POWERLINE

+ the magazine of the powerhouse museum winter 06

sydney design

+ 0

powerline winter 06

O 0 06 07 08 10

From the director Powerpicks Launch: On the box Sydney Design 06 New exhibition: In your face Interview: Patricia Urquiola Members news Members calendar Members scene and prizes China study tour New publication: Building a masterpiece Recent acquisition: Mastertouch donation New exhibition: Works wonders Name a star Sydney Observatory news Corporate partners Exhibitions at a glance

contents issue 8
JuNE JuLy AuGuST 2006

TRUSTEES Dr Nicholas G Pappas, President Dr Anne Summers AO, Deputy President Mr Mark Bouris Ms Trisha Dixon Mr Andrew Denton Ms Susan Gray Ms Margaret Seale Mr Anthony Sukari Ms Judith Wheeldon SENIOR MANAGEMENT Dr Kevin Fewster AM, Director Jennifer Sanders, Deputy Director, Collections and Outreach Mark Goggin, Associate Director, Operations and Services Kevin Sumption, Associate Director, Exhibitions, Projects and Planning Dominic Curtin, Associate Director, Finance and Systems

MOrE OF THE MuSEuM'S COLLECTiON GOES ON diSPLAy iN THE COMMuNiTy ANd iN CyBErSPACE.

11 1 14 15 16 18 0 1   4

FrOM LEFT: kAryN PALuzzANO, MLA FOr PENriTH, Mr JOHN HiLL, PrESidENT SSME, JENNiFEr SANdErS, dEPuTy dirECTOr POWErHOuSE MuSEuM, ANd HEr ExCELLENCy PrOFESSOr MAriE BASHir AC, GOvErNOr OF NSW, AdMirE THE MOdEL OF THE CANTErBury LAMB. yOuNG viSiTOrS ArE ENTHrALLEd By A MOdEL TrACTiON ENGiNE (FOrEGrOuNd) ANd POrTABLE ENGiNE ON diSPLAy. PHOTOS By SOTHA BOurN.

+
from the director
Australia recently lost one of its foremost architects with the passing of Harry Seidler. Harry had been a good friend of the Powerhouse Museum for many years. He spoke at numerous Museum events and our collection includes a range of models of major Seidler buildings. We have marked Harry’s contribution to Australian architecture and design by assembling in the foyer several showcases containing models of his work. The Seidler display is but a small example of the Museum’s very strong collection holdings and commitment to Australian and international design in all its manifestations. design is one on the Museum’s key drivers — indeed our corporate identity includes the tag-line ‘Science + design’. This issue of Powerline features a range of stories relating to major design exhibitions and programs being held at the Museum in coming months. Foremost among this program is our annual festival, Sydney design 06. As many members will recall, this program used to be called Sydney design Week but it has grown so large that a week could not do it justice. Sydney design 06 encompasses a huge array of exhibitions and programs at the Museum and a host of other venues across greater Sydney. it is, without doubt, the foremost design festival in Sydney, if not Australia. This is the tenth year the Museum has co-ordinated this program; it has been growing strongly in both scope and impact in recent years so i hope many of you will get along to some of its events. Our elegant new book, Building a masterpiece: the Sydney Opera House, edited by Powerhouse curator Anne Watson to mark the 50th anniversary of the Sydney Opera House design competition, is another example of the Museum’s design focus. until the publication of this book, it was probably not well known that we hold a considerable collection of material relating to Australia’s greatest building, including the company archive of Ove Arup & Partners, the English engineering firm that came to Australia specifically to tackle the daunting Opera House commission.

@
the beta_space experience a century of model making
Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC, Governor of NSW, was among the many guests who visited the Museum’s display of model engines at the Sydney Society of Model Engineers' centenary celebration in March. The society is the oldest continuously operating club of its kind in the world, with a site at Luddenham in Sydney’s west that boasts tracks for ride-on model steam trains, a dam for boats, a circuit for car racing, and space for model aircraft enthusiasts to spread their wings. Highlights of the Museum’s display included a rarely seen precision model of a naval gun and a miniature lathe used to manufacture tiny bolts and screws. Other favourites were the model of the Canterbury Lamb (a steam locomotive made in the 1830s for the Canterbury and Whitstable line in England), a detailed traction engine with winch and cable for ploughing, and a 19th

Miniature engines continue to work their magic on children and adults alike.

century coal tipper made in Germany. The Powerhouse has a worldclass collection of model engines, many of which were acquired from model enthusiast Albyn Stewart who amassed his collection over many years. His main interest was marine engines which he tested in a pond at his Wentworth Falls home in the Blue Mountains. Between 1938 and 1962 he sold over 250 models to the Museum, including the traction and portable engines shown above. The miniature lathe was made by Belvedere Smith who set up a factory and foundry in Hurstville, Sydney, in the 1920s to make screws for use by model makers. He donated the lathe to the Museum in 1953. Both Albyn Stewart and Belvedere Smith were patrons of the Society of Model Engineers.

And finally, if you’re interested in design, you should try to get along to our monthly forum, d factory. Every month host Nell Schofield and keynote speakers discuss a current issue in design. d factory always draws a good crowd and, best of all, it’s free. Dr Kevin Fewster AM Director

@
Hedda’s homepage

HEddA MOrriSON OuTSidE THE WESTErN CiTy WALLS OF PEkiNG. PHOTO By ALASTAir MOrriSON, SPriNG 1941. rEPrOduCEd COurTESy ALASTAir MOrriSON.

powerhousemuseum.com
FRONT COvER SydNEy OPErA HOuSE Mid 1960S, PHOTO By MAx duPAiN, GiFT OF rESMEd ASiA PACiFiC LTd 2005. rEPrOduCEd COurTESy MAx duPAiN & ASSOCiATES. BACK COvER CHArLES ANd rAy EAMES, LOuNGE CHAir ANd OTTOMAN, uSA, 1956. GiFT OF HErMAN MiLLEr (AuST) PTy LTd, 1987. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

Where to find us

Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, darling Harbour, Sydney Opening hours 10.00 am – 5.00 pm every day (except Christmas day). School holiday opening hours 9.30 am – 5.00 pm
Contact details

Powerline is produced by the Print Media Department of the Powerhouse Museum

Postal address: PO Box k346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Telephone (02) 9217 0111 infoline (02) 9217 0444, Education (02) 9217 0222
The Powerhouse Museum, part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences also incorporating Sydney Observatory, is a NSW government cultural institution.

PO Box k346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Editor: Tracy Goulding Editorial coordinator: deborah renaud design: Triggerdesign Photography: Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated.
Every effort has been made to locate owners of copyright for the images in this publication. Any inquiries should be directed to the rights and Permissions Officer, Powerhouse Museum. iSSN 1030-5750 © Trustees of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

Over the past 14 years the Powerhouse has developed an important collection of the photographs and memorabilia of Hedda Morrison (1908–1991), considered one of the finest photographers to have worked in Asia. The collection has been built up largely through the generosity of her husband Alastair Morrison, who was made a Life Fellow of the Museum in 2002. Alastair has recently added to this holding with a significant donation of Hindu and Buddhist bronzes, Japanese netsuke and a large library of books relating to Peking, the photography of

China, and Chinese culture, as well as Hindu and Buddhist iconography. So the public can have permanent access to this amazing collection we are in the process of developing a narrative-based, informationrich website drawing directly from the Museum's database. The website is a work in progress, at the moment focusing on material from Hedda's work in Germany and China, but more will be added as time and resources allow. We welcome members' comments on the site at powerhousemuseum.com/ heddamorrison

powerpicks

+

+ 0

powerline winter 06

+

+ 04

powerline winter 06

+ 05

powerline winter 06

w
scientific accolades footy fever

%
Many readers will remember the thrill of watching the Socceroos play their way into the 2006 World Cup when they defeated uruguay in Sydney last year. This was the culmination of a long soccer journey in Australia which is celebrated in a small exhibition opening in June, The World Cup dream: stories of Australia's soccer mums and dads. Through a series of interviews with Socceroo families, the exhibition looks at Australia's passion for the sport and explores what part postwar migration has played in developing a football culture here. Also featured are interviews with rale rasic, Socerroo coach in 1974 (the last time Australia competed in the World Cup), and Les Murray, the well known soccer commentator and author. And of course there will be footy momorabilia and video clips from some of the Socceroo's most memorable moments, including the recent victory over uruguay. The exhibition is opening just in time for the the 2006 World Cup kick off in Germany, so don't miss it!
THE SOCCErOOS CELEBrATE THEir ENTry iNTO THE 2006 WOrLd CuP. PHOTO COurTESy FOOTBALL FEdErATiON AuSTrALiA.

in March the Powerhouse Foundation hosted a dinner in honour of robyn Williams, host of ABC radio’s The Science Show, celebrating his 30 year contribution to science broadcasting and education. robyn has been a long term supporter of the Powerhouse and was made a Foundation Ambassador in 2004. Over 160 high profile guests attended including Her Excellency, Professor Marie Bashir AC, Governor of NSW, Peter and divonne Holmes a Court and The Honourable Neville Wran AC along with a host of media personalities. Television and radio host Geraldine doogue

was MC for the evening introducing an impressive line up of speakers including Science Show presenter, Susan Carleton, Malcolm Long, director of the Australian Film, Television and radio School, and dr Peter Farrell, CEO and Chairman of resMed. it was an evening of scientific anecdotes and accolades, where the role of the Powerhouse as one of Australia’s leading science museums did not go unacknowledged. The dinner would not have been possible without the support of Trust Company, an ongoing supporter of the Powerhouse Foundation.

