seasonally to their hunting or fishing camps on the shore, the latter identified by
middens, huge piles of discarded shells. Their principal transport artery through Brooklyn ran
a short distance north of the project site: for the Indians, as later for the Europeans, the
principal landing place for river traffic was at the point which later became the pier of the
Brookland Ferry, at the foot of Fulton Street. The route to the interior then ran along the line
of later Fulton Street; further on, just east of Flatbush Avenue and across the Eastern Parkway
to the Prospect Park reservoir (Armbruster 1919, 5ff.; Bolton 1922, 131).
At the time of the European conquest, the area of present-day downtown Brooklyn
was settled by the Marechkawiek Indians, one of the Long Island Canarsee groups possibly
related to Delaware subtribes (Bolton 1920, 271; Bolton 1922, 132). South of Wallabout Bay,
a neck of land jutting into the East River was called the "Cape of the Marechkawieck" (Stiles
1867, 307), and the 1639 Manatus map shows a Marechkawieck longhouse in this area
(Grumet 1981, 27). One of the Marechkawieck settlements was discovered in 1826 on a hill
on Bridge Street between Front and York Streets in what is now the Vinegar Hill
neighborhood (Bolton 1922, 133). Bolton suggested that another Indian settlement, called
Werpos or Worpus, should be located near Warren and Hoyt Streets (Ibid., 137). This site was
at the head of an Indian path that later came to be known as Red Hook Lane, now, in its
straightened form, Court Street (Bolton 1922, 137-138). Cropsey (1925) placed the longhouse
buildings mentioned above at Borough Hall and Fort Hamilton, and noted an Indian village
located near Lawrence and Jay Streets at Fulton Street. Stiles (1869, 35) reported that Indian
artifacts were found "on the right of the Old Ferry". There are, however, no site reports to
accompany any of these findings. The SHPO sensitivity map also records sites east and
southwest of the Brooklyn Bridge, on or near the waterfront (Sensitivity map A0047-01-0074,
A047-01-0179, A047-0l-0102). Yet in their 1984 report on a site immediately south of the
Brooklyn Bridge, Historical Perspectives consulted Solecki, who was then excavating in the

19
Fulton Ferry area and he stated that he had found no prehistoric remains (BPI 1984, 7).
There is evidence (above) that the water level was lower in prehistoric periods and that
the coastline consequently lay further west than in historic periods. It is therefore possible that
the area of the project site was not tidal, and aboriginal peoples might then have come here to
collect and process shellfish, leaving shell middens behind. As stated earlier, however, these
prehistoric remains, if present, would be below the present water table and only subject to
negative impacts in the event of future excavation below the fill on the project site, or of
dredging below the floor of the river adjacent to the project site. Clearly, the fill layer of
which the project site is composed will not contain any in situ prehistoric traces and is
therefore not considered sensitive for prehistoric archaeological remains.

20
4. HISTORICAL PERIODS

The area under review in this report, termed the "project site", is located immediately
south of the old village of Brooklyn, whose southern border lay along Atlantic Avenue,
formerly District Street. This street was laid out in 1829, following Patchen's Lane, a dirt tract
that had existed since 1714 and was named after Ralph Patchen, who had a house and dock at
the foot of the lane (Stiles 1870, 573, n. 1). In 1829, the South Ferry to New York began
service from Patchen's Dock, at the foot of the newly laid street, to Whitehall in New York.
The original owners of the ferry did such a poor job, however, that under threats from
disgruntled Brooklynites, they gave up their lease and the Corporation of Brooklyn took over
in 1835. The city ran the operation for a few years before it was taken over by the Union
Ferry Company (Stiles 1870,543,577, n. 1).
John Cornell, whose name appears on the 1855 Perris topographical map (Fig. 24),
was one of the early owners of the area immediately east of the project site. His father,
Whitehead Cornell, came to Brooklyn in the mid is" century from Queens, bought up part of
the Lubbertson patent (roughly present-day Red Hook), and further expanded his holding
through marriage into the Seabring family. He then expanded his holdings by acquiring the
remainder of the Seabring estates on the shore, including the area east of the project site. His
son John inherited 60 acres including the old Seabring mill (Bergen 1750). Solecki (1984, 12)
puts this mill, known as the Red Mill, on the point south of Butler Street (now Harrison
Street) near where Irving Street would later be built (Fig. 20). This was east of the project site,
which did not yet exist.
The history of the project site itself, which is composed of made land, does not begin
until after the creation of the City of Brooklyn in 1834 and the establishment of the 6th ward,
in which the project site is located. The ward boundaries ran from the Gowanus Creek " ...west
along to the bay to the west side of Red Hook then east along the bay and the East River to the
west side of the Village of Brooklyn to District Street".' The streets were laid out by the
Commissioners in the following year, although most of those traversing the project site were
not built until the later 1840s (Brooklyn C.C. 1870, 27ft). Columbia Street was paved

I Brooklyn C.C. 1870, 108, from Acts of the Legislature of New York State, Apr. 1, 1834,

Ch. 92, p. 90, Sec. 2.

21
between Kane and Union Streets in 1846, and from Union Street to Hamilton Avenue in 1847
(Stiles 1867, 20). Degraw Street was graded and paved in 1848 and Irving, Sedgwick and
Warren Streets in 1852 (Ibid.), The principal property owner on block 334, Anson Blake, was
one of those responsible for grading and paving President Street in 1846 (Brooklyn Eagle
1846). A street car ran along Columbia Street; its tracks were still visible in Stiles' day (I 867,
20).
There was also a street railway on Atlantic Avenue. In 1834, the Brooklyn and
Jamaica Railroad Company built a road from the East River along Atlantic Avenue to
Jamaica, but leased its road to the Long Island Railroad in 1836 (Atlantic Avenue 1897, 214).
The terminal building of the Long Island Railroad was located at the northern end of the
project site on Atlantic Avenue (block 281, lot 1, old block 4). The L.I.R.R. was given the
authority, in 1844, to construct a tunnel through Atlantic Avenue -- the oldest subway in the
world. according to some (Atlantic Avenue 1897, 177). Stiles (1867,15) thought that the dirt
from the excavation was probably dumped at the end of Atlantic Avenue and contributed to
the filling of the former cove between Atlantic Avenue and Joralemon Street. The Atlantic
Avenue tunnel was eventually closed in 1859 because of protests by real estate owners along
its route, and the stearn railway was removed after 1861 (Atlantic Avenue 1897, 177, 197,
215). As part of the agreement, the company was required to restore the street to its proper
grade and to move its terminus to Hunter's Point.
The cross directory in the 1842 Brooklyn Directory reveals that the lots on the west
side of Columbia Street between Atlantic Avenue and Amity Street were occupied by that
date (block 281, lot 1). This land was probably made in conjunction with the creation of
Atlantic Avenue, and is shown already on the 1836 Colton map. The short list of residents and
the presence of lumber yards between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street, and a livery stable
between Pacific and Amity Streets, however, indicate that these blocks were not yet densely
built up. The directory also confirms the absence of residents on any of the other streets on the
project site, and only Pacific Street, Amity Street and Baltic Street are noted as open up to the
East River.
One of the principal developers of south Brooklyn was Colonel Daniel Richards. A
member of the produce commission, and with experience in the transportation business, he
arrived in Brooklyn in 1832. In 1839-40, Richards planned the Atlantic Docks -- based on the

22
Liverpool docks in England -- on forty acres ofland at the foot of Hamilton Avenue. The Act
of Legislature that established the Atlantic Dock Co. authorized not only the creation of the
basin and surrounding wharves, piers and bulkheads, but the building of "foundries and
warehouses for commercial purposes" as wen (Brooklyn C.C. 1870, 114, May 6, 1840, Ch.
215, 0. 164). At Red Hook, Daniels was also responsible for building the first grain elevator
in New York port (Stiles 1870, 577, n.l). Construction of the Atlantic Basin began in 1841
with labor provided by the Irish immigrants who arrived en masse during the 1840s and
settled in the newly constructed housing in the area. As noted above (Chapter 3), the shoreline
consisted of salt meadows and marshes and the land chosen by Richards for the basin was
almost wholly uncovered at low tide (Stiles 1870, 575, n. 2). The materials produced by the
dredging for the basin, as well as earth from the leveling of hills adjacent to the port, were
used to fill the marshes all around it, and so link the port to the rest of the developed part of
the city (Stiles 1870, 577, n. 1). Red Hook Hill, which seems to have been the name of the
eminence immediately southeast of the project site between Henry and Clinton Streets and
south of Summit Street, was "fast passing away" in 1851, according to an article in the Star
(quoted in Stiles 1869, 291). The earth from dredging and leveling was also used in the
creation ofthe wharves, which were constructed of stone-fined cribwork, as were no doubt all
the old wharves in the project site area. The land was built out into the river far enough to
provide a sufficient depth of water for ships to moor at the piers (Ibid.).
The filling of the project site area and its development was a direct result of the
creation of the Atlantic Basin, which was completed in 1850. By this date (Dripps), all of the
project site blocks had been created. The first warehouse at the Atlantic Basin was built in
1844; during the last years of the 1840s, some seven hundred buildings were erected in the 6th
ward (Stiles 1867, 16; Stiles 1884, 633). Buildings on the newly created project site blocks
are no doubt included in this number. In 1847, Daniel Richards "and Others" who owned the
land fronting on the water in the sixth ward, were authorized by an act of the State Legislature
to "erect, construct and build docks, wharves, bulkheads, piers and basins on the land under
water in front of their lands" (May 5, Ch. 202, p. 194, Brooklyn C.C. 1870, 115). This act
includes part of the project site.
Some of the other "water lots" making up the project site were conveyed to the
following individuals (Brooklyn C.c. 1870, 173):

23
H. Alexander Jr., from the center of Union to the center of Summit Streets. (blocks
340,346,499 and 500) March 11, 1847 (Lib. H., p. 334, Lib. 163, p. 380).
Anson Blake, the lot bounded by Union and Sackett Streets (block 334) July 31, 1854
(Lib. I, p. 213, Lib. 374, p. 236).
John Laforge, the lot bounded by Columbia Street from the center of Warren Street to
a line North of Congress Street, 258 feet 8 inches in point on Columbia Street (part of block
281, lot 1, old lot 1 and part of old 2); February 2], 185] (Lib. H. p. 546, Lib. 242 p. 389,
April 14, 1851);
George Wood, W.F. Haveymer and F.e. Haveymer, the "water lot between the center
of Baltic Street and a line 130 feet south therefrom and parallel therewith" (part of block 281,
lot 1, old block 19), May 10, 1850, (Lib. H, p. 469, Lib. 217, p. 217).
The reader will note in the catalogue, (Part n of this report), that the earliest preserved
tax assessments record the fact that a number of lots on the project site blocks were owned by
the same individuals, who evidently purchased them as an investment. One of the major
speculators of properties in the project site area was Anson Blake, who bought up the old
farms in the I830s (Brooklyn Eagle 1896). His offices were on Atlantic Street at the corner of
Columbia Street, and at the "end of Columbia near Union" (Brooklyn Directory 1850). Anson
was President ofthe Dutchess County Insurance Company (Brooklyn Eagle 1849). In the tax
assessments, we find Blake's heirs listed as the owners of much of block 334, since Anson
died in 1868 (Brooklyn Eagle 1896).
By 1855, the project site had been developed for residential uses in some areas,
especially on blocks 334, 340, 346, 499 and 500 but also, to a lesser degree, in the more
heavily commercial areas bordering the piers on block 281, lot 1. Lot 62, on block 281, was
never completely filled. Only its southern edge was made land. There was a wharf and piers,
and a ferry service ran from here to NewYork until between 1950 and 1969 (Sanboms). In
the 19th century, the property was occupied by the Hamilton Ferry, one of the lines owned by
the Union Ferry Co. This firm was incorporated in 1854. It was formerly known as the Union
Ferry Company Association (1851-1854) and before that, the Brooklyn Union Ferry
Company (1844-51). In 1855, three ferries ran daily to Whitehall between 4:30 a.m. and
midnight (Record 1855, 83). Some of the buildings shown on the detailed 1855 Perris map
can be traced back to 1850, by comparing the configuration of buildings on the blocks to

24
those depicted on the smaller scale Dripps map, which shows no addresses or lot numbers, or
the material of the buildings (frame or brick), as the Perris does. Thus, the oldest buildings on
the project site date at the earliest to the late I 840s, with the majority erected between 1850
and 1855. These stores and houses were without either water or sewage facilities: the
Brooklyn directories of the 1840s and 50s list the addresses of public cisterns, but there were
none located anywhere near the project site, and sewer service was not available until ca.
1860.
Discussions about the city's poor water supply and plans to improve it began in the
early 1850s (Jarvis and Burnett 1852). In 1855, the Nassau Water Company was incorporated
and proceeded, in the following year, to begin excavation of a reservoir in what is now
Prospect Park (Stiles 1869, 422). The company evidently also began laying pipes in the late
1850s in anticipation of the forthcoming water supply, including in the streets in the project
site area, several of which date to 1857 or 1858. In December 1858, water was introduced into
the city mains, and public cisterns are no longer listed in the Brooklyn City Directory of 1859-
60 (Manufacturers 1886,60-61; Stiles 1869,429). Residences and businesses "began at once"
to benefit from the new water system, something that would only have been possible, of
course, if the pipes were already in place (Stiles 1869,430).
As for sewer service, a Board of Sewer Commissioners was constituted in April 1857
"to devise and carry into effect a plan of drainage and sewerage for the whole city [of
Brooklyn]" (Stiles 1869, 428). The city council had already authorized the construction of
sewers on main thoroughfares in the early 1850s, but these were meant exclusively to carry
storm water and were not part of an overall sewer system (Goldman 1988, 141). Some five
and a half miles of storm sewers had been laid by 1857 (Union 1899, 227). The plan for a
sewer system was adopted immediately after the introduction of the water supply, i.e. in 1859
(Goldman 1988, 140). Unfortunately, the first three volumes of the sewer connection records
for Brooklyn are lost and we therefore do not know the exact dates or locations of the first
connections. The earliest preserved volume of permits, recorded in Book 4, date to 1867. We
presume that volume 1 should be dated from ca. 1860 into the early 1860s, with books 2 and 3
dating to the early to mid 18605.
The area of project site block 281 now included in lot I was formerly divided up into
ten blocks bordered by the streets that today stop at the east side of Columbia Street but

25
formerly continued west of it. The following discussion of some of the early commercial uses
of this part of the project site uses the old block and lot numbers as they first appear on the
1880 Bromley maps (Figs. 33, 34, and 35). From north to south, the old block numbers west
of Columbia Street were: old block 4, between Atlantic and Pacific Streets; old block 3,
between Pacific and Amity Streets; old block 2, between Amity and Congress Streets; old
block 1, between Congress and Warren Streets; old block 20, between Warren and Baltic
Streets; old block 19, between Baltic and Kane Streets; old block 33, between Kane and
Irving Streets; old block 34, between Irving and Sedgwick Streets, old block 35, between
Sedgwick and Degraw Streets, and old blocks 47 (west) and 47A (east) between Degraw and
Sackett Streets. These ten old blocks were dominated by the massive warehouses and grain
elevators that stood at the foot of the piers. There were also industrial uses -- principally coal
and lumber yards, and lime kilns -- and commercial uses, with most of the buildings on these
blocks containing stores, at least on the ground level. These may also have had dwellings on
the upper stories. Buildings identified as dwellings ra~her than stores, on the 1886 and later
Sanborn maps, were less numerous on these old blocks. On the remaining project site blocks,
334, 340, 346, 499 and 500, residences were more common, although commercial uses, -
including hotels, were the most frequently noted on the insurance maps. There were also some
industries, such as a chemical manufacture on block 334.
Brooklyn's port offered a great advantage over the facilities at New York in that
cargoes could be unloaded directly into the warehouses located at the foot of the piers and so
save shippers the expensive cartage fees that they had to pay on Manhattan (Stiles 1870,574).
The 1850 Dripps map, published only a few years after the project site area was created,
already depicts two large buildings on block 281, lot 1, between Congress and Baltic Streets,
at the end of old blocks 1 and 20. The first detailed maps of the area, the 1855 Perris and 1860
Provision Stores maps, show how the warehouses by then dominated project site block 281,
lot 1 (Figs. 26, 27,28, and 29). Woodruffand Robinson's stores on old block 1, between
Congress and Warren Streets, handled sugar, guano, fish, and other products (Stiles 1870,
575). According to Stiles, their dock could accommodate as many as twenty ships, with ten
able to discharge their cargoes simultaneously (Ibid.) The Baltic Stores, on old block 19,
carried sugar, salt, rags, and wool, and the Union Stores, on old blocks 33 and 34, sugar,
molasses, coffee, and other products (Stiles 1870, 575). In the late 19th century, the Brooklyn

26
warehouses handled 90% ofraw sugar and molasses imports (Stiles 1884,633).
These businesses were also often the principal property owners on the old blocks
where their warehouses were located, as revealed by the slightly later tax assessments (1869-
1873). The principal names associated with the warehouses on the project site were David
Dows, Jeremiah P. Robinson, A. Woodruff, Charles Kelsey and J.S. Ward.
Kelsey & Loughlin were dealers in coal and wood with offices at 27 Atlantic Street
(Manufacturers 1870, 118). Their coal depot was at Nevins Street on the Gowanus Canal. The
company was founded in 1847 as W. & C. Kelsey, with Loughlin, an Irishman from
Brooklyn, joining in 1866.
The finn of Dows and Cary, founded by David's brother John, was the principal
supplier to the Union army during the Civil War and reputedly saved the government a great
deal of money on its transactions (Brooklyn Eagle 1890). In 1865, under the direction of
David Dows (1814-1890), who became sole proprietor in 1854, the finn built the Columbia
Stores on old block 4 at the foot of Atlantic Street. According to Dows' obituary (Brooklyn
Eagle 1890), "this was the first major grain store on the Brooklyn piers and began the
transformation of the area into a major grain-shipping center". David Dows & Co. also owned
the Pacific Elevator on old block 3. Dews' obituary observed that when he died, the flags at
all the New Yark City exchanges were hung at half-mast (Brooklyn Eagle 1890).
Jeremiah P. Robinson (b. 1819) was another of Red Hook's great developers. He
designed and built the Erie basin and adjoining basins, piers, and warehouses, together with
Franklin Woodruff and William Beard. Robinson began his career working for the firm of
E.P.A. Woodruff, jobbers in fish, salt and provisions. He soon made partner (Stiles 1884,
638). After E.P. Woodruff died, the firm was renamed A. Woodruff & Robinson. The owners
began acquiring and improving property on the waterfront in 1843, and went into the
warehousing business, becoming "pioneers in this line" (Ibid.). Franklin Woodruff (1832-
1898), a younger contemporary of Robinson, entered the firm in 1850 and became a partner in
1858 (Stiles 1884, 642; Brooklyn Eagle 1898). The firm was dissolved when he withdrew in
1875, but the Robinsons: Jeremiah P, the senior member, his brother, George C. and his son,
Jeremiah A. Jr., continued to run the business in the same locations. In 1873, their
warehousing business was said to be the largest lion the Brooklyn shore", with several million
in invested capital (Brooklyn Eagle 1873).

27
William Beard was an Irish immigrant who became a successful builder and railroad
contractor. In addition to helping develop the Brooklyn piers in Red Hook, he also promoted
the transformation of the Red Hook marshlands into Erie Basin by using ballast from
European vessels for landfill -- and charging the ship owners fifty cents per cubic yard for the
privilege of dumping it there (Stiles 1870, 580, n. 1; Stiles 1884, 638). After 1868, Beard built
the massive brick warehouses of the New York Warehouse Co., and the Brooklyn Wharf &
Warehouse Co., on old blocks 4, 3,2 and 1. These handled international shipments and those
from the American Midwest, and sent goods up the Hudson to the Erie Canal. At its height,
after consolidating eighteen other firms under The Brooklyn Wharf and Warehouse Coo's
direction, the company owned two hundred sixty four brick warehouses, a waterfront of
14,599 feet, and 44 piers (Brooklyn Eagle 1894).
1.S. Ward & Co., whose stores stood on old block 47, was founded in 1834. An article
in the Brooklyn Eagle (1872) describes the building as "of the most substantial character,
being required to sustain an immense weight of provisions" . Ward specialized in salt beef and
salt pork sent from Cincinnati, Chicago and the west. The warehouse must have contained
work areas such as tables, vats and the like, as well as space to store the thousands of bushels
of salt required each year, since the incoming barrels of meat were unpacked, inspected and
sorted according to quality, then resalted and repacked on these premises (see Fig. 35,
"Provision inspection Warehouse"). Some 150,000 barrels were received annually, with an
average value per barrel of $20. Thus, the gross annual value of goods handled by J .S. Ward
& Co. was in the neighborhood of $3,000,000. The warehouses on the north side of Degraw
Street, opposite 1.S. Ward & Co. were also initially used by meat packers, but according to the
same 1872 article in the Brooklyn Eagle, the United States Warehousing Company already
occupied the premises, in spite of the legend on the 1880 Bromley map (Figs. 35 and 41).
The United States Warehousing Company was a warehouse where grain was cleaned,
weighed and stored. A grain elevator on the dock, powered by a three hundred horse power
engine, was used for offloading and loading cargo between the ships and the warehouse. The
building itself was also a sturdy construction,

...entirely of iron and brick, 120 feet square and 100 feet high. Iron columns
extended from the ground to the roof, and the brick work partly encloses them,
forming a compact fireproof building. Instead of the ordinary wooden bins on

28
successive floors for grain storing there are 162 cylindrical columns, 50 feet
deep, open at the top, and with small openings or trap doors at the bottom to
draw the grain out. (Brooklyn Eagle 1872)

There was no wood used at all, only iron, for all the interior bins and piers, etc., which were
supported on granite foundations on piles, "driven as hard into the earth as possible" (Ibid.).
The weight of the grain when the bins were full- without the weight of the architecture-- was
about 15,000 tons. Evidently, the operation was considered state-of-the art both as far as the
grain storage was concerned, as well how it was moved, entirely "by machinery of the most
improved kind" (Ibid.).
The massive old warehouses, grain elevators and the machinery connected with them
no longer survive. Indeed, there is no trace of the old piers themselves. They were dismantled
after 1950, and the present piers and slips are configured quite differently from what one sees
on the 19th century maps. Only the area at the foot of the piers, between Columbia Street and
the inner edge of the slips, has not been impacted by the many building episodes that altered
the piers and slips over and over in the second half of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The
area at the foot ofthe piers, as well as on blocks 334, 340, 346, 499 and 500, was occupied by
stores, a few dwellings, the warehouses, and various buildings used for light industry, through
the first half of the 20th century. Its complete transformation from a densely built up area to a
largely vacant tract occupied by paved parking and loading areas and various pier sheds,
occurred during the 1950s and 1960s, as indicated by the Sanborn maps.

29
5. LOT HISTORIES: EVALUATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY

The catalogue in Part II of this report details all the information gleaned from the
historic maps, tax assessments and sewer records, and serves as the bibliography for this
section.

Block 281

Lot 62

Lot 62 is mostly underwater. It consisted of a wharf and piers. The area of the wharf
still exists; the piers do not (Fig. 4). The first map that shows a wharf and pier here is the 1869
Dripps map (Fig. 25), but it is known that the Hamilton Ferry Company was already running
ferries to Whitehall from the foot of Hamilton Street in the 1840s, and some kind of docking
facilities must have been built by that time (see p. 24, above). Lot 62 included a small,
rectangular area at the western end of old block 47, now mostly under water, that was
formerly occupied by the coal shed of the Union Ferry company and its coal conveyors (1886
Sanborn). The area where the ferry house once stood is probably also under water, and the
remaining portion of the block, along the water's edge was formerly the road called "Ferry
Place". This Jot is not considered archaeologically sensitive.

Lot 1

This large lot comprises the piers and adjacent parking lots and loading areas around
them. The east border of the site extends southward from Atlantic Avenue on Columbia,
Street as far as Kane Street, then turns west on Kane Street until Van Brunt Street, then
continues south on Van Brunt Street to Sackett Street, which is the south boundary of the lot.
For clarity's sake, the following discussion of lot 1, and the corresponding presentation of the
data in the catalogue, have been divided up into its former ten blocks, with the lot numbers as
shown on the 1880 Bromley maps. The early block numbers remained the same but the lot
numbers have changed over time, so the reader should refer to the 1880 Bromley maps for the
location of the lot numbers referred to below.

30
We may immediately eliminate from consideration the piers themselves, as these are

modem constructions dating to the 1960s. They replaced the old piers, which were

demolished after undergoing a series of transformations during their lifetimes. The area of

concern lies therefore between Columbia Street and the foot of the piers. Note that Columbia

Street will be widened on its west side, taking in 35 feet of the east, paved side of lot 1. This

area may however still be subject to future impacts arising from excavations for utilities. It

will be seen that lot I was largely built up with warehouses, although there are some rear
yards, not impacted by subsequent construction and associated with early dwellings or stores,

which are considered archaeologically sensitive for remains of privies and cisterns. The west-

east streets that appear on the historic maps and on the current tax maps of block 281, lot 1 are

no longer visible west of Columbia and Van Brunt Streets because they have been subsumed

into the open paved areas that make up most of the eastern part of lot 1. These streets have

never been built upon to the present time and are considered sensitive for remains of early
water pipes. The proposed changes to the city map affecting this block and lot were detailed
in Chapter 2, above.

The old blocks oflot 1 are as follows:

Old block 4 was between Atlantic and Pacific Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 3 was between Pacific and Amity Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Note that old blocks 4 and 3 are now one continuous area forming pier 7, which
extends from Atlantic Avenue on the north to the slip whose northern edge follows the

former north side of Amity Street.


Old block 2 was between Amity and Congress Streets, west of Columbia Street. It is now

mostly occupied by the slip between Piers 7 and 8.


Old block 1 was between Congress and Warren Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 20 was between Warren and Baltic Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 19 was between Baltic and Kane (formerly Harrison) Streets, west of Columbia

Street.
Old block 33 was between Kane and Irving Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.
Old block 34 was between Irving and Sedgwick Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.

Old block 35 was between Sedgwick and Degraw Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.

31
Old blocks 47 (west) and 47A (east) are between Degraw and Sackett Streets, west or Van
Brunt Street.

Old block 4
Between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street - Figs. 17,25,26,33,39,44,50, and 55.

The Sanborn maps (1939, 1958) record the presence of two water pipes in Pacific
Street one of which dates to 1858, making it among the earliest of the water pipes installed by
the Nassau Water Company. The area of Pacific Street is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for remains of this historic water supply system.
The 1841-42 reverse directory lists D.B. Keeler and A.P. Ostrom lumber yards on the
west side of Columbia Street between Atlantic and Pacific Streets. On the south side of
Atlantic Avenue (then Atlantic Street) were the Railroad Office; N. Pettit's grocery; Wm. H.
Terry; 1. Renie's south Ferry & R.R. Inn; Henry W. Smith; George Dowling, James Oakley's
Jamaica hotel; Jacob B. Walter's Rising States Hotel, and James Stoddart, Jr.
In 1855, the Long Rail Road Depot was situated at the foot of Atlantic Street at the
northwest corner of old block 4 and on its old north pier. The old depot, shown on the Perris
map, became an "eating house and clothing store" that in 1890 was owned by Mrs. Mulford
Martin (Brooklyn Eagle 1890C). There were three brick and one frame building on Atlantic
Avenue; three brick buildings on Columbia Street, including the one on the corner, and three
small frame buildings further south, also on Columbia Street. By the end of the 1860s, if not
earlier, the two small piers that had formerly stood at the west end of the block were built out
or replaced by a much larger structure. This was occupied by David Dows & Co. Columbia
Stores, built in 1868. The small buildings on the northeast side of the block, identified as
stores on the 1886 Sanborn map, still stood, but the southern half was already largely torn
down and by 1880, with the exception of some brick buildings on Columbia Street, there were
only sheds here. The large brick warehouse building survived until between 1904 and 1915,
when it was reduced to only its eastern third. The rest of its former area was replaced by a pier
shed that extended to the end of the pier and was initially occupied by the Sicula Americana
S.S. Co. Pierce Line, then by the New York Dock Co.'s Bull Steamship Lines. By the 1939,
only the buildings near the comer of Atlantic Avenue and Columbia Street still survived, with

32
most of the rest of the area used as a parking lot.
Since sewer service was not available until ca. 1860, lots shown to have been occupied
by frame or brick buildings on the 1855 Perris map could potentially be sensitive for the
remains of a privy, unless it can be demonstrated that their backyard areas were impacted by
subsequent construction. Thus, the history of each of the lots shown to have been already built
up on the 1855 Sanborn map was carefully traced and is detailed in the catalogue. It was
found that no portion of the yards of these early stores or dwellings had not been impacted by
later building episodes and consequently, no part of old block 4 is sensitive for
archaeological remains. But the bed of Pacific Street, as note above, is considered
archaeological sensitive for potential archaeological remains of early water pipes.

Old block 3
Between Pacific and Amity Streets - maps, Figs. 17,25,27,33,39,44,50, and 55.