yOuNG viSiTOrS ENJOy THEMSELvES PLAyiNG drESS uP iN THE POCkET. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

the pocket rocks

By now every Powerhouse member family is probably aware of The Pocket and its precinct on level 3. if not, you must get down there because, as they say, there is something for everyone! The Pocket is a free play area with different zones for children to select what they want to do, and staff regularly in attendance to help. during the kylie exhibition the big hits were the kylie paper dress-ups, the ‘you could be so lucky’ charm bracelets, and a frock which young visitors decorated with their own illustrated patches (just like kylie’s own). Now that On the box has opened The Pocket has taken on a television theme. you can make your own takeaway Tv set complete with a cast of paddle-pop stick

zoe and Cogs actors, see Mr Squiggle in the television zone, decorate your own costumes in our very own Costume department, and if you’re lucky spot a celebrity (B1 and B2 dropped in during April!). in the July school holidays zoe and Cogs will be screen hosts on a quiz show and thanks to the Museum’s talented model maker iain Scott-Stevenson young set designers can arrange the furniture in their own soapie set. Whew! Luckily there are seats so parents can sit back and watch it all unfold. The Pocket is open 10.30 am – 12.30 pm weekdays and 10.30 am – 3.00 pm weekends and public holidays.

The World Cup dream is on at the Powerhouse from 5 June–23 July. you can also visit the exhibition online at migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au
A Migration Heritage Centre exhibition in association with the Powerhouse Museum.


national treasures
The Great Wall of China: dynasties, dragons and warriors exhibition, which opens in September, includes many Grade One National Treasures from the National Museum of China, Beijing, and other participating museums. in China Grade One National Treasures, which are regarded as having the greatest cultural significance, are distinguished from Grade Two, Grade Three, Ordinary Objects, and Objects for reference. An object may be accorded ‘grade one’ status because of its rarity, beauty, quality of execution, or its association with a particular person or event. The decision to give an object this special status is made by a committee of experts. Within China there are strict guidelines about how many national treasures can be included in an exhibition and curators, museum directors and officials must work within these parameters. Negotiating the objects for The Great Wall of China required lengthy discussions to arrive at an object list that suited the needs of both the National Museum and the Powerhouse. Once the objects were agreed upon, the National Museum of China began the process of seeking approval from the Ministry of Culture and the State Bureau for the Administration of Cultural Heritage so that the objects could leave the country. Curators from both institutions are now developing audiovisuals, interactives, films, exhibition text and a book that will interpret and provide context for these remarkable objects associated with the history of the Great Wall.
The Great Wall of China: dynasties, dragons and warriors opens at the Powerhouse on 29 September.

THE HON NEviLLE WrAN AC, JiLL WrAN ANd rOByN WiLLiAMS. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

p
greetings in lace
Since the Lace Study Centre opened to the public in July 2004, it has attracted an increasing number of lace enthusiasts from Australia and around the world — 1036 in January, our best month yet. More and more visitors, including large numbers of design students, spend hours studying the 300 examples of handmade lace available, assisted by an enthusiastic team of volunteer teachers from the Australian Lace Guild of NSW. Now to keep themselves even busier, the volunteers have started making greeting cards while demonstrating their lace making skills. Their exquisite lace cards, based on designs by former staff member rosemary Shepherd, are sold in the Powerhouse Museum Shop. The lace volunteers pictured here are holding some of the cards made by the many different volunteers who look after the centre. rae ranc (left), Jenny Chioatto (centre) and dinah Hales, all skillled lacemakers, have dedicated many hours to the centre, helping to make it the succes it has become.

LACE STudy CENTrE vOLuNTEErS rAE rANC, JENNy CHiOATTO ANd diNAH HAyES WiTH SOME OF THE LACE CArdS NOW ON SALE AT THE POWErHOuSE SHOP. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

MOuNTEd GuArd, BrONzE, HAN dyNASTy (206 BCE – 220). COLLECTiON GANSu PrOviNCiAL MuSEuM.

+ 06

powerline winter 06

ON THE BOx OPENS AT THE POWErHOuSE ANd …

10
+ 07
powerline winter 06

SydNEy dESiGN 06 CELEBrATES A dECAdE OF dESiGN FESTivALS WiTH A PrOGrAM THAT iS BiGGEr ANd BETTEr THAN EvEr.

SD06 ten years young

This year marks the tenth anniversary of Sydney’s annual design festival, now known as Sydney design or Sd06! To mark this decade-long fling with design, the program has become bigger, bolder and better than before. There are events from Paddington to Pyrmont and Parramatta with the Powerhouse Museum as usual the centre of activity.

the stars come out
The day started with the buzz of a media launch where Mr Squiggle (and creator Norman Hetherington) met the press, and Stuart Wagstaff recalled the seat-of-the-pants excitement of live broadcasts. it ended with a glittering night of excitement and memories as the stars gathered at the Powerhouse to revisit the glory days of Australian television. Legendary producer reg Grundy, creator of such Tv icons as Prisoner and

Neighbours, officially opened the exhibition, reminiscing about the days when the panel of experts on his first production, Wheel of Fortune, consisted of a PA with an encyclopedia. We’ve come a long way he concluded and congratulated the Powerhouse for an amazing record of a remarkable 50 year journey of Australian creativity on screen.
On the box: great moments in Australian television 1956–2006 is on at the Powerhouse until 29 January 2007.

The focus at the Powerhouse will be on graphic design with the new exhibition in your face showcasing the work of 16 contemporary Australian graphic and visual communication design studios. designers featured range from advertisers and animators to a tattoo artist, promising to make it a fascinating exhibition. Complementing this will be the Australian design Awards, The Sydney Morning Herald young designer of the year Award, Electrolux design Lab and the 2006 Home Beautiful Product of the year Awards, which go public for the first time this year. Come and see the 50 product finalists in ten categories, view the judging process and have your say in the people’s choice vote. And of course there will be a series of talks and master classes, with Paris-based designer Matali Crasset the keynote speaker.

Further afield, other Sydney design favourites to return include workshopped, now in the upmarket shopping precinct Chifley Plaza. Showcasing the work of new designers, a highlight this year will be a ‘meet the designers day’. Also returning to the program is a very comprehensive list of architecture and design walks by both the Sydney Architecture Walks group and the AAA (Australian Architecture Association), who will expand their usual Sydney program to include Parramatta, Wollongong and Newcastle. The Historic Houses Trust will also host a walk of the landmark Petit & Sevitt project homes of the 1960s. Finally, Parramatta City Council will host a Sd06 project in one of the laneways of the Parramatta CBd.

And if you don’t feel like walking, there are exhibitions galore in the city including a selection of work by droog design at Object Gallery, wonderful images of 1920s and ’30s design by Harold Cazneaux at the Museum of Sydney, and an exploration of reworked and reused design at the ivan dougherty and uTS galleries. Last but not least, the 2006 Sydney Teapot Show joins the fold of Sd06 with a display of the quirky and the jaunty at the inner-city Clayworkers Gallery. All these and much more will take place from Saturday 5 August to Sunday 20 August. Check out www.sydneydesign.com.au from the beginning of July for full program details. Robert Swieca, Coordinator, Sydney Design 06

For some light relief, the ever-entertaining krispin k will be taking tours in the inspired! design across time exhibition to solve all your burning design issues and entice even the most jaded member of the family with design tips and quips. And if you thought the inaugural young Blood designers Market was a success, just wait until you see this year’s offering which will be held on the evening of Friday 11 August and all day Saturday. Last year over 3000 people shopped ’til they dropped on emerging design — this year we could only go bigger and better.

CLOCkWiSE FrOM TOP LEFT: GOLd LOGiE WiNNEr HAzEL PHiLLiPS WiTH NO 96 STAr ELAiNE LEE ANd FriENd; SEEiNG dOuBLE! NOrMAN HETHEriNGTON WiTH HiS FAMOuS PuPPET Mr SquiGGLE; Tv PErSONALiTy STuArT WAGSTAFF; LiBBi GOrr (AkA ELLE MCFEAST) ANd FAMiLy; rEG GruNdy (CENTrE) WiTH HiS WiFE JOy CHAMBErS (riGHT) ANd CurATOr PETEr COx ON A TOur OF THE ExHiBiTiON; Tv PErSONALiTy ANd POWErHOuSE TruSTEE ANdrEW dENTON WELCOMES GuESTS TO THE LAuNCH; Tv PrESENTEr ANd dFACTOry HOST NELL SCHOFiELd CHECkS OuT THE BiG BrOTHEr diAry rOOM CHAir; vETErAN NEWSrEAdEr BriAN HENdErSON (riGHT) WiTH POWErHOuSE dirECTOr, kEviN FEWSTEr; ExHiBiTiON CurATOr PETEr COx WiTH ASSiSTANT CurATOr rEBECCA BOWEr, PLEASEd WiTH THE rESuLT! PHOTOS By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki ANd SOTHA BOurN.