The 70-foot-wide Amity Street contains a six-inch water pipe installed in 1858. This is
among the earliest pipes in the area's water supply system and therefore of historic
significance. Thus, the former street bed of Amity Street is considered archaeologically
sensitive.
The eastern end of the block was developed by 1841-42, since there are individuals
listed on the west side of Columbia Street, between Pacific and Amity Streets in the 1841-42
reverse directory: M. Cole, E. Cole; J. Campbell, J. Riley, P. Murray, livery stable, and J.
Fagan and Mrs. McGuire.
The eastern end of the block was first developed with brick and frame buildings, some
of which were probably also used as dwellings, as well as with commercial or industrial
structures such as a lime and brick yard on the north side of the block and lime kilns on the
south side. Around 1860, the northwest corner of the block was occupied by a coal yard.
These industries disappeared during the 1870~. Most of the rest of the block in 1855 was
taken up by identical rows of six brick buildings facing each other, either side of the twenty-
foot wide Kelsey Alley that ran east-west from Columbia Street to the end of the made land,
down the middle of the block. Either side of the buildings at the opening of the alley, on
Columbia Street, were another large brick building at the corner of Pacific Street, and three

33
small frame buildings, with yards, near and at the comer of Amity Street. Three brick
buildings on Pacific Street were followed by a lime and brick yard with frame buildings at the
foot of the north pier. There were five frame buildings on Amity Street and a brick building
containing four lime kilns near the foot of the pier, as well as half a dozen frame buildings on
the wharf. Since these buildings existed before sewer service was available, it is possible that
those that had rear yards may also have had cisterns and privies. Examination of a long series
of historic maps, however, revealed that at one point in time or another, each of the former
backyards was impacted by subsequent construction. They are therefore not considered
sensitive for archaeological remains.
There were originally two small piers at the end of this block but during the 1860s
they were transformed by the addition of a new section in the middle that united them into one
much larger structure, with a long, narrow pier extending into the river. By 1869, like the pier
building on old block 4, the large structure erected on the pier was owned by David Dows &
Co. The brick building, a grain elevator, extended to Columbia Street over the area formerly
occupied by Kelsey Alley and the brick buildings on it. Between 1915 and 1939, the grain
elevator was converted for the premises of the New York Dock Co.'s Bull Steamship Lines.
By 1886, most of small buildings on the Pacific Street side of the block were built
over by the office, engine room and boilers connected with the grain elevator, while the west
half of the Amity Street side was built over by frame structures, first occupied by Canda &
Kane Storage and later by the American Ice Company. Between 1915 and 1939, the
remaining areas where the earlier frame and brick buildings had stood, at the corner of
Columbia and Pacific Streets and on Amity Street to the corner of Columbia Street, were built
over by an extension of the huge pier building and a warehouse for paper and twine storage,
respectively.
Because of negative impacts from subsequent building episodes, no part of old block
3 is considered sensitive for archaeological remains, but the former bed of Amity Street is
considered archaeologically sensitive for early water systems.

34
Old block 2
Between Amity and Congress Streets - Figs. 17.25,27.33.39.44, 50, and 55.

The sixty-foot wide Congress Street contains an 1857 water pipe that may be impacted
by possible future excavation for utilities. The pipe belongs to the earliest city water system
installed in the area and is therefore of historic significance. Thus, the former street bed is
considered archaeologically sensitive.
The 1855 Perris map shows the northeast comer of old block 2 fronting on Columbia
and Amity Streets occupied by Osman and Phyfe lumber yard. There is only a small, brick
office building on the comer and a second, small building further south, on Columbia Street.
On the southeast comer of the block was Walter & Broker Coal Yard, with a small frame
building on Columbia Street and a store approximately one-third of the way up the block, on
Congress Street. That building adjoined a large, frame structure, probably a storage shed,
either for the coal and lumber yard, or for the iron yard immediately west of it on Congress
Street. The area west of Osman's and including part of the yards south of it, to the end of the
built-up area. is now part of the slip between piers 7 and 8. In 1855, Woodruff & Robinson's
storage warehouse stood at the western end of old block 2. This building was back-to-back
with the brick building of Barber's Beef & Pork Packing Establishment at the northwest end
of the block. East of the packing house, on Amity Street, was "Vorhies & Spencer Lime &
Brick Yard", with a large frame building, an empty yard, and a second shallow frame building
along the street. The 1869 Dripps map preserves the notation" A. Woodruff and Robinson' s",
and shows two, instead of one, pier at the end of the block. The entire area of old block 2 was
completely built over by 1880 by the brick structure of "Robinson's Stores". The warehouse
was owned or operated in tum by the Brooklyn Wharf Warehouse Company. the New York
Dock Co., and the Amity Street Stores. By 1939. the area had been divided up between
garages, a hauling finn. and the N.Y. Dock Co. Between 1950 and 1969, old block 2 was
removed and the current configuration of piers and slips created. Except for a small area at the
eastern end of the old block that was first occupied by coal and lumber yards, none of the old
block still exists: it is now the slip between piers 7 and 8.
Old block 2 is therefore not considered sensitive for archaeological remains, but
Congress Street is considered archaeologically sensitive for early water systems.

35
Old block I
Between Congress and Warren Streets, west of Columbia Street - Figs. 17,25,27, 34,
39,45,51, and 56.

The fifty-foot wide Warren Street, not currently mapped west of Columbia Street,
contains a six-inch water pipe installed in 1860. This is among the earliest of the water pipes
installed by the Nassau Water Company and therefore of historic significance (for Congress
Street see above, under old block 2). Tire area of Warren Street is considered
archaeologically sensitive for early water systems.
Woodruff & Robinson Storage Ware House, which by 1880 took over most of the area
of piers 7,8 and 9A - old blocks 4,3,2,1,20,19 and 33 -- was already established by 1855
in a brick structure occupying approximately the westernmost third of old block 20. The area
of the Iron Yard and its few associated stores and sheds immediately east of Woodruff's, on
Congress Street, disappeared under the much enlarged brick store that the company erected by
1880, as did Mills Coal & Coke Yard, on Warren Street. The rest of the block, in 1855, was
occupied by both brick and frame buildings. Those on Columbia Street all had yards except
for the brick building at the comer of Warren Street, which occupied its entire lot. Of these
old lots, numbers 23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 35, 37, 39, and 40, as numbered on the 1880
Bromley map, have not been impacted by subsequent construction and are considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and lor privy.
The three story brick dwelling on old lot 23 was erected by 1855 but was connected to
the sewer system only in the late 1860s. the three-story building that stood on the lot ca.1869-
1873 belonged to John M. Lerman. In 1915, a one-story brick shed was erected on the rear of
the lot, leaving uncovered all but approximately fifteen-feet of yard in the middle of the lot.
The rear of the building was not impacted, and we can not eliminate the possibility that the
center of the area may have contained a privy. Old lot 23 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
The four story dwelling on old lot 24, also belonging to John M. Lerman in 1869-
1873, was erected by 1855 and connected to the sewer system in the late 1860s. Aside from a
couple of narrow sheds, neither the rear of the house, nor the rear of this yard was impacted
by subsequent construction. Old lot 24 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for

36
a cistern and a privy.
The twelve-foot deep yard behind the four-story brick store on old lot 26 could
conceivably have accommodated a privy. Like its neighbor on old lot 25, it was built before
1855 but not connected to the sewer system until the late 1860s. In 1869 to 1873 it too
belonged to Lerman (1869-1873). Old lot 26 is therefore considered archaeologically
sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Although a frame shed was built at the rear of old lot 28 by 1886, this still left an
approximately seventeen foot deep yard between the shed and the two story store that had
stood on the front of the lot since at least 1855. It is possible that the U.S. Goverrunent
Weighing Station overlapped part ofthis area. But enough of the yard area remained free of
negative impacts to have preserved a privy. There is no record of a sewer connection for this
property. The reading of the first owner's name, from 1869 to 1873, is uncertain: possibly B.
Mabee. Old lot 28 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a
privy.
Old lot 29 had a frame building on the front of the lot by 1855. There is no sewer
connection record for this property. It was owned by Charles O'Neil in 1869-1873. Except for
a narrow shed along the rear lot line and the possible impact of the U.S. Goverrunent
Weighing Station, which partly overlapped the center of the lot, enough of the original yard
remained free of subsequent buildings so that a privy, if present, could have been preserved.
The rear of the house was also not impact by subsequent construction. Old lot 29 is therefore
considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
By 1855, there was a frame building on the front of old lot 30. The owner in 1869-
1873, Charles O'Neil, connected the property to the sewer system in 1873, some twenty years
after the first building was erected. The building was either enlarged or replaced by a much
longer structure by 1886, but the rear portion of the yard was not impacted by subsequent
construction. Old lot 30 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy.
A second property of Charles O'Neil (1869-1873), old lot 31, had a brick building on
the front of the lot by 1855. He connected it to the sewer system in 1873. Neither the rear of
the building, nor most of the yard were impacted by subsequent construction. Old lot 31 is
therefore considered arckaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Old lot 35 was developed with a brick building by 1855. The 1886 Sanborn map

37
records it as a dwelling. Woodruffand Robinson connected the property to the sewer system
in 1868. At that time, there was a two-and-a-half story building with basement on the lot.
There is a second recorded connection for this lot in 1908 naming the same finn. Woodruff &
Robinson owned the property in 1869 to 1873. The occupants of the building in the 1850s
may well had a cistern and privy which, if present, will not have been impacted by subsequent
construction episodes. Old lot 35 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a
cistern and a privy.
Old lot 37 had frame buildings on the front and rear of the lot by 1855 but the property
was not connected to the sewer system until 1868, by Woodruff & Robinson. The owner in
1869-1873 is listed as Mathew Murphy. The 1886 Sanborn records the building as a three
story dwelling. The earliest residents may well have built a cistern and privy in their yard,
which, if present, will not have been impacted by subsequent construction episodes in this
part of the lot. Old lot 37 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and
a privy.
Old lot 39 had a frame building on the lot, probably used for some industrial purpose
from at least 1855. By 1880, this structure was replaced by a brick building. The yard was
never built on, aside from a small one-story building at the rear of the lot, along the lot line,
and there is no record of a sewer connection before 1907, by J. Gaffuey. The earliest listed
owners were Woodruff & Robinson, 1869-1873. There is a possibility that a privy once
existed in the yard, in which case it will not have been impacted by subsequent construction.
Old lot 39 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy.
Old lot 40 was not developed until after 1855, but before 1869. There is no sewer
connection record, however, until John Breman in 1908. The earliest owners of the property
were once again Woodruff & Robinson in 1869-1873. There is certainly ample time and space
for a cistern and a privy to have existed at the rear of the old building and in the yard of this
lot, and in the absence oflater building episodes, the remains ofthe privy shaft could have
survived. Old lot 40 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a
privy.
The remaining old lots of old block 1: 21, 22, 25, 27, 32, 33, 34, 36 and 38 are not
considered sensitive for archaeological remains either because they were in time completely
built over, or because they were not developed prior to being connected to the sewer system.

38
The two-story building on old lot 21, owned by Margaret Green in 1869-1873, was
connected to the sewer system by B. Green in 1870. Between the existence at various times of
a building in the rear half of the lot or at the rear lot line, and additions at the rear of the front
building, no part of the old lot was not eventually built upon. Old lot 21 is therefore not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 22 was not developed until after 1869, by which time it was connected to the
sewer system. The names associated with this lot in the sewer connection records and tax
assessments are unfortunately not legible. Old lot 22 is therefore not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 25 had a brick building on it by 1855 that was connected to the sewer system
in the late 1860s. It was owned by Mr. Lerman in 1869-1873. The 1903 Hyde map shows that
by that date a one story addition had been erected that completely covered the former yard
area of this lot. Old lot 25 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 27 had a frame building on the front of the lot by 1855. In 1869-1873, the
property was owned by James Hughes, who connected it to the sewer system in 1870. Either
by 1880, or between 1880 and 1886, a brick building was erected on the lot that completely
covered the former yard. Old lot 27 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 32, Charles O'Neil's third property on this block (1869-1873), was also
developed by 1855 with a brick building on the front of the lot and a frame building at the rear
(see old lots.30 and 31, above, for O'Neil's other two properties). There are four sewer
connections for this lot ranging from the early 1860s to ca. 1914. The lot was completely
covered by a building by 1869. Old lot 32 is therefore not considered archaeologically
sensitive.
Old lot 33, Charles O'Neil's fourth property on this old block (1869-1873) was not
developed until after 1855, though by 1869 there was a building on the front ofthe lot. The
property was connected to the sewer system by Woodruff & Robinson in 1868 probably at the
time when the building was erected, or vel)' close to it Old lot 33 is therefore not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 34 was not developed until after 1855, but by 1869 there was a building on the
front of the lot. In 1868 the property was connected to the sewer system by the firm of
Woodruff & Robinson, which continued to own it from 1869 to 1873. It is likely that the

39
sewer connection was more or less contemporary with the erection of the first building on the
property. Old lot 34 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 36 already had four small frame buildings on it by 1855. Mrs. Leahy is listed
as the owner in 1869-1873. There are two sewer connection records, the first in 1868 by
Woodruff & Robinson, the second ca. 1914. By 1939, the former narrow yard area between
the front and back buildings depicted on the 1855 Perris map was completely covered over by
a one story brick building. Old lot 36 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 38 was connected to the sewer system in 1868 by Woodruff & Robinson,
which also owned the property in 1869-1873. The yard between the two frame buildings that
stood on the lot in 1855 was completely covered over when a large brick building was erected
on the lot probably in the 18805. Old lot 38 is therefore not considered archaeologically
sensitive.

Old block 20
Between Warren and Baltic Streets, west of Columbia Street - Figs. 17, 25, 28, 34, 40,
45,51, and 56.

Baltic Street is not currently mapped west of Columbia Street and there is no plan to
re-map it. The six-inch water pipe installed in 1856 in Baltic Street could be negatively
impacted by future construction. This is among the earliest of the water pipes installed by the
Nassau Water Company and therefore of historic significance. The area of the street is
considered archaeologically sensitive.
Between 1904 and 1915, the southern third of the block was covered by railroad
tracks, with a freight station on Baltic Street at the eastern end of the block. The tracks may
have disturbed the old foundations of buildings on this part of the block but they did not
actually cover the area of the rear yards. The old lots on Baltic Street are therefore discussed
individually below. With one exception, noted below, the owner of all the properties listed for
1869-1873 was the Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. Where not stated otherwise, there was no
sewer connection record.
In 1855, approximately the western third of this block was occupied by Thompson's
Beef & Pork Packing House. This establishment consisted of both a main, brick building, and

40
what may have been a number of frame sheds or storage areas. Immediately east of this
complex were vacant lots. There are six sewer connection records for this part of the block.
The New York Dock Company is listed for five of the records, ranging in date from 1912 to
1932, and J.1. Dixon is listed for the sixth, 350 feet west of Columbia Street, in 1913. The
Baltic Street side of the block was occupied by Jackson & Shannon's lumber yard. The same
lumber dealers used most of the area fronting on Columbia Street for a lumber yard as well.
Between these establishments, there were a number of frame buildings on individual lots
usually on both the front and rear of the lots or in the yards, but leaving ample vacant areas
for potential privies and cisterns. By 1880, the area formerly occupied by the pork packing
house and the empty lot on Warren Street immediately east of it were swallowed up by
another of Woodruff & Robinson's massive Congress St. Stores (see block 1, above).
Although the 1869 Dripps map shows a number of buildings on the front of the lots on the
Warren Street side of the block, by 1880 (Bromley), the entire area east of the giant
warehouse was vacant, except for a small brick building at the comer of Baltic and Columbia
Streets. The former coal yard at the east end of Baltic Street was at that point being used to
store coal and wood.
Old lot 3, shown on the 1880 Bromley map, included in 1855 three lots that were built
up with industrial and non-industrial frame buildings on three separately outlined lots. The
eastern two of these contained vacant areas in the middle and rear of the lots that were not
subsequently built upon. The buildings were demolished between 1869 and 1880. There is a
possibility that privies could have existed in the yard areas and given the lack of later building
episodes, remains of these features could have survived. Old lot 3 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
In 1855, old lot 4 was divided into four lots, with frame buildings on both the front
and rear of the lots and yards in between. The garage of the New York Port Authority's
administration building, erected between 1950 and 1969, completely covered the area of this
lot. Old lot 4 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 5, on Columbia Street at the corner of Baltic Street, was occupied by lumber
yards and later a coal and wood yard. Like the other lots on this side ofthe block, it was half
covered by railroad tracks laid between 1904 and 1915. Like old lot 4, this lot was completely
covered by the garage of the New York Port Authority's administration building, erected

41
between 1950 and 1969. Old lot 5 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 6, at the corner of Warren and Columbia Streets, had two recorded sewer
connections: Burke (first initial illegible), in 1868, and the new York Dock Co., in 1913. The
owner in 1868 to 1873 was the Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., like almost every other part of
this old block. In 1855 this lot was divided up into three lots each containing frame buildings.
Possibly already ca. 1869, but certainly between 1903 and 1915, a one story building
occupied by engineers and contractors completely covered the lot. The later garage of the
New York Port Authority's administration building again overlapped the southwest comer of
old lot 6. Old lot 6 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 7 was covered by the same one story building, erected between 1903 and 1915,
that covered the neighboring old lot 6. The rear of this old lot was also later overlapped by the
garage of the New York Port Authority's administration building. Old lot 7 is therefore not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 8 was also completely covered by the same one story building that extended
over old lots 6 and 7. The southeast comer of the lot was later overlapped again by the garage
of the New York Port Authority's administration building. Old lot 8 is therefore not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
In 1855, old lot 9 had frame buildings on the front and back of the lot with a vacant
area in between, but like its neighbors to the south, it was covered by the Supply Construction
& Supply Co. Engineers and Contractors building, erected between 1904 and 1915. Old lot 9

is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.


Old lot 10 was owned by Nicole (?) Doran in 1869-1873, but she did not connect her
. house to the sewer system until 1878. Whether or not Mrs. Doran had a privy in her yard, by
1915, the entire lot area was covered by the engineers and contractors building that extended
over old lots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Old lot 10 is therefore not considered archaeologically
sensitive.
Only old lot 3 of old block 20 is considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern
and a privy. The other old lots, because of impacts from subsequent construction episodes.
or because of the lack of development, are not archaeologically sensitive. Baltic Street is
considered archaeologically sensitive for remains of early water systems.

42
Old block 19
Between Baltic and Kane (formerly Harrison) Streets, west of Columbia Street - Figs.
17,25,28,34,40,45,51, and 56.

The 1915 Sanborn map shows three water pipes in Harrison Street, one of which was a
twelve-inch pipe for salt water, marked "private". No dates are recorded, but the private pipe,
ifnot also the undated 20- and 16-inch pipes, are certainly worth investigating, and the area of
Harrison Street within the project site is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for
early water systems.
Except for one brick building on old lot 6 and a sprinkling of seven small frame
buildings, four of which served industrial purposes, old block 19 was not yet developed in
1855. But by 1869, the brick storehouses or A.C. Woodruff's Baltic Stores covered
approximately two-thirds of the block. There are six sewer connections for this part of the
block ranging in date from 1870 to 1909, and under a number of names. The eastern end of
the block was still vacant, used for coal and lumber yards, as also still in 1880. By 1915,
much of the northern half of the block was covered by railroad tracks. The 1869 Dripps map
records a building at the rear of old lot 6 at 59 Harrison Street. By 1880, the lot was vacant.
There were other buildings erected on both the front and the rear of old lot 6 later in the 19th
century and early zo" centuries, but the yard at the center of the lot remained vacant. There
are no sewer connection records for this lot, and there could have been a privy associated with
the lot's first period of occupation. If so, it will not have been impacted by subsequent
construction.
Old lot 6 is therefore considered sensitive for archaeological remains of a privy, but
the remainder of old block 19 is not considered archaeologically sensitive. Harrison Street
is considered archaeologically sensitive for remains of early water systems.

43
Old blocks 33 and 34
Between Kane and Sedgwick Streets west of Van Brunt Street - Figs. 17,25,29,35,
40,46,52, and 57.

These two old blocks have often been united in the past, since Irving Street has usually
not been open west of Van Brunt Street. Sedgwick Street however was, and it contains a six-
inch water pipe dating to 1860. This belongs to the earliest water system in the area and is
therefore of historic significance. The 1915 San~om map also notes a "private", undated
twelve inch water pipe in Van Brunt and Kane Streets, as well as two water pipes dated to
1904 in Van Brunt Street. An opportunity to investigate the 1860 pipe or the "private" pipes,
would certainly be of archaeological and historic interest. Except for Irving Street, which has
no recorded pipes in its bed, all the streets around old blocks 33 and 34 are therefore
considered archaeoiogically sensitive. The entire length of Van Brunt Street contained within
the project site is considered archaeologically sensitive.
In 1855, old blocks 33 and 34 were occupied by the frame stores of the Robins
Southern naval Store Yard and a small brick lime shed on the wharf near Sedgwick Street.
There was also a small frame storage facility on Van Brunt Street, along with a couple of
smaller frame buildings. There are three sewer connections for old block 33 dating to the
early 1860s, and a connection dated 189I, 60 feet west of Harrison, for the Brooklyn Storage
Company. There are no recorded connections for old block 34. The 1869 Dripps map records
a facility for coal on Kane Street, and what are probably the same frame buildings on the
south side of old block 33. By this date, ifnot already earlier, Charles Kelsey owned both old
blocks 33 and 34 and the pier. In the 1869-1873 tax assessments, his building is noted as four
stories. By 1880, old block 34 was covered by Kelsey Stores and Union Stores. Between 1886
and 1893, Union Stores erected another building that covered approximately half of old block
33 on its north side. A small commercial building was erected in the line of Irving Street in
the late 1880s or early 1890s. Because these old blocks were more or less completely
occupied by large warehouses, they are not considered archaeologically sensitive.
While no part of old blocks 33 or 34 is considered archaeologica//y sensitive, the
former street beds surrounding these old blocks, including Sedgwick, Van Brunt and Kane
Streets, are considered archaeologica//y sensitive for remains of early water pipes.

44
Old block 35
Between Sedgwick and Degraw Streets, west of Van Brunt Street, Figs. 17,25,29,
35,41,46,52, and 57.

A six-inch water pipe was installed in Degraw Street in 1860. This is among the
earliest of the water pipes installed by the Nassau Water Company and therefore of historic
significance.
In 1855, this block had both commercial and residential buildings. The western half
was occupied by the brick building and frame sheds of Caldwells & Underhill, a finn that
processed pork and beef. By 1869, these buildings were occupied by Parker, a beef and pork
inspector, and the rest of the block was built up probably with the sheds and other buildings
related to the pork inspection and packing business shown on the 1880 Bromley map. A.
Baxter, whose International Packing House is noted on the 1886 Sanborn map, already owned
the property where the business was sited in 1869-1873.
In 1855, aside from Caldwells, there was only a row of eight brick dwellings on
Degraw Street (old lots 9 to 16) and two on Van Brunt Street (old lots 7 and 8), with vacant
areas between the houses and Caldwell's and in the northeast quarter of the block. These
houses were small, measuring 12.5 feet wide by 35 feet deep, with 35 foot deep yards behind
the rowan Degraw Street and small one story sheds (?) at the rear of each lot, along the lot
line. According to the tax assessments, the buildings on old lots 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 are
noted as having two stories, but the 1886 Sanborn map records them as three-story structures.
Yet they are the same size, so that the owners must have simply added a floor to the existing
buildings. The two three-story houses on Van Brunt Street, recorded as such ill 1869-1873,
were the same 12.5 X 35 foot size, but were on 100 foot lots and therefore had deeper yards,
also with narrow, one-story structures at the rear of their properties. Old lots 7 and 8 were
connected in 1871 to the sewer system by McCosker (first initial unreadable) and John Stutt,
respectively. The listed owner of both these properties in 1869 to 1873, as well as old lots 13
and 14, was John Stutt. The sewer connections for old lots 9, 11, 12 and 13 were all in the lost
book 3, and probably date to the mid 18605. There are no records of any connections for old
lots 10, 14, and 16. Old lot 15 was connected in 1867, by D. Farrell, who was also the owner
of both this property and its neighbor, on old 16, in 1869-1873. The listed owners for the

45
remaining old lots, in 1869 to 1873, were: Richard (Dayle?), old lots 9 and 10; Maurice
Degard, old lot 11, and William Ellmore, old lot 12.
The rear yards of old lots 7, 8, 13 and 14 were never impacted by subsequent
construction and are considered potentially sensitive for the remains of a cistern and privy,
since they existed a decade or more before the residents began using the city's sanitary
facilities. The rear yards of old lots 9, 10, 11, 12, 15 and 16 were built over at various times
in these old lots' history and are therefore not considered sensitive for archaeological
remains. Degraw Street is considered archaeologically sensitive for remains of early water
pipes.

Old blocks 47 and 47A


Between Degraw and Sackett Streets west of Van Brunt Street - Figs. 17,25,29,
35,41,46,52, and 57.

It is proposed to establish continuations of Degraw and Sackett Streets west of Van


Brunt Street as far as a new street, Conover Street, that will curve westward from the west end
of Degraw Street and continue west across old blocks 47A, and blocks 334 and 340. On old
block 47A the street will run over the rear of old lots 1 to 12; 13, 14,37,38, and 18,19 and
36. The sections of Degraw and Sackett Streets west of Van Brunt contain six inch water
pipes that were laid in 1860 and are therefore among the earliest city water pipes in Brooklyn.
They are of historic interest and the portions of these streets adjoining the project site are
therefore considered archaeologically sensitive.
The wharf area was not built up yet in 1855, but by 1869, the western end of old block
47 was covered by John S. Ward's warehouse. The 1880 Bromley map records that Ward's
was a provision inspection ware house. (The southwest comer of this block belongs to lot 62,
discussed below). Because of the building coverage and its nature, This part of old block 47 is
not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old blocks 47 and 47A were originally separated by the 35 foot wide Beach Place.
This street appears on the 1915 Sanborn map but no longer on the 1939 map. From 1855, the
street was flanked on both sides by rows of twelve dwellings, each two stories high and
measuring 16.8 feet wide by about 30 feet long with a twenty foot deep yard, according to the

46
Sanborn maps (old lots 6-17 and 1-12). The owner of all these properties in 1869-1873 was
the same John S. Ward who owned the warehouse at the end of the block. The two sewer
connections for the lots on the west side of Beach Place, located on the north and south sides
of the block, date only to 1931 and 1938, and were for Butler's Warehouse (1939 Sanborn).
On the south side of Beach Place, there are also two recorded sewer connections, located in
the middle of each side of the area occupied by these lots, dating to the late 1860s. Any or all
of these dwellings could therefore have been equipped with a cistern and privy at the back of
the buildings and in their yards. Old lots 6 to 17 of old block 47 and old lots 1 to 12 of old
block 47A are therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.
East of Ward's houses on old block 47A, a cooperage extended the width of the block
over old lots 13, 14, and 38, completely covering their areas. In 1886, the facility was used as
a brass foundry and for storing 'junk". Old lots 13, 14 and 38 are therefore not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
The eastern two-thirds of old block 47A was divided up into a number of house lots,
with two rows of houses on Degraw and Sackett Streets.
Old lots 15 to 22 were developed by 1850 with a row of eight houses on the fronts of
the lots. the 1855 Perris map records these as built of brick. Each measured 12.5 feet wide by
60 feet long, with 40 foot rear yards, and a shed or other shallow building stood at the rear of
each lot. In 1869-1873, these two story dwelling with basements belonged to William Cornell
(four properties) and the Empire Building Association (four properties). The sewer
connections are all later; west to east: two for P. (Blixt?), in 1895; one ca. 1877 (record lost);
one early 1860s (record lost); and two for Straus in 1877. Any of these dwellings could have
heen equipped with a water and sanitary facilities at the rear of the buildings or in the
yards, and because there is no evidence of negative impacts from subsequent construction,
old lots 15 to 22 are considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.
Old lots 28 to 32 were developed by 1855 with a row of five brick houses each 20 feet
wide by 50 feet deep with 25 foot deep yards. All the properties were connected to the sewer
system during the early 1860s (book 2, lost). The yard of the building on old lot 28 was
eventually completely covered by a two story rear addition, but aside from some small sheds
at the rear of lots 30, 31 and 32, the former yards of these dwellings have not been impacted
by subsequent construction. Old lots 29 to 31 are therefore considered archaeologically

47
sensitivefor cisterns and privies, but old lot 28 is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
In 1855, there were also buildings at, and near, the comer of Degraw Street on Van
Brunt Street, on old lots 23 and 24. The buildings on old lot 23 covered its entire area. Owner
Caroline Myers (1869-1873) connected the property to the sewer system in 1867. Because the
house completely covered the lot area, old lot 23 is not considered archaeologically
sensitive.
Old lot 24 belonged to Michael Flood in 1869 to 1873, but he connected it to the
sewer system only in 1873 and he may well have found it convenient to build a cistern and
privy in his yard. There was ample space, with an approximately 40 foot deep yard behind
Flood's three story dwelling. Neither the rear of the building, nor the yard were ever
impacted by subsequent construction and old lot 24 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a privy.
Old lots 25, 26 and 27 on Van Brunt Street were not developed until after 1855 but
there were buildings on these properties by 1869. In 1869-1873, Chester Adams owned old
lots 25 and 26, while old lot 27 was owned by W. H. Imlay. The sewer connections are later:
two for Hodgkiss in 1886 (old lots 25 and 26) and one for W.J. (Ninns?) in 1914 (old lot 27).
In 1886 these three lots were part of a coal yard. The buildings were one story frame sheds
with one brick section, also used as a shed, on old lot 27. After the properties were connected
to the sewer system in 1886 and before 1893 (Bromley), old lots 25 and 26 were developed
for residential occupation with three story brick buildings. By 1904, the area of old lot 27 was
completely built over (and again between 1950 and 1969). Because of this, and because all
these old lots in their earliest periods of use were occupied by a coal yard rather than by a
store or residence, old lots 25,26 and 27 are not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 33, owned by e.G. Lawless in 1869-1873, was connected to the sewer system
in the late 1860s. Every part of the lot was built on at one point or another and old lot 33 is
therefore not considered archoeologically sensitive.
Old lot 34 had a frame building on the rear of the lot by 1850. Old lot 35 was not
developed until after 1869 but by 1880 had a frame building on the front of the lot and a shed
at the rear that extended over the rear of old lot 34 as well. Old lot 36 was not developed until
after 1880 but by 1886 had a one story brick building on the front of the lot. All three
properties (and the cooperage on old lots 37 and 38) were owned by Joseph Thompson in

48
1869 to 1873, and are noted in the tax assessments as "shops". Old lot 34 was connected to
the sewer system by N. Davis in 1887. Old lots 35 and 36 were connected by Daniel Ferry in
1891. By 1893, all three lots had long, five story brick tenement buildings on the front of the
lots. These covered all but approximately nine feet of the former yard area on old lots 34 and
35 that had existed between the frame buildings and the sheds at the rear of the lots ca. 1880.
This area may be reduced by another foot or two to allow for the disturbance created by the
excavation for the foundations of the five story tenement buildings. In sum, although a small
part of the former yards old lots 34 and 35 were not impacted by subsequent construction, the
likelihood of a privy being discovered here, directly in front of the sheds, seems remote. And
although the rear yard of old lot 36 was never built over, the property was not developed until
the 1880s and then connected to the sewer system within a few years. Altogether, it is
concluded here that, because of the space and time periods involved, old lots 34, 35 and 36
are not considered archaeologically sensitive.