'LiGHT TO SHArE', LAMPAdAirE EN quArTiErS/ FOur quArTErS OF A LAMP, dESiGNEd By METALi CrASSET, 2001.

+ 08

powerline winter 06

iN yOur FACE, A NEW ExHiBiTiON AT THE POWErHOuSE ON CONTEMPOrAry AuSTrALiAN GrAPHiC dESiGN, iS A HiGHLiGHT OF SydNEy dESiGN 06.
story_ANNE-MAriE vAN dE vEN, CurATOr, dECOrATivE ArTS ANd dESiGN

visual and vital
in the visually saturated world of the 21st century we are surrounded by examples of graphic design — from billboards, to television, magazines, packaging and clothing, not to mention the world wide web. Often it is virtually invisible, just part of the background ‘noise’ of daily life. But every so often a piece of design will make us sit up and take notice because it is strikingly original or effective. Or because it captures or anticipates something of the mood of the moment, reflecting the essence of the latest technology or style. ceramics by Stephen Bowers (1980s). Many illustrate how contemporary graphic design has its origins in the modernist movements of the early 20th century. Then as now, artists and designers began experimenting with moving images, sound and music and integrated illustration, typography, photography, collage and montage. Then as now, graphic design was a barometer of the available technologies and the influence these had on contemporary life. However, what distinguishes graphic design of the 21st century from its predecessors is the rapidity at which communication ideas can now be generated through pixels and digital technology. Today graphic designers, animators, art directors, illustrators and other creatives beaver away in boutique studios, designing content that is eventually applied across many media and platforms from television to portable entertainment and communication devices. Performance Space. voice’s artistic designs for the 2006 Adelaide Symphony Orchestra stand in stark contrast to qube konstrukt’s giant mechanised robots for Toyota vardis. Carefully crafted graphic design by 3 deep design, and multidisciplinary design by Frost design (including a stage set, a restaurant environment, a poster and annual report for the Sydney dance Company) will also be shown. The Telemetry Orchestra’s Suburban Harmony music video, a wondrous ’60s-inspired animation directed by Steve Scott from Pod, will be projected onto a large screen. Ongarato design’s collaged, backlit supergraphics for the Space furniture showroom and Carby Tuckwell’s unique identity program for the Japanese-inspired customised motorcycle store deus ex Machina demonstrate just how far applications of graphic design extend into the environment. This exhibition also reveals how Streetwize creates community-focused comics, Chris O’doherty (aka reg Mombassa) developed an Aussie icon, and Crumpler bags evolved a distinctive and quirky global logo out of a simple pavement stencil aimed at bike couriers. it shows how Soap Creative spent many, many hours developing a complex, multi-layered website design for the Mambo fashion label, and how Soap's Ashley ringrose and illustrator Nathan Jurevicius collaborated with Film victoria and the ABC to create a computer game called kelman to the rescue. Finally an amazing series of 23 ten-second animations based on the designs of Nathan Jurevicius for output to subways, mobile phones and digital television will shock everyone into realising just how pervasive visual communication has become. Willingly or begrudgingly each and every one of us is being dragged into a visually saturated digital age!
in your face: contemporary graphic design opens at the Powerhouse on 5 August.

in your face: contemporary graphic design looks at how these designs come into existence and what makes them stand out from the crowd. Focusing on 16 contemporary case studies it explores the process of visualising an idea, the role of materials and technology, and the commissioning, design and production processes involved in realising a graphic design solution. it acknowledges graphic and visual communication design as a vibrant and influential field of artistic practice, despite it still being a relatively unrecognised discipline compared to product design, contemporary art and architecture.
Featuring alternative and mainstream design for new media, motion graphic, animation, music video and web design, as well as large-scale super graphic and billboard design, comic, poster, book and magazine design, and even tattoo art — the exhibition is a sweeping look at contemporary graphic design in action. it also places graphic design in an historical context, juxtaposing pieces drawn from the Museum’s 20th-century Australian design archives alongside current design to look at changes in technology, materials and styles. designs from the archives include collages from the 1930s, 1940s murals by douglas Annand, Martin Sharp’s designs for Oz magazine from the ’60s and graphically illustrated

in your face presents cutting-edge design for a broad spectrum of clients ranging from individual and community groups to large corporations. it reveals that visual communication is a cross-disciplinary field where graphic design merges with other areas of practice including art, photography, music, architecture, interior design, literature, film, television, digital media and engineering. it also invariably involves and is limited by, though sometimes oddly also enhanced by, the client’s brief.
Pop culture heroes SpongeBob SquarePants, South Park’s Cartman and Charlie Brown’s beloved Snoopy make star appearances in deuce design’s corporate identity for product licencers Haven. Another familiar design in the exhibition is the widely distributed ‘Talk Eat Live Laugh Shirazamataz’ billboard created by kwp! for yalumba, Australia’s oldest family-owned winery. Less familiar designs include Tatudharma’s Asian-inspired tattoo designs for individual clients, or Suzanne Boccalatte’s seasonal posters for Sydney’s

ABOvE: Bird, BikE ANd GO ANiMATiON STiLLS, SuBurBAN HArMONy By SiLENT/TELEMETry OrCHESTrA, dirECTEd By STEvE SCOTT, POd, SydNEy, 2004. riGHT: COMMuNiTy PrOGrAM idENTiTy FOr AdELAidE SyMPHONy OrCHESTrA 2006 SEASON, dESiGNEd By vOiCE, AdELAidE, 2006.

+ 10

powerline winter 06

+ 11

powerline winter 06

iTALiAN-BASEd dESiGNEr PATriCiA urquiOLA iNSPirEd AudiENCES AT THE POWErHOuSE iN MAy. HErE SHE TALkS TO POWErLiNE ABOuT HEr WOrk.

MEMBErS ONLy TOurS AT CASTLE HiLL PrOMiSE TO BE POPuLAr.

fatty elegance
Patricia urquiola has been described as the hottest property in italian design right now. Having trained and worked in italy for over 20 years, she has designed everything from furniture, lighting and household products to the interior of a new nightclub in Shanghai. Powerline interviewed Patricia about her work, influences and passions. Tell me about the things that inspire your work? Travel has always been important to my work. When you are travelling, everything is so new that a natural curiosity comes out of your skin. you become like a newborn, absorbing a lot of energy from around you. But i'm also inspired by domestic everyday objects, things that you might find on the street or in a little market. you might translate these things — using another sensibility — into a design. it doesn’t always have to be a big profound idea. Often i think it’s simply an open mind and a curious eye. What was the inspiration behind the Fat Fat series? Fat Fat was really the beginning of my incredible relationship with the design company B&B italia, a relationship that continues to grow because of a gentle dialogue that allows my ideas to take form. i remember saying to them that for me the B&B style was perhaps too elegant, too refined and that i wanted to create something that was not necessarily about proportion and elegance. Something fatty, something with a few extra kilos — a problem i think many of us can relate to. So i proposed this idea of a ‘fatty elegance’ and they were really supportive of these provocative ideas of mine. i am hoping we can do a ‘fat’ sofa next year. What do you think is special about what a designer does? i have friends who are artists, designers and architects and more or less, they all have that sensibility and that need to communicate with others. But the difference with a designer is that they are always moving within limitations. They need to solve very practical problems such as how to use something and even more importantly, how to use it in a contemporary way. While there are many chairs, each one gives us a sense of how to sit at different moments in history or in our own lives. Whether it is about decoration or a lack of decoration, the designer puts this into the work. unless you take care of these elements you are not a designer. you may be an artist creating strong pieces that look like they could be sat on. Or you could be an engineer who creates chairs for sitting on, but there is no design. Good design is somewhere between these things. Your products don’t have an instantly recognisable style. What is the common thread in your design work? i think that in some ways my products are all quite ‘essential’ — fundamentally reproducible in an industrial way. unless you are doing a one-off, you have to be essential. But occasionally, i might do something more complex because i feel i need to. For example, if you see my work with the Foscarini lighting company, the Bague lamp is very simple. A perforated metal net, cut and made in an industrial way, covered with silicon resin and with a standard table lamp inside. Then there is the Caboche suspension lamp where the mood is that of a very chic, historical hanging lamp, like a Murano. you might have this very clean and simple table and you need something which is an object of desire while still being very contemporary. We began with this idea and the lamp ended up looking like an important handmade crystal and glass lamp but it’s made out of plastic and realised in an industrial way. i like the irony of that, that this very complex, luxury product is really a few pieces of plastic. Did you grow up in a creative environment? There were lots of women with a strong sense of decoration in my home. They were into antiques and would go to London and Paris to buy things. For example the room where i played with my brothers was decorated with these incredible wallpapers and fabrics by the British interior designer david Hicks. My mother loved his work. She also encouraged us to leave Spain, to go to England, to France, to move around and to see the world. Interview_Lily Katakouzinos, Educator, Design and Decorative Arts

F
Castle Hill tours

SENiOr CurATOr dr kiMBErLEy WEBBEr SHOWS MEMBErS SOME OF THE MuSEuM'S EArLy SEWiNG MACHiNES.