49
Block 334

Like their neighbors to the north, the residents and businesses of block 334 had access
to city water from the pipe in Hamilton Avenue as early as 1857. Water pipes were also laid
in Union and Sackett Streets before 1860 (1915 Sanborn). These are among the earliest of the
water pipes laid by the Nassau water company, and therefore of historic significance. Since
the Hamilton Avenue right-of-way runs over the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, whose
construction may have destroyed the early pipes, and in any case, will never be excavated, it
is not considered archaeologically sensitive. The sections of Union, Sackett and Van Brunt
Streets lying within the project site, however, are considered archaeologically sensitive for
early water systems.
Although city water was available by the end of the decade, block 334 was developed
already by 1855, and the earliest residents may wall have built cisterns at the rear of their
buildings. similarly, while the earliest sewer connections for some properties followed in the
1860s, many were not connected at all, or only at much later dates. For these, the possibility
exists that residents or business owners of the mid to late 19th century dug privies in their
yards. Where no impacts from subsequent construction on the fanner yard areas can be
demonstrated, the lots are considered potentially archaeologically sensitive for the remains of
a cistern or privy.
The following discussion refers to lots by the current numbering system, except for
those lots that comprise multiple old lots, in which case the old lot numbers, as shown on the
1880 Bromley map, are used.
There is no recorded sewer connection for Lot 1, whose first recorded owners were the
heirs of Anson Blake (1869-1873.). The property was built up already in 1850. The brick
building shown on the 1855 Perris map extended over lots 1 and 2. The 1886 Sanborn map
shows one-story structures at the rear of the building with a vacant space between them only
approximately five feet deep. The configuration appears rather too cramped to install a privy,
but there might have been a cistern at the rear of the building. Lot 1 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern, but not for a privy.
Lot 2, the store on the corner of Sackett Street and Ferry Place, completely covered
its lot by 1886 and is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive for a backyard

50
privy.
Lot 7 comprises the five old lots 5 through 9. By 1880 all these lots were covered by
the four story brick building of J. Monroe Taylor Chemical Works until roughly the tum of
the century. By 1915 the factory was occupied by Hamilton Pipe Works. Then it became a
baking powder manufacture. In its last industrial incarnation, the building was the paint ware
house of the Martin-Senour Co. In the late 20th century it served as a freight terminal. Any
fixtures of possible significance for the history of the chemical industry will have been
removed when the manufacture was converted to other purposes. Lot 7 is therefore not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 14 comprises the five old lots 10 through 14, (later numbers 14 to 18). All were
developed with buildings by 1855.
Old lot 10 was used as a hotel at least by 1886. Between 1903 and 1915, a one story
hall was added to the rear of the building that completely covered the former yard area. At the
time ofthe first tax assessments, the lot was owned by Mr. / Mrs. Haverty (initial unreadable),
but the property was not connected to the sewer system until 1878, by M. Taylor, who was no
doubt related to, or the same person as, the J .M. Taylor who owned the chemical factory next
door on lot 7. Because the yard was impacted by subsequent construction, this part of lot 14
is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Old lot 11, which was used as a dwelling at least ca. 1886, was first connected to the
sewer system in the early-mid 1860s. The owner in 1869-1873 was Simon Fitch (the reading
of the last name is unclear). Whether or not the property was originally equipped with a
cistern and privy is moot because by 1915, a brick one-story wing was added to the rear of the
dwelling that completely covered the former yard area. This part of lot 14 is therefore not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
The rear yard of old lot 12, which was used as a dwelling ca. 1886, was never
completely built over. There was a one story brick building along the rear lot line at a couple
of points in the lot's history, but otherwise the yard remained empty of structures and the
building unchanged. The house was owned by Simon (Fitch?) like its neighbors to either side,
and connected to the sewer system in the early to mid 1860s. This still leaves some years,
perhaps a decade or so, when the house had no sanitary facilities except possibly a privy in
the yard. This part of lot 14 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy. This

51
part of lot 14 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Old lot 13 was used as a store ca. 1886, but between 1903 and 1915, a one story brick
building that served as a dining room was erected on the rear third of the lot leaving about
fifteen feet of yard between it and the front building. This would still leave room enough for a
cistern and a privy, however, which might have been needed before water and sewer service
became available. The first recorded owner in the tax assessments was Simon (Fitch?). This
part of lot 14 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Aside from a small one story brick building, perhaps a shed, that existed at one point
at the rear of the lot, the yard of old lot 14 was never completely built over. The first owner
listed is Celia Tucker, 1869-1873. The property was connected to the sewer system in the
early 1860s, some years after it was erected. There is room, both temporally and spatially, for
a cistern and a privy at the rear of the building and in the former yard area, and this part of lot
14 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
For lot 14, therefore, the former yard areas of old lots 12, 13 and 14 are considered
archaeologically sensitive for a privy; old lots 10 and 11 are not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
The large lot 40, comprising old lots 30 to 39, was not occupied until after 1855 and
up to 1869 it was still not built on but being used as a coal yard. The 1869-1873 tax
assessments record that all the old lots of lot 40, and indeed all the lots as far as VanBrunt
Street, belonged to the heirs of Anson Blake. By then, they were all built up with sheds. By
1880, however, the Bromley map shows two brick buildings on old lots 37 and 38, distinct
from the frame buildings on old lots 30-35. Old lot 37 was connected to the sewer system by
A. Blake in 1875, and may be eliminated from consideration for archaeological sensitivity.
Thel886 Sanborn depicts this brick building as a stable or shed, and in the early zo" century,
it was used as a carpenter shop. The building on old lot 38 was not connected to the sewer
system until 1891, at which time it still belong to the Anson Blake estate. But it was only a
shed or stable, not a residence or a shop, and in 1915 it was being used to store hay feed. It is
doubtful that this building would have been equipped with its own cistern or privy, especially
in view of the fact that the neighboring property, which did have facilities, belonged to the

same family or owner. Old lots 37 and 38 are therefore not considered archaeologically
sensitive.

52
The only other sewer connection recorded for lot 40 is H. Olsen in 1916, on old lot 35
at 35 Union Street. He presumably lived in the one story brick dwelling shown on the 1915
Sanborn map. Since both this lot and lot 36 (33 Union Street) were apparently vacant in 1880,
the buildings date to the 1880s. Both were being used as dwellings as early as 1886. Although
the 1903 Hyde map notes that they were shops at that time, during the later 1890s (post 1893)
or early years of the 20th century, the building on lot 35 acquired a two story rear addition that
could have served as a residence. There was also a very large shed or stable extending over
the rear third of both lots that had stood there since at least 1886. Between the two story
addition at the rear of the building on old lot 35, and the small shed in the yard of old lot 36,
and the shed at the rear of both lots, one wonders where the residents would have found room
for a privy. We can not however rule out the possibility that they did install a facility in the
yard, perhaps in the vacant area behind and between the two shops. By the time the buildings
were erected, water service was long available and we would not expect to find a cistern
connected with it. Old lots 35 and 36 are therefore both considered sensitive for
archaeological remains of privies.
Every part of old lots 30, 31 and 34 was covered with buildings at one point or another
in these lots' history, which would have impacted possible backyard features, and there can
not be more than a few square feet of old lot 39 that were not also eventually impacted by
construction. The buildings themselves were used as sheds or stores; connected with a coal
yard; used as carpenter workshop or as a machine shop. None of these uses would yield
remains of historical significance. Old lots 30, 31 and 34 are therefore not considered
archaeologica//y sensitive.
The remaining old lots, 32 and 33, were built up with sheds from ca. 1869 on. By
1886 they were part of Petite's coal yard. Given the history of occupation on these lots, which
remained commercial and largely connected with storage of materials, old lots 32 and 33 are
not considered sensitive for archaeological remains.
For lot 40, therefore, the former yard areas of old lots 35 and 36 are considered
archaeologically sensitive for a privy; old lots 30 to 34 and 37 to 39 are not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
Lots 51 to 65 all had brick buildings erected on the front of the lots by 1855 before
sewer service was available, and all had rear yards that could have accommodated a privy.

53
The 1886 Sanborn records that these were all four story stores with one story rear wings. The
histories of the individual lots are as follows:
The buildings on lots 53, 56, 57, 61, 62 and 63 may be eliminated from consideration
for archaeological sensitivity because their rear yards were impacted by subsequent building
episodes. The first listed owners of these properties in 1869-1873 were Ellen Hickey for lot
53; Conroy (first initial unreadable), for lot 56; James (Cananaugh?) for lot 57; Catherine T.
Tanner for lot 61; John Ross for lot 62, and Elizabeth Murtagh, for lot 63. The only name
preserved from the sewer connection records is John Collins, in 1885, for lot 57. The records
for lots 56, 61, 62 and 63 are in the lost books of the early-mid 1860s. For lot 53 there is no
record of a connection at all. Because the former yard areas were completely built over at
one point or another in the lots' histories, lots 53, 57, 61, 62 and 63 are not considered
archaeologica/ly sensitive.
As for lots 51, 53, 54, 58, 59, 64 and 65, they were all developed with brick buildings
on the front of the lots by 1855. the 1869 Dripps map indicates that the rear yards of lots 51,
53, and 54 were used for coal storage, which makes one wonder how or where the owners or
tenants of the stores on these lots, fronting on Union Street, would have built privies behind
their establishments after ca. 1869. Apart from this episode, however, the rear of these lots, as
of lots 58, 59 and 60, remained vacant, and except for a few small structures at various times
their yards were not impacted by subsequent construction episodes. Thus, we can not rule out
the possibility that the properties were equipped with cisterns and privies in the 1850s to early
1860s, prior to being connected to the water and sewer systems and before the coal yard
located on Sackett Street ca. 1855, moved into their backyards. This may have occurred after
the erection of the chemical works (see lot 7, above). Lots 51, 53, 54, 58, 59, 64 and 65 are
therefore considered archaeologica/ly sensitive for cisterns and privies.
The building on Lot 51 was connected to the sewer system in the early 1860s, some
years after the building was erected. Z. Landerberger is listed as the first owner (1869-1873).
Since there were no negative impacts from subsequent construction either to the building or
its yard, the possibility that a cistern and privy existed on this lot can not be ruled out. Lot 51
is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
The first listed owner of the property on Lot 52 was Peter J. Rudden. Confusingly, the
sewer connection lists his neighbor Ellen Hickey (1869-1873). But the location of the

54
connection suggests that it may have been on the property line between the two lots. In any
case, this would not rule out the possibility that the tenants had a privy in the yard during the
1850s. Neither the building nor the yard was impacted by subsequent building episodes. Lot
52 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 54 has no recorded sewer connection. The first recorded owner is Ann G. Jane
(1869-1873). The owners or tenants on this property may have found it useful to construct a
privy in the yard at some point. Neither the building nor the yard was impacted by subsequent
building episodes. Lot 54 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and
a privy.
Lot 55 was connected to the sewer system in the early 1860s. The property's first
owner was Anthony (Prossler?) (1869- 1873). Here too, an indeterminate number of years
preceded the sewer connection, which means that the possibility of a privy in the rear yard can
not be ruled out. Neither the building nor the yard was impacted by subsequent building
episodes. Lot 55 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 58 was connected to the sewer system by Mr. Murphy in 1873 although the listed
owner for 1869-1873 was James (McGriavy?) Thus, the building was standing on the lot for
some two decades before the tenants availed themselves of the city's sewage facilities.
Additions or rebuildings eventually almost the entire lot area, making unlikely that a cistern,
usually located at the rear of buildings, would have survived. We can not however rule out the
possibility that a privy existed in the small area at the rear of the lot that was not impacted by
subsequent construction. Lot 58 is therefore considered archueologically sensitive for a
privy, but not for a cistern.
Lot 59, composed of old lots 48 and 49, was owned was Ellen (Skehan?). There are
two sewer connection records: The larger building on old lot 49, I3 Hamilton Avenue, was
connected in the early 1860s, but its neighbor was not connected until 1925, by S. Brown.
Both could have used backyard privies, as well as cisterns, and since neither buildings nor
yards were impacted by subsequent construction, these installations may have survived. Lot
59 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.
Lots 64 and 65 and the adjacent lot 63, which was eventually completely built over,
were occupied by a four story brick hotel and store that were erected by 1850, and by 1855 at
least, named the "Atlantic Hotel". The building served as a hotel until at least 1886, and the

55
structure survived until after 1915. Lot 64 has three recorded sewer connections: one in the
early 1860s and two in the late 1860s. The first recorded owners were 1. & M. Murphy (1869-
1873). Lot 65 was not connected to the sewer system until 1941 by J.B. White. Like the other
properties on Ferry Place, its first recorded owners were the Heirs of Anson Blake in 1869-
1873. The vacant area at the rear of these lots is very narrow, but behind lot 65 it was about
20 feet long, and this is certainly big enough for a few, surely much needed, privies. The
vacant area behind lot 64 was very restricted, but the two spaces are adjacent and were
originally connected, so that the feature(s) might have overlapped the two lots. Lots 64 and 65
are therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.

56
Block 340

There were quite a few buildings standing on this block already by 1850. By 1855, it
was fully developed. As elsewhere, some property owners availed themselves of sewer
service soon after it became available, ca. 1860, while others, for one reason or another, did
not. Water service was available to this blocks' residents already by the late 1850s. A twelve
inch water pipe was laid in President Street in 1857; six inch pipes existed in Hamilton
Avenue and Van Brunt Street also in 1857, and a six inch pipe was laid in Union Street before
1860. These pipes are among the earliest laid by the Nassau Water Company and therefore of
historic significance. The former Hamilton Avenue runs over the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel,
whose construction may have destroyed the early pipes, but in any case, this area will never
be excavated, and is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive. The sections of
Union, President and Van Brunt Streets surrounding block 340, however, are considered
archaeologically sensitive for early water pipes.
The following discussion refers to lots by the current numbering system, except for
those lots that comprise multiple old lots, in which case the old lot numbers, as shown on the
1880 Bromley map, are used.
The 1855 Perris map shows brick dwellings with stores under on most of the lots. But
there were also complexes of an industrial character, as indicated by the presence of buildings
marked green for hazard. There was also a coal yard on old lots 36 and 37 (part of lot 48, see
below). In later decades these industrial uses disappeared along with the few residential ones,
and every building on the block was designated as a store except for the large bakery on
Union Street and a hotel briefly located on old lot 34 (lot 46, below).
The oddly configured lot I has no rear yard to speak of, just a long, approximately
four-foot strip that runs along the east side of old lot 2, which was also already built on in
1850. Although this strip was part of lot 1 already in 1850, and has never been impacted by
construction, it would not make sense to test it except in conjunction with its neighbor, lot 2,
whose rear yard was also never built on. The 1886 Sanborn records that both were four story
stores. Lot 1 was connected to the sewer system in the early 18605, but there is no record of a
connection for lot 2. Both lots 1and 2 are considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern
and a privy.

57
Lot 3 had a building standing on it by 1850 and a vacant rear yard. Neither was ever
impacted by later building on the lot. The property was not connected to the sewer system
until 1929 by A. (Pitinos?). It is possible that the owners of this four story store also found it
practical to build facilities for water and sewage. Lot 3 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
The building on Lot 4 in 1855 was part of a large structure that also extended over lots
4, 17, 19 and 20, and was marked green for hazard on the Perris map, so probably an
industrial space. By 1869, this complex no longer existed. The building on lot 4 was
connected to the sewer system in the late 1860s. Because it completely covered the lot, lot 4
is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
By 1855, lots 5 and 6 each had a brick building standing on the front of the lot, with a
yard behind it. There are two sewer connections for lot 5, one dated ca. 1869, the other in
1907, by William Evertt. Lot 6 was connected to the sewer system in the late 1860s. Between
1893 and 1903 a one story brick building was erected on each of the lots that covered all of
the former yards except a narrow strip perhaps five feet deep at the rear. Lots 5 and 6 are
therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
The 1850 Dripps map shows a building on lot 7 completely covering it, but the 1855
Perris map shows a brick building with a rear extension that covered not quite halfthe rear
yard on its east side. This building survived until between 1915 and 1939. It was not
connected to the sewer system until 1890, by Andrew Donovan, and previous owners or
occupants may have found it convenient to erect a privy in the yard, although the space,
approximately twelve by fifteen feet, is small. But the vacant rear corner of the yard, which
existed from at least 1855, was never built upon and the possibility that there was a cistern at
the rear of the building and a privy in the yard can not be ruled out. Lot 7 is therefore
considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lots 8 and 14, on President and Union Streets respectively, were completely built over
with a brick building by 1855. The building on the Union Street half already existed in 1850.
The 1886 Sanborn records the building as a four story store. Lot 8 has no recorded sewer
connection, but lot 14 has two, the earlier from the first, lost sewer connection book, probably
dating ca. 1860, the second by J.e. Koehl (?) in 1887. Because the lots were completely
covered by buildings, lots 8 and 14 are not consideredarchaeologically sensitive.

58
The building on lot 9 depicted on the 1855 Perris map extended from President to
Union Streets. The 1886 Sanborn records it as a four story store. There are no sewer
connections for this lot, but as the lot was completely covered/rom the start, lot 9 is not
considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 10, the western tip of this triangular block, was completely covered by a brick
building on it in 1855 that is labeled "Barker House" on the Perris map. It continued to serve
as a hotel until at least 1886, when it was called Waldo Ho, (house or hotel). This
establishrri.ent was connected to the sewer system as soon as facilities became available: its
record is in the lost book 1, ca. 1860. Because the lot was completely covered/rom the start,
lot 10 is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 15 had a brick building on the rear of the lot in 1850 and another on front of the
lot by 1855, by which time the older building had been removed. Except for a narrow, one
story brick building along the rear lot line, the rear yard was never impacted by subsequent
construction. The property was connected ca. 1860, but this still leaves an indeterminate
number of years, approximately five at the minimum, during which the building was without
facilities. There may therefore have been a privy in the yard used during that early period of
the lot's occupation, as well as a cistern at the rear of the building. Lot 15 is there/ore
considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
The brick building on lot 16, in 1855, was the mirror image of the one on lot 7, with
an extension at the rear on only one side of the building, here the east. The lot however had a
much larger, L-shaped yard that was never impacted by subsequent construction. The
property was connected to the sewer system ca. 1860, but this still leaves an indeterminate
number of years, approximately five at the minimum, during which the building was without
facilities. There may therefore have been a privy in the yard used during that early period of
the lot's occupation, as well as a cistern at the rear of the building. Lot 16 is there/ore
considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 17 comprises old lots 6 and 7. Most of the lot was occupied by an industrial
building in 1850 that had wings on lots 4, 19,20 and 21. The property was not connected to
the sewer system until 1877 by Mrs. Burgaman, but eventually the vacant areas at the rear of
old lot 6 and along the east edge of lot 7 were built over. Lot 17 is there/ore not considered
archaeologically sensitive.

59
In 1855, the front of lot 19 was occupied by a brick store and the rear by a wing of the
industrial complex that extended over lots 4, 17,20 and 21. The property was not connected
to the sewer system until 1891, but this is moot, because the narrow yard between the earliest
buildings on the lot was covered by 1886 by a building that housed a bakery. Lot 17 is
therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 20 and part of lot 48 (old lot 37), were connected ca. 1886 and are therefore
treated here together. In 1855, the front of the L-shaped lot 20 was occupied by a brick store
and part of the rear by a wing of the industrial complex that extended over lots 4, 17,20 and
21. The store was connected to the sewer system in 1867 by Chas. (Boltmen?) The eastern
end of the "L", south oflot 23 and extending partly over the area south oflot 22, was never
built upon. This piece ofland, however, did not belong to the rear yard of the lots on Union
Street, it was a separate lot, number 30 on the 1880 Bromley. There were no buildings on it
until 1886, when the western end had a small wing, marked "rectifying" of the building on lot
20. At this point, the building on lot 20 ran across the block, taking in the building on old lot
37. Judging by the "rectifying" chamber, it was no doubt partly given over to manufacturing,
although the building on the front of lot 37 was the old four story store that had stood there
since at least 1855. That property was also connected to the sewer system in the late 1860s.
There is no sewer connection for old lot 30, and it was not possible to fmd an owner's name
to go with it. Nevertheless, in view of this area's lack of relationship to surrounding lots and
the fact that it was not actually occupied either by a store or a dwelling, neither lot 20, nor old
lot 37 of the neighboring lot 48 are considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 21, developed by 1850, was completely covered by a brick building by 1886.
Although the property was never connected to the sewer system, this is moot in view of the
lot coverage. Lot 21 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lots 22, 23 and 24 all had brick stores on the front of the lots by 1850. Except for
narrow sheds along the south and east lot lines on lots 22 and 23 and a single narrow shed
along the rear lot line of lot 24, their rear yards were never built on. The buildings on these
properties were all identified as four story stores on the 1886 Sanborn map. Lot 22 was only
connected to the sewer system in 1897, by E. (Mondainia?), leaving half a century without
facilities. There is no record of a sewer connection for lot 23. Lot 24 was connected in 1876
by Cosgrove. The possibility that privies existed in the yards of these lots, as well as cisterns

60
at the rear of the buildings, can not be ruled out, and lots 22, 23 and 24 are therefore all
considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.
The Lshaped lot 25 includes part of old lot 30 as defined on the 1880 Bromley. This
portion of the lot was covered by a frame building erected between 1893 and 1903 and may
be eliminated from consideration for archaeological sensitivity. It may be noted that on the
1915 Sanborn, it is designated "Dry Ho." and was possibly part of the industrial complex on
lot 20 (see above). In 1855 there was a brick store on lot 25 fronting on Union Street and a
narrow frame building some distance behind it along the east half ofthe lot and extending
over old lot 30 marked green for hazard. The property was connected to the sewer system in
1876 by Cosgrove. Between 1915 and 1939, the yard was covered by a one story brick pool
room, which would have negatively impacted any potential remains of a privy. Lot 25 is
therefore not considered archaealogically sensitive.
The Dripps map shows that lot 26 was developed for multiple dwellings by 1850 with
a row of brick buildings fronting on an alley called Union Court on the 1855 Perris map.
There are two sewer connection records for this property, both dated 1868, for Butterworth.
The 1886 Sanborn records a three story store on Union Street followed by a row of two story
brick buildings. By 1903, these buildings were replaced by a massive structure with a three
story wing in the front and a two story wing in the rear. A one story section connecting the
two was built over the west side ofthe lot, covering the remaining area of the former alley.
Lot 26 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 28 was developed by 1850 with a building on the rear of the lot. In 1855, there
was a brick building on the front of the lot with a frame rear wing that together covered the
rest of the lot area, although the earlier building was by that time removed. There is no sewer
connection for this lot, but if there had been a privy in this narrow yard, the two one-story
brick buildings built in there in the early 20th century would probably have negatively
impacted a privy or cistern. Lot 28 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 29 had a brick building standing on the front of the lot by 1850. The property was
connected to the sewer system by Mr. (Annor?) in 1867. The 1886 Sanborn records that the
building was a three story store. An extension at the rear of the building may have negatively
impacted a cistern, but the rear yard was never disturbed by subsequent construction. Lot 29 is
therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy, but not a cistern.

61
By 1903, the former yard of lot 30 was completely covered by extensions to the
original ca. 1855 brick store on the front of the lot. The property was connected to the sewer
system in the mid-1860s, but this is moot in view of the lot coverage. Lot 30 is therefore not
consideredarchaeologicaUysenshiv~
Lot 31 had a brick building on the front of the lot by 1850. The property was
connected to the sewer system ca. 1860. Its year yard was not impacted, except by the
addition, in the early 20th century, of a one story brick building along the rear lot line. The
building remained unchanged during its lifetime. Lot 31 is therefore considered
archaeologica/ly sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 32 was eventually completely built over. It was initially developed by 1855 with a
brick store at the front of the lot, and connected to the sewer system by Lang in 1873. But in
view of the lot coverage, lot 32 is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 33 was already completely covered by buildings in 1850. The 1855 Perris map
records a brick store on Union Street and two small buildings marked green for hazard on Van
Brunt Street. The property was connected to the sewer system ca. 1860. In view of the lot
coverage, lot 33 is not considered archaeologica/ly sensitive.
Lot 35 comprises two old lots, numbers 23 (north) and 24 (south). Two buildings, later
recorded as brick stores, were standing on the front of lot 35, on Van Brunt Street, by 1850.
One of the buildings was connected to the sewer system ca. 1860, the other in 1867, by
g.D.W. Mitchell. Except for a one story brick building in the yard of old lot 23, along the
north lot line, the southern half of the yard and a strip at the rear, along the west lot line, were
never impacted by subsequent construction. Old lot 24, for all intents and purposes, was
eventually completely covered by building. Old lot 23 of lot 35 is therefore considered
archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy, but old lot 24 of lot 35 is not considered
archaeologicallysensitiv~
Later identified as a brick store, lot 38 already had a building on it by 1850. There is
no recorded sewer connection. The lot was however eventually completely covered with
buildings. In 1950, the premises were occupied by an undertaker. In view of the lot coverage,
lot 38 is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 39 was built upon by 1850. On later maps, the building is identified as a brick
store. The 1855 Perris map also shows a narrow building at the rear of the lot along the lot

62
line. The property was connected to the sewer system ca. 1860. The rear yard was never
impacted by subsequent construction. We can not eliminate the"possibility that the occupants
used a cistern and a privy during the first ten years or more the building's occupation. Lot 39
is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for cistern and a privy.
By 1850,lots 40, 41, and 42 had buildings on the front of the lots. The 1855 Perris
map indicates that these were brick, and shows also narrow structures along the rear lot line.
Lot 40 was connected to the sewer system in the early to mid 1860s; lot 41, only in 1910, by
G. Tasso, and lot 42, in the early to mid 1860s. The yards of these properties were never
impacted by subsequent construction. We can not eliminate the possibility that cisterns and
privies were used on these properties during the early years of their occupation. Lots 40,41
and 42 are therefore considered archaeoJogica//y sensitive for cisterns and privies.
Lot 43 was developed by 1850, but its area was completely built over by 1903. The
1886 Sanborn map indicates that the building was a three story brick store. The property was
connected to the sewer system in the mid I 860s, but this is moot in view of the lot coverage.
Lot 43 is therefore not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 44, also developed by 1850, was also eventually completely built over by the same
three story brick building that covered the fanner yard of its neighbor, lot 43. The early
building was a three story brick store (1886 Sanborn). It was connected to the sewer system
ca. 1860. There is also a later connection, east of the first, dated 1877, for M. Smith. Because
of the lot coverage, lot 44 is not considered archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 45 was developed by 1855 with a brick building on the front of the lot. The rear of
this lot was never impacted by subsequent construction and although it was connected to the
sewer system ca. 1860, there are still some years during which the occupants may have found
it practical to use a cistern and a privy. The 1886 Sanborn records the building as a three story
store. Lot 45 is therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 46 comprises old lots 33 and 34, both of which had brick stores standing on the
front ofthe lots by 1855. Additionally, old lot 34 (on the west), had a frame building at the
rear of the lot colored green for hazard, so probably connected with some industrial use or
containing flammable materials. Both lots were connected to the sewer system ca. 1860. Lot
34 was completely built over by the early 20th century. While the extensions at the rear of the
original building on old lot 33 will have probably destroyed a potential cistern, portions of the

63
rear yard were never impacted by subsequent construction. Old lot 33 of lot 46 is therefore
considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy, but old lot 34 is not considered
archaeologically sensitive.
Lot 48 comprises old lots 35, 36 and 37. Old lot 37 was treated above under lot 20.
Old lot 35 was almost completely covered by buildings by 1855, with a brick store on the
front of the lot and two frame buildings, both marked green for hazard, in the rear half of the
lot. The three story store on the front of the lot was augmented by a three story addition in the
early 20th century. The only vacant area was along the west lot line. There is no sewer
connection record for this property, but this is moot, given the lot coverage. In 1855, old lot
36 was occupied by a coal yard. By 1869, there was a building on the front of the lot. The lot
was connected to the sewer system by the late 1860s. By 1886, the lot was almost completely
covered by buildings, except for a narrow strip along the west side of the property. Because
of the lot coverage, old lots 35, 36 and 3 7 are not considered archaeologically sensitive.

64
Block 346

This block was filled in the late 1840s before 1849, and the Hamilton Street side was
completely covered with brick dwellings with stores by 1855. Unlike block 499 (below), the
first tax assessments of 1869-1873 do not show one owner-developer buying up a row of lots
but rather a different owner is listed for almost every lot. In 1850, there was one building on
Hamilton Avenue, and three on President Street. But while the Hamilton Avenue side then
developed quickly, with a complete row of brick buildings by 1855, the President Street side
continued to be sparsely occupied, with only three brick stores on old lots 20, 21, 22 and some
frame structures marked green for hazard and therefore probably industrial on old lot 23.
. Businesses and residents on every side of block 346 had access to city water as early
as 1857, the date when water pipes were laid in all three streets bordering the block. These are
among the earliest installations of the Nassau Water Company and therefore of historic
significance. But since the Hamilton Avenue right-of-way runs over the Brooklyn Battery
Tunnel, whose construction may have destroyed the early pipes, and in any case, will never be
excavated, it is not considered archaeologically sensitive. But the sections of President,
Carroll and Van Brunt Streets bordering block 346 are considered archaeologically
sensitive for remains of early water pipes.
Sewer connections for some of the properties on Hamilton Avenue (old lots 18, 19,20
and 21) and President Street (old lots 2 and 3), followed in the I 860s. The remaining
connections -- when they were actually made at all- date after 1870. Although a number of
the lots on this block may be eliminated from consideration for potential archaeological
sensitivity because they were completely built over at one point or another (lots 1, 2, 7, 11,
21, 22, 25 and 26), the rear yards of lots 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 23 were not impacted by
subsequent construction and may be sensitive for archaeological remains consisting of
cisterns and privies. Unfortunately, except for the ship chandlery at 43 Hamilton Avenue
indicated on the 1886 Sanborn map (lot 11), we have no information about the types of
businesses that existed at these addresses in the mid-late 19th century.
Lot 3, on the comer of Carroll Street and Hamilton Avenue, was a three-part brick
building with stores at least on the ground floor. Its sewer connection was recorded in the lost
book I, which may be dated ca. 1860, several years after the erection of the building. We can

65
not rule out the possibility that the building's earliest users were equipped with a cistern and
privy, and since the rear of the lot was never impacted by subsequent construction, lot 3 is
therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a cistern and a privy.
Lot 5, 6, 9 and 10 on Hamilton Avenue, all twenty-foot wide lots with three story
brick buildings on them, were built by 1855. Lots 6 and 9 were connected to the sewer system
in the early l860s (records in the lost book 3 and book 2, respectively), but the adjacent
properties on lots 5 and 10 have no sewer connection records. Again, we can not rule out the
possibility that these buildings' earliest users had cisterns and privies, and since there were no
later building episodes on these lots that may have destroyed these features, lots 5, 6, 9, and
10 are all considered archaeologically sensitive for cisterns and privies.
The church and school on the corner of President and Van Brunt Streets is not
considered archaeologically sensitive because its buildings completely covered the lot. The
main building, erected between 1880 and 1886, was first occupied by the Bethel Ship
Methodist Episcopal church. By 1903, the building was transformed into a Catholic convent
school run by the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart. The school was later renamed the
$1. Charles School.