+ +

news and photos prizes to be won exclusive events family activities special offers

Only a tiny percentage of the Museum's collection is exhibited at the Powerhouse, so next year to bring some of our many unseen treasures to light the Museum will be opening its Castle Hill storage facility to the public. But before this we are offering a series of members-only thematic tours where you will have the opportunity to hear the stories behind our collection of objects from cars to cookers, sewing machines to steam engines.

The first of these will take place on 4 July when dr kimberley Webber, Senior Curator, Australian History and Society, will introduce members to some of our domestic technology treasures. Nineteenth century sewing machines, early experiments with refrigeration and the still popular ‘Early kooka’ stoves will be just some of the highlights of the tour. These tours are bound to be popular so make sure you book early. For details and bookings phone (02) 9217 0600.

+ + +

Members e-newsletter
if you would like to receive the regular Members e-newsletter with updates on all members events please call (02) 9217 0600 or email members@phm.gov.au with your membership number and e-newsletter in the subject line.

'LAzy '05' CHAirS / SMALL ArMCHAirS COLLECTiON FOr B&B iTALiA, dESiGNEd By PATriCiA urquiOLA.

+
from the members manager

The excitement of the On the box launch certainly proved to be a hit with our members. it was the chance to mingle with the stars and be among the first to see this fabulous exhibition celebrating 50 years of Australian television. For those who want more, don't miss our tribute to the king of Australian television comedy, Graham kennedy, in June. This is bound to be a memorable event. Other highlights coming up for members in winter include a series of curator talks on some of the more obscure aspects

of our collection. A particular treat will be Megan Hicks' talk on medical boxes in August. Be sure to join Megan as she reveals medical artefacts and anecdotes from days gone by. To celebrate the opening of The Great Wall of China: dynasties, dragons and warriors exhibition in September this year, the Powerhouse Museum and renaissance Tours are offering a not-to-be-missed tour of China, which will include visits to Beijing, the Great Wall of China, the terracotta warriors, and special access to many

other sites of interest. Make sure you book early for this exclusive tour as places are strictly limited. See page 15 for more details. Congratulations to the lucky winners of our fabulous membership prizes, especially the zoofari Lodge overnight stay. See page 14 for another fantastic members giveaway. And don’t forget to drop in to the members lounge for a coffee and a catch up next time you’re at the Museum. Leonie Crane, Members Manager

dETAiL, BriCk PAiNTEd WiTH AN iMAGE OF A MiLiTAry PrOCESSiON, WESTErN JiN dyNASTy (265–316). COLLECTiON NATiONAL MuSEuM OF CHiNA, BEiJiNG.

members

+

+ 1

winter
events calendar
green indicates members event
dATE / LOCATiON EvENT / COST dESCriPTiON

powerline winter 06

+ 1

powerline winter 06

how to book for members events
unless othewise stated, bookings and pre-payment are essential for all events. you can book online at powerhousemuseum. com/members or by phone on (02) 9217 0600 for events at the Powerhouse Museum. For bookings for Sydney Obervatory phone (02) 9217 0485. Three full working days are required for a refund for Powerhouse events. unfortunately we can’t refund or transfer bookings for SoundHouse vectorLab workshops. All events are held at the Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated. All dates, times and venues are correct at time of publication.

Sunday 4 June
2.00–3.30 pm Coles theatre, level 3

Free radicals
Death by ignorance
Free with Museum entry. No bookings.

Can we learn from our mistakes to protect the future of the planet?

Sunday 16 July
2.00 am & 3.30 pm

Dishhh... What shape is this
box thing anyway?
Free with Museum entry.

Critics, programmers and crystal-ball gazers describe the changing shape and content of Tv. The final in the series of fun forums for die-hard Tv fans. The rTA is turning off the floodlights on Sydney Harbour Bridge to help return the stars to Sydney's sky. Come along to the Observatory for the best view in town plus much more. Nell Schofield talks to the experts about what increasingly sophisticated portable media devices and services mean for designers. Create your own video in this hands-on workshop combining digital imaging, editing and sound production skills. Time allowed for personal project development.

Monday 1 June
2.00–3.30 pm

Fit for a King:
the Graham Kennedy tribute
$10 plus Museum entry.

Join Stuart Wagstaff, Tony Sattler, Noeline Brown and John Mangos in a tribute to the king of Australian television comedy.
Bookings essential on (02) 9217 0222 or powerhousemuseum.com/bookings

Fri 1 and Sat  July
6.00–10.00 pm Sydney Observatory

Festival of the stars
Cost: $15 adults, $10 children, $45 families. Bookings essentail on (02) 9921 3485 or online. Shuttle bus from Circular quay.

Sunday 18 June
2.00–3.30 pm

Dishhh: the dirt on Tv
Getting off the box
Free with Museum entry. No bookings.

Soapie survivors tackle the question: when your 15 minutes of fame are up, what comes next? Hosted by Tv presenter, soap expert and pop culture junkie Andrew Mercado. Hear myths and legends about the winter solstice, view the night sky through telescopes and enjoy a champagne supper.
Members discounts apply. Bookings essential on (02) 9241 3767 or online.

Thursday 7 July
6.00–8.30 pm Courtyard Café

d factory
Your mobile day
Free. No bookings.

Wednesday 1 June
8.15–10.15 pm

Winter solstice celebration
Cost: $25 adults, $22 concession.

Saturday 9 July
10.00 am – 3.30 pm SoundHouse vectorLab

Teenager digital video editing workshop
Suitable for ages 11-16yrs only.
Cost: members $70, non-members $100 (includes student membership) Bookings are essential.

Sydney Obervatory

Saturday 4 June
10.00 am – 3.30 pm SoundHouse vectorLab

Teenager computer music workshop
Suitable for ages 11–16yrs only.
Cost: Members $70, non-members $100 (includes student membership)

Turn your home computer into a recording studio. Learn to mix, arrange and record original music tracks using loops, samples, beats and basslines. This workshop will allow participants to make their own original music scores and learn a range of techniques for producing music on the home computer.

Thursday  August
11.00 am – 12.30 pm

Medical boxes
Suitable for ages 12+
Cost: $15 (members only)

Saturday 4 June
10.00 am – 5.00 pm

Members discount shopping day

To celebrate the exhibition On the box, the Powerhouse Museum Shop would like to offer all members 20% off all product with free gift wrapping. So come along on the day and check out our exciting range of On the box merchandise and much more.

Many of the Museum’s most interesting medical artefacts come in boxes. There are 19th century medicine chests, battered first aid kits, bush nurses’ cases, wartime field surgery kits, and much more. Join Megan Hicks, Curator, Health and Medicine, as she lifts the lid on a few medical secrets.

Sat 5 – Sun 0 August
daily 12.00 pm & 2.00 pm (except Saturday 12 August)

Krispin K – inspired tour!
A Sydney Design 06 event
Free with Museum entry.

Performer Nigel Sutton returns as the design virtuoso krispin k. Join him as he reveals the inspiration and gossip behind some of the worlds most ingenious designs. Exclusive preview of the new film by Gillian Armstrong unfolding Florence: the many lives of Florence Broadhurst.
Bookings essential (02) 9217 0222 or sydneydesign.com.au/bookings

Thursday 9 June
6.00–8.30 pm Courtyard Café

d factory
The business of fashion
Free. No bookings.

Fashion designers talk about the thrills and spills of Fashion Week.

Sunday 6 August
12.00 noon

Celebrating Florence 1
A Sydney Design 06 event
Cost: check sydneydesign.com.au

Sat 1 – Sun 16 July
10.30 am – 3.00 pm

The Pocket
Free with Museum entry.

A place for under 8s to dress up, create craft and have fun. Also open during term time 10.30 am – 12.30 pm weekdays, 10.30 am – 3.00 pm weekends and public holidays. Test your Tv trivia knowledge and take home prizes in this quiz show for all the family hosted by comedian Nigel Sutton, with special guests zoe and Cogs. Be among the first to visit our new collection storage facility at Castle Hill! This is a rare opportunity to see the Museum’s important collection of home appliances, including classic Singer sewing machines, early washing machines, mangles, stoves and much more.

Thursday 10 August
6.00–8.30 pm Courtyard Café

d factory
The subversive font
Free. No bookings.

This month’s d factory delves into the fascinating work of some of Australia's most subversive graphic designers.

Mon  – Fri 14 July
12.00 noon & 2.00 pm

Tv dinner quiz show
Free with Museum entry.

Tuesday 4 July
10.30 am – 12.00 pm

Castle Hill tour with Dr Kimberley Webber
Cost: $15 (members only) Parking available on-site. Morning tea included.

?

Fri 11 & Sat 1 August
Friday 6.00–9.00 pm Saturday 8.00 am – 5.00 pm

Young Blood
A Sydney Design 06 event
Free with Museum entry.

Now in its second year, young Blood designers Market returns to showcase Australia’s best and brightest new designers. Meet the designers, shop ’til you drop and enjoy great food. Join Maggie Tabberer and a panel of experts for high tea, annecdotes and insights on acclaimed designer Florence Broadhurst. Bookings essential (02) 9217 0222 or sydneydesign.com.au/bookings Paris-based designer Matali Crasset talks about how she uses design to gently question the way we live our lives.
Bookings essential (02) 9217 0222 or sydneydesign.com.au/ bookings

Sunday 1 August
2.00 pm

Celebrating Florence 
A Sydney Design 06 event
Cost: check sydneydesign.com.au

Thursday 17 August
5.30 pm for 6.30 pm

Matali Crasset — talk
A Sydney Design 06 event
Cost: $35 / $30 members & concessions

Saturday 8 July
11.00 am – 12.30 pm

An introduction to the Lace Study Centre
Suitable for ages 12+
Cost: $15 (members only)

Join curator Lindie Ward in the Lace Study Centre for an in-depth look at the Museum’s lace collection dating from the 16th century to the present.
GrAHAM kENENdy, PHOTO COurTESy SEvEN NETWOrk; CArdS FEATuriNG FABriC SWATCH dESiGNS FrOM THE MuSEuM'S COLLECTiON ArE JuST SOME OF THE MANy iTEMS ON SALE AT THE POWErHOuSE SHOP; rAdiOLA TELEviSiON, AWA AuSTrALiA 1956. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

Thursday 4 August
6.00–7.30 pm Courtyard Cafe

Free radicals
Creating the future
Free with Museum entry. No bookings.

in a new evening format, forward-thinking Sydneysiders look to the future for a sustainable city.

Saturday 6 August
10.00 am – 3.30 pm SoundHouse vectorLab

Teenager digital darkroom workshop
Suitable for ages 11–16yrs only.
Cost: members $70; non-members $100 (includes student membership) Bookings are essential.

using Photoshop, participants will explore a huge variety of tools and processes to warp, bend, filter and composit digital photographs and images.
SydNEy OBSErvATOry AT NiGHT. PHOTO By rOGEr dECkkEr; NiGEL SuTTON AS kriSPiN k. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

Wednesday 1 July
10.30 am – 2.30 pm Sydney Observatory

Cost: $10 children / one accompanying adult free

Family fun day

Go on a Mission to Planet Freeze, have your family photo taken in outer space, enjoy a 3-d Space Theatre adventure and much more. Coffee cart and sausage sizzle on site.

+ 14

powerline winter 06

members scene

Discover deal: members China with the Powerhouse! travel to China!
THE GrOuP diSCuSSES zOE, PriNTEd GOLd LEATHEr SHOES By dONNA-MAy BOLiNGEr, 1997, ANd A PAir OF GrEEN LEATHEr SHOES By THE PuBLiC BENEFiT BOOTEry LTd, ABOuT 1930.

There were several shoemakers among the members who recently enjoyed a rare tour of the Museum's Australian shoe collection with assistant curator Lindie Ward.
PHOTOS By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

To mark the opening of The Great Wall of China exhibition in September we’re inviting Powerhouse members and friends on a study tour of China — one of the world’s oldest civilisations and fast emerging as the economic and political superpower in our region. rob renew, Senior Curator of Engineering and design at the Powerhouse,

will be leading the tour which includes days of discovery in and around Beijing, Chengde, qinhuangdao and xian. As the Powerhouse Museum has special relationships with a number of cultural organisations in China, sightseeing will be complemented by special ‘behind-the-scenes’ visits at a number of sites, along with

MANy OF THE SHOES, SuCH AS THESE BLACk WiNkLE-PiCkErS By rAOuL MErTON, 1962, APPEAr iN THE POWErHOuSE PuBLiCATiON STEPPiNG OuT: THrEE CENTuriES OF SHOES.

MEMBErS AdMirE THE BONdAGE BLACk SuEdE STiLETTO SANdALS By dAHTO, ABOuT 1997.

A NOT-TO-BE-MiSSEd OPPOrTuNiTy FOr POWErHOuSE MEMBErS ANd FriENdS TO SEE CHiNA uP CLOSE.
THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA. PHOTO By FrANk CAHiLL kNiTTEd WOOLLEN ANd LEATHEr SHOES By MyrA MOGG, ABOuT 1940 ; ruBBEr SurF SHOES, ABOuT 1920; LEATHEr SHOES FOr PHANTOM OF THE OPErA By JOdiE MOrriSON, 1997.

FOrEGrOuNd: FABriC BOOTS, HANdPAiNTEd By MAry SHACkMAN, 1971; PiNk LEATHEr PLATFOrM SANdALS By MErivALE, 1970–78.

A NOT-TO-BE-MiSSEd OPPOrTuNiTy FOr POWErHOuSE MEMBErS ANd FriENdS TO SEE CHiNA uP CLOSE.
Beginning in Beijing, China’s ancient capital, the many highlights will include the Forbidden City, the Temple of Heaven, the Summer Palace and, of course, the Great Wall at Badaling. The journey continues in the north to remote sections of the

To celebrate the opening of The Great Wall of China: dynasties, dragons and warriors exhibition in September we’re inviting Powerhouse members and friends on a study tour of China, one of the world’s oldest civilisations and fast emerging as the economic superpower in our region. Exhibition co-curator rob renew will lead the tour, which includes days of discovery in and around Beijing,

Chengde, qinhuangdao and xi'an. Sightseeing will be complemented by special ‘behind-the-scenes’ visits at a number of sites, along with regular talks by rob.

Great Wall at Jinshanling and Shanhaiguan, then on to the Mausoleum of qin Shihuang and the remarkable terracotta warriors near xi’an. Once the terminus of the ancient Silk route, xi’an is the site of China’s best preserved city walls, dating back 14 centuries. The last stop is Shanghai, the economic capital of China and the site of some amazing developments in contemporary architecture.

w more members prizes
To celebrate the opening of On the box: great moments in Australian television 1956–2006, Powerhouse Publishing is offering members a chance to win a copy of the exhibition book. Filled with images and stories from the past and present, this book takes you on a fascinating journey through Tv's greatest moments. For your chance to win a copy, simply phone the Powerhouse Members hotline (02) 9217 0600 after 10.00am on Friday 16 June 2006 and quote your membership number. Winners of our autumn membership prizes! We’re happy to announce that rose rogenmoser was the lucky winner of the zoofari Lodge prize, Michael Higgins and Annaliese Wicks won the Hasbro Toys family prize packs, and Michael Butler is now the lucky owner of the original promotional banner of Golum from The Lord of the rings Motion Picture Trilogy – The Exhibition.
Prizes courtesy of zoofari Lodge and Hasbro Toys.

To mark the opening of The Great Wall of China exhibition in September we’re inviting Powerhouse members and Dates friends on a study tour of China — one of the world’s 20 October – 4 November 2006 oldest civilisations and fast emerging as the economic Price and political superpower in our region. rob renew, Senior Per person, twin-share $6475 Curator of Engineering and design at the Powerhouse, will be leading the tour which includes days of discovery in Single supplement $1400 and around Beijing, Chengde, qinhuangdao and xian. As *Single travellers may request to share - please advise at time of booking the Powerhouse Museum has special relationships with a Includes number of cultural organisations in China, sightseeing will return economy airfares Sydney–Beijing–Shanghai–Sydney inc. air taxes be complemented by special ‘behind-the-scenes’ visits at a number of sites, along with regular talks by rob. 15 nights accommodation in centrally located 4-star hotels, most meals, deluxe coach transport, domestic flights, comprehensive guided Beginning in Beijing, China’s ancient capital, the many sightseeing and a program of talks with your tour leader. highlights will include the Forbidden City, the Temple of Heaven, the Summer Palace and, of course, the Great Wall For full tour details contact renaissance Tours on: at Badaling. The journey continues in the north to less 1300 727 095 visited regions such as the 18th century imperial Summer resort at Chengde and remote sections of the Great Walls info@renaissancetours.com.au or at Jinshanling and Shanhaiguan. renaissancetours.com.au Of course, no visit to China would be complete without a visit to the mausoleum of qin Shihuang and the

THE BuNd, SHANGHAi. PHOTO By FrANk CAHiLL

+ 16

powerline winter 06

+ 17

powerline autumn 06

A NEW BOOk ON THE BuiLdiNG OF THE SydNEy OPErA HOuSE EdiTEd By CurATOr ANNE WATSON uNCOvErS PrEviOuSLy uNPuBLiSHEd STOriES ANd iMAGES.