66
Block 499

Block 499 is no longer surrounded by four streets as shown on the tax map but
subsumed into the general area at the southern end of the Brooklyn Piers. The residents of this
block, at least on the Hamilton A venue side -- which was the first to develop Hamilton
Avenue _. had access to city water as soon as it became available. A pipe was laid in
Hamilton Avenue in 1857. But since this right-of-way runs over the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel,
whose construction may have destroyed the early pipes, and in any case, will never be
excavated, it is not considered archaeologically sensitive. Today, block 499 is bounded on the
west by Summit Street, which contains two water pipes, a six inch pipe dated 1874 and a
twelve inch pipe dated ] 904. These are not among the earliest pipes laid in the area and are
therefore of much less historic interest than their neighbors on nearly every other street on the
project site. Both water pipes in Imlay Street date to 1904, and the same remarks apply. The
four-inch water pipe in Conover Street is not dated on the maps. In view of the number of
opportunities of recovering remains of early water pipes on every other street on the project
site, the later or undated pipes located in Summit, Imlay and Conover Streets are not
considered of archaeologically sensitive, and the area of Hamilton Avenue, which will not
he impacted by subsequent excavation or construction is also not considered
archaeologicallysensitiv~
The land on which this block was built was created after ca. 1849 and before 1855, by
which time the Hamilton Avenue side of the block was built up with a row of identical brick
buildings, probably the same four story stores as shown on the 1886 Sanborn map, which also
records the maritime commercial character of many of these establishments. All the buildings
were four story brick stores, with a number whose businesses clearly reflect the proximity of
the Atlantic Dock, viz. the workshops for carpenters and boat builders and shipwrights;
storage for stevedores, and a "sail institute" on Summit Street, as well as a boarding house
and a hotel on Commercial Wharf and Imlay Street, respectively. The upper stories of the
stores would have been occupied by those who ran the shops or rented out to others.
Block 499 today contains only lot 1, but formerly was divided up into 17 old lots. The
earliest tax records, from 1869-1813, record that groups of lots had been bought up by single
individuals, evidently for investment. David Van Cleef, for instance, owned old lots 4, 5 and

67
6, and all the Hamilton Avenue properties except for the comer lot on Commercial Wharf
were developed by Martha Peet. Her lessees' names are unfortunately unknown, since the
sewer records, which might have provided them, are lost.
In 1855, the Commercial Wharf (now Conover Street) side of the block had just two
buildings near the comer of Summit Street. The rest of the old lots on the Summit Street and
Commercial Wharf sides of the block were built upon only after 1855 but before 1869. Both
the two buildings shown on the 1855 Perris map near the comer of Summit Street, as well as
the later buildings on the north and west sides of the block, may be eliminated from
consideration for archaeological sensitivity either because the old lots were sooner or later
completely built over (old lots 1 through 6), or because the sewer connection records predate
1867 while the buildings were erected after 1855, suggesting that they were probably hooked
up shortly after their construction. For instance, lots 7 and 8, were not developed until after
ca. 1869 (Dripps), but their sewer connections were recorded in the lost book 3, which should
date before ca. 1867. Old lots 1 through 8 are therefore not considered archaeologically
sensitive.
The properties on lots 9 through 14 were also connected to the sewer system before
1867. Their connections were recorded in the lost book 2, dating probably to the early to mid
18605, probably no more than about ten years after the buildings were erected. Lot 17 was
connected in 1869. Lot 15 has no sewer connection recorded and lot 16 was not connected
until 1931! None of the buildings or their rear yards was impacted by subsequent
construction, and the residents may well have used cisterns and privies. Old lots 9 through 17
are therefore considered archaeologically sensitive for a privy and a cistern.

68
Block 500

The small triangular block 500 is no longer bounded by three streets as shown on the
tax map but subsumed into the general area at the southern end of the Brooklyn piers. As
noted in the previous sections, neither Summit Street, nor Hamilton Avenue is considered
archaeologically sensitive, but Van Brunt Street, which passes in front of the tip of this
block, is considered archaeologically sensitive for early water pipes.
Like block 499 to the north, the land on which block 500 was built was created only
ca. 1850, but quickly developed thereafter, because the 1855 Perris map already shows four
brick buildings on the block, three of them industrial, since they are marked green for hazard.
These cover most of the block area. The Imlay Street front of the block was developed by
1880. The 1886 Sanborn records that several of the shops where smithies. By 1915, the
commercial establishments had become more diversified, with a plumber supply and a
moving picture store sharing the block with other stores, and a poultry seller moving in
between 1915 and 1939. All the old buildings were demolished between 1939 and 1950, to be
replaced by a single large office building that was in its tum demolished between 1979 and
1988.
Because the block was almost completely covered with commercial buildings
practically since its creation, and these will not have left archaeological traces of historic
interest, no part a/this block is considered archaeologically sensitive.

69
6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDA nONS

This assessment has determined that a total of seventy-three sites, consisting of the
former back yards of dwellings and stores, are potentially archaeologically sensitive for
remains of cisterns and / or privies associated with the earliest period of occupation on the
project site. Twenty-four of these sites are located on block 281, lot 1: there are ten sites on
the block between Congress and Warren Street (old block I) and seven on the block between
Degraw and Sackett Streets (old blocks 47 and 47A); one site is located each of the old blocks
between Warren and Baltic Streets (old block 20) and Baltic and Kane Streets (old block 19);
the block between Sedgwick and Degraw Streets contains four sites. The remaining sections
of block 281, lot 1 are not sensitive for archaeological remains, that is: the entire area between
Atlantic Avenue and Congress Street, and between Kane and Sedgwick Streets. Block 281, lot
62 is not considered archaeologically sensitive. The remaining sites are located as follows:
thirteen sites .on block 334; twenty-one on block 340; six on block 346, and nine on block
499. No part of block 500 is considered archaeologically sensitive.
Sections of almost all the present and former streets within the project site area contain
water pipes belonging to the earliest system installed in the area. These are therefore also
considered archaeologically sensitive. Only Summit, Imlay and Conover Streets may be
eliminated from consideration, as the pipes laid in those streets are later in date. Hamilton
Avenue is also not considered archaeologically sensitive because no building or excavation
will take place in its right-of-way, which runs over the Brooklyn Battery TunneL In any case,
the excavation for the tunnel will have probably destroyed the old street bed and the pipes that
it contained. In all the other streets, however, there are pipes dating between the late 1850s to
1860, which are the earliest laid by the Nassau Water Company and therefore of historical
significance. The streets considered potentially sensitive for archaeological remains of early
water systems are: Pacific, Amity, Congress, Warren, Baltic, and Kane Streets, west of
Columbia Street; Kane, Sedgwick, Degraw, Sackett, Union and President Streets, west of Van
Brunt Street, and Van Brunt Street between Kane Street and Hamilton Avenue.
This assessment recommends that archaeological testing be undertaken in the former
back yard areas flagged for archaeological sensitivity in order to determine the presence or
absence of remains of privies or cisterns and their state of preservation. A backhoe may be

70
used to remove the asphalt and its bedding to expose the fill layer beneath in which the privies
or cisterns may have been excavated. Any features encountered would then be excavated by
hand by archaeologists, their form and location recorded, and their contents collected,
recorded and studied. As for the area of the streets, the following protocol is recommended.
In the case of mapped streets, where the street needs to be opened in install new utilities, or in
the case of demapped streets, where construction will necessitate excavation within the former
street beds, it is recommended that an archaeologist be present to monitor the work of the
utilities company or builder. Should any old pipes come to light during either of these
operations, or any other operation that might negatively impact potential archaeological
remains, it is understood that work would be temporarily suspended until the archaeologist
could assess the integrity of the remains, record them, and if the archaeologist and the LPC
deemed it appropriate, excavated portions of the pipes for further study and possible
conservation.

71
7. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Armbruster, Eugene L.
1919 The Ferry Road on Long Island. New York: Published by the author.

Atlantic Avenue
1897 Report of the Atlantic Avenue Commission. City of Brooklyn. Brooklyn: Eagle
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Bergen, T.G.
[1750] Copy of an Ancient Map in Possession of a descendant of the Hannes or Hans
Bergen whose house is located thereon.

Board of Health map


1875-76 Map showing the Original high 7 low grounds, salt march & shore lines in
the City of Brooklyn 1776-7. Report of the Board of Health 1875-6.

Bolton, Reginald Pelham


1920 "New York City In Indian Possession". Museum of the American Indian, Heye
Foundation. Indian Notes and Monographs, vol. II, no. 7.
1922 "Indian Paths in the Great Metropolis". Museum of the American Indian, Heye
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Bromley, G.W. & E. Robinson


1880 Atlas of the City of New York, pIs. 3, 15.
1893 Atlas of the Borough of Brooklyn, City of New York, pIs. 6, 30.

Brooklyn C.C.
1870 The Brooklyn Compendium. Compiled by John Brooklyn c.c. Jr. Brooklyn
Common Council.

Brooklyn Directory
1842 Brooklyn Alphabetical and Street Directory and Yearly Advertiser, for 1841-2
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1850 Brooklyn Directory.

Brooklyn Eagle
1846 "Common Council". March 17, p. 2.
1849 "Passing a False Token", Sept. 22, p. 3.
1872 "The Shore Line. Docks, Piers and Warehouses. From Hamilton to South
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1873 "Irregularity, Woodruff, Robinson & Co, and the Government". Oct. 18, p. 8.
1875 "Woodruff & Robinson. The Firm to be Dissolved - How the Business will be
Conducted Hereafter", Jan. 12, p. 4.
1890 Obituary, David Dows, March 31, p. 5.

72
1890B "The Death of David Dows", March 31, p. 4.
1890C "A Well Known Street", Aug. 3, p. 12.
1894 "Premature Talk ofa Trust", Dec. 7, p. 1.
1896 "Old Brooklyn Farm Lands", July 19, p. 20.
1898 Obituary, Franklin Woodruff, March 17, p. 7.

Butt, Richard
1846 Map of the City of Brooklyn and the Village of Williamsburgh.

Camrnissa, A.G.
1995 Phase IA Archaeological Documentary Study for Columbia Street Urban
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Coastal Survey
1845 Map of New York Bay and Harbor and the environs. Survey of the Coast of the
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Colton, J.H.
1836 Topographical Map ofthe City and County of New York and the adjacent
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1849 Map of the City of Brooklyn. New York.

Cropsey, Frances Bergen


1925 Indian Trails of Kings County compiled by Frances Bergen Cropsey. Read at
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Dripps, M.
1850 Map of the City of Brooklyn. New York.
1869 Map of the City of Brooklyn. New York, pl. 5.

Goldman, Joanne Mara


1988 The development of a sewer system in New York City, 1800-1866: evolution
of a technological and managerial infrastructure. Ph.D. Diss., SUNY
Stonybrook.

Grumet
1881 Native American Place Names in New York City. Museum of the City of New
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HPI
1984 Phase IA Archaeological Impact Report/or the Watchtower bible and Tract
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Hyde, E. Belcher
1898 Atlas of the Borough of Brooklyn City of New York. Vol. 1, pis. 2,3,4.
1903 Atlas of the Borough of Brooklyn City of New York. Vol. 1, pls, 5,8.

Jarvis, ].8. and Burnett, W.B.


1852 Reports of John B. Jarvis, Esq., and Ward B. Burnett, Esq., civil engineers. in
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T. Kelsey & Loughlin


1869 Advertisement, Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Nov. 17, p. 1.

Manufacturers
1886 Half-Century's Progress of the City of Brooklyn. The City's Leading
Manufacturers and Merchants. New York: International Publishing Co.

Perris, Wm.
1855 [Topographical] Maps of the City of Brooklyn, pl. 13.
1855 Maps of the City of Brooklyn, pls, 7,9, 10.

Provision Stores
1860 Atlas of Provision Stores and Sheds in New York and Brooklyn.

Record
1855 The Brooklyn City and Kings County Record: Budget of General Information.
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Robinson
1886 Atlas of Brooklyn, pl. 30.

Sanborn
1886 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol. 1, pis. lb. 2a, 2b, 3a.
1904 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol. 1, pis. 6. 7. 9, 10.
1915 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol. 1, pls. 6,7,9,10.
1939 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn. voL 1, pls, 6,7,9,10.
1945 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol. I, pls. 6. 7, 9, 10.
1950 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol. 1, pls, 6,7,9,10.
1969 Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn. vol. I, pls. 6. 7, 9, 10.
1979, 1980-1982, 1987, 1988, 1991-1993, 1995,2004
Insurance Maps of the Borough of Brooklyn, vol.l , pls. 6. 7, 9, 10.

Solecki, R.S.
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1 B-2, Alternate Route from No. 12 Regulator to Degraw Street Inclusive,
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74
Stiles, Henry R.
1867 A History of the City of Brooklyn, Including the Old Town and Village of
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75
Fig. 1.. General aerial view of the project site area under review forarehaeolegieal
sensitivity.
Fig. 2. Aerial view of part of block 281 with piers 7 & 8, showing the location of part
of the project site.
Fig ..3 .. Aerial view of part of block 281 with piers 9A & 9B, showing the location of
part of the project site.
Fig. 4. Aerial view of blocks 334, .340, 346,,499 and 500" showing the location ofpart
of the project site.
Fig. 5. View west on Atlantic Av,enue;the project site and pier 7 on the left.

Fig ..,6. View from the northeast corner of Columbia Streetand Atlantic Av,enue
looking towards pier 7
Fig. 7. View from Columbia Street west towards pier 7.

Fig. 8..View from Columbia Street west towards pier 8 on the left.
Fig. 9. View from the comer of Columbia Street at Warren Street looking south
southwest towards the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the
New York Marine Terminals Brooklyn Port Autbroity Piers Admwnistration
buildings ..

Fig. 10. View from the east side of Columbia Street at Baltic Street looking west
towards 100 Columbia Street, the Waterfront Commission Building.
Fig. 11. View from the east side of Columbia and Baltic Streets towards the southwest.

Fig. 12. View from the northeast comer of Kane and Columbia Streets north on
Columbia Street,
Fig .. 13. View from near the corner of Van Brunt and Degraw Streets looking west.

Fig. 14. View from the northwest comer of Van Brunt and Sackett Streets looking
south southwest.
Fig. 15...View from the southeast comer Van Brunt Street and Hamilton Avenae,
looking northwest along Van Brunt Street (Summit Street on the left).
EXi.s1irig Strudures 'E~tobl~shed and
*
Uni!- Heretof Qre _

~~r:bY EtlmlrKlfed I lore Eslobllshed


ru.iQfl Here 0
Street DIms Reto-lned
and H.,.b, bltshed
5,,,,,, I Dlmnn:ion Hereby ESlC'

A 6d Parce),
Proposed

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klyn Phi "I"
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Courtesy
RIVE!'?
EAST ---
CHANNEL
BUTTE.RMILK
~ p. a __ .-
_Jj1!.!!.!~~ -------

--- Project Site ]

Fig. 17. Tax map of block 281. lots land 62.


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VAN BRUNT ST. ._-- Project Site I

Fig. 18,. Tax map of blocks 334 and. 340.


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VAN 'BRUNT ST.


Fig. 19. Tax map of blocks 346. 499 and 500.
Fig. 20. 183,6 Colton map showing the location of the project sites ..
Ih'f/wud :~.Hm'A'
:\h
jl

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....,:". . .",:-.::'.1.L~:b.,..
.. r. : :...

\( '- 31

Fig, 21. 1845 Coastal Survey map showing the location of the project sites.
\
\
,

Fig. 22.. 1846 Butt map showing the location of the project sites.
Fig. 23. 1849 Colton map showing the location of the proj ect sites.
\~J--~'~

""
Fig, 24. 1855 Perris map showing the original. coastline and the location of the
project sites.
,
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.
I

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,
,I

--7

.,
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.....

Fig...25. 1869 Dripps map showing the location of the project sites.
1
.

L
Fig. 26. 1855 Perris map showing the location. of
the project site on block 281, lot I, between
Atlanticsnd Pacific Streets.
flrf ri Iff"

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- . 81j"('(J I

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Warren St
Fig. 27.1855 Perris map showing the tocationofthepmject site on block 281.
lot I, between Pacific and. Warren Streets.
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Fig. 28. Fig. 1855 Perris map showing the location of part
of the project site on block 281, lot I, between
Warr,en and. Harrison (Kane) Streets.
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Fig. 29. 185.5Perris map showing the location of part of the project site on block 281, lot 1~between Harrison
(Kane) and Sackett Streets.
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Fig. 30. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on block 334
/
/
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Fig. 31. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on blocks 340 (left) and
346 (right),
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Fig. 32. 1855 Perris map showing the location of the project site on blocks 499
and 500.
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Fig ..33. 1880 Bromley map showing the location. of the project site on block 281,
lot I, between Atlantic Avenue and Congress Street.
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Fig. 34. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site onblock 281, lot 1,
between Congress and Harrison (Kane) Streets.
Fig. 35. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Harrison (Kane) Streets and. Sackett Streets ..
,

Fig ..36. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project
site on block 334.

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BRUNT ZOO'
Fig. 37. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on
block. 340.
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Fig, 38. 1880 Bromley map showing the location of the project site on block
346, 499 and 500.
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I

Fig. 39. 1:886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site oublock 281, lot I.
between Atlantic and. Warren Streets.
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Fig. 40. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lot 1,
between Warren and Sedgwick Streets.
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Fig. 41. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, lots 1
and 62, between Sedgwick and Sackett Streets.
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11
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VAN

Fig. 42. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334 and 340..
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Fig. 43. 1886 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 346,
499. and 500.
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Fig. 44. 1904 Sanborn map showing the location oftbe project site on block 281, lot 1,
between. Atlan.tican.d Congress Streets.
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Fig. 45. 1904 Sanborn map' showing the location of the project site on block 28,1" lot I,
between Congress and Harrison Streets.
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Fig. 46. 1904 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281, lots land 62,
between Harrison and Sackett Streets.
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Fig. 47. 1903 Hyde map: 'showing the location of the


project site on block 334.
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II

Fig..4-8.. 1'903 Hyde map showing the location of the project site
on block 340.
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Fig. 49'. 1903 Hyde map showing thelocation of theprojectsite on blocks 346 and 499.
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Fig. 50. 1915 Sanborn. map showing the location of the project site on
block 281, lot 1, between Atlantic and Congress Streets.
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'ot

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Fig . .5 L 1915 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on block 281, mot I,
between Congress and Harrison Streets.
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8 n

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Fig. 52 . 1915 Sanborn map showing tbe location of the project site on block 281, lots 1
and 62, between Harrison and Sackett Streets.
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... ...IiL
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Fig. 53. 19'15 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334
and 340.

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5

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en
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~:
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Fig. 54. 1915 Sanborn. map showing the Iocation of the project site on
blocks 346,.499 and 500.
-------------------~~-~!_~!~-~----------~~~-~---
-\ .... _------------
---.... _-

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9 loa'
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Fig. 55.. 199'5 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281,
lot 1, between Atlantic and Congress Streets
8'V,i rtH'1I11. x C'H", NNet. ----- ......-~----- .. -_ ...._

...... -... -.... -.... _---


OCT 19LU

SoJrU:,'~~~-.u
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Fig .. 56. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on part of block 281.
lot 1 between Congress and Kane Streets.
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Fig. 57. 19'95 Sanborn map' showing the location of the project site on part of block 281,
lots 1 and 62 between Kane and Sackett Streets.
< .,
"
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1 '

340
i ~
~

Fig. 58. 1995 Sanborn map showing the location of the project site on blocks 334.340,
346, 499 and 500,
R'IVER
EAST
CHANNEL ------
BUTTERAflLK
-,n a_---
-- ,--
9t-
...-
_J2EillI!J:&.v--- ---

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9
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Fig. 591, !Plan of bloClk28t. lot 1 showing the 10eaUon of thel old lots Icontaining areas of alfchaeologieal sensitiviity,o,
5
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VAN BRUNT ST. ___ Project Site,

Fig.,160. Plan of blocks 334 and 340 showing the location of the lets containing areas of
amhaeological sensItivity.
-(~ -

'100'

VAN: BRUNT ST.


Fig. 61. Plan o,f blocks 346, 499 and 50,0 showing the loceton of the lots ,containing areas of
1

archaeologIcal sensitivity.
1jL)~ D
BROOKLYN PIERS 7-12
CEQR NO. 06SBS009K
BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
PHASE IA ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT

PART II

Prepared for: Philip Habib and Associates


Prepared by: Celia J. Bergoffen, Ph.D., R.P ..A.
Date: November 27,2006.

"~o
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I

LIST OF FIGURES

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARy 6
TABLE I - ASSESSMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITy 9

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT SITE AND PLANNED DEVELOPMENT 12

3. ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING AND PREHISTORIC PERIODS 16

4. HISTORICAL PERIODS 21

5. LOT HISTORIES: EVALUATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY 30

6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 66

7. BIBLIOGRAPHY 68

PLATES

PART II

LOT HISTORIES - SUMMARY DATA


Notes for readers:

The following catalogue of sites is a summary of all the historical records and maps
pertaining to each of the blocks and lots under review. The sewer connection data is taken
from the records at the Brooklyn Sewer Department, which are unfortunately incomplete.
The first four books of sewer connection records have been lost, and the dates that they
covered can only be estimated, based on the history of sewer service in Brooklyn, which
began ca. 1859/60. The tax assessment records for Brooklyn's 6th ward, which includes the
project site, are housed at the Municipal archives. The maps cited are in the collections of the
New York Public Library and at the New York Historical Society.
Old block numbers used in the analysis of block 281, are taken from the 1880
Bromley map, as are all the old lot numbers, for block 281 and all the other blocks reviewed
in this assessment, where the modem block or lot subsumes more than one old lot. (Current
block numbers were applied after 1893 and before 1903, viz. the Bromley and Hyde maps of
those dates, respectively).
"Vacant" as used here only means devoid of buildings (not unoccupied).
Words or phrases appearing in quotes are copied from the maps and appear in the
style as rendered on the maps, i.e. italicized, small caps, etc.
BLOCK 281, lots 1,62

Bounded by Hamilton Avenue (S) Van Brunt Street and Columbia Street (E) and Atlantic
Avenue (N) and the river (W)

Lot 62
Current use: vacant / under water.
Old lot: part of old block 47, lot 20; area on the west side of Ferry Place no block
number.
Old addresses: none.
First tax ass.: Union Ferry Co., 1869-1873.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: wharf on the west side of Ferry Place.
1869 Dripps: two piers and a railway around the north side of old lot 48, rest
under water.
1880 Bromley: one large and three small piers, "HAMILTON FERRY" wharf.
1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde: same with longer piers, "HAMILTON FERRY".
1886 Sanborn: same, coal conveyors from the Union Ferry Co. 's coal shed on
old block 47 in the east corner of the site.
1904 & 1915 Sanborn: "UNION FERRY CO'S HAMILTON FERRY HOUSE" and
"MJ RUDOLPH LUMBER YARD" in the east corner of the lot; two piers.
1939 & 1950 Sanborn: "MUNICIPALFERRYHo. FERRY TO SOUTH ST. N.Y.c."
and "MJ RUDOLPH Co COAL YARD" occupies the northern of the two piers.
1969 Sanborn: no land north of Ferry Place.
Conclusion: this part of block 281 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

2
Lot 1

This large lot is divided up into its former blocks (Bromley 1880). Note that the west-
east streets are no longer open or even visible west of Columbia and Van Brunt Streets
because they have been subsumed into the open paved areas that make up most of the eastern
part of this lot 1. The mapping, demapping, or widening proposed for most of these streets
are discussed in Part I of this report, Chapter 2. Since these streets have never been built
upon and therefore have no history of use that would warrant their inclusion in this catalogue,
their potential archaeological sensitivity is evaluated in Part I, Chapter 6.

Old block 4 is between Atlantic and Pacific Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 3 is between Pacific and Amity Streets, west of Columbia Street.
Note that old blocks 4 and 3 are now one continuous area fanning pier 7, which
extends from Atlantic Avenue on the north to the slip whose northern edge follows
the former north side of Amity Street.

Old block 2 is between Amity and Congress Streets, west of Columbia Street, now mostly
occupied by the slip between Piers 7 and 8.

Old block 1 is between Congress and Warren Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 20 is between Warren and Baltic Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Old block 19 is between Baltic and Kane (formerly Harrison) Streets, west of Columbia
Street.

Old block 33 is between Kane and Irving Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.

Old block 34 is between Irving and Sedgwick Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.

Old block 35 is between Sedgwick and Degraw Streets, west of Van Brunt Street.

Old blocks 47 (W) and 47A (E) are between Degraw and Sackett Streets, west of Van Brunt
Street.

Old block 4 - Between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street, west of Columbia Street.

Street widths: Atlantic Avenue (formerly Atlantic Street) - 100 ft.; Pacific Street - 50 ft.
Old addresses: 12-18 Atlantic Street, 2-22 Columbia Street (Sanborn 1886).
Old lots: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and the pier (no lot no.)
Current use: Atlantic Avenue and the vacant area fronting the north and part of the east

3
sides of the warehouse on pier 7, used for parking and loading of vehicles and
storage.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: Furman Street crosses the block, which is built up to the line of
the old piers at the foot of Atlantic Avenue (see Robinson 1886).
1849 Colton: east end is built up, west end marked "Depot", Atlantic Avenue
approximately the same length as today.

The pier
Old addresses: none - the area formerly approximately west of the line of Furman Street.
First tax ass.: David Dows, five stories, 130 X 430, 1869-1873.
Sewer conn.: none.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: the northern half of block is filled to approximately 175 ft. west
of the west side of Furman street, the southern, not much beyond this line. A
long frame building on Atlantic Street was probably connected with the
"Long Island Rail Road Depot" on the northern of the two long, narrow piers
at the end of this block.
1869 Dripps: the block is built out approximately 100 ft. further. "Columbia
Stores" 5-story building occupies the entire area except for the new pier on
the south comer of the block.
1880 Bromley: same, "David Dows & Co. COLUMBIASTORES".
1886 Robinson: same, "COLUMBIASTORES"south side of the pier widened.
1898 Hyde: same, "BROOKLYNWHARFWAREHOUSECOMPANY"; second
short pier added at the north corner of the block.
1903 Hyde: same, "GRAINWAREHOUSE"
1904 Sanborn: same building, "COLUMBIASTORES","FULTONGRAIN&
MILLINGCO." at the west end of the building;
1915 Sanborn: one-story building on this "PIERNo 22" marked "SICULA
AMERICANAS.S. CO.PIERCELINE" with two story office at its east end, covers
most of the area where the northern two-thirds of the Columbia Stores
building formerly stood. The eastern most third of "COLUMBIASTORES"still
stand, marked "VACANT,3RD, 4TH, 5TH".
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, but pier building is ''NEW YORKDOCKCO.
BULL STEAMSHIP LINES(LESSEES)CORR.IRONONSTEELFRAME;WOODR'F ON
STEELTRUSSES;WOODENFL.WOODPILESCOLUMBIASTORESAPPROVED
PUBLICW.HO."
1969 Sanborn: old pier is destroyed; new, present pier is 150 ft. west of the
west side of Atlantic Avenue, its east edge runs approximately along the line
of the west edge of the old pier; the area of the former Columbia Stores
vacant and remained vacant to the present.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.
Old lot 2
Old Address: 2 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)
Size: 80 X 25 ft.
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Mulford Martin, four stories, 25 X 60, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building with store under, yard behind.

4
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde: same.
1903 Hyde: same. four stories.
1915 Sanborn: same, hotel (1904), store (1915) but with a one-story
brick extension at the rear.
1939 Sanborn: very small one story building at the front of the lot, "Auto
Parking" in the rear.
1950 Sanborn: one story brick store, L-shaped at the front of the lot, "Auto
Parking" at the rear.
1969 Sanborn: covered by the "PORTOFNEW YORKAUTHORITYPIER7"
building.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 4
Old Address: 4 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)
Size: 80 X 20 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.:S.P. Collins, two stories; 1866-1873.
Historic maps; 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front and rear of the lot.
1880 Bromley 1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde: brick building on the front of the
lot, store, rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, with a one story brick addition at the rear.
1903 Hyde: two story brick but extended to the same length as its neighbor
on lot 2.
1915 Sanborn: same, with two one-story brick additions at the rear covering
all but a narrow strip at the southeast corner of the lot.
1939 Sanborn: small one story building at the front of the lot, "Auto Parking"
in the rear.
1950 Sanborn: 1939 building gone; new small one story brick building "fill'g
sta." set further back from the street.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 6
Old Address: 6-10 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Sanborn)
Size: 80 X 20 ft.
Sewer conn: Book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: Kelsey & L[o]ughlin.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley, 1886 Sanborn, 1898 Hyde: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant; one of three connected stores (Sanborn).
1903 Hyde: same, two stories, joined to frame buildings at nos. 8 & 10
Atlantic Avenue to form one building, with a one-story addition at the rear.

5
1915 Sanborn: vacant.
1939 Sanborn: small one story building at the front of the lot, "STGE","AUTO
PARKING"at the rear.
1950 Sanborn: vacant, AUTOPARKING".
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 8
Old Address: 6-10 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Sanborn)
Size: 80 X 23.4 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
Kelsey & L[0]ughlin.
First tax ass.:
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley, 1886 Sanborn, 1898 Hyde: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant; one of three connected stores (Sanborn).
1903 Hyde: same, two stories, joined to frame building on old lot 6 to form
one building, with a one-story addition at the rear.
1915 Sanborn: vacant.
1939 Sanborn: small one story building at the front of the lot, "STGE","AUTO
PARKING"at the rear.
1950 Sanborn: vacant, AUTOPARKING",
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 10
Old Address: '12 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)
Size: 80 X 23.4 ft.
Sewer conn: Kelsey & [probably Loughlin], 1868
First tax ass.:
Kelsey & Loughlin, 1869-1873, two stories.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: frame building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: vacant.
1898 Hyde: frame building on the front of the lot, alley west of the building
& rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: longer, one-story frame building replaces the earlier structure.
1904 Sanborn: same, "EXPRESSOFF."
1915 Sanborn: same, "STORAGE".
1939 Sanborn: new one-story building, "STGE" covers the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant, AUTOPARKING;'.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 11
Old Address: 14 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)

6
Size: 80 X 23.4 ft.
Sewer conn: M. Martin, 1868.
First tax ass.: Mulford Martin, 1869-1873,23 X 60, three stories.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building covers most of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, store, three stories.
1903 Hyde: four story building with one story rear extension covers the lot.
1915 Sanborn: same, "PRODUCE".
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 12
Old Address: 16 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)
Size: 60 X 22.3 ft.
Sewer conn: C. Emerson, 1868.
First tax ass.: W. Emmerson, 22 X 40, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story store, rear vacant.
1904 Sanborn: same, "CANDY FAC."
1915 Sanbom: same, not labeled.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: part of a large building covering this lot and lot 13 on
the comer.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 13
Old Address: 18 Atlantic Avenue (1886 Robinson)
Size: 60 X 24.5 ft.
Sewer conn: C. Kenyon, 1896.
First tax ass.: W. Emmerson, 24 X [?], [?]
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building covers the lot.
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story store.
1904 Sanborn: same, "SEAMENS INSTITUTE".
1915 Sanborn: same, not labeled, two stores.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: part ofa large building covering this lot and lot 13 on
the comer.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 14

7
Old Address: 8 & 10 Columbia Street (1886 Robinson)
Size: 60 X 24.5 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.:W. Emmerson, three stories, 1869-1873.
Kelsey & Loughlin, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: two small brick buildings side by side, yards vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the lot (unclear).
1880 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1886,1904,1915 Sanborns: as 1855 Perris, three story stores.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: three part, one story building, all stores, covers the
lot, "AUTOLAUNDRY"in the front.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is Dot sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 15
Old Address: 16 Columbia Street (1886 Sanborn)
Size: 190 X 50 ft.
Sewer conn: Record not found, Book 11, ca. 1893.
First tax ass.:
David Dows.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: two frame buildings at the front of the lot, long frame building
along the south lot line directly behind the one on the street.
1869 Dripps: same.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick building on the south lot line, at the front of
the lot, "Vac."
1904 Sanborn: large one story brick "Machine Shop" covers approximately
the front of the lot; one story frame storage building at the rear, south of old
lot 2.
1915 Sanborns: same plus a series of one-story additions that cover the entire
lot.
1939 Sanborn: vacant.
1950 Sanborn: small one story storage building at the front of the lot, and
another one story building at the rear.
1969 Sanborn: front part vacant, rear partly covered by the "PORTOFNEW
YORKAUTHORITYPIER 7" building.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

8
Old lot 16
Old Address: 18-22 Columbia Street (1886 Sanborn)
Size: 190 X 50 ft.
Sewer conn: nos. 2-22 Columbia, Can Edison Co., 1960.
First tax ass.:
David Dows (on both Columbia and Pacific Streets).
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building at the northeast comer of the lot on Columbia
Street.
1869 Dripps: small building on the southeast comer of the lot.
1880 Bromley: frame building on the southeast comer of the lot & a long
frame building along the middle ofthe north lot line, brick building on the n
northeast corner of the lot.
1886 Robinson same long frame building along the middle of the north lot
line now making an "L" to Pacific Street on its west side, same brick building
on the northeast comer of the lot, frame building on the west lot line, fronting
Pacific Street.
1903 Hyde: vacant.
1904 Sanborn: small one story brick "Shed" at the northeast comer of the lot,
"Contractors Yard" occupies most of the rest of the lot, one story brick
building in the northwest corner of the lot marked "To Be Dynamo Rm" and
"Engine" connected by a "Tin clad Bridge 2nd" to the building on the next
pier to the west (old block 3).
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: " Wagon Sheri"; Leshaped, at 18-12 Columbia Street
and along the north lot line; same building at the west end of the lot rear plus
a two story building immediately east of it.
1950 Sanborn: small building at the rear of the lot, new building east of it, a
wider "GARAGE (PRIV.)"
1969 Sanborn: front part vacant, rear partly covered by the "PORTOFNEW
YORKAUTHORITY PIER 7" building.
Conclusion: this part of old block 4 is Dot sensitive for archaeological remains.

9
Old block 3 - Between Pacific and Amity Streets, west of Columbia Street.

Current use: east side storage, pier shed on pier 7.


Street widths: Amity Street -70 ft.
Old lots: 2,3,5-15.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: land has been created.
1845 Coastal survey: shows only the northeast comer of the lot created and
built on.
1846 Butt: as 1855 Perris, but with only one pier.
1849 Colton: same.

Old lot 3
Size: 125 X 50 ft.
Old Addresses: 13-17 Columbia Street.
Sewer conn.: Dept. of Marine Aviation, 1948, corner of Pacific & Columbia Streets.
First tax ass.: David Davis, two properties, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: "Lime & brick Yard" on north half of the block, frame buildings;
three brick dwellings with yards; corner brick building fronting on Columbia
Street has no yard.
1869 Dripps: buildings cover the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building(s) on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick "Engine" and "Office" of the stores on lot 15
cover all but the front 35 ft. of the lot (formerly covered by 13-17 Columbia
Street)
1904 & 1915 Sanborns: same, east end of the lot used for "Coal Storage".
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: part of the building on lots 15, "NEW YORKDOCKCO.
BULL STEAMSHIP LINES (LESSEES)"
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 3 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 5, 6, 7
Size: 56 X 50 ft. (together).
Old Addresses: 40-44 Columbia Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: two recorded; book 2, lost; H. Patchen, 1876, 42 Columbia Street.
First tax ass.: Patchen, 2 stories, 1869-73 (comer lot); others uncertain correspondence; next entry
James Eagan, two stories, 1869-1873, then M. Callister & Cutlett, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: three frame buildings on the front of the lots, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: houses on the lots; unclear.
1880 Bromley: frame buildings on the lots.
1886 Sanborn: lot 5 covered by a three story store; lot 6, three story store on
the front of the lot, yard vacant; lot 7, covered by a three story store.
1898 Hyde: same.
1903 Hyde: same, more additions at the rear oflot 6.
1904 Sanborn: same, rear oflot 6 completely covered by one story brick
additions.
1915 Sanborn: vacant
1939 Sanborn: covered by "PAPER& TWINE WHo", one story.

10
1950 Sanborn: same building, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 3 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 8, 9
Size: 50 X 35 ft. (together)
Old Addresses: 29 and 31 Amity Street.
Sewer conn.: Gasteiger, 1915, northwest corner of Columbia (location unclear);
First tax ass.:
Patchen, 1869-1873; Mrs. James Donohue, 1869-1873 (location uncertain).
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: frame buildings on the front of the lots, yards vacant.
1869 Dripps: unclear, vacant?
1880 Bromley: frame buildings on the lots.
1886 Sanborn: lot 8, three story building, "v ac"; lot 9, three story dwelling
on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same.
1904 Sanborn: lot 8, same, dwelling; lot 9, replaced by large one story stable
that extends over lots 10-14.
1915 Sanborn: lot 8, vacant; lot 9, same.
1939 Sanborn: both lots covered by "PAPER& TWINE WHo", one story.
1950 Sanborn: same building, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 3 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 10-14


Size: 50 X approximately 275 ft. (together).
Old Addresses: 3-27 Amity Street.
Sewer conn.: only one connection on Amity (apart from Gasteiger, above), Brooklyn [...?]
Removal Co., 1917,200 ft. west of Columbia (at the foot of the pier) (sic.),
1869-1873.
First tax ass.: Mrs. James Donohue, two properties; Augustus Nettlebohm; Dwights
Spe[n?]eer, 1869-1873, locations uncertain.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: (E to W), three frame buildings; four lime kilns in a brick
building; frame building with a another, marked hazard, at right angles
behind it and four frame buildings northwest of these near the middle of the
block.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the lots.
1880 Bromley: lots 10-13 vacant, brick building on an unnumbered lot
between 13 and 14; frame building and small brick building completely cover
lot 14.
1886 Sanborn: all lots covered by the building of "CANDA& KANESTORAGE",
brick, one story.
1898 Hyde: same, "Consolidated lee Co."with additional wings, lots
completely covered to the line ofthe slip at the end of Amity Street.
1903 Hyde: same, "AMERICANICECO."
1915 Sanborn: same, no legend.
1939 Sanborn: lots 10, 11, 12 & more than half of 13 covered by "PAPER&

11
TWINEWHO" building; rest of lot 13 & lot 14 vacant.
1950 Sanborn: same, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: lots 10-13, vacant; lot 14 partly covered by the current pier
shed.
Conclusion: this part of old block 3 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 2 (? 1880 Bromley; later lot 15 includes 1880 Bromley's lot 3, treated above)
Size: 606 (approximately) X 100 ft.
Old Addresses: none / unknown.
Sewer conn.: two recorded, book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: David Davis stores; M. Callister & Cutlett, 1869-1873, locations uncertain.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: two rows of brick buildings W/E either side of Kelsey Alley in
the middle of the block.
1869 Dripps: covered by a building. David Dows & Co. PACIFIC ELEVATOR
1880 Bromley: "David Dows & Co. PACIFIC ELEVATOR", brick building
1886 Sanborn: same building, no legend.
1893 Robinson: same "COLUMBIA STORES".
1898 Hyde: same, "BROOKLYNWHARFWAREHOUSECOMPANY".
1903 Hyde: same, "NEW YORK DOCK CO."
1915 Sanborn: same, no legend.
1939 Sanborn: same, "NEW YORK DOCKCO. BULL STEAMSHIP LINES
(LESSEES)".
1950 Sanborn: same, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: east end vacant, west covered by the pier shed.
Conclusion: this part of old block 3 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

12
Old block 2 - Between Amity and Congress Streets, west of Columbia Street;

Street widths: Congress Street - 60 ft.


Old addresses: 46-60 Columbia Street (1886 Sanborn).
Old lots: 1-52 (1880 Bromley) Current use:
Current use:
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: only a narrow strip at the north end of the block has been
created.
1849 Colton: most of the block has been created, except for the northwest
comer.
1855 Perris: at the west end of the block - brick building of"Barber's Beef &
Pork Packing Establishment" and on Amity Street & the pier; "Woodruff &
Robinsons Storage Warehouse" adjoining it on the south, fronting Congress
Street; "Lime and Brick Yard" of "Vorhies & Spencer" on Amity Street,
frame buildings; "Iron yarer with three small sheds south of it, on Congress
Street; "Osman & Phyfe Lumber Yard" at the northeast comer of the block
with a small brick office at the comer of Columbia; .. Walter & Broker Coal
Yarer south of it, with a small frame office on Columbia Street and a brick
building and large frame building at the west end of the coal yard.
1869 Dripps: "A. Woodruff and Robinson's", block completely covered
(unclear).
1880 Bromley: "ROBINSONSSTORES"brick building almost completely
covers the block.
1886 Sanborn: "ROBINSONOR CONGRESSST STORES","BONDED"and
"FREE" spaces; 16-54 Columbia Street occupied by "GUANOMILLS&
SCREENING" .
1898 Hyde: "BROOKLYNWHARFWAREHOUSE COMPANY".
1903 Hyde: "NEWYORKDOCKCO".
1904 Sanborn: "AMITYSTREETSTORES",18-22 Amity Street occupied by
"WAYOELL& Co. COOPERAGE STOCK".
1915 Sanborn: "ROBINSONSTORES",23-51 Congress Street occupied by
"COMPRESSED CORKCo. CORKM'F.G.", 53-65 with "ROPE & JUNK".
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: "N.Y. DOCKCO.; "THE MOTORHAULINGCO. INC.;
garages, and the rope & junk warehouse, as in 1915; building no longer
owned by a single company.
1969 Sanborn: slip & vacant area at the east end of the former block.

Conclusion: Old block 2 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

13
Old block 1 - Between Congress (formerly Bergen) and Warren (formerly Wykoff)
Streets, west of Columbia Street

Street widths: Warren Street - 50 ft.


Old lots: 2-50 (1880 Bromley; some later numbers 1903 Hyde, noted below).
Current use: vacant and pier 8 warehouse.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: block not yet made.
1849 Colton: block made and built upon.

Old lots 2-20 and 41-50


Old Addresses: 20-36 Congress Street &9-45 Warren Street (1904 Sanborn)
Size: 415 ft. (N), 200 ft. (W), 297 ft. (S) 100 ft .(NE & SE)
Sewer conn: five recorded, earliest is Robinson 1868,215 ft. west of Columbia Street on
Warren Street; others all N.Y. Dock Co.: 1909, two connections on Warren
Street; 1926, fronting on the East River, and 1940, on Congress Street 400 ft.
west of Columbia Street.
FITsttax ass.: Woodruff & Robinson, 1868-1873, all the property on the east side of the
bulkhead, row of three story buildings, and the pier; all the properties on
Warren Street except old lots 18, 19 and 20; ten listings of stores on the south
side of Congress Street.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: "Woodruff & Robinson Storage Ware House", on lots 1-12 and
45-50; lots 13-20 on Warren Street vacant;" Mills Coal and Wood Yard", one
small frame building marked hazard and an office; lots 18-20 on Warren
Street, "Iron Yarer on lots 41-43 with a frame hazard building on the front of
lot 43, and frame at the rear; frame building on the front of lot 44 and another
at the rear; lots 18-20 on
1869 Dripps: same, "Warehouses".
1880 Bromley: same, with brick additions on lots 13-20 and 41-44,
"Woodruff & Robinson CONGRESSsr. STORES"covers all these lots.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same, "ROBINSON'SCONGRESSSTORES".
1898 Hyde: same, "BROOKLYN WHARFWAREHOUSE COMPANY".
1903 Hyde: same, ''NEW YORKDOCKCO. Davis & Others", four, three and
one story sections.
1904 & 1915 Sanborns: same, "ROBINSONSTORES".
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, "MICHAELBROSFURNEW.Ho. and
"ROBINSONSTORES".
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 21/4


Old Addresses: 47 Warren Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 23.8 X 81.85 ft.
Sewer conn: B. Green, 1870.
First tax ass.: Margaret Green, two stories
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, building marked hazard in
the middle of the rear half of the lot, vacant area behind it.

14
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: frame building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: frame building on the front ofthe lot, rear vacant.
1886 Sanborn: same, two stories, brick, with a frame one story building at the
rear of the lot at the lot line.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde. 1903 Hyde: same.
1904 Sanborn: 1 Yz story brick dwelling, with one story rear addition covers
slightly more than half the lot; one story brick shed at the rear of the yard.
1915 Sanborn, 1939 Sanborn. 1950 Sanborn: same, without the shed.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 22/3


Old Addresses: 49 Warren Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 23.8 X 81.85 ft.
Sewer conn: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
unclear.
Historic maps:1855 Perris: small brick shed marked hazard on the east lot line near the front
of the lot.
1869 Dripps: vacant.
1880 Bromley: frame building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the lot, shallow rear yard.
1886 Sanborn & 1893 Bromley: same, one story store.
1903 Hyde: same size, four story brick building.
1915 Sanborn, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: : same, store.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 23/2


Old Addresses: 51 Warren Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 23.8 X 81.85 ft.
Sewer conn: book 4, lost.
First tax ass.:
John M. Lerman (1) three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot. .
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the lot, shallow rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story dwelling.
1904 Sanborn: same, three stories with basement.
1915 Sanborn: same, with one story brick shed on the rear of the lot, narrow
vacant area in between.
1939 Sanborn: vacant (and remained so, to present).
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

15
Old lot 24/60
Old Addresses: 53 Warren Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 31.1 Y2 X 46.4 ft.
Sewer conn: book 3, lost (one connection for the 46.9 X 80 ft. area at the corner of Warren
and Columbia Streets.
First tax ass.: Lerman, two four story buildings, three buildings listed on property (probably
applies to old lots 24, 25 and 26)
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building front ofthe lot, shed at the rear, narrow vacant
area in between.
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, narrow yard.
1886 Sanborn to 1903 Hyde: same, dwelling, three stories.
1915 Sanborn: same, with a brick shed on the rear of the lot.
1939 Sanborn: vacant (and remained so, to present).
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 25
Old Addresses: 59 Warren Street & 76 Columbia Street (1886 Sanborn)
Size: 25.4 X 49 ft.
Sewer conn: book 3, lost (one connection for the 46.9 X 80 ft. area at the comer of Warren
and Columbia Streets.
First tax ass.: Lerman, two four story buildings, three buildings listed on property (probably
applies to old lots 24, 25 and 26)
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the corner, rear yard (on Warren Street)
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store connects with building on lot 26.
1903 Hyde: same, with a one-story frame addition covering the yard.
1904 & 1915 Sanboms: same, store.
1939 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 26
Old Addresses: 74 Columbia Street.
Size: 25.4 X 49 ft.
Sewer conn: book 3, lost (one connection for the 46.9 X 80 ft. area at the comer of Warren
and Columbia Streets.
First tax ass.: Lerman, two four story buildings, three buildings listed on property (probably
applies to old lots 24, 25 and 26)
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store connects with building on lot 25.
1903 Hyde; frame one story structure covers the former yard area.
1904 Sanborn: same, store, very small brick building, one story, southwest

16
side of the yard.
1915 Sanborn: same, old shed gone, new one story brick shed in the
northwest comer of the lot, part of building in the yard of old lot 24.
1939 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 27/59


Old Addresses: 72 Columbia Street.
Size: 25 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: Hughes, 1870.
First tax ass.: James Hughes, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building covers the lot.
1886 Sanborn through 1950 Sanborn: same, four story store.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 28/58


Old Addresses: 70 Columbia Street.
Size: 17 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: missing pages, ca. 1890.
Firsttax ass.: [8. Mabee"], 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front ofthe lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: as 1855 Perris, frame building.
1886 Sanborn: two story brick building on the front of the lot "Feed"; one
story frame shed on the rear of the lot.
1904 Sanborn through 1950 Sanborn: same, store.
1969 Sanborn: "U.S. GOV'TWEIGHING STA." partly overlaps the middle of
the old lot, rest is vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 29/57


Old Addresses: 68 Columbia Street.
Size: 21 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Charles O'Neil, three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, store, four stories, narrow shed along the Tear lot line.
1893 Bromley through 1950 Sanborn: same, without the shed.

17
1969 Sanborn: "U.S. GOV'T WEIGHING STA." partly overlaps the middle of
the old lot, rest is vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 30/56


Old Addresses: 66 Columbia Street.
Size: 21 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: C. O'Neil, 1873.
Firsttax ass.: Charles O'Neil, three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store, narrow shed along the rear lot line.
1893 Bromley through 1950 Sanborn: same, without the shed.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 31
Old Addresses: 64 Columbia Street.
Size: 21 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: C. O'Neil, 1873.
First tax ass.: Charles O'Neil, three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building appears to cover the lot (but see later maps).
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: as 1855 Perris.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story store, small, two-story brick building at the
rear of the lot.
1904 Sanborn: same, rear building is one story, and north side overlapped by
building on lot 32. .
1915& 1939 Sanborns: same, rear building gone.
1950 Sanborn: front vacant, small three story brick addition of building on lot
32 covers the rear of the lot; former yard area remains vacant.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 32
Old Addresses: 62 Columbia Street & 54 Congress Street.
Size: 21 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn: four records for this lot: book 1, lost; book 10, missing pages, ca. 1890; book
18, two records, ca. 1914.
First tax ass.: Charles O'Neil, three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, frame building on the rear
of the lot, narrow vacant area in between.
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot.

18
1880 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building covers all but a small section in the middle of
the lot, half the lot width.
1886 Sanbom through 1950 Sanborn: lot completely covered by three story
store on Columbia Street with three story rear wing, and three story dwelling
(separate building) at 54 Congress Street.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 33/52


Old Addresses: 52 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 83.1 Y2ft.
Sewer conn: Woodruff & Robinson, 1868.
First tax ass.:
Charles O'Neil, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, four stories, dwelling, L-shaped building on the
southeast comer ofthe lot.
1903 Hyde: same, without the rear building.
1904,1915,1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, "Stevedore's Storage IstD
above".
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 34/51


Old Addresses: 50 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 83.1 ft.
Sewer conn: Woodruff & Robinson, 1868.
First tax ass.:
Woodruff & Robinson, two stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps:1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store.
1898 Hyde: same.
1903 Hyde: same.
1904, 1915,1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, "Stevedore's Storage l " D above"
with rear buildings, one story brick sheds.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

19
Old lot 35
Old Addresses: 48 Congress Street.
Size, 22 X 81.1 ft.
Sewer conn: two records, Woodruff & Robinson, 1868, and J.R. Robinson, 1908.
First tax ass.: Woodruff & Robinson, two stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: as 1855 Perris.
1886 Sanborn: same, four stories, dwelling.
1903 Hyde: same, with basement.
1904 Sanborn: same, with shed at the southwest comer of the lot.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, without the shed.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 36
Old Addresses: 46 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 81.1 ft.
Sewer conn: two records, Woodruff & Robinson, 1868 and book 8, missing pages, ca.
1914.
First tax ass.: Mrs. Leahy, three stories.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: two frame buildings on the front of the lot, two at the rear, small
vacant areas in the middle of the lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick building on the front of the lot "Cooper", one
story frame building at the rear of the lot.
1893 Bromley: same, no back building.
1904 Sanborn: one story brick building "rope Storage" at the front of the lot,
no back building.
1915 Sanborn: same, "Storage".
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same with a one story addition at the rear that covers
all but a narrow strip along the rear lot line.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 37
Old Addresses: 44 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 80.5 ft.
Sewer conn: Woodruff & Robinson, 1868.
First tax ass.: Mathew Murphy, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, frame building on the rear
of the lot, yard in between.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

20
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: brick three story dwelling on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1904 Sanborn: same, small one story brick shed at the southeast comer of the
lot.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, another small one-story brick addition at
the rear of the main building.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 38
Old Addresses: 42 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 80.5 ft.
Sewer conn: Woodruff & Robinson, 1868.
First tax ass.: Woodruff & Robinson, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick buildings on the front & rear of the lot, yard in between.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: larger, four story store on the front of the lot covers former
vacant area at the center of the lot, rear vacant.
1904, 1915, 1939 Sanborn: same
1950 Sanborn: one story store covers the lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 39
Old Addresses: 40 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 79.1 ft.
Sewer conn: J. Gaffney, 1907.
First tax ass.: Woodruff & Robinson, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building marked for hazard on the front ofthe lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick building on the front of the lot "Vac, 1st", one
story brick building at the rear of the lot.
1904 Sanborn: same, store, no back building.
1915 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 40
Old Addresses: 38 Congress Street.
Size: 22 X 79.1 ft.
Sewer conn: John Breman, 1908.
First tax ass.: Woodruff & Robinson, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.

21
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1904,1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 1 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

22
Old block 20/303 - Between Warren and Baltic Streets, west of Columbia Street;

Street widths: Baltic Street - 50 ft.


Old lots: 1-13 (1880 Bromley; some later numbers 1903 Hyde, noted below).
Current use: Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York Marine Terminals
building on the front of the lot, rest vacant. Historic maps:
1836 Colton: block not yet made.
1849 Colton: block made and built upon.

Old lots 1,2 and western part of lot 3 and 11-13


Old Addresses: 16-64 Warren Street and 21-41 Baltic Street.
Size: 479.9 ft. (N) X 271 ft. (S) X 200 ft. (WIE)
Sewer conn: six recorded, New York Dock Co., 1912, 1913, 1918, 1925 and 1932; J.1.
Dixon, 1913,350 ft. west of Columbia Street, probably associated with
Miner-Edgar Co., 1915 Sanborn).
Tax ass.: the only proprietor on Baltic Street is Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., who
own 6 "plots"; they are also listed as owners of two plots on Warren Street,
1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: Thomson's Beef & Pork Packing House, brick & frame
buildings, occupies lots 1 & 2, 3 overlaps the vacant area of "Jackson &
Shannon Lumber Yard".
1869 Dripps: "Woodruff & North" on the Baltic Street side; name on the
Baltic Street side illegible.
-1880 Bromley: "Woodruff & Robinson CONGRESS ST. STORES", all brick
buildings.
1898 Hyde: same, "BROOKLYNWHARF WAREHOUSECOMPANY".
1886 Robinson: "ROBINSON'S CONGRESSSTORES"
1886 Sanborn: same, "Being Built Robinson or Congress St. Stores".
1898 Hyde: same, "BROOKLYNWHARF WAREHOUSECOMPANY".
1903 Hyde: same, ''NEW YORK DOCK CO."
1904 Sanborn: same, "ROBINSON STORES".
1915 Sanborn: southwest third of the building now covered by railroad
tracks; remaining sections fronting the pier - "ROBINSON STORES"; fronting
on Warren Street, "JAS. BEGGS & CO. TESTING & SHIPPINGOF MACHINERY"
at 44-50 Warren Street; "MINER-EDGAR CO. CHEMICALW.Ho." and
"STORAGE" at 52-64 Warren Street.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same buildings but, "NACHMAN SPRJNOFILLED
CORP. KAy Mr'o CO. - WIRE SPRINGSDIVISION" at 16-50 Warren Street, and
"A.R. HAEUSERSHELLACM. 'G" at 44-74 Warren Street.
1969 Sanborn: vacant
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 3/19 (east half)


Old Addresses: none / unknown (Baltic Street).
Size: 250 X 99.1 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.

23
First tax ass.:the only proprietor on Baltic Street is Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., who
own 6 "plots".
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: "Jackson & Shannon Lumber Yard", vacant area and three lots,
containing many frame buildings. The first, from the west, will be negatively
impacted by the "FREIGHTSTA." shown on the 1950 Sanborn. The other two
lots were not built upon subsequently. On the first (from the west) is a frame
building on the street with three rear sections and a second frame building
marked hazard at the rear of the lot, with a vacant area in between;
easternmost lot has a frame building on the street and a second roughly L-
shaped frame building in the rear half of the lot, vacant area in between and
in the northwest corner ofthe lot.
1869 Dripps: unclear, possibly largely vacant.
1880 Bromley: all vacant.
1886 Sanborn: vacant except for part of a carpentry shop overlapping the
northwest comer of the lot.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde, 1904 Sanborn: vacant.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: covered by railroad tracks over more than half of the
front of the lot; single track crosses diagonally over the rear of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: same, plus "FREIGHTSTA." over the western two-thirds of the
vacant area at the rear of the lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 4
Old Addresses:
Size: 100 X 92.1 ft.
Sewer conn: none / unknown.
First tax ass.: the only proprietor on Baltic Street is Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., who
own 6 "plots".
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: four lots originally, each with frame house and vacant areas on
it, but the area will be imapacted twice by construction of the railroad tracks
and the building that currently stands on the lot.
1869 Dripps: "Lumber Yaref'.
1880 Bromley: "COAL & WOOD"
1886 Robinson through 1904 Sanborn: vacant.
1915 Sanborn: part of the "Freight Station" and tracks on the front of the lot,
tracks on the rear of the lot, vacant area in between.
1939 Sanborn: same, but freight station is "VAC".
1950 Sanborn: same, station is now "W.Ho."
1969 Sanborn: the one story "GARAGENEW YORKPORTOFAUTHORITY
ADMINISTRATION BLDG." covers the entire lot area.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

24
Old lot 5
Old Addresses:
Size: 100.9 X 135 ft.
Sewer conn: none / unknown.
First tax. ass.: the only proprietor on Baltic Street is Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., who
own 6 "plots".
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: "Jackson & Shannon Lumber Yard" very small buildings in all
the comers except the southwest, rest vacant.
1869 Dripps: "Lumber Yard'.
1880 Bromley: "COAL& WOOD"
1886 Robinson through 1904 Sanborn: vacant.
1915, 1939 & 1950OSanborns: tracks on the front ofthe lot, tracks on the rear
of the lot; vacant area in between.
1969 Sanborn: west side partly covered by "GARAGENEWYORKPORTOF
AUTHORITY ADMINISTRATION BLDG." covers the entire lot area, rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 6/9


Old Addresses: 64-78 Columbia Street / 78-86 Warren Street (1886 Sanborn, 1915 Sanborn).
Size: 138 X 65 ft.
Sewer conn: two recorded, Burke, 1868, 33 ft. west of Columbia; New York Dock Co.,
1913, southwest comer of Columbia and Warren Streets.
First tax ass.: Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., plot., 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: three lots, comer lot with two frame buildings front and back,
vacant in the middle; center lot, frame house on the front of the lot, rear
vacant; southernmost lot, frame building marked hazard on the front of the
lot, rear yard with shed in the corner.
1869 Dripps: buildings cover (?) the lot.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Robinson: vacant.
1886 Sanborn:
1893 Bromley: two frame buildings on Columbia Street, corner of Baltic and
Columbia Streets & the rest of the lot vacant.
1903 Hyde: vacant.
1915 Sanborn: one story "SUPPLYCONSTRUCTION & SUPPLYCo. ENGINEERS
ANDCONTRACTORS" WlTH"OFFICES"on Columbia Street; building
completely covers the lot; concrete floor noted.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, "STANDARDFOODPRODUCTSCORP.WHOL.
LIQUORW. HO."
1969 Sanborn: southwest corner of the lot overlapped by "GARAGENEW
YORKPORTOFAUTHORITYADMINISTRATION BLDG.";rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

25
Old lot 7
a ld Addresses: 76 Warren Street.
Size: 25 X 99.1 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., plot., 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot and one at the rear.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Sanborn: vacant.
1893 Bromley: frame stable on most of the lot.
1903 Hyde: vacant.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanborns: covered by "SUPPLY CONSTRUCTION& SUPPLY
CO. ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS"building.
1969 Sanborn: rear ofthe lot overlapped by "GARAGE NEW YORK PORT OF
AUTHORITYADMINISTRATIONBLDG.", rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 8
Old Addresses: 72 Warren Street.
Size: 25 X 99.1 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., plot., 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, frame building marked
hazard near the rear lot line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Sanborn: vacant.
1893 Bromley: vacant.
1904 Sanborn: small, one-story "tool rm" near the northwest corner of the lot.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: covered by "SUPPLY CONSTRUCTION& SUPPLY
CO. ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS"building.
1969 Sanborn: southeast corner ofthe lot overlapped by "GARAGE NEW
YORK PORT OF AUTHORITYADMINISTRATIONBLDG.", rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 9
Old Addresses: 68-70 Warren Street.
Size: 50 X 99.1 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., plot., 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame buildings on the front of the lot and at the rear (two each),
western rear building marked for hazard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front ofthe lot.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Sanborn: brick building near the front of the lot running WfE.