building a masterpiece
it is now half a century since the NSW Government launched the competition early in 1956 to give Sydney a ‘national opera house’. By december that year the 38year-old danish architect Jørn utzon had submitted his visionary designs and less than two months later his scheme was pronounced the winner. Since then the Sydney Opera House has become one of the defining symbols of a nation, an iconic signifier whose distinctive outline has been turned into marketing magic on everything from a coffee ad to an Olympic logo. But the Opera House is not just a monument with a highly marketable silhouette. it is, above all, an inspirational tribute to the human imagination — a landmark of modern architecture and its architect, Jørn utzon, now an internationally acknowledged ‘Nobel laureate’ of his profession. it is also an important part of our history — a great feat of imagination and ingenuity that perhaps more than any other 20th century structure of its stature, has generated many narratives. Through ten essays by scholars and experts drawn from around the globe, Building a masterpiece explores many of the untold layers of these narratives. These are the stories of the individuals whose careers were made or broken by the Opera House, the companies whose reputations were secured through their association with the building, and the innovative technologies and methodologies developed to meet the demands of its unprecedented design and challenging construction. Extending outwards, these narratives are closely intertwined with Sydney’s social fabric: the workers who built the Opera House, the politicians, architects and members of the public who championed it and its often beleaguered architect — and those who found its design simply incomprehensible and its foreign architect just too unorthodox. With a foreword by Jørn utzon, Building a masterpiece begins with reflections by acclaimed utzon author richard Weston on the universal appeal of the Opera House and its role as iconic monument. Fittingly the book ends with an essay on utzon’s recent re-engagement, and the implications of the building’s heritage significance for its future and its current bid for World Heritage listing. Bridging both essays are explorations of the genesis of the competition in the 1950s; the new technologies pioneered in the construction of the building; the story of the workers, many of them recent immigrants, who laboured on a site that became a focus for union activism in the 1960s; and the response to and impact of utzon’s enforced withdrawal in 1966. in the process of exploring new territory Building a masterpiece has drawn on the accounts and archives of many individuals who played a part in the Opera House story: robert Geddes and Balthazar korab who submitted competition schemes placed second and fourth respectively; architect and cartoonist George Molnar and the late Harry Seidler, also competition entrants, who championed utzon’s building throughout their lives; Elias duek-Cohen and Ted Mack who spearheaded the campaign to have utzon reinstated in the late '60s; Arup engineer dr John Nutt who was associated with the building throughout its construction; architect and engineer yuzo Mikami who worked for both utzon and Ove Arup — and many others. To the book’s great benefit these new perspectives on the Opera House story have also drawn out new pictorial material. Many of the book’s 200 or so images — from competition schemes to construction photos, to ‘Bring utzon back’ posters — have not been previously published and give a rich new dimension to the story of the building’s history.

Building a masterpiece set itself the task of investigating previously little-documented aspects of the multi-layered history of the Sydney Opera House. At the heart of all the narratives, however, is still the magnificent building on Bennelong Point, and its architect Jørn utzon. As he created his visionary scheme 50 years ago in wintry denmark, utzon could not have imagined the remarkable journey on which his competition design would take him and so many others. Nor could he have imagined the enduring impact of his creation on the heartbeat of a city — or indeed a nation.
Anne Watson, Curator, Architecture and Design
Building a masterpiece will be published in August 2006. $55.00 pb / $70.00 hc / 10% members discount. Building a masterpiece is generously supported by Arup, celebrating 60 years, 1946–2006.

THE SydNEy OPErA HOuSE, Mid 1960S. PHOTO By MAx duPAiN. GiFT OF rESMEd ASiA PACiFiC LTd 2005. rEPrOduCEd COurTESy MAx duPAiN & ASSOCiATES.

+ 18

powerline winter 06

+ 19

powerline winter 06

iT’S THE ENd OF AN ErA FOr THE MASTErTOuCH PiANO rOLL COMPANy BuT A GENErOuS GiFT MEANS iTS MEMOry WiLL LivE ON AT THE POWErHOuSE MuSEuM.
story_MiCHAEL LEA_CurATOr, MuSiC ANd MuSiCAL iNSTruMENTS

Mastertouch rolls out
in the first half of the 20th century the player piano rivalled the gramophone and the wireless as a source of home entertainment. A piano that played itself meant you didn’t have to have a trained pianist in the family to stand round the upright for a sing-along. Or you could just sit back and enjoy your favourite tunes played ‘live’ by a gifted artist in the comfort of your own home. With the advent of television and the 33 1/3rpm LP the popularity of the player piano waned but that didn’t stop the Mastertouch Piano roll Company from continuing to do what it did best, making and recording music in the traditional way. Now after 86 years in operation the company has closed its doors but not before its owner, Barclay Wright, approached the Museum with the offer to donate what must be one of the largest collections in Australia relating to piano roll manufacture, complete with player pianos, master piano rolls, roll making and recording equipment and archival material. due to the significance and size of this donation the Museum has also been greatly assisted by a grant from the NSW Heritage Office to help with the cost of transport and documentation of the collection. The Mastertouch Piano roll Company was founded in 1919 in Sydney by G H Horton, at a time when player pianos were in great demand both for home entertainment and to accompany silent movies. Barclay Wright bought the business in 1961 and expanded its repertoire to include not only the classical and popular music from the pre-World War ii period, the heyday of the player piano, but also contemporary tunes. Of course there were still classics like the Moonlight Sonata, White Christmas or Mother Machree but these were complemented by top 40 classics from the Beatles, Creedence Clearwater revival and Abba to Elton John, Billy Joel, kylie Minogue and Mariah Carey. Musicals were also popular items including My Fair Lady and The Sound of Music through to Jesus Christ Superstar, Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables. Mastertouch kept up with current musical trends, despite the rapid changes occurring in methods of reproducing recorded music. But why is Mastertouch so important? As the last surviving large-scale manufacturer of piano rolls in the world using a traditional roll cutting method, Mastertouch had no peer in recent years. Today qrS in the uSA is the only big manufacturer of rolls left, but unlike Mastertouch, uses a modernised digital production system. There are also a number of smaller manufacturers of piano rolls around the world, but none on the scale of Mastertouch. Mastertouch is not only significant as a producer of music rolls but also (due to the unique enthusiasm of Barclay Wright and his employees and supporters) as a living museum, preserving many artefacts and equipment significant to the history of the player piano. First developed in the late 19th century, the player piano (or ‘pianola’ as it was often called although this was a specific brand name) is unique in musical history in that it combines a live piano performance with pre-recorded musical data — the experience of a live piano performance without a musician. Music roll technology is also interesting as an early form of music data storage. To create a piano roll the music is first played by a skilled pianist (known as the artist) onto a special recording piano connected to a master recording machine. This machine ‘records’ what is being played by punching holes of varying length in a blank master roll. This coded data tells the player piano which notes to play and for what duration giving information relating to both the tune and the rhythm. Once the master roll is cut multiple copies of it can be made — just like a Cd recording today where data is stored in binary code, which can be coped many times. The Mastertouch Collection will be stored in the Museum’s Castle Hill store, which is scheduled to open to the public in early 2007. Plans are underway for a small thematic case study of selected items at Castle Hill and the development of a website describing the Mastertouch collection and the history of the company and piano roll production in Australia. We will keep members up to date with progress.

CLOCkWiSE FrOM TOP LEFT: PiANO rOLL CuTTiNG MACHiNE, CuTTiNG FrOM A MASTEr rOLL; PArT OF THE kEyBOArd COLLECTiON WiTH A CABiNET PiANO By AdOLPHE rAyNOr, LONdON, 1825–30 iN THE FOrEGrOuNd; BOxES OF PiANO rOLL MASTErS; AN EArLy PiANOLA (Or 'PuSH-uP') PLAyEr PiANO By AEOLiAN, uSA, ABOuT 1905. PHOTOS By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

+ 0

powerline winter 06

+ 1

powerline winter 06

ASTrONOMEr iAN SANSOM GivES THE iNSidE STOry ON THE STArS BEHiNd THE OBSErvATOry’S NAME-A-STAr PrOGrAM.

starry starry night
Go out to the countryside, where the stars shine brightly in the wonderful inky black sky, and you will see that some are brighter than others, and some have delicate, transparent hues of orange, yellow or blue. Why is this so? What is a star and how do stars work? What does this, Sydney Observatory’s very successful Name-a-Star program, kissing fine girls or guys, and Annie Jump Canon have in common? All will be revealed. Stars are born out of huge clouds of gas and fine dust called nebulae (wonderfully described in their star-forming phase as ‘stellar nurseries’). A large dense nebula often produces numerous large stars which, contrary to logical assumption, have very short lives. The largest stars are very hot and bright, and burn up their fuel at an astonishing rate — like James dean, these big stars live fast and die young. Modest stars like our Sun are very frugal with their fuel and will live hundreds of times longer, which is good news for us. A star’s colour (spectral type) indicates its size and temperature. Notwithstanding the colours on our bathroom taps, a blue star is very hot and a red star is relatively cool. Just as raindrops split sunlight into the colours of a rainbow, we can separate starlight into its spectral colours and lines to reveal a great deal about the star’s chemistry and temperature. These relationships between the size, temperature, colour, brightness and lifespan of a star were independently plotted by the danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung in 1911 and the uS astronomer Henry Norris russell in 1913, on what became known as the H-r (Hertzsprung-russell) diagram. Spectral types (or classes) of stars were classified at Harvard between 1911 and 1924 by one of the great female pioneers of astronomy: a woman with the unlikely name of Annie Jump Cannon. Cannon had been hired in 1896 by the director of Harvard Observatory, Professor Edward Pickering, as one of ‘Pickering’s Women’. Not as politically incorrect as it sounds, Pickering employed a group of women with astronomical qualifications to work as ‘computers’ — carrying out astronomical calculations, classifying spectra etc — for the compilation of the Henry draper star catalogue. in doing so, Pickering provided some rare career opportunities in science for women at the time. Cannon was assigned the task of developing a system, previously started by two predecessors, of classifying stars according to their spectra. She reduced the complex 22 established classes to a logical sequence of seven spectral types, O B A F G k M, from the hottest blue O type stars to the coolest red M type stars. Astronomers remember this valuable astronomical tool with the delightful mnemonic ‘Oh, Be A Fine Girl/Guy, kiss Me’. Sydney Observatory's Name-a-Star package is often purchased as a gift for a special occasion or to remember a loved one, and includes an evening visit to the Observatory to view the star. during the star viewing, we now provide a dozen nontechnical pages describing how stars are born, live and die. This information always seems to make the occasion much more special — to know that their special star is 50 times larger and hotter than our Sun, for example, is a lovely pale blue colour, that it will live for another billion years, and that the starlight they are seeing left their star as the Crusades were starting almost a thousand years ago. Their star then comes to life and becomes more than just a twinkle in a telescope. Ian Sansom, Sydney Observatory
For information about buying a Name-a-Star package contact (02) 9217 0485 or visit sydneyobservatory.com