26
1893 Bromley: vacant.
1903 Hyde: large frame stable set back from the street.
1904 Sanborn: three small one story brick "tool Houses" one behind the
other.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanborns: covered by "SUPPLYCONSTRUCTION & SUPPLY
CO. ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS" building.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 10
Old Addresses: 66 Warren Street.
Size: 25 X 99.1 ft.
Sewer conn: Mrs. Doran, 1878.
First tax ass.: [Nicole?] Doran, lot, house, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, rest vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: frame building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story dwelling with two-story rear wing on the front of
the lot, rear vacant.
1893 Bromley: same, frame building.
1903 Hyde: vacant.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanborns: covered by "SUPPLYCONSTRUCTION & SUPPLY
CO. ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS".
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 20 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

27
Old block 19/308 - Between Baltic and Kane (formerly Harrison) Streets, west of
Columbia Street.

Street widths: Kane Street - 60 feet.


Old lots: 3/9,4,5,6,7,11,12,13,14 (1880 & 1893 Bromley, combined).
First tax ass.: not possible to relate the following data, of 1869-1873, to specific lots or
addresses; Columbia Street - Sylvester {Rofs?], plot; Baltic Street, Wood &
{Havemire?], 100 X 400; Harrison Street - Sylvester {Rofs]?, plot; D.O.
Budger, stores; Phe{]ix Warehousing co., half pier; Wood & [Havemire], half
pier.
Current use: vacant.
1836 Colton: block not yet made.
1849 Colton: block made and built upon.

Old lots 7, 11,12, 13, 14


Old Addresses: 9-57 Harrison Street & 114-54 Baltic Street.
Size: 808.6 (N), 507 (S), 200 (WIE).
Sewer conn: six recorded, west to east, Book 1, near the end of the block, lost; Boro Dev.
Co., 1909, 750 ft. west of Columbia Street; book 9~pages missing, ca. 1889;
E.W. Laughlin, 1888,288 ft. west of Columbia Street; Murray, 1870,248 ft.
west of Columbia Street; book 8, lost.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: area covered by buildings; "Woodruff & North" written in the
slip.
1880 Bromley: brick building completely covers these lots except for alleys
between lots 13 and 12, and between the two long stores that cover lots 11 &
12 on Baltic Street & lot 7, on Harrison Street, "A.C. Woodruff BALTIC
STORES".
1886 Robinson: same, "BALTIC STORES"
1893 Bromley: same, plus "COAL YD. "
1898 Hyde: same, no names.
1903 Hyde: north half of block covered by railroad tracks, lot 7, two small
buildings at the center of the lot, large stable at the east end, brick curtain
wall around the area, rest vacant.
1904 Sanborn: buildings, as 1898 Hyde, lot 7 - "GREASON& SONCOAL
YARD", lots 11-14, "THE HILLSBROTHERSCo. BALTICSTORES".
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: lot 7, vacant; lots 11-14 covered by railroad
tracks "NEW YORKDOCKCo. BALTICTERMINAL"with "PLANKING"in
between; narrow building marked "FREIGHTDEPOT" all along Baltic Street.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 19 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

28
Old lot 6
Old Addresses: 59 Harrison Street.
Size: 22 X 94.10 ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front and rear of the lot, middle vacant.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick shed set back from the curb, "lumber" in the
yard.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick building set back from the curb, frame shed
addition at its rear, vacant yard.
1903 Hyde: brick building on the lot.
1904 Sanborn: same, with a one story "wagon shed" at the rear of the lot,
vacant area between the two.
1915,1939 & 1950Sanborns: vacant.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 19 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 5
Old Addresses: none I unknown
Size: 66 X 94.1 ft.
Sewer conn: book 1, lost.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot marked green for hazard,
small frame & hazard buildings along the street, rest vacant, "Stone Cutters
Yarer.
1869 Dripps: vacant, industrial, but legend unclear.
1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Sanborn, 1893 Bromley: partly vacant, partly covered by a brick
"Lumber Shed" Of"SVLVESTERRoss LUMBER YARD", but Bromley shows
the building as frame.
1898 Hyde: same, frame building.
1903 Hyde: vacant.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant, railroad tracks and "PLANKING"at the
rear of the lot.
Conclusion: this part of old block 19 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 4
Old Addresses: 120 Columbia Street.
Size: 200 X 95 ft.
Sewer conn: two or three recorded, Penna R.R" 1929, northwest corner of Harrison Street;
number untraceable, possibly ca. 1929; S. Ross, 1876, location unclear,
possibly lot 5.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: small frame buildings marked green for hazard at the southwest
comer of the lot, rest vacant. .
1869 Dripps: vacant, industrial yard, legend unreadable, "Timber" in
Harrison Street.
1880 Bromley: frame shed on Harrison Street, small brick building on the

29
corner, "LUMBER".
1886 Sanbom: partly vacant, partly covered by a brick "Lumber Shed' of
"SYLVESTERRoss LUMBERYARD".
1893 Bromley: large frame building with brick front on Harrison Street, small
brick building on the corner, rest vacant.
1898 Hyde: same, with frame extension that overlaps lot 5.
1903 Hyde: same, without the frame extension.
1904 Sanborn: same, "HYDECONSTRUCT'NCo. Storage Shed' brick, two
story Office on the corner.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant, railroad tracks and "PLANKING"at the
rear of the lot.
Conclusion: this part of old block 19 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 3/9 and 14 (14 treated above)


Old Addresses: 100 Columbia Street.
Size: 140.1 X 105 ft.
Sewer conn: New York Dock Co., 1931, southwest comer of Baltic Street.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: two frame buildings set back from the street and at an angle to it.
1869 Dripps: building on the comer of Baltic & Columbia Streets, rest
vacant, "Coal".
1880 Bromley: brick building on the corner of Baltic Street, rest vacant,
"COOPERAGE" .
1886 Sanborn: "SYLVESTERRoss LUMBERYARD",vacant.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: two frame buildings on Columbia Street, rest
vacant, no legend.
1903 Hyde: covered by railroad tracks, no buildings.
1904 Sanborn: six one story buildings at 98-106 Columbia Street, north to
south, "Office" "Photo", "Stevedores Tools", "Junk", "Wheelwright",
"Shed".
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanboms: railroad tracks of "NEWYORKDOCKCo.
BALTICTERMINAL"with "PLANKING"in between; narrow building marked
"FREIGHTDEPOT"all along Baltic Street.
Conclusion: this part of old block 19 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

30
Old blocks 33 / 313 and 34 /315 - Between Kane and Sedgwick Streets, west of Van
Brunt Street; part ofthe Kelsey Estate (1880 Bromley).

Street widths: Irving Street - 60 ft., Sedgwick Street - 60 feet


Current use: vacant.
Sewer conn.: block 33 - three on Kane Street near the comer of Van Brunt, book I, lost;
one on Van Brunt Street, Brooklyn Storage Co" 1891,60 ft. west of Harrison
Street;
block 34 - none recorded.
First tax ass.: block 33 - Charles Kelsey, plot and pier, 1869-1873.
block 34 - Charles Kelsey, plot 100 X 310; (same owner) four stories; (same
owner), plot [unreadable dimensions] & Pier 5; (same owner), Pier.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: bit of land at and just west of Columbia Street and part ofthe
north end of the peninsula enclosing Cornets Mill Pond.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.
1855 Perris: blocks 33 & 34 united in a single area; large frame sheds of
"Robins Southern Naval Store Yard" in the middle of the block and a small
brick office building on the wharf; brick "Lime Shed" on the wharf as well as
a small brick office at the comer of Sedgwick Street; frame "Storage"
building and other small frame buildings on V an Brunt Street.
1869 Dripps: block 33, various buildings, different configuration "Coal';
block 34, mostly covered by buildings, He. Kelsey".
1880 Bromley: block 33 vacant; block 34 completely occupied by brick
buildings of "/(ELSEY STORES" and "UNION STORES", on the north and south
halves of the block, respectively.
1886 Sanborn: blocks 33 & 34 united in a single area, north - "KELSEY'S
WHARF" and "/(ELSEY'S PIER"; south as 1880 Bromley.
1898 Hyde: block 33, north half, lot 2, covered by a brick building; brick
building straddling the southeast comer and halfway across Irving Street;
block 34, same, with two small frame buildings on the wharf, all part of
"BROOKL YN WHARF WAREHOUSECOMPANY".
1904 Sanborn: same, stores on block 33 at 2-12 Van Brunt Street, and stores
at 2846 Van Brunt Street, but Irving Street demapped; two story building in
the street at 26 Van Brunt Street is divided into three shops, "Smithy",
"Carptr", "lumber storage".
1915 & 1939 Sanborn: same, additional small one story buildings between 14
and 26 Van Brunt Street, "PAINT STORAGE".
1950 Sanborn: same, but small paint storage building removed; one story
addition to 26 Van Brunt Street, now used for "A UTO REp. PIPE SHED TIN
SHOP BL. SH. " at no. 22, "WOODWKG & MACH SHOP"; one story building at
18-20 Van Brunt Street; addition at 14 Van Brunt Street to the south side of
the stores at 2-12 Van Brunt, "STORAGE SHED", "PAINTER", "PLUMBER".
1969 Sanborn: Kane, Irving and Van Brunt Streets not mapped west ofYan
Brunt Street; area is vacant.
Conclusion: old blocks 33 and 34 are not sensitive for archaeological remains .
~ ~ I __ _ _

31
Old block 35 / 317 - Between Sedgwick and Degraw Streets. west of Van Brunt Street.

Street widths: Degraw Street - 60 ft.


Old lots: 1-20.
Old addresses: 35-49 Degraw Street (1855 Perris).
Current use: vacant, pier 9B shed.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: part of the peninsula enclosing Cornets Mill Pond, rest under
water.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.

Old lots 1,2,20,21


Old Addresses: 1-17 Degraw Street.
Size: 342.9 (S) X 300 (N) X 200 (E I W)
Sewer conn: Provision Co., 1891, 180 ft. from Van Brunt.
First tax ass.: United States Warehouse Co. 119 & 100; (same owner), Building; (same
owner), Plot, vacant, 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: frame sheds of"Cadwells & Underhill" and brick building of
"Pork & Beef P/[ ..]king Yare!"; eight brick buildings with rear yards at 35-
49 Degraw Street; two others mid-block, on Van Brunt Street.
1869 Dripps: area mostly covered by buildings; "Parker lnspr. of Beef &
Pork" written in Degraw Street; west end of block marked "U'S.
Warehousing Co." & a second legend, unreadable.
1880 Bromley: "PORKINSPECTION"brick building at the southwest corner, on
the wharf, rest of the area covered by sheds.
1886 Robinson: brick building on lot 20, "U.S. WAREHO."lot 1 vacant and
frame building, lot 2, brick building; rest of this area vacant.
1886 Sanborn: same, 1-2 stories.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, part of "BROOKLYNWHARFWAREHOUSE
COMPANY";lot 2 I completely covered by a brick shed contiguous with
building on lots 17- 19 (see below).
1904 to 1950 Sanborns: vacant, except for lot 21, which is part of the
"INTERNATIONAL PROVISIONS"building on lots 17-19.
1969 Sanborn: partly covered by the pier shed of pier 9B, rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 35 is not sensitive for archaeological remains,

Old lots 3, 4, and 5


Old Addresses: none I unknown.
Size: 148 (N/S) X 100 (W/E) ft.
Sewer conn: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Chas. D. Mathens, ho. size 20 x, 80 x ,42 x, 1869-1873. These correspond to
the individual lot lengths.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: covered with buildings.
1880 Bromley: covered by a large shed, part of the "PORKINSPECTION"
facility.

32
1886 Sanborn: two story wing on lot 3, rest of these lots covered by a one
story structure, "JUNK".
1886 Robinson: same building on lot 3, lots 4 & 5 vacant.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde, 1904 Sanborn: vacant.
1915 Sanborn: "LUMBER PILES" in a brick walled area.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same wall, no piles noted.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 35 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 6
Old Addresses: 45-56 Van Brunt Street.
Size: 68 X 100 ft.
Sewer conn: Wm. M. Martin, 1886, southwest comer of Sedgwick Street.
First tax ass.:
Chas. D. Mathens, ho. size 68 x , 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot.
1880 Bromley: covered by a large shed, part ofthe "PORKINSPECTION"
facility.
1886 Robinson: vacant.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick building, "JUNK".
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick building(s) on the lot, shallow rear yards.
1904, 1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, five brick dwellings, 48-56 Van
Brunt Street, shallow yards.
1969 Sanborn: small "Gate Ho." near Sedgwick Street, at the rear of the
lot, rest vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 35 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 7,8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16


Old Addresses: old lots 7 & 8 ~ 58-60 Van Brunt Street;
old lots 9-16,55-41 Degraw Street.
Size: old lots 7 & 8 - 12.5 X 100 ft.
old Jots 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 -12.5 X 75 ft.
Sewer conn: old lot 7 - McCosker, 1871,88 ft. north of Degraw Street;
old lot 8 - John (Stutts?), 1871, 101 ft. north of Degraw Street;
old lots 9, II, 12, 13 - book 3,lost;
old Jots 10, 14, 16 - none recorded;
old lot 15 - D. Farrell. 1867, 75ft. west of Van Brunt;
First tax ass.: all 1869-1873:
old lots 7 & 8 - John Stutt, three stories; James Stutt, three stories;
old lots 9 & 10 ~ Richard D[ ay?] le, MO stories;
old lot II - Maurice Degard, two stories;
old lot 12 - William Ellmore, two stories;
old lots 13 & 14 ~ John Stutt, two stories;
old lots 15 & 16 - D.O. Farrell.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: brick buildings with rear yards on all these lots.
1869 Dripps: same.

33
1886 Sanborn: same, but rear yards of old lots 9 & 10, at the comer, covered
by a two-story brick extension at the rear of old lot 9, which is a three story
store; all others are three story dwellings.
1904 Sanborn: same, but houses on old lots 11-16 have narrow one story
brick buildings at the rear ofthe lots, against the lot line & old lots 8, 11 & 12
have small one story additions at the rear of the buildings.
1915 Sanborn: lots 15 & 16 covered by a four story wing built 1915 of the
"INTERNATIONALPROVISIONCO."; rest is the same, old lot 7 with a small fear
addition and small one story shed in the yard.
1939, 1950 Sanboms: old lots 7,8,9, 10, 11, 13, 14, vacant; old lot 12, same
(three story house & yard); old lots 15 & 16 as 1915 Sanbom;
1969 Sanborn: old lots 9,10, II, 12 and front halfoflot 7 completely
covered by the "Seamen's Center" building; rest is vacant.
Conclusion: old lots 7, 8,13 and 14 are potentially sensitive for archaeological remains;
old lots 9, 10, 11,12, 15 and 16 are not sensitive for archaeological
remains.

Old lots 17-19


Old Addresses: 35-39 Degraw Street.
Size: 75 X 100 ft.
Sewer conn: three recorded, west to east, book 2; lost, Int. Provision Co., 1910, 140 ft.
west of Van Brunt; Int. Provision Co., 1912, 132 ft. west of Van Brunt.
First tax ass.: Archibald Baxter, three properties, second is a "store", 1869-1873.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: covered by a building.
1880 Bromley: brick "PORK PACKING" building covers all three lots.
1886 Sanborn: same, one story, "A BAXTER'S INTERNATIONALPACKINGHo."
1893 Bromley: building expanded over lot 21,33 Degraw Street (see under
lots 1,2,20,21, above).
1904 Sanborn: same INTERNATIONALPROVISIONCO."
1915,1939 Sanborn: same building, no legend.
1950 Sanborn: same, "OPEN VAC."
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 35 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

34
Old blocks 47 /327A and 47A /328 Between Degraw and Sackett Streets, west of
Van Brunt Street, originally separated by Beach Place.

Street widths: Sackett Street - 60 ft.; Beach Place - 35 ft.


Current use: vacant and slip south of Pier 9B.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: part of the peninsula enclosing Cornets Mill Pond, rest under
water.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.

Old block 47
Old lots: 2, 3, 18,20
Old addresses: 4-16 Degraw Street, 21-27 Sackett Street.
Size: 45 (S) X 234 (N) X 200 (W/E) ft.
Sewer conn: two recorded, book 2, lost, on both the north and south sides of the block.
First tax ass.: John S. Ward stores, 1869-1873/
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: lots 2 & 20 with five buildings, three marked for hazard, lots 18
& 20 vacant except for two small buildings near the northeast lot line, and on
the south lot line, near the east end of the lot.
1869 Dripps: same, lot 18 covered by buildings, "Ward Stores".
1880 Bromley: brick building covers lots 18 and 3, "PROVISION INSPECTION
WARE Ho. " lots 2 & 20 vacant.
.' 1886 Robinson: same, "U'S. WAREHO. Co. " , three stories; large frame
building on lot 2, lot 20 vacant.
1886 Sanborn: same, "WARD"S PROVISIONINSPECTIONWARE Ho."; frame
building on lot 2 covers most of the lot, "UNION FERRY CO'S COAL SHED",
one story with two coal conveyors to the pier.
1904 & 1915 Sanborns: same, "E.H. DOUGHERTY'S PROVISIONINSPECTION
WARE Ho." & the coal shed, as above; two "Elevated Coal Conveyor "s from
the shed to the pier and an "elevated runway" from Dougherty's;
1939, 1950 Sanborn: same, "BUTLERS WAREHOUSESINC."
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 6-17


Old addresses: 23-1 Beach Place (1855 Sanborn); 2-24 Beach Place (N to S, 1886 Sanborn).
Size: 50 X 16.8 ft. each lot.
Sewer conn: two recorded, on north and south sides of the block, both Butler's Warehouse,
324 ft. west of Van Brunt, 1931 and 1938.
First tax ass.: John S. Ward, two stories, 1869-1873, all lots west side of Beach Place.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: row of twelve brick houses with yards in the rear.
1869 Dripps: same.
1880 Bromley: same.
1886 Sanborn: same, two story dwellings.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde, 1904 & 1915 Sanboms: same.
1939 Sanborn to present: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

35
Old block 47A

Old lots 1-12


Old Addresses: 24-2 Beach Place (N to S, 1855 Perris); 1-23 Beach Place (N to S), 1886
Sanborn).
Size: 50 X 16.8 ft. each lot.
Sewer conn.: two recorded, one in the middle of each side of this area, locations unknown;
both book 3, lost.
First tax ass.: John S. Ward, 1869-1873, all the lots.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: row of twelve brick houses with yards in the rear.
1869 Dripps: same.
1880 Bromley: same.
1886 Sanborn: same, two story dwellings.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde, 1904 & 1915 Sanborns: same.
1939 Sanborn to present: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 13, 14, 38


Old Addresses: 41-43 Sackett Street & 30-32 Degraw Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 50 (N/S) 200 (W/E)
Sewer conn.: four recorded; lot 38, two in book 2, lost; lot 13, book 3, lost; lot 14, book 11,
ca. 189l.
First tax ass.: lot 38, Joseph Thompson shops and lots 13 & 14, Joseph Thompson sheds,
1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: two brick buildings on the front of lot 38, on Sackett Street; rest
of lot 38 and lots 13 and 14 vacant.
1869 Dripps: lot completely covered by a building.
1880 Bromley: same, brick, "COOPERAGE".
1886 Sanborn: old three-story brick buildings are part of the brick building of
a "BRASS FOUNDRY", with frame shed at the rear and two "JUNK" spaces.
1893 Bromley: lot 38, two long brick buildings on the front of the lot with
yards, lots 13 & 14 vacant.
1898 Hyde: same on lot 38; brick buildings with rear yards on lots 13 & 14.
1904 & 1915 Sanborn: same, buildings on lot 38, five story stores; on lots 13
& 14, 5 story dwellings, all dumbbell style.
1939 & 1950 Sanborn: lot 38, same; lots 13 & 14 vacant.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is Dot sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 15-22


Old Addresses: 1-8 Degraw Street (1855 Perris); 34-48 Degraw Street (1886 Robinson); 30-40
Degraw Street (1904 Sanborn).
Size: 100 X 12.5 ft.
Sewer conn.: west to east: book 3 lost; two connections for P. (Blixt?), 1895, 175 and 150
ft. west of Van Brunt; book 6, ca. 1877; book 2, lost; two for Strauss, 1877,
112 and 102 ft. \west of Van Brunt.

36
First tax ass.: William Cornell, two stories with basement, four properties; Empire building
Ass., two stories with basement, four properties, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: row of houses on the front ofthe lots, rear yards.
1855 Perris: row of brick houses with frame rear extension, yards, sheds at
the rear of the yards.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front ofthe lots.
1880 Bromley: same.
1886 Sanborn: same, two story dwellings, rear wing, one story, brick, vacant
yards (no rear sheds indicated).
1893 Bromley: same.
1898 Hyde: longer buildings on lots 15-18; lot 19 vacant; lots 20-22 same.
1904 & 1915 Sanboms: all eight old buildings replaced by longer five story
dwellings on the front of the lots, rear yards still vacant.
1939 Sanborn: vacant (to present).
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 23
Old Address: 70 Van Brunt Street & 50 Degraw Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: Myers, 1867, near Degraw Street.
First tax ass.:
Caroline Myers, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: building completely covers the lot; brick, central part marked
green for hazard; separate brick building on Degraw Street at the west end of
this lot.
1869 Dripps: buildings cover the lot.
1886 & 1904 Sanborn: same, three story brick on Van Brunt; one story in the
middle; separate three story dwelling, brick, on Degraw Street.
1915 Sanborn: same, but 50 Degraw Street building is "Vac".
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: no building at 50 Degraw Street; other buildings
"Damaged by Fire".
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 24
Old Addresses: 72 Van Brunt Street.
Size: 100 X 20 ft.
Sewer conn.: Flood,1873.
First tax ass.: Michael Flood, three stories.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building at the front of the lot, narrow frame additions at
the rear, deep yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, set back slightly from the street, brick, three stories, one
story addition at the rear along the
south lot line, deep yard.
1904 to 1950 Sanborns: same, dwelling.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is sensitive for archaeological remains.

37
Old lots 25, 26, 27
Old Addresses: 74-80 Van Brunt Street (1886 Sanborn).
Size: 100 X 80 ft.
Sewer conn.: two recorded for Hodgkiss, 1886,45 ft. and 65 ft. south of Degraw; W.J. (Ninns?),
1914, 100 ft. south of Degraw.
First tax ass.: Chester Adams, two properties, 1869-1873; [?] W.H. (Im1y?),1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of the lots.
1880 Bromley: frame building on lot 25; brick buildings on lots 26 & 27,.
1886 Sanborn: "Coal Yard" occupies all three lots; long narrow one story
shed on north half of lot 25 with a narrow "foot" on the front of lot 25; one
story buildings on the front oflots 26 & 27; L-shaped building in the
southwest comer of the area.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde:
- lot 25, now 39, 100 X 20 ft.; brick building on the front ofthe lot;
-lot 26, now 40, 100 X 20 ft.; brick building on the front of the lot;
-lot 27, now 41, 100 X 40 ft.; frame shed on the front of the north
half; rear half with brick shed on the front of the lot; L-shaped building
in the southwest comer of the lot, as earlier.
1904 & 1915 Sanborns:
- lot 25, same, three story dwelling, one story addition at the rear along
the south lot line, three story dwelling at the rear of the lot, vacant area
in between;
- lot 26, same three story dwelling, noted as store on 1915 map;
- lot 27, same with additions that cover the lot; one story brick
"Office" at 78 Van Brunt and two story brick "Hay & Feed Shed" at
80 Van Brunt Street; rear buildings are one story brick stables / sheds,
including a "Wagon Shed".
1939, 1950 Sanborns:
- lot 25, dwelling; lot 26, store, same buildings.
- lot 27, vacant.
1969 Sanborn:
- lots 25 & 26, vacant.
- lot 27, building covers the lot.
1979 Sanborn: all lots vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 28-32


Old Addresses: 26-34 Sackett Street (W to E, 1855Perris); 53-61 Sackett Street (1886 Robinson).
Size: 75 X 20 ft. each lot.
Sewer conn.: lots 28, 29 (two connections), 30, 31, and 32 all book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: lot 28, Heirs of Owen Regan, 20 x 40, three stories with basement;
lot 29, Michael Frawley, 20 x 40, three stories with basement;
lot 30, Owen Regan, 20 x 40, three stories with basement;
lot 31, Jeremiah (Conley?), 20 x 40, three stories with basement;
lot 32, Mary (Dorn?), 20 x 40, three stories with basement.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: row of five brick buildings, rear yards.

38
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of the lots.
1880 Bromley: same except building on lot 28, which covers the lot.
1886 Sanbom: same, all three story dwellings except lot 28, which is a store
with three stories in front and a two story rear wing.
1904 & 1915 Sanboms: same, some sheds at the rear of lots 30 and 31; small
shed at the northwest comer oflot 32.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same except lot 30, which now has a one story brick
rear wing covering the former yard.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: old lot 28 is not sensitive for archaeological remains; old lots 29, 30,31, and
32 are sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 33
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Old Addresses:51 Sackett Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
e.G. Lawless, two stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1850 Dripps: building at the rear of the lot.
1855 Perris: frame building rear third of the lot, front vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the rear of the lot, front vacant.
1880 Bromley: same, plus a brick building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: front building, two story brick dwelling; rear building three
story brick dwelling; rear of the lot, on the lot line, a one story brick structure;
vacant areas between all three buildings.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: all above buildings replaced by a single long brick
building that covers the former vacant area between the front & back building.
1904 & 1915 Sanborns: same, four story store; one story brick sheds at the
rear of the lot.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, without the rear sheds.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lots 34, 35, 36


Size: 100 X 25 ft. each lot
Old Addresses: 45-49 Sackett Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: old lot 34, N. Davis, 1887, 125 ft. west of Van Brunt; old lots 35 and 36,
DanielFerry, 1891, 153 ft and 178 ft. west of Van Brunt.
First tax ass.: Joseph Thompson, shop, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: old lot 34, building on the rear ofthe lot.
1855 Perris: old lot 34, frame building rear third of the lot, front vacant; old
lots 35 & 36, vacant.
1869 Dripps: same.
1880 Bromley: frame building (shed) on the rear third of old lots 34 & 35
plus frame buildings on the front of the lots; old lot 36, vacant.
1886 Robinson: frame buildings of the same size on the front of all three lots,
rest of the lots vacant.
1886 Sanbom: three one story brick buildings on the front of the lots; old lots

39
34 & 35 share a "Wood Yard" in the rear and appear to be part of the
same property with old lot 33.
1893 Bromley: long brick buildings on the front of all three old lots replace
earlier structures, yards vacant.
1904 to 1950 Sanboms: same, all five story brick buildings; old lots 34 & 35,
dwellings; old lot 36, store.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of old block 47A is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

40
BLOCK 334 (Old block 48)

Lots 1,2, 7, 14,40,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,61,62,63,64,65

Bounded by Hamilton Avenue and Union Street (S), Van Brunt Street (E), Sackett Street (N)
and the river (W)

Street widths: Union Street - 65 fi.


Lots: 1,2, 7, 14,40,51-59,61-65.
Current use: vacant.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: land not yet created.
1845 Coastal survey: land not yet built on, part of the flats.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.

Lot 1
Current use: Vacant.
Old lot: 55/57 (1880 Bromley/l 886 Robinson)
Old addresses: 3 Ferry Place (1855 Perris).
First tax ass: Heirs of Anson Blake, 1869-'1873.
Sewer conn.: none recorded
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: one wing of the brick dwelling with store under at the comer of
Sackett Street, i.e. on lots 1 and 2; rear of lot vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: probably no longer part of the building on lot 2.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store on the front of the lot, one story wing at
the rear and one story triangular building at the rear of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot,
triangular rear yard. .
1903 Hyde: same, four stories, (now lot 1)
1915 Sanbom: same, store, with two one story brick additions at the rear that
completely cover the former yard.
1939 and 1950 Sanboms: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 2
Current use: Vacant.
Old lot: 1 (1880 Bromley)
Old addresses: 3 Ferry Place (1855 Perris).
First tax ass: Heirs Anson Blake, 1869-1873.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: two wings of the brick dwelling with store under at the corner of
Sackett Street; small triangular rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot,

41
triangular rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915, 1939 and 1950 Sanborns: same, store, with two one story brick
additions at the rear that cover all but a short, narrow strip along the east lot
line.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 7
Old lots: 5,6, 7, 8, 9.
Sewer conn.: old lot 5 - record not located, ca. 1873.
old lot 6 - Carr, 1871.
old lot 7 - P. Taylor, 1878.
old lot 8 - M. Taylor, 1869.
old lot 9 - J.M. Taylor, 1878.
Firsttax ass: old lot 5 - Sidney A. [Pusyn?], 1869-1873.
old lot 6 - G. Anderson, 1869-1873.
old lots 7, 8 and 9 - 1. Munroe Taylor, 1869-1873.
Sizes: old lots 5 & 6, 80 X 20 ft.
old lot 7, 85 (W), 92.6 (E), 60 ft. (N/S) ft.
old lot 8, 92.6 (W), 95 (E), 20 (N/S) ft.
old lot 9, 95 X 20.
Old addresses: 18-30 Sackett Street (1903 Hyde).
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of old lot 5; building center of lot 7.
1855 Perris:
- old lots 5 and 6, brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lots,
shallow frame addition at the rear, rest of lots vacant.
- old lot 7, "Coal Yard", brick hazard building and frame building both
running parallel to, and partly over the street, at the front of the lot.
- lot 8, two brick hazard buildings, one parallel to, and partly over the street, at
the front of the lot, second building behind it, both on the west lot line.
- old lot 9, vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of old lots 5 and 6; old lots 7 & 8
completely covered by a building, lot 9 vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building of"J. Monroe Taylor CHEMICALWKS." covers
almost all of the old lots; unbuilt areas are, at the rear of old lots 5 & 6, a
narrow triangular area, with a maximum width often feet in the southeast
corner of old lot 6.
1893 Bromley: same, "CHEMICAL WKS"
1898 Hyde: same, "TAYLORS CHEMICALWORKS".
1903 Hyde: same, five and four story sections, "M.F.G. BUILDING".
1915 Sanborn: same,
- old lots 5 & 6, "HAMILTON PIPE WORKS".
- old lots 7, 8 & 9, "BAKING POWDERMFG".
1939 and 1950 Sanboms:
- old lots 5, 6, 7, and 8, "THE MARTIN-SENOUR CO. INC. PAINT W. Ho."; lot 9,
"SHERWIN WILLIAMS CO."

42
1969 & 1979 Sanboms: same, "FRT.TERMINAL".
1988 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 14
Old lots: (west to east) 10/14, 11/15, 12/16, 13/17, 14/18 (1880 Bromley/1903 Hyde).
Sizes: 20 X 95 ft. (all)
Old addresses: 25-33 Sackett Street/32-40 Sackett Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson)
Sewer COlU1.: M. Taylor, 1878.
Two connections: Book 3, lost, and J.M. Taylor, 1879.
Book 3, lost.
Book 2, lost.
Mrs. O'Connor, 1867.
First tax ass: [?] Haverty, three stories, 1869-1873.
Simon [Fitch?] (three properties), 1869-1873.
Celia Tucker, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris a row of brick dwellings on the front ofthe lots with store under,
rear yards vacant.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same.
1886 Sanborn: same, except that lots 11115, 12/16 and 13/17 all have small,
narrow buildings along their rear lot lines.
- old lot 10/14, three story brick building, "HOTEL".
- old lot 1IllS, three story brick dwelling.
- old lot 12/16, three story brick dwelling.
- old lot 13/17, three story brick store.
- old lot 14/18, three story brick store.
1903 Hyde: same, without the small buildings at the rear of the lots (or
notations on use).
1915 Sanborn:
- old lot 10114, same, store, "HALL".
- old lot 11/15, same, store, but with one story brick rear addition that extends
to the rear lot line (frame partition within).
- old lot 12/16, same, store.
- old lot 13/17, same, store, with a one story brick building occupying the rear
of the lot "DINING R'M", yard between it and the store.
- old lot 14/18, same, narrow one story brick structure at the rear of the lot
along the south lot line.
1939 Sanborn:
- old lot 10114, same.
- old lot II/IS, same but without the rear wing.
- old lot 12/16, same, with a narrow one story brick building at the rear of the
lot along the lot line, front building "BOARDEDUP".
- old lot 13/17, dining room demolished, front building "BOARDEDUP".
- old lot 14/18, same, but "OPENFIREWRECK".
1950 Sanborn:
- old lot 10/14, same.

43
- old lot 11/15, same.
- old lots 12/16, 13/17, 14/18, vacant.
1969 Sanborn:
- old lot 10/15, same.
- old lots 11/15 & 12/16, one story brick building extends over the rear of both
lots, front empty marked "MISELSTGE".
- old lots 12/16, 13117, 14118, vacant.
1979 Sanborn: all same.
1988 Sanborn: all vacant.
Conclusion: old lots 10/14 and 11/15 are not sensitive for archaeological remains; old
lots 12/16,13/17 and 14/18 are sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 40
Old lots: (east to west) 30/40, 31/41, 32/42, 33/44, 34/45,35/46,36/47,37/48,38/49,
39/50.
Current use: Vacant.
First tax ass: Heirs Anson Blake, sheds, 1869-1873 (all the following old lots).
Sewer conn.: see under individual old lots, below.
Historic maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: "Coal", vacant.

Old lot 30/40


Old Address: 45 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, with a second frame building making an "L" with the first,
on the 23st lot line;
1915 Sanborn: brick store, brick stable, one story, and extensions at the rear
completely cover the lot.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS".
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 31141


Old Address: 43 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: frame building completely covers
the lot.
1903 Hyde: one story frame building on the front of the lot, rear half vacant.
1915 Sanborn: one story brick building with one and a half story stable
addition at the rear, yard vacant "STALLSLETOUT", i.e. stables.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS".

44
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 32/42


Old Address: 41 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: frame building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: yard Of"PETfm's COAL YARD".
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: frame building on the front ofthe
lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: two one story buildings side by side, eastern is frame, western is
brick, rear vacant.
1915 Sanborn: one story wagon building on the front of the lot, "stalls let
out" on the rear of the lot.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS".
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 33/44


Old Address: 39 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 30 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: frame building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick shed on the front of the lot, yard of "PETITE'S
COAL YARD" in the rear.
1886 Robinson: frame building covers all put a narrow strip along
approximately two-thirds of the east side of the lot, to the rear lot line.
1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: frame building covers all but a small square area
about half the lot
1903 Hyde: one story frame building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1915 Sanborn: brick one story office and one story wagon building on the
front of the lot, brick one and a half story stable on the rear of the lot.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS".
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 34/45


Old Address: 37 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: frame stable on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: frame building covers all but a
narrow strip along the west lot
1903 Hyde: one story frame building covers most of the lot, a vacant area
remains at the rear of the lot about half the lot width and a third of its length,
along the west lot line.
1915 Sanborn: "Machine Shop" covers the lot - brick building with three
chambers, two, one and two stories in height.

45
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS", except for part of a one
and a half story chamber of a three part building at the rear of the lot and
extending over lots 45, 46 and 47.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 35/46


Old Address: 35 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: H. Olsen, 1916.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: one story frame building "SHOP" on the front of the lot with one
story rear addition, frame stable on the rear of the lot, vacant L-shaped area
around the two-story rear wing ofthe shop".
1915 Sanborn: one story dwelling on the front of the lot with a one-story
"storage" wing on the east lot line followed by small one and two story
chambers at its rear, one-story frame stable at the rear of the lot, vacant area
behind the dwelling and in front ofthe stable.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OFPARKS", except for part ofa
"COMFORT STA.", one story, part of a three part building at the rear of the lot
and extending over lots 44, 46 and 47.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 36/47


Old Address: 33 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: vacant.
1886 Robinson. 1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: one story frame building "SHOP" on the front of the lot with one
story stable in the middle of the lot against the west lot line, U'-shaped vacant
area around it, frame stable at the rear of the lot.
1915 Sanborn: one story "Smith" brick building on the front of the lot, one
story brick "WAGON SHED" and stable at the rear of the lot, vacant area in the
middle of the lot. .
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant "DEPT. OF PARKS", except for part of a
"COMFORT STA.", and another room, parts of a three part building at the rear
ofthe lot and extending over lots 44, 45 and 46.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is sensitive for archaeological remains.

46
Old lot 37/48
Old Address: 31 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 25 ft.
Sewer conn.: A. Blake, 1875,343 ft. west of Van Brunt.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: brick building on the front ofthe lot.
1886 Sanborn: brick one story stable or shed on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson. 1898 Hyde. 1893 Bromley: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: long, narrow one story frame building on the front of the lot,
leaving narrow vacant strips along both the east and west lot lines, frame
stable at the rear of the lot, vacant area in between.
1915 Sanborn: one story "Carp'r" brick building on the front of the lot, part
of a one story brick "WAGONSHED"and stable at the rear of the lot, vacant
area in the middle of the lot and on the northwest side.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 38/49


Old Address: 29 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 20 ft.
Sewer conn.: Est. of Anson Blake, 1891,230 ft. east of Hamilton Avenue (or old lot 39)
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: edge of the brick building on lot 38 overlaps the southeast
comer of this lot.
1886 Sanborn: brick one story stable or shed on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: frame building on the front of the
lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: one story frame building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1915 Sanborn: one story brick "Hay & feed" building on half of the front of
the lot, rest vacant.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 39/50


Old Address: 27 Union Street.
Size: 100 X 20 ft.
Sewer conn.: see old lot 38.
Historic maps: 1880 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1886 Robinson: narrow frame building on the front of the lot on the east lot
line with a narrow vacant strip along its western side, frame building at the
rear of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: one story brick building on the front of the lot, "Coal Shed" at
the rear of the lot.
1898 Hyde, 1893 Bromley: brick building at the front of the lot on the east lot
line, frame extension along the west lot line covering most of the lot, rear
vacant.
1903 Hyde: enlarged front building, "SHOP", one story, rear half of the lot

47
vacant.
1915 Sanborn: same, "IRONWORKS"and "STORAGE"one story brick building
at the rear of the lot, center of the lot vacant.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 40 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 51
Old lot: 40.
Old addresses: 11 Union Streetl25 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: book I, lost.
First tax ass:Z. Landerberger, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot with store under, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, vacant area "Coal", behind.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story at the rear, small frame
building at the rear of the lot.
1915,1939 and 1950 Sanboms: same, store, two narrow one-story frame
buildings along the west and east lot lines at the rear of the lot, T -shaped
vacant area in the rear half of the lot.
1969 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 52
Old lot: 41.
Old addresses: 9 Union Street/23 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: Mrs. Hickey, 1868, 153 ft. south of Hamilton, could be on property line
between lots 52 and 53.
First tax ass: Peter J. Rudden, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under, rear
yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, vacant area "Coal", behind.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story at the rear, small frame
building near the northeast corner of the lot.
1915, 1939 and 1950 Sanboms: same, store, one story frame building along
the northeast lot line, rest of the rear of the lot vacant.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

48
Lot 53
Old lot: 42.
Old addresses:7 Union Street/2l Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: none recorded, (but see previous entry for lot 52).
First tax ass:Ellen Hickey, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under, rear
yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, vacant area "Coal", behind.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story at the rear, small frame
building at the rear of the lot.
1915. 1939, 1950 & 1969 Sanborns: same, store, but with a further one story
frame addition covering the former yard area.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 54
Old lot: 43.
Old addresses: 5 Union Streetl19 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass:Ann G. Jane, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under, rear
yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, vacant area "Coal", behind.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, two stories at the rear, small frame
building at the rear of the lot, along the north lot line.
1915 Sanborns: same, store.
1939, 1950 & 1969 Sanborns: same, without the frame building on the rear
lot line.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion; this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 55
Old lot: 44.
Old addresses: 3 Union Street/I 7 Union Street (1855 Perrisll886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass: Anthony Prossler, three stories, 1869-1873 ..
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under, rear
yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, vacant area "Coal", behind.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.

49
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story at the rear, small frame
building at the rear of the lot, along the north lot line.
1915,1939 and 1950 Sanborns: same, store.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 56
Old lot 45.
Old addresses: 1 Union StreetJ15 Union Street (1855 Perris!l886 Robinson).
Sewer conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass: [?] [J.?] Conroy, three stories,1869-1 873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front ofthe lot with store under, rear
yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building completely covers the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: same, brick building on the front
of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story at the rear, small frame
building at the rear of the lot, along the north lot line.
1915, 1939 and 1950 Sanborns: same, store.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 57
Old lot: 46.
Old addresses: 17 Hamilton Avenue/13 Union Street (1855 Perris & presentJ1886
Robinson).
Sewer conn.: John Collins, 1885.
First tax ass: James (Canaunagh?), three stories, 1869,.1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on most ofthe lot, narrow rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building covers most of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling on most of the lot,
narrow rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, two stories addition at the rear,
separate one story frame building almost immediately behind the brick
building, covering the former yard.
1915, 1939 and 1950 Sanboms: same, store, but two story wing extended
with one story addition at the rear of it two-story wing completely covers the
lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

50
Lot 58
Old lot: 47.
Old addresses: 15 Hamilton Avenue!11 Union Street (1855 Perris & present/1886
Robinson).
Sewer conn.: Mr. Murphy, 1873.
First tax ass: James [McGriavy?], four stories, 1869-1873,
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: large brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under,
shallow rear yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building covers most of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling on most of the lot,
narrow rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in front, one story addition at the rear, rear
yard.
1915 and 1939 Sanboms: same, store, but two story addition at the rear.
1950 Sanbom: same, but two-story wing extended to cover almost the entire
lot, small triangular vacant area at the rear, "IRON WKS".
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 59
Old lots: 48 and 49.
Old addresses: 13 & 11 Hamilton Avenue 17 Union Street/7 & 9B Union Street (1855
Perris!1886 Robinson/I915 Sanborn).
Sewer conn.: S. Brown, 1925 (old lot 48); book 1, lost (old lot 49).
First tax ass.: Ellen [Skehan?], four stories; 1869~1873, two entries.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: large brick dwellings on the front of the Ions) with stores under,
rear yards vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of the lots, rear yards.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lots.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling on the lots, lot 48
has a shallow rear yard, lot 49 a deeper one.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in the front, one story at the rear.
1915 and 1939 Sanboms: same, stores, small one story brick building in the
northwest corner of lot 48.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 61
Old lot: 50.
Old addresses: 9 Hamilton Avenue/5 Union Street (1855 Perris!1915 Sanborn).
First tax ass.: Catherine T. Tanner, four stories, 1869-1873.
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling on the front of the lot with store under, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lots.

51
1886 Robinson: brick dwelling on the front of the lot.
1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick building on most ofthe lot except for the
narrow northern end.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories in the front, one at the rear.
1915 and 1939 Sanborns: same, store, two stories at the rear, fanner yard
covered by a one-story shed.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains,

Lot 62
Old lot: 51
Old addresses:7 Hamilton Avenue/3 Union Street (1855 Perris/1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
John Ross, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwellings on the front of the lot(s) with store under,
rear yards vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley:. brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling on the front of the
lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories, one story brick building covers the former
back yard.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, store, rear connected with the adjacent
building on old lot 52 (5 Hamilton Avenue)
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 63
Old lot: 52.
Old addresses:5 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
Elizabeth Murtagh, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot with store under, part ofthe
"Atlantic Hotel", rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling on the front of the
lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, store, rear connected with the adjacent
building on old lot 51 (7 Hamilton Avenue)
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains .
a ~ .

52
Lot 64
Old lot: 53.
Old addresses: 3 Hamilton Avenue/ 1 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: three connections recorded: book 1, lost; book 3, lost; book 4, record not
located.
First tax ass.: Isaac Hart, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot with store under, part of the
"Atlantic Hotel", rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling covers all but the
narrow eastern end of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915, 1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, store, small one story brick structure
along the northeast lot line, small sliver of yard remains.
1969 Sanbom: part of the large building on the corner; the lot area is almost
completely covered by building, except for a small area approximately seven
foot square in the northeast corner of the lot.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 65
Old lots: 54 & part of 55; lot configuration slightly different on every map.
Old addresses: I Hamilton Avenue /1 Hamilton Avenue & 1,2, & 3 Ferry Place (1855
Perris/1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: agent for J.B. White, 1941, northeast corner of Ferry Place.
First tax ass.: J. & M. Murphy, three stories.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot with store under, part ofthe
"Atlantic Hotel", rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Robinson. 1893 Bromley. 1898 Hyde: brick dwelling covers the front of
the lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915. 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, store, one story addition at the rear, one
story building shed (?) on the southeast side of the small triangular vacant
area remaining at the rear of the lot (contemporary lot configuration).
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

53
BLOCK 340 (Old block 49)

Bounded by President Street (S), Van Brunt Street (E), Union Street (N), and Hamilton
Avenue (W).

Street widths: President Street - 60 ft.; Hamilton Avenue - 90 ft.


Lots: 1-10, 14-17, 19-26,28-33,35,38-46,48,51.
Current use: vacant.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: land not yet created.
1845 Coastal survey: land not yet built on, part of the flats.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.

Lot 1
Old lot: 39
Old addresses: 1 President Street & 31 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:
Nicholas M. Grath, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1850 Dripps: building on the lot.
1855 Perris: two brick dwellings with store under on the front of the lot, small
vacant area at the rear of the eastern one.
1869 Dripps: same, probably
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building covers all but the narrow strip
at the rear of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store, one-story brick addition at the rear.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: same, "PAINTS & OIL STGE 1ST VAC ABV."
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains .
......... , Ii II' .
Lot 2
Old lot: 40.
Old addresses:29 Hamilton Avenue (1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.:
Gotlieb Fay (1) 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1850 Dripps: building on the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: same, probably
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, triangular rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story brick store, one story brick addition at the
rear.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: same, "PAINTS & OIL STGE 1ST VAC ABV."
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

54
Lot 3
Old lot: 41.
Old addresses: 39/27 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perrisl1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: A. [Pitinos?l, 1929.
First tax ass.:Christina Bungarb, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: same, probably
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, deep rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story brick store, one story brick addition at the
rear.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, store.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains .
............. 111111 " " .

Lot 4
Old lot: 42.
Old addresses: 37/25 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:Gottlieb Fay, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: two parts of a frame store that also extends partly over lots 17,
19 and 20 fronting on Union Street, completely covers lot 4.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot only.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, deep
rear yard.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store with one story rear extension covers
most of the yard, small triangular area at the rear of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, but additional one-story addition at the
rear covers the remainder of the lot area.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 5
Old lot: 43.
Old addresses: 33/23 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perrisl1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: two connections: book 4, record not located, ca. 1869 (E); William Evertt,
1907 (W).
First tax ass.: Gottlieb Fay, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: same, probably.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: one-story brick building covers the lot.

55
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
.................................................................. , " ,. .
Lot 6
Old lot: 44.
Old addresses: 33/21 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
M.P. Bowne (?) two stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: same, probably.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: one-story brick building covers the lot.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
....................................................................................................................................................................
Lot 7
Old lot: 45.
Old addresses:31/19 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: Andrew Donovan, 1890.
First tax ass.:
M.P. Bowne (?) two stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, narrow
rear extension over about half of the yard area, the rest vacant.
1869 Dripps: same, probably.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, shallow
rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories, with a two-story extension that covers the
eastern half of the former yard.
1915 Sanborn: same, store.
1939, 1950 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains
.................. 11 '" ,

Lot 8
Old lot: 46.
Old addresses: 17 Hamilton Avenue (1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Robert Bennett, two stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, extending over adjacent lot
14 on Union Street, covers the entire lot.
1869 Dripps: same, probably.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: very narrow, triangular yards separate the
Hamilton Avenue and Union Street buildings.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.

56
1915, 1939 Sanborns: same, one-story shed in the northeast corner of the lot.
1950Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
.............................. 111 "' .

Lot 9
Old lot: 2.
Old addresses: 25/15 Hamilton Avenue & 10 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: President Street - Meta Stelling, four stories, 1869-1873; Union Street:
M. Benger(ru)in?, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, extending over the entire lot,
to Union Street.
1869 Dripps: same.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915, 1939, 1950 & 1969 Sanborns: same, store; "Vac. " in 1969.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
.4 ..
Lot 10
Old lot ].
Old addresses: 19-23 Hamilton Avenuell3 Hamilton Avenue & 2-8 Union Street (1855
Perris/1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: two connections in book], missing, one in book 12, pages missing.
First tax ass.: S.E. Ensign, five stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, extending over the entire lot,
marked "Barker House".
1869 Dripps: building covers the entire lot.
1880 Bromley: same, "HOTEL"~
]886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1886 Sanborn: same, "WALDOHo."
1903 Hyde: same, five stories.
] 915 & 1939 Sanborns: six stories, store.
1950 Sanborn: same "VAC."
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
................................................................................................................................................................ 111 .

Lot 14
Old lot: 3.
Old addresses: 12/14 Union Street (1886 Robinsonl1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: two connections recorded, one in book 1, lost J.C. ? Koehl? 1887.
Firsttax ass.: Julius Koehl, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, extending over adjacent lot 8
on Hamilton Avenue, covers the entire lot.
]869 Dripps: same.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, small

57
triangular yard at the rear.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, store.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 15
Old lot: 4.
Old addresses: 14/16 Union Street.
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.:
Robert Burnett, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the rear of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: same.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, small
triangular yard at the rear.
1886 Sanborn: same, four story store.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, narrow one-story brick building along the rear lot
line.
1939 Sanborn: same "VAC. & OPEN".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 16
Old lot: 5.
Old addresses: 16/18 Union Street (1886 Robinsonl1893 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.:
W.G. Hopkins, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, narrow
rear extension over about half of the yard area, the rest vacant.
1869 Dripps: same. .
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store on the front of the lot with two and one
story extensions along the east lot line.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, small
yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 & 1939 Sanborn: same, store, additional very small one-story room at
the rear.
1950 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains
................................................ Ii iI .

Lot 17
Old lots: 6 & 7.
Old addresses: 18-20 Union Street/20-22 Union Street (1886 Robinson & 1915
Sanboml1893 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: Mrs. Burgaman, 203 ft. east of Hamilton Avenue, 1877.

58
First tax ass.: Nicholas Peters, 1869-1873, two properties.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building covers most of the lot, rear yard.
1855 Perris: large brick store on most of the front of the lot except for a
narrow vacant strip on the east side of the building, with a smaller frame
rear wing over about half of the yard area; this building is part of a
structure that covers lot 4 and parts oflots 19 and 20.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot only.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley:
lot 6-brick buildings on the front and rear of the lot, vacant area in between;
lot 7-brick building completely covers the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, two stories (both lots).
1915 & 1939 Sanborn:
lot 6 - two story stores on the front of the lot, one story addition at the rear
covering the formerly vacant area, two story dwelling at the rear of the lot;
buildings completely coverthe lot.
lot 7 - two story store on the front of the lot, one story extension at the rear,
two story brick building at the rear of the lot; buildings completely cover the
lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this tot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 19
Old lot: 8
Old addresses:22-24 Union Street/26 Union Street (1855 Perris/1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: Esposito, 1891.
First tax ass.:
John (Schmadeke?) and Claus Mintens, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear half
of the lot covered by part of a wing of the building that extended over all of
lot 4, and part oflots 17,20 and 21; with a narrow yard between the two
buildings.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot only.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building(s) completely cover the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, one building, two stories in front, one story at the rear.
1915 Sanborn: same, two "OVEN"S at the rear of the lot.
1939 & 1950 Sanborn: same, "BAKERY" with the buildings on lots 20 & 21.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
11' 1- * .

Lot 20
Old lots: 9 & 10/48 (1880 Bromley/1893 Bromley).
Old addresses: 24-26 Union Street/28 Union Street(1855 Perris/1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: Chas. Bolt[men?] 1867.
First tax ass.: Julia B. Koehl, 1869-1873, two properties.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear half
of the lot vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

59
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building(s) completely cover all but the
"toe" - at the rear of lot 23 and part of22 (25 ft. WIE) -- of this L-shaped lot.
lot.
1886 Sanborn: two stories at the front, one at the rear, building runs through
to President Street; two and a half story wing "Rectifying" extending east
behind lot 21 and part of lot 22.
1903 Hyde: same, one building, two stories in front, one story at the rear; rear
of30 Union Street, occupied by a three-story brick building; "toe" of the lot
still vacant.
1915 Sanborn: same, foot of the "L" occupied by two ovens, "toe" still
vacant.
1939, 1950 & 1969 Sanborns: same, "BAKERY" with the buildings on lots 20
&21.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
.................................................................................................................................................... 111 ..

Lot 21
Old lot: 11 (1880 Bromley).
Old addresses: 28 Union Street/3D Union Streetl28 Union Street (1855 Perris/1903
Hyde/I915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: (initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40, 31 Union Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front ofthe lot, rear half
vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley, 1898 Hyde: brick building completely covers
the lot.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front ofthe lot, rear yard.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, one-story L-shaped shed along the south and
east lot lines.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
illlI 111 1- .

Lot 22
Old lot: 12
Old addresses: 30 Union Street/32 Union Street/3D Union Street (1855 Perris!l903
Hyde/1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: E. [Mondainia?], 1897
First tax ass.: (initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40,33 Union Street. 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front of the lot, rear half
vacant.
1869 Dripgs: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.

60
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, one-story L-shaped structure along the south
and east lot lines.
1950 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 23
Old lot: 13.
Old address: 32 Union Street (1855 Perris).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: (initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40,35 Union Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front of the lot, rear half
vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, one-story L-shaped structure along the south
and east lot lines.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains
.............................................................................................. , , .
Lot 24
Old lot: 14.
Old address: 34 Union Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: Cosgrove, 1876.
First tax ass.:(initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40,37 Union Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front ofthe lot, rear half
vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, one-story structure along the rear lot line.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 25
Old lot: 15.
Old address: 36 Union Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: Cosgrove, 1876.
First tax ass.: (initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40,39 Union Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front ofthe lot.
1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front of the lot, brick
store, hazard along the east lot line, in the center of the lot, occupies
approximately half the lot width.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

61
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot only.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard, frame
building occupies the rear third, approximately of the lot; area south oflot 24
occupied by two frame buildings with a narrow vacant area in between ..
1915 Sanborn: same, one-story is "DRY HO."; rear of 34 Union Street vacant
except for a very narrow, one-story addition at the rear of 11 President Street,
which overlaps onto lot 25.
1939 Sanborn: one story "Pool Rm." occupies the rear halfof36 Union
Street, covering former yard area, but rear of 34 Union Street still vacant.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
........ 111 lIiI 1111 .

Lot 26
Old lot: 16.
Old addresses: 34 Union Street/40 Union Street/38 Union Street (1855 Perris!1886
Robinson! 1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, both Butterworth, 1868.
First tax ass.: (initials unreadable), Butterworth, 18.9 X 40, 41 Union Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling facing Union Street and 6 small brick dwellings
side-by-side behind it on an alley called "Union Court"; small vacant area at
the rear of the lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson. 1893 Bromley: brick building(s) run to the rear lot line, alley
on the west side of the lot still open.
1886 Sanborn: three story store on Union Street with a row of two story brick
buildings south of it, along the alley, terminating in a staircase (?) along the
south lot line.
1903 Hyde: three story brick building on the front of the lot, two-story brick
building on the rear of the lot, narrow area in between occupied on the west
half (over the former alley) by a one-story frame chamber.
1915 Sanborn: same. but two one-story brick wings in the narrow area
between the two buildings; front buildings are two stores; rear has a
"GALLERY" .
1939 Sanborn: same, rear building "HALL".
1950 Sanborn: same, without the western, one-story structure in the middle of
the lot; rear building "CLAY POITERY MFG. 2 DRY KILNS".
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 28
Old lot: 17.
Old addresses: 36 Union Street/42 Union Street! 40 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886
Robinson! 1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: William Mollar (?), three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

62
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, frame
extension at the rear, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front ofthe lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915,1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, two small one-story structures at the rear
of the yard.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
......................................................................................................................................... " .
Lot 29
Old lot: 18.
Old addresses: 38 Union Street! 44 Union Street (1855 PerrislI886 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: Mr. (Armor?] 1867.
First tax ass.: Thomas O'Connor, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, shallow
frame extension, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories, shallow two story frame extension at the rear
that does not take up the entire lot width.
1915, 1939 & 1950, 1969, 1979 Sanboms: same.
1988 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains
....................... iI' "'."' .

Lot 30
Old lot: 19.
Old addresses: 40 Union StreetJ46 Union Street (1855 Perrisl1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:S.M. Parks, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: three story brick building with two story rear extension and a
frame extension behind that extending to the rear lot line.
1915, 1939, 1950 Sanborns: same, but with a narrow, one story brick
chamber at the rear, on the west lot line, instead of the earlier frame wing,
1988 Sanbam: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
............ ;,. .
Lot 31
Old lot: 20.
Old addresses: 42 Union Street!48 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.: Jacob Cromwell, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

63
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson. 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915. 1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, but with a narrow, one story brick
chamber atthe rear of the yard, along on the east lot line (1915 & 1950
Sanboms).
1988 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 32
Old lot: 21.
Old addresses:44 Union Street/50 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: Lang, 1873.
First tax ass.:
Frederick Mangles, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: three story brick building on the front of the lot, two story wing
of an L-shaped building at the rear of 52 Union Street extends over the rear
yard of this lot.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: three story store with a one-story rear extension over
the fanner yard area; rear of the lot has a narrow one-story brick building
along the west lot line & a narrow, two story stores along the south lot line.
1950 Sanborn: one story "BEVERAGE DEPOT" covers the entire lot.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 33
Old lot: 22.
Old addresses: 46 Union Street/52 Union Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.: Frederick Mangles, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, two stores
on the rear of the lot, marked for hazard, narrow space in the rear (west) of
these.
1869 Dripps: building on the entire lot.
1886 Robinson. 1893 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1903 Hyde: three story brick building on the front of the lot, two story L-
shaped wing at the rear that extends to the lot line and over the rear of lot 32.
1915 Sanbom: three story store on the front of the lot, two story brick
building behind it, on VanBrunt Avenue with a narrow vacant strip behind it,
on the west lot line; a narrow, two story store along the south lot line.
1939 Sanborn: same, but all three buildings one story and all stores.
1950 Sanborn: same, but southernmost building part of the beverage depot on
lot 32.

64
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
" 111 -11 .