Late last year Dr Peter Farrell AM, on behalf of ResMed, generously donated a portfolio of over 178 photographs by Max Dupain documenting the building of the Sydney Opera House. Showing various stages of construction over eight years, the earliest images are dominated by elaborate scaffolding before the classic profile of Jørn Utzon’s brilliant design begins to emerge. The photographs were originally printed for Peter Hall, the government architect who took over on Utzon’s departure from the project, and were acquired by Dr Farrell at auction. A selection are displayed on level 5 of the Museum and are also featured in the forthcoming Powerhouse publication Building a masterpiece: the Sydney Opera House. Dr Farrell is the chairman and CEO of ResMed, the company he founded in 198 to develop a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, a life threatening condition affecting millions around the world. He is recognised as a world leader in innovation and entrepreneurship and has been honoured with many awards including Australian Entrepreneur of the Year, Australian Export Hero and National Entrepreneur of the Year for Health Sciences of America. Dr Farrell was introduced to the Museum by broadcaster and Foundation ambassador, Robyn Williams. In addition to this collection donation, he has also given generously to the Foundation making him one of its first Governors, the highest contribution category. We are delighted to announce Dr Farrell will be one of the guest speakers for the Foundation’s President Circle Luncheon series in 006. Melissa Smith, Foundation Executive, (0) 917 0564 or foundation@phm.gov.au

AFTEr TOuriNG NSW FOr TWO yEArS, AN ExHiBiTiON ABOuT BOTH STrANGE ANd COMMONPLACE HOME rEMEdiES COMES TO THE POWErHOuSE.

The weird and the wonderful
Probably the most unusual home remedy in the Powerhouse Museum’s medical collection — and certainly the largest — is a multiwave oscillator, an electronic device that takes up a whole garden shed. it was built by Mr Angas ‘Joe’ Jones at his home in dundas in the 1970s, based on the design of the first ever multi-wave oscillator, which was invented by French engineer Georges Lakhovsky in the mid 1920s. Lakhovsky viewed illness as a battle of vibrations between the cells of the body and disease microbes. He believed that radio waves from his multiwave oscillator reinforced the body’s vibrations so that they could repel disease. Mr Jones was a radio and telephone technician by trade and an inveterate tinkerer after hours. His unprepossessing suburban house featured a homemade hi-fi system, an elaborate security set-up, and a few more surprising devices including the multi-wave oscillator, housed in a garden shed located in the double garage in his back yard. Mr Jones sat in it regularly for a dose of therapeutic radiation, until his death in 2003 at the age of 85. With its door open so that the internal electronic system can be viewed — along with its 1970s décor — the multi-wave oscillator was added to Works wonders: stories about home remedies when it came to the Powerhouse in May. The Works wonders exhibition opened in Hay in december 2003 and has travelled to 15 other small venues in regional NSW since then. Along the way the exhibition has collected stories of many home remedies as visitors in each town record their own favourites. For local displays, children have drawn pictures of remembered catastrophes, chemists have dug into the dimmest recesses of their storerooms, and local people have bravely revealed the secrets of their medicine boxes. At Wollongong there was an ‘odour’ interactive where visitors could take a good sniff of an empty bathroom cabinet that had not lost its evocative smell. At Newcastle val Wallace resurrected a poem she had written some years ago. Called ‘Survival of the fittest’ it began: despite the rigours of moving the exhibition every two months, Powerhouse staff are much healthier for the experience. They have tasted the bark of a quinine tree in Brewarrina, sipped grappa infused with rue at Leeton, and taken a dip in the hot mineral baths at Moree. But they have also declined advice to hold onto an electric fence to relieve arthritis (Newcastle), smoke three cigarettes in quick succession for migraine (Broken Hill), or rub a cut garden slug on their warts (Lithgow). And they have never felt the need to take a good dose of castor oil to clean out their system (everywhere). Megan Hicks, Curator, Health and Medicine
Works wonders: stories about home remedies is on at the Powerhouse until 16 June.

Recent Donors
Whitney drayton Margaret Bourke CWA Flynn Paul & dr Prapaipuk Mottram Judith Wheeldon Melissa E Smith dr Brian vern-Barnett Peter Sandilands Paradise Garage Australia Helena Ferrier Enid Wilson

do you remember, as a child, if you were crook or faint The remedies that Grandma had, were worse than the complaint However was it we survived, with crazy insane cures? No matter whether colds or flu, diarrhoea or open sores Granny had the answer, she’d nod her knowing head And most times when she’d finished, we’d wish that we were dead!

Mr 'JOE' JONES (LEFT) ANd MrS BEryL JONES TESTiNG THE MuLTiWAvE OSCiLLATOr. THE PHOTOS WErE TAkEN iN THE 1970S WHEN JOE WAS iN THE PrOCESS OF BuiLdiNG HiS HiGH-vOLTAGE dEviCE iNSidE A GArdEN SHEd. PHOTOS FrOM THE FAMiLy ALBuM.

iN 1923 ANNiE JuMP CANNON WAS vOTEd ONE OF THE 12 GrEATEST LiviNG WOMEN iN AMEriCA ANd iN 1931 AWArdEd THE NATiONAL ACAdEMy OF SCiENCE'S drAPEr GOLd MEdAL ANd AN HONOrAry dOCTOrATE FrOM OxFOrd. iMAGE COurTESy uNivErSiTy ArCHivES, uNivErSiTy OF dELAWArE.

dr PETEr FArrELL ANd dr kEviN FEWSTEr WiTH ONE OF THE dONATEd MAx duPAiN PHOTOGrAPHS. PHOTO By MAriNCO kOJdANOvSki.

+ 

+

powerline winter 06

+ 

powerline winter 06

observe

WiNTEr iS THE BEST TiME TO viEW THE SOuTHErN CrOSS AT SydNEy OBSErvATOry.

THE POWErHOuSE MuSEuM GrATEFuLLy ACkNOWLEdGES THE SuPPOrT OF THE FOLLOWiNG OrGANiSATiONS
+principal partners

POiNTErS SOuTHErN CrOSS

DICK SMITH
SPOrT: MOrE THAN HErOES & LEGENdS ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956–2006 THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA: dyNASTiES, drAGONS ANd WArriOrS diCk SMiTH AuSTrALiAN ExPLOrEr BELL 206B JETrANGEr iii HELiCOPTEr THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA: dyNASTiES, drAGONS ANd WArriOrS COLES THEATrE, TArGET THEATrE, GrACE BrOS COurTyArd, k MArT STudiOS

THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA: dyNASTiES, drAGONS ANd WArriOrS

+senior partners

k
the crux of the matter
The Southern Cross is one of the best known constellations in the night sky. For hundreds of years it has come to symbolise the southern hemisphere, appearing today on the logo of thousands of Australian businesses and on the flags of Australia, New zealand, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and Samoa. To astronomers the Southern Cross is known as Crux (a Latin word meaning cross), the smallest of the 88 modern constellations. it contains four bright stars situated at the extremities of a cross and is best viewed during the early evening from May to August. it cannot be viewed from North America or Europe and only people living south of Florida in the uS or the island of Taiwan can see the Southern Cross.

THE SOuTHErN CrOSS. PHOTO By GEOFF WyATT.

ECOLOGiC: CrEATiNG A SuSTAiNABLE FuTurE

THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA: dyNASTiES, drAGONS ANd WArriOrS

POWErHOuSE WizArd

GrEEk TrEASurES: FrOM THE BENAki MuSEuM iN ATHENS

MuSEuM MASCOTS: zOE ANd COGS ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956–2006 SydNEy dESiGN 06

A constellation that has come to symbolise the southern hemisphere.
THE GrEAT WALL OF CHiNA: dyNASTiES, drAGONS ANd WArriOrS ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956–2006

To Australia’s indigenous people the stars of the Cross were important. Some viewed it as the foot print of a wedge tail eagle while others saw it as a stingray being chased by a shark. A commonly asked question at Sydney Observatory is ‘How do i find the Southern Cross?’ The best way is to look for two bright stars Alpha and Beta Centauri, known as the Pointers, that point towards the cross (see photo). For a ‘road map’ to the Crux check our monthly star chart available on our website (sydneyobservatory. com) or Sydney Observatory's Australian sky guide (available from the Observatory or Powerhouse Publishing). Dr Martin Anderson, Astronomy Educator


festival of the stars
Sydneysiders will be familiar with the experience of looking up to the night sky and seeing hardly any stars. This is because the lights of the city reduce the contrast that makes the sky seem so black and the stars so bright and numerous in the country. But for the second year running the rTA is turning the floodlights out on the Sydney Harbour Bridge for the Observatory’s Festival of the Stars to help make the stars once again glow brightly in our night sky. This is the chance to view the Southern Cross (Crux), Mars

MArS, THE rEd PLANET. PHOTO COurTESy NASA.