Lot 35
Old lots: 23 & 24/35 & 36 (1880 Bromley/1903 Hyde).
Old addresses: 30 Van Brunt Street! 118-1120 Van Brunt Street (1855 Perris/1886 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, book 1, lost; E.D.W. Mitchell, 1867.
First tax ass.:Letitia (J.?) Moore, 1869-1873, John [F.?]erin, , 1869-1873, both three stories
with basement.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: two brick dwelling with store(s) under on the front of the lot, set
back from the street, rear of the lot vacant.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of the lot set back from the street.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same, brick.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement, one story frame extension at
the rear.
1915 Sanborn: same, both marked store, with the following additions:
old lot 23, one story brick building at the rear, in the yard, approximately half
the lot in width;
old lot 24, two further one story brick additions at the rear, and a narrow, one
story brick building along the west lot line, narrow strip along the north lot
line is the only still vacant area. .
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same.
1979 Sanborn: new building covers the lot.
Conclusion: old lot 23 is sensitive for archaeological remains; old lot 24 is not sensitive
for archaeological remains .
....... "" oil , Ii Ii Ii II

Lot38
Old lot: 25.
Old addresses: 27 President Streetl29 President Street (1855 Perrisl1886 Robinson) + 126
Van Brunt Street (1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: John [F?]erin, 20 X 49, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard,
shed at the rear of the yard, on the lot line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, brick building at the
rear of the lot, narrow vacant area in the middle.
1886 Sanborn: "Bakery [ ..?], same, but the formerly vacant area now
covered with a frame structure.
1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde; three story brick building on the front of the lot, two story
brick buildings on the rear half of the lot at 126 Van Brunt Avenue, narrow
vacant strip between them.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 & 1969 Sanborns: same, with a small addition connecting the three

65
story building,"UNDERTK'R",and the two story buildings.
1979 Sanborn: front building torn down.
1989 Sanborn: lot vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 39
Old lot: 26.
Old addresses: 25 President StreetJ27 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.:George Wise, 20 X 38, three stories with basement, 25 President Street,
1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, small
frame extension at the rear, rear yard, shed at the rear ofthe yard, on the lot
line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 40
Old lot: 27.
Old addresses: 23 President StreetJ25 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:Johana Engelhardt, 20 X 38 ft., three stories with basement, 23 President
Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, small
frame extension at the rear, vacant rear yard, shed at the rear of the yard, on
the lot line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, store, with a narrow, one story brick structure
along the east lot line.
1950 & 1969 Sanborn: same, without the one story structure in the yard.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

66
Lot 41
Old lot: 28.
Old addresses: 21 President Streetl23 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: G. Tasso, 1910.
First tax ass.:Thomas Hunt, 20 X 38, three stories with basement, 21 President Street,
1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, small
frame extension at the rear, vacant rear yard, shed at the rear of the yard, on
the lot line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same with a narrow one story brick building running
from the back of the store the length ofthe east lot line.
1950 Sanborn: same, without the one story structure in the yard.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 42
Old lot: 29.
Old addresses: 19 President Streetl21 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: Annie Bedew, 20 X 38, three stories with basement, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, small
frame extension at the rear, vacant rear yard, shed at the rear of the yard, on
the lot line.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement, frame extension is one story.
1915, 1939, 1950 &1969 Sanboms: same but extension is deeper, plus a
narrow one story brick building running along the east lot line at the rear of
the lot.
1979 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains
Ii I" Ii Ii Ii II ...

Lot 43
Old lot: 30.
Old addresses: 17 President Street/19 President Street (1855 Perrisll886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.: G.W. Kirtland, 20 X 38, four stories, 17 President Street, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: one wing of the brick dwelling with store under that extended
over lot 44, rest of lot vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.

67
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, brick shed/stable
extending across the rear of the lot.
1893 Bromley: same, plus a brick extension of the building on the front of the
lot, that ran up to the building at the rear
1903 Hyde: three story building at the front of the lot, probably the same as
shown on the 1893, plus a three story brick building with basement that
covered the remaining area of the lot.
1915 Sanborn: same.
1939 Sanborn: same, "STEVEDOREBOARDING2ND & 3RD HORSESHOER".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
........................................................... 111 .

Lot 44
Old lot: 31.
Old addresses: 15 President Street/I 7 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, book 1, lost (W); M. Smith, 1877 (E).
First tax ass.:
Ferdinand Koehn, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1850 Dripps: building on the front ofthe lot.
1855 Perris: small brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot that
extended onto the front oflot 43, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories, with one story rear extension that covered
the former yard.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains
.......................... I" __ 'II 'II' _. ~ _.

Lot 45
Old lot: 32.
Old addresses: 13 President Street/IS President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 1, lost.
First tax ass.:
J.E. Feldhauser, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: small brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot rear
yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, with a narrow structure along the north
lot line at the rear of the yard.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains

68
Lot 46
Old lots: 33 & 34.
Old addresses: 11 and 9 President Street/13 & 11 President 'Street (1855 Perris/1886
Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: two records both book 1, lost.
First tax ass.: Mary Butler, four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: two brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear
of 1 I President Street is vacant: frame store at the rear of9 President Street.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanbom: old lot 33, four story store with three one story brick
extensions covering about two thirds of the yard area; old lot 34 marked store
and "HOTEL" with one story rear extensions that cover the entire lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick buildings on the front of the lots, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four story with the following additions:
Old lot 33, frame additions along the back of the building and on the east lot
line, small frame building northwest
Old lot 34, one story brick addition that extends nearly to the north lot line,
leaving only a narrow alley along the east lot line.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms:
Old lot 33, same, "HOTEL" with additional narrow one story brick buildings,
the east lot line extending to the north lot line, a second from the northwest
corner of the brick building, over about a third ofthe yard's length; in 1939, a
third one story structure between this one and the earlier frame building at the
rear of the brick building, on the east lot line.
Old lot 34, same, "HOTEL" with rear additions that completely cover the lot
area.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: old lot 33 is sensitive of lot 46 for archaeological remains; old lot 34 is not
sensitive for archaeological remains.
, , "' "
Lot 48
Old lots: 35,36,37

Old lot 35
Old addresses: 9 President Street/9 President Street (1855 Perris/1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Mary Butler, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store on the front of the lot, frame extension
at the rear, two frame stores behind this, to the rear lot line, narrow vacant
space along the west side of the lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Sanborn; three story stores on the front of the lot and two story brick
dwelling on the rear of the lot, vacant area in between.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: same.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories in the front, shed or stable at the rear.

69
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, with three story extension at the rear of the
front building, two story brick dwelling at the rear of the lot. .
1950 & 1969 Sanboms: same, with staircase in front of the rear dwelling,
along the east lot line.
1979 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 48 is sensitive for archaeological remains

Old lot 36
Old addresses: 7 President Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
James Stutt, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: "Coal Yard".
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building runs the length of the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick buildings on the front and rear of the lot, vacant area in
between.
1903 Hyde: one story brick building on the front of the lot only.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: two, two story brick stores on the front ofthe lot, two
story brick dwelling at the rear, vacant area in between.
1950 & 1969 Sanboms: same, with staircase in front of the rear dwelling,
along the east lot line.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: tbis part of lot 48 is sensitive for archaeological remains

Old lot 37
Old addresses: 5 President Street (1886 Robinson).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
Nicholas M. Grath, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: "Coal Yard".
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, rear wing is one story.
1939 Sanbom: front of the lot vacant (?) except for stairs leading to a "PL'r'M
2nd" (platform) on the east lot line, one story brick building at the rear of the
lot.
1950 Sanbom: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 48 is not sensitive for archaeological remains

Lot 51
Old lot: 38.
Old addresses: 3 President Street (1855 Perris).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Julia Bikane (?) four stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, small

70
frame extension at the rear, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1886 Robinson, 1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear
yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories in the front, rear wing two stories with frame
building in the northwest half of the yard.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: three story store with one story rear wing completely
covers the lot.
1950 Sanborn: same, "EDIBLE OIL CANNING"
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains

71
BLOCK 346 (Old Block 50)

Bounded by Carroll Street (S), Van Brunt Street (E), President Street (N), and Hamilton
Avenue (W)

Street widths: President Street - 60 ft.; Hamilton Avenue - 90 ft.


Lots: 1-3,5-7,9-11,21-23,25,26,29.
Current use: vacant.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: land not yet created.
1845 Coastal survey: land not yet built on, part of the flats.
1849 Colton: land created and built upon.

Lot 1
Old lots: 13 & 14.
Old addresses: 5 Carroll Street (1855 Perris); same, plus 148, 144 and 142 Van Brunt Street
(1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: old lot 13 - P. Ross. DATE??
First tax ass.: Patrick Rogers, three stories, two houses on lot, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant; brick store (hazard), at the rear of the lot, fronting on Van Brunt
Street.
1869 Dripps: buildings on both lots, vacant area at the rear oftot 14.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on both lots.
1893 Bromley: same, with a frame addition at the rear of lot 14.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick buildings on both lots, small vacant area
between the rear of 5 Carroll Street and the frame building on Van Brunt
Street.
1915 Sanborn: same, brick buildings are stores; one-story frame building
marked "storage".
1939 Sanborn: one story extension at the rear of 5 Carroll Street store covers
the formerly vacant area behind that building.
1950 & 1969 Sanborn: same.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 2
Old lot: 15.
Old address: 3 Carroll Street (I 855 Perris).
Sewer Conn.: Sinsheimer? Shisheimer?, 1868, 1 Carroll Street (?)
First tax ass.: [?] Sinsheimer, three stories.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, on the front of the lot, rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick buildings.

72
1915 Sanborn: same, one story brick building at the rear of the lot.
1939 Sanborn: same, but building at the rear of the lot demolished.
1950 & 1969 Sanboms: one story addition at the rear of the three story store
covers the remainder of the area of the present -day lot 2 and north west
comer oflot 1.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.
, ""~ I .

Lot 3
Old lot: 16.
Old addresses: I Carroll Street & 56 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris); 1 Carroll Street & 59
Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley); 1 Carroll Street & 59 Y2 & 59 Hamilton
Avenue (1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, book 1, lost (E), book 13, record not found, ca. 1897.
First tax ass.: [?] S.T. Stranahan, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, on the front of the lot, rear
yard vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front ofthe lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three three story brick stores.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building.
1915 Sanborn: same, three stores at 1 Carroll Street and 591;2 and 59
Hamilton Avenue.
1939 Sanborn: same, 59 Hamilton Avenue "Boarded up".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 5
Old lot: 17.
Old addresses: 54 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris); 57 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: A.G. Hill, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot rear yard
vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building.
1915 Sanborn: same, store.
1939 Sanborn: same, "Boarded up".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

73
Lot 6
Old lot: 18.
Old addresses:52 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris); 55 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.:
A.G. Hill, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, with small, one-story addition at the rear.
1939 Sanborn: same, "Boarded up".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 7
Old lots: 19 & 20, then 7 & 8.
Size: 19/7 = 25 (W) X 67.9 (S) X 76.6 (N); 20/8 = 20 (W) X 76.6 (8) X 68.2 (N).
Old addresses: 50 & 48 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris), 53 & 51 Hamilton Avenue (1893
Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, book 3 (E) and book 2 (W), both lost.
First tax ass.: Henry Alexander Jr., three stories, 1869-1873.
Isaac Solimen, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building at 50 Hamilton Avenue on the front of the lot.
1855 Perris: brick dwellings with stores under on the front of the lot, rear
yards.
1869 Dripps: buildings on the front of the lots.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store at 51 Hamilton Avenue; four story brick
store at 53 Hamilton Avenue.
1893 Bromley: brick buildings on the front of the lots, rear yards vacant.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building with vacant rear yard at 53 Hamilton
Avenue; three story brick building extending to the rear lot line at 51
Hamilton Avenue.
1915 Sanborn: one story addition at the rear ofthe [our-story store at 53
Hamilton Avenue completely covers the lot and extends over the rear of the
adjoining lot at 51 Hamilton Avenue but with a shallow vacant area shown
immediately behind the three story store.
1939 Sanborn: same, 51 Hamilton Avenue: Auto 1St, Storage 2nd & 3fd; one
story extension at the rear ofthe lot - "W. Ho." (warehouse).
1950 Sanborn: same.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains .
................................................. iliI ij 111 .

74
Lot 9
Old lot: 21
Old addresses: 46 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris), 49 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:Charles Calvert, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building.
1915 Sanborn: same, store.
1939 Sanborn: same.
1950 Sanborn: same.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains .
.........~ ~"' " , ..
Lot 10
Old lot: 22
Old addresses: 44 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris), 47 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.:Ann Pick Jr., three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under, on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick buildings on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, with small, one-story addition atthe rear.
1939 Sanborn: same, "Boarded up".
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 11
Old lots: 23/11,4/12,3/13,2/14, 1/15, and 5/20 (later numbers from the 1903 Hyde).

Old lot 23/11


Old address: 42/45 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.:
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwellings with stores under both sides, rear yards.
1869 Dripps: unclear, possibly building only on the Hamilton Avenue side.
1880 Bromley: brick building(s) both sides.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store on the front of the lot with one story
rear extension that completely covers the lot.

75
1903 Hyde: same; small yard behind the three-story brick building at 14
President Street.
1915 Sanborn: same, both are stores.
1939 Sanborn: same plus a new extension at the rear of 14 President Street
that covers the former yard.
1950 Sanborn: same.
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 4/12


Old addresses: 40143 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1893 Bromley) and 12 President Street
(1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
Firsttax ass.: John Walsh, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on Hamilton Avenue, same on
President Street, yards behind both.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot
1880 Bromley: brick building(s) on both sides of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story brick store, "Ship chandlery".
1893 Bromley: lot is completely covered by a brick building.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: same, "wool sorting".
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 3/13


Old addresses: 38/41 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/I893 Bromley) and 10 President Street
(1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.: Michael Cullen, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick dwelling with store under on Hamilton Avenue, President
Street side of the lot is vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building(s) on both sides of the lot.
1893 Bromley: lot is completely covered by a brick building.
1903 Hyde: same, Hamilton Avenue side building is three stories; President
Street side building is one story.
1915, 1939, 1950 Sanboms: same.
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 2/14


Old addresses: 36/39 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1893 Bromley) and 8 President Street
(1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: J.D. Leahy, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: part of the brick building occupying the entire comer, 32-34-36
Hamilton Street; narrow vacant area along the east lot line on the President

76
Street side.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building(s) on both sides of the lot.
1893 Bromley: lot is completely covered by a brick building.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, store, not communicating with the structures
on the comer.
1950 Sanborn: same, "wood wkg".
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 1115


Old addresses: 34-32/39-37 Hamilton Avenue (1855 Perris/1893 Bromley) and 2~6 President
Street (1915 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: J.M. Carwick, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: part of the brick building occupying the entire corner, 32-34-36
Hamilton Street; narrow vacant area along the east lot line on the President
Street side.
1869 Dripps: buildings cover the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1893 Bromley: lot is completely covered by a brick building.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 5/20


Old addresses: 14 President Street (1886 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: Shaw, 1875, location unclear.
First tax ass.:Richard Neil, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick store on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1893 Bromley, 1903 Hyde, 1915 Sanborn: same.
1939 & 1950 Sanboms: same, with one story addition at the rear that covers
all but a small triangle at the southwest corner of the lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this part of lot 11 is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 21
Old lot: 6.
Old addresses: 16 President Street (1855 Perris).
Sewer Conn.: Ferrily? (illegible), 1871.
Firsttax ass.: Thomas [?]esney, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front of the lot, L-shaped
rear yard.

77
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot (?)
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, L-shaped rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 Sanborn: same, store.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same wi one-story rear wing that covers the former
yard.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 22
Old lot: 7
Old addresses: 18 President Street (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: Mrs. Monahan, 1891.
First tax ass.: Mary Tanner, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building with store under on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot (?)
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick dwelling, one story addition at the rear along
the east lot line.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front ofthe lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories with basement.
1915 Sanborn: front of the lot vacant, one-story "Shed" occupies almost the
entire rear 2/3Tds ofthe lot, except for a narrow strip along the rear lot line.
1939, 1950, 1969 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 23
Old lot: 8.
Old addresses:22 President (Perris 1855),20-22 President Street (1886 Sanborn).
Sewer Conn.: Shaw, 1875.
First tax ass.:
John Shaw, three stories, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot, large frame building at the
rear of the lot marked hazard, vacant area in between and on the west side of
the lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot (?)
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick dwelling on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1903 Hyde: same, four stories.
1915,1939,1950, 1969 Sanboms: same, dwelling.
1979 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is sensitive for archaeological remains .
....................................................................................................................................................................

78
Lot 25
Old lot: 9
Old addresses:22 President Street (1893 Bromley).
Sewer Conn.: F [?] John (unclear), 1870.
First tax ass.:
Salt Company ofOn-[?], 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: same.
1880 Bromley: same.
1886 Sanborn: one story shed at the front of the lot; large one story brick
" Varnish fac. " at the rear of the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the lot except for a narrow passage
along the east lot line.
1903 Hyde: four story building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
191'5 & 1939 Sanborns: same, dwelling.
1950 Sanborns: vacant.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 26
Old lots: 10-11
Old addresses: 26-28 President Street and 130-138 Van Brunt Street.
Sewer Conn.: two recorded, Hanoveran, 1878 and N.M.E. Church, 1885.
First tax ass.:W. [Loomis?], Church, two entries, tax exempt, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the front of lot 10, rear yard, lot 11 vacant.
1886 Sanborn: "Bethel Ship M.E. Church", one story brick building; two and
a half story brick dwelling at 136 Van Brunt Street, both set back from Van
Brunt Street, no yard behind the dwelling; 138 Van Brunt vacant.
1893 Bromley: brick building, "SCHOOL"on the front of the lot set back from
President and Van Brunt Streets, and with a narrow alley on its 23st side, rear
of the lot, 138 Van Brunt Street, vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, "MISSIONARY SISTERSOFTHESACREDHEARTSCHOOL",two
stories with basement.
1915 Sanborn: same, "ST. CHARLESSCHOOL",rear wing, at 136 Van Brunt
Street, "MISSIONARIESSISTERSOF THESACREDHEARTCONVENT";two one-
story wings off the west side of the school just large enough for the
"WC"s.
1939 Sanborn: vacant.
1950 Sanborn: one-story "crN. BL." building at 138 Van Brunt Street extends
the width of the lot, leaving a narrow alley along the south side.
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

Lot 29
Old lot: 12
Old addresses: 140 Van Brunt Street.
Sewer Conn.: book 2, lost.

79
First tax ass.: City of Brooklyn, 1869-1873.
Historic Maps: 1850 Dripps: building on the rear of the lot.
1855 Perris: Brick "Engine Ho." on the front half of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building covers the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the lot.
1903 Hyde: two story brick building covers all but a narrow alley along the
north lot line and a small triangular area in the northwest comer of the lot.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, but building extends to the rear lot line.
1939 Sanborn: same, one and two story structures fill the narrow gap along
the north lot line, "STAIRS".
1950 Sanborns: same, "JUNK".
Conclusion: this lot is not sensitive for archaeological remains.

80
Block 499 (Old block 203; 515C on the 1939 Sanborn)

Bounded by Imlay Street (S), Hamilton Avenue (E) and Conover Street (formerly
Commercial Wharf) (N)

Street widths: Imlay Street - 50 ft.; Conover Street - 39.8 ft.


Old lots: 1-17.
Current use: vacant.
Historic maps: 1836 Colton: land not yet created.
1845 Coastal survey: land not yet built on, part of the flats.
1849 Colton: land created, not built upon.

Old lot 1 then 7


Old Addresses: 15 Conover Street (1903 Hyde); 15 Conover Street and 1 & 7 Summit Street
(1915 Sanborn).
Size: 25 X 75 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Henry Cordes, four stories, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building with three wings and frame addition at the rear,
fronting on Conover Street, covers the lot.
1880 & 1893 Bromley, 1903 Hyde: same, Hyde notes four stories.
1915, 1939. 1950 Sanborn: four story store, three story locker at the rear, now
Summit Street.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 2 then 8


Old Addresses: 13 Conover Street (1903 Hyde).
Size: 25 X 75 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Frederick C. Dipperman, two stories, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: frame building with two wings on the front of the lot, east half of
the rear half of the lot with a frame extension, small frame shed (?) at the rear
of the west half of the back of the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store with one story rear addition and narrow,
one story brick carpenter shop at the rear of this lot and lot I, completely
cover the lot.
1903 Hyde: four story brick building on the front of the lot, vacant rear yard,
frame shed at the rear oftbe yard.
1915 Sanborn: same, "Boarding".
1939 Sanborn: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: same, "ST'CE 1st", with large one story brick building at the
rear of the lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

81
Old lot 3 then 9
Old Addresses: II Conover Street (1903 Hyde).
Size: Irregular, 25 X 75 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Roger Costello, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: same, three story store.
1893 Bromley: same, rear yard vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, three story brick building, rear yard, frame shed at the rear
of the lot.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store.
1950 Sanborn: same, "PIPE SHOP" with a one story brick addition at the rear
that covers the lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains .
. ~~ ,, ...
Old lot 4 then 6
Old Addresses: 9 Summit Street (1903 Hyde).
Size: 25 X 65 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: David Van Cleef, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: frame building on the front of the lot.
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick building covers the lot "Sail Ins 't",
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the entire lot area.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories
1915 Sanborn: same, "Shipwright all floors".
1939 Sanborn: same.
1950 Sanborn: same, "Machine Shop I" Stock Rm 2nd Pattern Shop Jrd"
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains .
~ ~ ~ ~ ++ , ..

Old lot 5
Old Addresses: 11 Summit Street (1915 Sanborn).
Size: 25 X 60.3 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: David Van Cleef, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: three story brick "Carpenter" shop covers the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the entire lot area.
I903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 Sanborn: Frame building covers the lot (same structure?) "Stevedore

82
Storage 2nd Capenter jrd '').
1939 Sanborn: communicates with the building at 9 Summit Street, "Auto Ho
jSl Stevedore Storage 2nd Carpenter s":
1950 Sanborn: same, "Stevedore St'ge Paint Spray'g r':
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 6 then 3


Old Addresses: 13 Summit Street (1915 Sanborn).
Size: 25 X 55.1 ft.
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: David Van Cleef, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the lot.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: two story brick "Boat Builder" covers the lot.
1893 Bromley: brick building covers the entire lot area.
1903 Hyde: same, three stories.
1915 Sanborn: two story building covering the lot, "Storage lSI Hotel Annex
2nd ",
1939 Sanborn: same "Storage 1"'.
1950 Sanborn: same.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: Tbis old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains .
-I- -1- -1- ~ -I- * * * -1- -1-. -1- -I- -I- -I- -I- -1- -I- -1- -I- -I- -I- -I- -I- -I- -I- -1-.

Old lot 7 then 1


Old Addresses: 15-17 Summit Street 112 Imlay Street, 1915 Sanborn).
Size: 30 (W) X 50 (N) X 43.9 (S) ft. .
Sewer conn.: book 3, lost.
First tax ass.: Wm. M. Martin, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the Summit Street side of the lot, rear yard vacant.
1880 Bromley: frame building Summit Street, brick building on Imlay Street.
1893 Bromley: same, narrow alley between the brick building on lot 6 and
the frame building on lot 7.
1903 Hyde: same, but no alley indicated.
1915 Sanborn: two story building covering the lot and lot 8, "Hotel Beverly".
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, Store, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old Lot 8 then 20


Old Addresses: 80 Hamilton Avenue (1903 Hyde), ditto plus 2 Imlay Street (1915 Sanborn).
Size: 30.7 (W) X 50 (N) X 47.8 (S), 11.5 (E) ft.
Sewer conn.: same permit as old lot 7.
First tax ass.: Martha Peet, 1866-1869.

83
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: vacant.
1869 Dripps: vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store covers the lot.
1893 Bromley: same, covers the lot.
1903 Hyde: same, one story.
1915 Sanborn: two stories, Store, part of Hotel Beverly on lot 7/1 to the west.
1939 & 1950 Sanborns: same, no legend.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is not considered sensitive for archaeological remains .
1111 II II Ii 'II '" , '" 111 '" '" '" '" '" '" '" "' .

Old lot 9 then 19


Old Addresses: 78 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley).
Size: 20.4 Y2(W) X 54.0 Y2(N) X 50 (S), 20 (E) ft.
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: Martha Peet, three stories, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store on the front of the lot, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, part ofa narrow, one-story building
along the rear lot line that extends onto 76 Hamilton Avenue.
1950 Sanborn: one story "shed" with "off' (i.e. office) in the front covers the
lot.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 10 then


18
Old Addresses:76 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley)
Size: 20 (W), 50.1 (N), 54.0 Y4(S)
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:
Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick building (hazard), on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, small frame building in the northwest comer of the lot.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, other half the narrow one-story building
along the south lot line of78 Hamilton Avenue extends over the back of this
lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

84
Old lot 11 then 17
Old Addresses: 74 Hamilton Avenue (1903 Hyde)
Size: 20 (W), 62.1 Y2(N) 50.1 (S)
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building, on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, small frame building along the rear lot
line.
1915 Sanborn: same, store, but part ofa much smaller one-story building in
the northwest comer of the lot.
1939 Sanborn: same.
1950 Sanborn: one-story "miscl. St'ge" building on most of the lot, rear
vacant.
1969 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 12 then


16
Old Addresses:72 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley)
Size: 20 (W), 64.5 (N) 62.1 Y2(S)
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:
Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick building, on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, small frame building along the rear lot
line.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, but part of a much smaller one-story
building in the northwest comer of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 13 then 15


Old Addresses: 70 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley)
Size: 20 (W), 64.5 (N) 62.1 Y2(S)
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.: Martha Peet, four stories, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building, on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard, part of a small one story brick

85
structure overlapping the yard of this lot and old lot 14.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, small frame building along the rear lot
line.
1915 & 1939 Sanbarns: same, store, but part of a much smaller one-story
building in the northwest comer of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 14
Old Addresses:68 Hamilton Avenue (1903 Hyde).
Size: 20 (W), 64.5 (N) 62.1 ~ (S)
Sewer conn.: book 2, lost.
First tax ass.:
Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick building, on the front ofthe lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, small frame building along the rear lot
line.
1915 & 1939 Sanboms: same, store, but part of a much smaller one-story
building in the northwest corner of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant. l
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 15 then 13


Old Addresses: 66 Hamilton Avenue (I 893 Bromley).
Size: 20 (w), 65.1 12(N), 64.5 (S)
Sewer conn.: none recorded.
First tax ass.: Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1855 Perris: brick building, on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: - same.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, small frame building along the rear lot
line..
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, but part of a much smaller one-story
building in the northwest comer of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

86
Old lot 16 then12
Old Addresses: 64 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley)
Size: Irregular (pentagonal) - 20 (E), 50 + 21.2 (N), 81.1 12(S)
Sewer conn.: J. Loperfida? 1,931.
First tax ass.:
Martha Peet, 1866-1869.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick building, on the front ofthe lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, frame building along the south lot line
to the rear of the lot.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, but only small one-story building at the
rear of the lot.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

Old lot 17 then


11
Old Addresses: 62 Hamilton Avenue (1893 Bromley), 9 Conover Street (1903 Hyde).
Size: Irregular 23.9 (E), 92.6 (N), 50 + 21.2 (S), approximately 6.7 (W)
Sewer conn.: Keller, 1869, southwest comer of Commercial St.
First tax ass.:
Capt. A. Lorilova ? 1866-1869.
Historic Maps:1855 Perris: brick building, on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1869 Dripps: building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1880 Bromley: brick building on the lot.
1886 Sanborn: four story brick store, rear yard.
1893 Bromley: brick building on the front of the lot, rear vacant.
1903 Hyde: same, four story building, rear, along Conover Street, is vacant,
small frame building on the side of the building, in the street, near the comer
of Hamilton Avenue.
1915 & 1939 Sanborns: same, store, no building in the street.
1950 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: This old lot is considered sensitive for archaeological remains.

87
Block 500 (Old block 385)

bounded by Hamilton Avenue (E)~Imlay Street (N), and Summit Street (W)

Current use: Vacant.


Old Addresses: 19-33 Summit Street (1915 Sanborn), 82-92 Hamilton Avenue (1893
Bromley, 1903 Hyde).
Sewer Conn.: old lots 5/6,92 Hamilton Avenue, book 3, lost.
old lot 7,90/92 Hamilton Avenue, two records, illegible name [Prainig?]
1873, and book 9~record not found.
old lot 3,86 Hamilton Avenue, book 3, lost.
old lots 1 & 2 - none recorded.
First tax ass.: south side of Hamilton Avenue: A.s. Foster, Harriet E. Carey (two
properties), 1. Lorillard (three properties), 1866-1869.
Historic Maps: 1836 Colton: land not yet created.
1845 Coastal survey: land not yet built on~part of the flats.
1849 Colton: land created, not built upon.
1855 Perris: store and dwelling composed of three wings cover the
southern half of the block (later lots 6/8, 5,4/7); another store directly north
of this building, also extending between Summit Street and Hamilton Avenue
later lot 3); the northern end of the block (about 25 ft. west and 42 ft. east in
depth) vacant (later lot 2).
1869 Dripps: block completely covered by buildings.
1880 Bromley: Same, possibly a frame building on the Hamilton Avenue side
of lot 3.
1886 Sanborn: all brick buildings cover the lot; old lots 4-6, three story
stores, lot 3 with a "Smithy"; old lot 3,2 story store, "Smith"; old lot 7, two
story; old lot 8, "Ship Smith".
1893 Bromley: Entire block is covered with buildings, including lots 2 and 1
on the north side of the block~ except that these buildings are frame, instead
of brick, like those on lots 6, 5, 7 and 3.
1903 Hyde: Buildings on lots 2 and 3 are "Shops"
1915 Sanborn: lot 7 "Plumber Supplies"; lot 3~"Moving Pictures 15\ D. 2nd,,~
lots 5 and 6: five narrow stores.
1950 Sanborn, 1969, 1979: all old buildings destroyed, replaced by a two
story "Off." that covers most of the block.
1988 Sanborn: vacant.
Conclusion: this block is Dot considered sensitive for archaeological remains,

88