+partners
BOMBAY SAPPHIRE d FACTOry SydNEy dESiGN 06 POLOxYGEN ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA, SYDNEY DIvISION ENGiNEEriNG ExCELLENCE 2005 RADIO UE INDESIGN MAGAzINE d FACTOry ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956–2006 SOUNDHOUSE™ MUSIC ALLIANCE SOuNdHOuSE™ MuSiC & MuLTiMEdiA LABOrATOry iNSPirEd! dESiGN ACrOSS TiME Tv WEEK ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956–2006 MINCOM LIMITED LiFE FELLOWS diNNEr 2006 SOUTHERN STAR ON THE BOx: GrEAT MOMENTS iN AuSTrALiAN TELEviSiON 1956-2006

+supporters
ANSTO SCiENCE EduCATiON PrOGrAM ARAB BANK AUSTRALIA THE CuriOuS ECONOMiST: WiLLiAM STANLEy JEvONS iN SydNEy ELECTROLUx ELECTrOLux GLOBAL dESiGN LABOrATOry MONUMENT SydNEy dESiGN 06 NOvOTEL SYDNEY ON DARLING HARBOUR OFFiCiAL SydNEy HOTEL PACIFIC MAGAzINES THE RACI INC. NSW BRANCH SCiENCE EduCATiON PrOGrAM TRUST CO OF AUSTRALIA

next to the bright star regulus, Jupiter and the constellations Scorpius and Centaurus through the Observatory’s large telescopes — or just enjoy a starry starry night from Observatory Hill. As well as telescope viewings, there will be astronomy focus talks, a torchlight tour, an astronomy night fair and a sausage sizzle. Sydney Observatory's Festival of the Stars starts at 6.00 pm on Friday 21 and Saturday 22 July. For details and bookings phone (02) 9921 3485 or visit sydneyobservatory.com

HOME BEAUTIFUL SydNEy dESiGN 06

+platinum corporate members
AMP BOEiNG AuSTrALiA THOMSON PLAyFOrd

+gold corporate members
AdOBE JCdECAux LiLyFiELd PriNTiNG MASSMEdiA STudiOS MuLTiPLEx SiNCLAir kNiGHT MErz TrANSGrid

+silver corporate members
ArAB BANk AuSTrALiA duNLOP FLOOriNG AuSTrALiA HASBrO MACquAriE BANk FOuNdATiON NSW dEPArTMENT OF LANdS PdC CrEATivE TABCOrP TAFE NSW: SydNEy iNSTiTuTE THOMSON TELECOM AuSTrALiA WEir MiNErALS AuSTrALiA

+ state government partners
THE POWErHOuSE MuSEuM iS A STATuTOry AuTHOriTy OF, ANd PriNCiPALLy FuNdEd By, THE NSW STATE GOvErNMENT. CASiNO COMMuNiTy BENEFiT FuNd NSW ENvirONMENTAL TruST

+australian government partners
AuSTrALiA COuNCiL FOr THE ArTS AuSTrALiAN rESEArCH COuNCiL

FOr MOrE iNFOrMATiON ON SPONSOrSHiP OPPOrTuNiTiES ANd GiviNG TO THE POWErHOuSE MuSEuM PLEASE CONTACT MirANdA PurNELL ON (02) 9217 0577.

exhibitions at a glance
JuNE_JuLy_AuGuST 2006
On the box: great moments in Australian television 1956–006
LEvEL 4

Powerhouse Membership It makes a great gift!
i wish to join Powerhouse Members Membership number (if renewing): i wish to renew my membership

Strasburg clock model
LEvEL 4

INDIvIDUAL
Standard Concession/country* Name to go on card

Fifty years of Australian television are celebrated in this landmark exhibition, delve into Tv history with classic clips, interactives and insights from the trailblazers of Australian Tv. Inspired! Design across time
LEvEL 4,

Following a long period of preservation work the treasured ‘Strasburg’ model, based on Strasbourg Cathedral’s famous astronomical clock, returns to a new location next to the new decorative arts and design gallery, inspired! design across time. Works wonders: stories about home remedies
LEvEL 2, uNTiL 18 JuNE 2006

1 year $60 $30 

years $108 $54 

years $153 $77

*Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed. Country members must live more than 150 km from Sydney GPO.

HOUSEHOLD**
Standard Concession/country*

Featuring fashion, furniture, textiles, glass, graphics, ceramics and metalwork, inspired! surveys 300 years of decorative arts and design. discover the power of objects and the pleasure of people who use and treasure them. Engineering Excellence
LEvEL 4,

1 year $85 $50 

years $153 $90 

years $217 $127

An exhibition about some of the weird, wonderful and commonplace ways in which people have dealt with sickness and injury at home. In your face: contemporary graphic design
LEvEL 3, FrOM 5 AuGuST 2006

** A household is up to two adults and all students under 18 years at the same address. Country households must be more than 150 km from Sydney GPO. Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed and all adults in the household must be eligible for concession.

Name to go on first card Name to go on second card Card number (for concession memberships) i wish to give a gift membership

Outstanding engineering projects from the Engineers Australia, Sydney division, Engineering Excellence awards. Australian Design Awards
LEvEL 4, FrOM 1 JuLy 2006

From advertisers and animators to a tattoo artist, this fascinating exhibition gives the inside story on graphic design. Showcasing 16 designers and studios, in your face explores what makes some designs stand out from the crowd. Electrolux Design Lab
LEvEL 3, 5–20 AuGuST 2006

GIFT MEMBERSHIP RECIPIENT
Name Address Postcode Phone number (BH) Email Please send the membership to Future renewal notices to be sent to: Card message (if applicable) The giver The giver directly to the recipient The recipient

The Powerhouse selection from the Australian design Awards features outstanding achievements in design.

Home Beautiful Product of the Year Awards 006
LEvEL 2, 18–21 AuGuST 2006

From home accessories, outdoor furniture to lighting and bedding design, Home Beautiful magazine seeks out the year’s ‘must have’ products for the home. See the shortlisted products and watch a panel of experts make their final selection of this year’s winners. SMH Young Designer of the Year
LEvEL 2, 5–13 AuGuST 2006

A selection of innovative designs from some of the award-winning entries for the third Electrolux design Lab competition where students from around the world were invited to design household appliances for the home of 2020. The World Cup dream: stories of Australia's soccer mums and dads
LEvEL 3, 5 JuNE – 23 JuLy 2006

Just in time for the 2006 World Cup! Through a series of interviews with Socceroo families, this display looks at the rise of Australia as a soccer nation.

GIFT MEMBERSHIP GIvER
Name Address Postcode Phone number (BH) Fax Email Number in household adults children

A selection from the winning entrants from The Sydney Morning Herald young designer of the year Award.

PAYMENT DETAILS
Total cost of membership: $ i would also like to make a donation to the Powerhouse Foundation of $ to help build our collection (donations over $2.00 are tax deductible). Total amount to be paid $
vASE iN BLuE JASPEr. JOSiAH WEdGEWOOd & SONS, ENGLANd, 1786–90. GiFT OF POWErHOuSE MEMBErS 1990; PAuL HOGAN WiTH GArry MCdONALd AS NOrMAN GuNSTON, ABOuT 1977; ASiAN-iNSPirEd TATTOO dESiGN By JOSH rOELiNk, TATudHArMA, SydNEy, 2005.

i enclose a cheque/money order for this amount made payable to Powerhouse Members. Please charge this amount to my credit card: visa Amex M/card diners B/card Expiry /

exhibitions at Sydney Observatory
By the light of the southern stars Look behind the Southern Cross, hear Aboriginal stories about the sky and see instruments from Australia’s first major observatory.

coming soon!
The Great Wall of China: dynasties, dragons and warriors
FrOM 29 SEPTEMBEr 2006

Card number Cardholder name Signature

Built over a period of more than 2000 years, the Great Wall of China is both an astonishing monument and the symbol of ancient empires. Featuring treasures never before seen outside China, this exhibition tells the story of the Great Wall, from its pre-dynastic beginnings to its iconic status today.

date that gift should be received by
While all effort will be made to meet deadline, please allow 14 days processing.

Please complete all relevant sections and return to the members department: + By fax on 9217 0140 + By post to: Powerhouse Members PO Box k346, Haymarket, NSW 1238 or phone the Members hotline on 9217 0600. Please phone the Members Hotline for information about other gift membership categories or visit: www.powerhousemuseum.com/members

+

Give a gift membership
www.powerhousemuseum.com
TurN OvEr FOr dETAiLS

from the collection
American designers Charles and ray Eames were one of the most important design partnerships of the post war era. Endlessly innovative, their work ranged from furniture and architecture to films, exhibitions and toys. Their creativity across many disciplines — design, mathematics, technology and photography — has had a lasting influence on our world. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Eames lounge chair and ottoman, a 20th-century design classic and the Eames’ final and most resolved statement in a series of plywood chairs designed over a 15-year period. Fifty years old and still going strong, the chair pays tribute to the brilliance of the Eames’ partnership and the importance of their

www.powerhousemuseum.com

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful