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Axe Creek – Eppalock Newsletter Incorporating news from the Eppalock Primary School, Axe Creek Fire

Axe Creek – Eppalock Newsletter

Incorporating news from the Eppalock Primary School, Axe Creek Fire Brigade & the Axe Creek Landcare Group.

Welcome to the Spring Issue

How wonderful to see the blossom and floral blooms out at the mo- ment. Not to mention the dams full and waterways cleared and full also.

In this issue you will find some great content from the Axe Creek Fire Brigade on the upcoming fire season. As always, it is recommended reading to ensure you are aware and prepared for any threat that may occur.

We also have a new inclusion in this newsletter. An update and call out for new members from the Axe Creek Cricket club. Turn to page 13 for more.

May your team win in any upcoming finals, and don’t forget to share any community news will us via axecreeknews@gmail.com

Sam Spence

Advertise your Business AND help the Community

If you would like some great local exposure for a reasonable price, then advertise in the next issue of the Axe Creek – Eppalock Newsletter.

Full Page

$100

Half Page

$50

Quarter Page

$25

Fees charged help cover printing costs.

Advertising deadline for future issues:

Summer 2016

Dec 2nd

Autumn 2017

Mar 3rd

Winter 2017

June 2nd

Spring 2017

August 31st

Contact us via axecreeknews@gmail.com

Edition 52. Spring 2016  Welcome  Community Notice Board  CFA News  Eppalock
Edition 52. Spring 2016
 Welcome
 Community Notice Board
 CFA News
 Eppalock PS Update
 Axe Creek Playgroup
 Landcare’s Latest
 Axe Creek Cricket Club
 Church News
 Community News
 Kids Corner
Thank you to this issues
Contributors
John Wells - Axe Creek Fire
Brigade
Marie Mannes - Eppalock PS
Gillian Wells & Chris Kirwan -
Axe Creek Landcare
James O’Bryen - Axe Creek
Cricket Club
Steve Weickhardt - Anglican
Parish

Community Notice Board

Emergency Contact Numbers

Fire, Police & Ambulance

(life threatening or time critical emergencies only)

SES Flood & Storm Emergency Bushfire Information

Information & advice about significant fires, total fire bans

Burn Off Notifications Poisons Information Wildlife Rescue Service

000

13 25 00 1800 240 667

1800 668 511 13 11 26 0419 356 433

School Terms 2016 Term 1 27 Jan – 24 Mar Term 2 11 Apr –

School Terms

2016

Term 1 27 Jan 24 Mar

Term 2

11

Apr 24 Jun

Term 3

11

Jul 16 Sept

Term 4 3 Oct 20 Dec

Local ChurchesSt Stephens Anglican & Strathfieldsaye Uniting Church 920 Wellington St, Strathfieldsaye Combined Service - Sunday

St Stephens Anglican & Strathfieldsaye Uniting Church

920 Wellington St, Strathfieldsaye Combined Service - Sunday Mornings 9am Family Service - Saturday - 5pm

St Joseph’s Catholic Church

Cnr Axe Creek & Strathfieldsaye/Eppalock Rds. Sunday Mornings 9am

All Welcome

Axe Creek CFACaptain Neil Irving-Dusting 5439 6388

Captain

Neil Irving-Dusting 5439 6388

axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 3
axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 3
axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 3

CFA News From Axe Creek Brigade

NEWS FROM THE JUNIORS

The Brigade's junior program is still in the establishment phase. We are looking for young people, 11 to 15 years old, from the Axe Creek / Eppalock / Strathfieldsaye area who are keen to develop their team- work and leaderships skills whilst learning practical and firefighting skills and having some fun.

We will begin meeting at the Axe Creek Fire station on Sunday mornings in October to get to know each other and start to develop as a team, with competition team training to begin in January.

If you are interested please contact Brad Knight on 0429 802 538.

SEASONAL OUTLOOK

Each year fire and land managers meet with meteorologists and climatologists to develop the Seasonal Bushfire Outlook for Southern Australia, used by fire authorities to make strate- gic decisions on resource planning and fire management for the upcoming fire season.

The preliminary outlook was released at the end of August. It will be reviewed late in spring to take into account the impacts of the actual rainfall and temperatures in the lead up to sum- mer. The red areas on the map indicate higher than normal bushfire potential, and the blue areas lower than normal po- tential. Although much of south-eastern Australia had good winter rainfall, it was not enough to overcome the effects of the previous long dry period: hence the high bushfire potential for western NSW and much of central western Victoria. Our district falls in the red area: so be prepared!

Our district falls in the red area: so be prepared! The outlook was based on forecasts

The outlook was based on forecasts for northern Victoria of higher spring temperatures, and most likely about average rainfall. Of course our September rainfall turned out to be well above average. Historically wet springs mean prolific grass growth, and when it the grass dries out—as it will—a much greater risk of fast-running grass fires.

IT'S TIME NOW TO START PREPARING FOR THE FIRE SEASON!

NOW is the time to get the spring growth under controlbefore it begins to dry out, and become a ma- jor fire hazard. Here are some hints from Sue Moses, Fire Prevention Officer for the City of Greater Bendi- go.

For residential areas (where neighbouring houses are close by)

Ensure ground fuels such as grasses and weeds are no more than 100mm high across the whole of your land.

Remove all rubbish, flammable debris, fallen branches and tree cuttings from your property.

Prune branches away from buildings and fences.

It is important that you maintain your property until the fire season is over.

Larger blocks and farms

Create a fuel (fire) break of at least 20 metres around buildings and structures (yours and those located on your neighbours' land).

Create a fuel break 10 - 20 metres wide along the boundaries of paddocks adjoining residential areas.

Create a fuel break of approximately 10 - 20 metres around crops, and paddocks adjoining woodlands.

In heavily treed areas create a 5 - 10 metre fuel break around the inside of boundary fences. This in- cludes reducing ground fuels (grass and weeds) to less than 100 mm in height and removing fallen branches. For areas inaccessible by a slasher or mower this may need to be done with a brushcut- ter.

Land intended to be used for grazing or cropping

If you intend to crop or graze the paddock, please advise the Fire Prevention Officer or you may receive a fire prevention notice. It is likely a fire break will still be required.

I want to remove trees and shrubs

Depending on where you live there may be exemptions under the 10/30, 10/50 and fence line clearing rules (see below). Before removing vegetation always check with the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Department on 5434 6355 or visit the website https://www.bendigo.vic.gov.au as a planning permit may be required.

How can I get rid of my waste?

Call council on 5434 6000 for information on our Landfill and transfer stations.

To assist residents to prepare for the fire season residents can drop off their green waste at the Eaglehawk Eco-Centre or the Heathcote Landfill free of charge on set days as advertised on the City of Greater Ben- digo website. The days coming up are Saturday 22nd October, Sunday 23rd October, Saturday 19th November, and Sunday 20th November.

Materials accepted are tree pruning's, garden clippings, grass and leaf litter.

My property is prepared, but my neighbour’s is not

Please let us know if there is a property of concern and we will inspect it. Phone the CoGB on 5434 6000.

THE 10/30, 10/50 AND FENCE LINE CLEARING RULES

These came into force after Black Saturday to make it less onerous for property owners in high risk areas to manage vegetation for bushfire protection around dwellings without the need for planning permits. It re- lates to dwellings only (not to other buildings), built or approved prior to 10 September 2009.

10/50 rule

Allowss landowners in areas covered by the Bushfire Management Overlay (check with the City of Greater Bendigo to see if this applies to your property) to clear:

any vegetation, including trees, within 10 metres of a house, and

any vegetation except for trees within 50 metres for bushfire protection.

10/30 rule

Applies in areas including the Bendigo municipality to clear:

any vegetation on their property, including trees, within 10 metres of a house, and

any vegetation except for trees within 30 metres for bushfire protection.

Fence clearing rule

In areas where 10/30 exists, any vegetation can be removed for a combined maximum width of four me- tres across an existing property fence. It cannot be cleared four metres either side.

DON'T LET YOUR BURN-OFF GET AWAY!

If you live on a rural property, burning dry solid fuel (outside the Fire Danger Period!) may be an option for reducing the fuel load before summer. Before burning off it is important to check whether a permit is needed, make sure that you can contain the burn, and notify your neighbours.

Read the City of Bendigo's Open Air Burning Fact Sheet, available from the council offices (5454 6000) or at the council web site under Fire Prevention.

You should also register with the Burn-off Notification Line (1800 668 511) to save the brigade having to turn out should somebody report the fire. You will need to specify the location of the burn, the date and ex- pected start and finish times, the estimated size, and what you intend to burn.

Before lighting up check for fire restrictions in the area (ring the Victorian Bushfire Information Line: 1800 40 667), and check the weather conditionsparticularly the wind. Make sure you have sufficient equipment and water to stop the fire spreading, and never leave the fire unattended.

JUST WHAT (AND WHEN) IS THE FIRE DANGER PERIOD?

The Fire Danger Period is declared by the CFA in the lead up to the fire season to help prevent fires start- ing. During the Fire Danger Period there are restrictions on the use of fire, and activities that are likely to cause fires.

The starting date for the Fire Danger Period is determined each year according to the rainfall, the rate at which grasslands are drying and other local conditions. It is set separately for each municipality (shire or council area), and the date publicised via local newspapers and radio stations. In the City of Greater Bendigo the Fire Danger Period typically starts in November or December. The Fire Danger period ends (i.e. restrictions are lifted) when the fire danger eases at the end of summer.

The Fire Danger Period is different from a Total Fire Ban. A Total Fire Ban is declared for one or more spe- cific days, and has much more stringent conditions, whereas the Fire Danger Period applies for most of the summer months.

Restrictions during the Fire Danger Period

Here are some restrictions most likely to affect households and residents:

You must not light a fire in the open (except for cooking or warmth, as summarised below) without a per- mit from the local council or CFA. (Note that permits are rarely issued in our district.)

Any machinery such as a chainsaw, mower or trimmer operated in dry vegetation (e.g. dry grass or scrub) must be fitted with an effective spark arrestor, and you must have with you an approved knapsack spray or stored pressure fire extinguisher with at least 9 litres of water.

Welding, grinding, soldering, charring, gas cutting etc. may only be carried out if there is a guard or shield to contain sparks, an area of at least 1.5 m around is clear of flammable material or wetted down, you have a hose or knapsack spray with at least 9 litres of water, and somebody is in attend- ance at all times who can extinguish a fire.

Commercially manufactured gas or electric barbecues are generally OK for use, provided

the area within 3 metres around the barbecue is clear of flammable material;

you have a hose connected to a water supply or a container with at least 10 litres of water for imme- diate use;

an adult is present when the barbecue is in use who has the capacity and means to extinguish a fire; and

the barbecue is completely extinguished before the adult leaves.

Solid fuel barbecues or camp fires may be lit only if

the wind is less than 10 km/h (this can be observed if leaves and small twigs are in constant motion);

the fire is lit in a properly constructed fireplace or in a trench at least 30 cm deep;

the area within 3 metres around the barbecue or fire is clear of flammable material;

the fire is no more than 1 square metre in area, and the size and dimensions of the fuel are the mini- mum necessary for the purpose;

an adult is in attendance at all times while the fire is alight and has the capacity and means to extin- guish the fire; and

the fire is completely extinguished before the person leaves.

This is just an outline of the main provisions. For more detailed information ask the Brigade or CFA office in Bendigo for a copy of the "Can I or Can't I?" brochure, that sets out conditions for both the Fire Danger Period and Total Fire Days, or look at the CFA website (www.cfa.vic.gov.au).

axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 6
axecreeknews@gmail.com
Issue 52
6

A CONVERSATION WITH LIEUTENANT GREG HENDERSON

Can you tell us when you first joined CFA, and why?

It was about 20 years ago, a little while after we had moved to Axe Creek. One day Craig Houlahan came to retrieve a cow that had wandered on to our place, and he asked if I had considered joining the brigade. I suppose I did so for several reasons: to do something for the community, to get to know neighbours, and for social connections.

In those days, before compulsory basic training was introduced, new members trained on the job, by jumping on the back of the truck and learning from the more experienced firefighters. One day we went to a burn-off at the Axedale cemetery: I really enjoyed the experienceseeing how to control firebut another new member, who suffered from asthma, quickly found out that working in thick smoke was not for him.

You live close to the fire station. I guess that made it possible for you to learn quickly.

Yes, I'm usually the first to arrive at the station. I always hear the siren, even if I'm wearing ear muffs while operating machinery.

After being an operational firefighter for a number of years I became a lieutenant4th, and then 2ndand now I'm also one of the leaders of the junior brigade team. It's good to be able to pass on knowledge and skills to others, whether newer crew members or juniors.

What are some of your most memorable firefighting experiences?

The Black Saturday fires stand out. It was a terrible day: hot and windy, and the whole place was tinder dry and ready to go up. About 3 o'clock Neil, the captain, rang to say that there was a fire at Redesdale, and we were likely to be called to it. I went immediately to the station, and soon enough we were on our way in the first attack. It was mayhemfire everywhere. We managed to save a couple of houses, and outbuildings at an olive plantation. Later we were re-located to Mia Mia to form up with a strike team to help defend the township. We had to wait until the fire came out into the grassland, and then three strike teams worked together to extinguish the running edge of the fire. That was an impressive piece of team- work: truck after truck attacking the flames, and then peeling off to refill with water while those behind continued the work. We could really see our reward as the fire was brought under control.

We were relieved late at night. After getting some sleep I was back with the truck next day for night shift in Bendigo, mopping up around the town. That was quieter than the hectic time at Redesdale!

You would have seen a few changes in the last few years. What do you see for the future?

Yes, a big change in recent years has been the rapid dispatch of a firebombing helicopter from Bendigo as soon as a fire is reported on a hot day. The pilots are amazingthey can drop a load of water right on the head of a fire, and they can be back for a second drop much more quickly than fixed-wing aircraft that have to return to the airport to refill.

There are many more opportunities for training and development now, which is a step forwards. It's good to train on the job, but that doesn't always prepare you for unexpected circumstances. We can also learn more general skills, such as first aid.

I hope brigade members will soon be trained to use breathing apparatus, which is particularly important for fire in buildings because of the thick smoke and toxic fumes that firefighters can encounter there. Some neighbouring brigades carry breathing apparatus on their trucks, but users need to be relieved frequently, so more crew members are needed for support.

Although there are very able female firefighters in the brigade we could do with more. Firefighting used to be seen as a man's job, but women do the work equally well. Come on, girls and ladies: put your hands up!

Many Axe Creek firefighters have work commitments during the week. We'd love to hear from people who could respond to daytime calls. You don't have to be available all the time, but the more we have the more likely it is that we can crew the truck quickly.

Have you any final words for us?

My family has given me great support for my CFA activities. You don't get a lot of pats on the back for the work you doI guess in times of emergency people have other things on their mindbut it is reward- ing to see how you've been able to help keep people safe. I'd urge anybody interested to get in and have a go at it!

Thanks, Greg, for your time, and all the best for your future in the CFA.

go at it! Thanks, Greg, for your time, and all the best for your future in

FROM THE ARCHIVES

In this issue we have a couple of sad stories about house fires:

The Age, Friday 31 May 1935

BENDIGO. A fire, which broke out at 4 o'clock this afternoon at Axe Creek destroyed the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Bush. There are nine children to the family, and they were left with only the clothes they were wearing at the time.

left with only the clothes they were wearing at the time. The Age, Tuesday 17 Sep-

The Age, Tuesday 17 Sep- tember 1935

BENDIGO, Monday.An eight-roomed weather- board and brick house, owned and occupied by Mrs. D. M. Layton, post mistress at Emu Creek, was totally destroyed by fire on Sunday evening.

The fire broke out about 8.30 o'clock, and the country people were summoned by the tolling of a bell. They were una- ble to check the blaze, which burned itself out by midnight. Mrs. Layton was left with only the clothes she was wearing.

itself out by midnight. Mrs. Layton was left with only the clothes she was wearing. axecreeknews@gmail.com
itself out by midnight. Mrs. Layton was left with only the clothes she was wearing. axecreeknews@gmail.com

Eppalock Primary School

Eppalock Primary School It has been a spectacular term in Grade 2/3 at Eppalock Primary School.

It has been a spectacular term in Grade 2/3 at Eppalock Primary School. We spent the first few weeks investigating ‘What Does a Learning Community Look Like?’ Some of the key things the students agreed on were that it was important for everyone to:

encourage each other

speak kindly

ask questions

believe in themselves

believe in each other

give compliments

be a good sport a good winner and loser,

 be a good sport – a good winner and loser, Amongst other things these ideas

Amongst other things these ideas have become our Class Charter and guide how we work and play at school every day.

We then leapt into an investigation of the question, ‘What Does it Take to Become an Olympic Athlete?’ Students have looked at the human body, personal qualities and other things needed to become an Olympic athlete.

Throughout the term students have also created some eye-catching artwork: mixed-media hot air bal- loons, Olympic mascot paintings, collage owls, papier mache heads of their dads and grandparentsfor Fathers’ Day and more.

Maths has been all about addition, subtraction and measurement of length. Students had to measure a castle and design and measure their own treehouse as well as measure things around the classroom and playground.

Plus we still had time to go on a Frisbee Football Excursion with BLUEARTH and see “Snugglepot and Cud- dlepie” at the Ulumbarra Theatre, not to mention an overnight camp for the Grade 3s to 6s in Maldon.

We’ll have to tell you all about reading and writing in the next newsletter – but rest assured the students have been keen and astute detectives on the hunt for great characters, exciting settings and thrilling plots to engage them as readers and inspire them as writers. Plus they’ve been sitting on the Reading Chair (just one at a time) to read their favourite book to the class. And if you know a Prep to Grade 3 stu- dent at Eppalock Primary School, please ask them about WOW words …

Happy learning, Di Riepsamen, Grade 2/3 Teacher, Eppalock PS

2017 ENROLMENTS

We are now being taken at Eppalock Primary School. Please contact Craig Arrowsmith, Acting Principal, on 5439 6366 for details.

FAMILY EXERCISE PROGRAM Sam, our PE teacher, arranged a weekly fam- ily fitness session before
FAMILY EXERCISE PROGRAM Sam, our PE teacher, arranged a weekly fam- ily fitness session before

FAMILY EXERCISE PROGRAM

Sam, our PE teacher, arranged a weekly fam- ily fitness session before school during the term. The program gave all students and par- ents the opportunity to join together in some light exercise before starting the school day.

ATHLETIC CARNIVAL

Joe (long jump and discus), Will (triple jump), Levi (800m) and Travis (high jump) represented Eppalock Primary in the District Athletic Carnival recently. Congratulations boys we are very proud of your efforts.

All students are currently training very hard for our annual Athletic Carnival with Axedale Primary early next term.

Athletic Carnival with Axedale Primary early next term. Responsible Pet Our Prep, Grade 1, 2 and

Responsible Pet

Our Prep, Grade 1, 2 and 3 students were visited recently by Denise and ‘Rossey”, the dog, as part of the Responsible Pet Education Program. The program aims to education children on being a re- sponsible pet owner as well as provides information and strategies to ensure the child and pet relationship is a happy and safe one.

Grade 3/4/5/6 students along with staff members attended the Victorian Bluelight Youth Camp, Maldon for this year’s school camp. Prior to arriving at Camp, they stopped off at Carman’s Tunnel for a tour. This tunnel was commenced around 1882 by the Great International Quartz Mining Company, as an attempt to drive a tunnel right through Mt Tarrangower, intersecting the rich gold-bearing reefs that had been mined previously from shaft type mines on the mount. The 570m (1870ft) long Tunnel was dry, clean, spa- cious, level and easily accessible. Students found this experience very interesting.

Over the two days at Camp, students were involved in a range of activities including bike riding, mini golf, obstacle course, night walk, and a scavenger hunt through Maldon township.

The return trip was via Castlemaine where students had the opportunity to explore the beauty of the Bo- tanical Gardens.

Eppalock PS Sustainability program

Living Green has been very wet this term, which is appropriate, given we have been looking at water and

healthy waterways.

from their source to the Murray River (and eventually the sea). In particular we have learned that every

single person in a catchment plays a part in it's health.

Children have been involved in learning about the journey of local creeks and rivers

We have tested the water of Axe Creek (it was flow- ing this year!) and found that it was pretty healthy. We compared the Axe Creek macro inver- tebrates (water bugs) to those in a dam and learned lots of cool facts about the bugs and we even partic- ipated in H2Olympics when we learned about how water moves through landscapes.

In addition to our investigations into water we did some gardening and really enjoyed not having to water the garden!

into water we did some gardening and really enjoyed not having to water the garden! axecreeknews@gmail.com

AMAZING BOOK WEEK ACTIVITY DAY ….

Eppalock Primary School celebrated Children’s Book Week with a parade followed by multi-aged group activities. A special thank you to our MARC Library teacher, Sue, for organizing the many fun activities which were all based around The Children’s Book Council of Australia shortlisted books. Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone.

Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com
Sue has the won- derful ability of always bringing the joy of books to everyone. axecreeknews@gmail.com

Axe Creek Community Playgroup

Axe Creek Community Playgroup When Friday Mornings 9am - 11.00am Where Eppalock PS – Old School

When

Friday Mornings

9am - 11.00am

Where

Eppalock PS Old School Building.149 Patons Road Axe Creek

(just a few minutes from Strathfieldsaye)

Come along and join other families for a cuppa and chat whilst your pre-school children enjoy lots of fun activities. Fresh fruit is provided.

enjoy lots of fun activities. Fresh fruit is provided. Morning Tea & activities provided. Gold Coin

Morning Tea & activities provided. Gold Coin Donation

For further information please phone (03) 5439 6366 email: eppalock.ps@edumail.vic.gov.au http://www.eppalockps.vic.edu.au

All Welcome

http://www.eppalockps.vic.edu.au All Welcome Advertising Opportunity! Your Advert could be here!

Advertising

Opportunity!

Your Advert could be here!

Contact us via axecreeknews@gmail.com for more details.

Axe Creek Landcare

The Axe Creek Landcare Committee meet at Eppalock Primary School, in the old staffroom on the first Monday of each month at 8.00 pm during daylight saving period or at 7.30 pm for the rest of the year.

We have two or three public meetings during the year, generally with a guest speaker. Topics in the past have included weeds, pest animals, sustainable soils, gardening, ani- mal husbandry, grasses. We also hold field days, working bees and excursions.

Members of the community are always welcome to attend any meeting!

Keep a watch out for turtles

Spring is here and love is in the air so it’s that time of the year when turtles are on the move.

The increased warmth and recent rains have encouraged the frisky amphibians to travel to seek out other turtles with ro- mance in mind.

Unfortunately, their journey often includes crossing busy roads and when they feel threatened, perhaps by a car passing close by, their defensive reaction is to pull in their heads and legs and wait for the threat to go away.

Now while this may be fine in the bush, when they do it on the road, they change from being turtles to being sitting ducks with an increased likelihood that they will be run over by the next passing vehicle.

Only last week I rescued three trying to cross Sedgwick Road.

So, please keep your eye out for them. If you are driving, try to avoid running over them.

If you spot one, please give it a helping hand if possible by carefully picking it up by the side edge of its carapace and gently moving it off the road, preferably in the direction it was travelling.

off the road, preferably in the direction it was travelling. It might wee – so be

It might wee – so be careful and hold it at arm’s length!

Poo Pile! Need manure for your garden? Bags available from out the front of 125
Poo Pile!
Need manure for your garden? Bags available from out the front of
125 Axe Creek Rd at $2.00 each or phone
54393144 for a trailer load at $10-$15.00 per load.
All proceeds to Riding for the Disabled Association.
load at $10-$15.00 per load. All proceeds to Riding for the Disabled Association. axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52

Is Landcare For You?

I am a reluctant secretary of the Axe Creek Landcare Group. Well, partly reluctant anyway. I’ve got lots of other things to do and time is short. I bet I share that with you/ I’m not alone in that.

Yet Landcare is one of the Good Things in my life. And, it seems, in the lives of the other members.

If you have an interest in the environment, a wish to grow plants or animals on your property and enjoy sharing your interest with others, please think about joining the Axe Creek Landcare Group. I know It’s hard to find the time, but most of us who are members are short of time too, so we tailor our activities accordingly.

What do I like about Landcare? For one thing, Landcare members seem to be a particularly nice sam- ple of the general population a friendly bunch. Some of them know useful things about the environ- ment which they are (of course) willing to share. We are losing one of our most knowledgeable mem- bers because he is moving interstate, so it would be good to get some new members who know a lot about managing small holdings and the environment. People who don’t know much are good too because they ask useful questions!

Like most landowners, we’d rather leave our blocks of land in a better rather than worse condition. Landcare helps by providing access to information and ideas from the North Central Catchment Man- agement Authority and from occasional speakers/visiting Experts as well as from friends.

Through the Landcare group, grants are available, too, for local projects both on public and private land. It’s very satisfying seeing birds and sugar gliders using nest boxes we’ve put up, seeing native plants or pasture grass replacing gorse or spiny rush infestation and seeing flowering understory in place of cape weed. (Though I have to say there is still an awful lot of cape weed!)

At the Axe Creek Landcare group, we are very democratic. Everyone is encouraged to put forward their ideas for activities. We would love to welcome more members for their new ideas.

The committee meets each month and organises activities on an irregular basis. We invite you to come to a committee meeting as an easy way to see what goes on.

STRATHFIELDSAYE DISTRICT COMMUNITY CARNIVAL Sunday 9th October 10

There will be a Landcare stall. Look out for it and come and talk to us!

Spring In The Bush

Look out for it and come and talk to us! Spring In The Bush Now that

Now that Spring has arrived it’s time to go for walks in the forest. After all the rain we’ve had, the wild-flowers are promising a fine showing.

By the time you read this there should be masses of chocolate lilies (not edible but they smell delicious). The plebeian little Early Nancies are in profusion in spots. Buttercups look very English, but they are, in fact, Australian natives.

We’ve seen some orchids already and there will be lots more.

seen some orchids already and there will be lots more. While the local hardenbergias are much

While the local hardenbergias are much more modest in their growth habits than the rampant cultivar ‘Happy Wanderer’ they are there to be seen.

The list of what flowers we have in our local forests would be a long one. Better than reading lists is to go out and see what you can find!

Axe Creek Cricket Club

Axe Creek Cricket Club are preparing for the new cricket season and training starts in September at the Longlea Recreation Reserve. We are still looking for new or former players to join our ranks.

This year we will finally have a watered oval thanks to collaboration and hard work by volunteers from the Cricket club and Longlea Landcare.

Our new clubrooms are a fantastic place to relax after a game. We have many family friendly social events planned for the season and everyone is welcome.

For more information, please contact James O’Bryen on 0408 405 640 or Rob Fisher on 0430 300 405.

please contact James O’Bryen on 0408 405 640 or Rob Fisher on 0430 300 405. axecreeknews@gmail.com

Church News

Ah Spring… just the word brings a smile to my wife’s face. It’s a sensational time of year, in that Spring truly does trigger all five senses. The vivid bursts of colour, the sounds of birds (and bees!), the smell of new blos- soms, the touch of the warm sun on the back, and the taste of home grown fruit and vegetables.

There is an order to Crea- tion that is both wonderful- ly simple, and mind- blowingly complex. Days, months and seasons swing around, as do droughts and floods, fires and re- growth, life and death. There is an interdepend- ence within Creation, as we live under the power of the climate and on the power of the earth. We can work the soil, plant and grow for sustenance, and tend animals for materials, food and friend.

sustenance, and tend animals for materials, food and friend. As the first flush of dawn emerges

As the first flush of dawn emerges earlier according to our clocks, and the days stretch out longer, and the warm sun draws us out to do more during the day, remember to lift up your eyes to the Creator who has made all of it possible. The One who brings the spectacular out of the sunrise and sunset is the One who sends the rain. We may get too little, or too much, according to our own needs! But the One who provides is the One who knows your mind, your heart, your soul.

He knows when your soul is in winter, when all seems dark and cold. He knows when you are running hot, when everything is going so well and you don’t know where it is taking you. He knows your hunger, both the hunger of your stomach and the hunger of your heart.

He knows your need for purpose and meaning, that there has got to be a point for all this. He’s not a dis- tant deity that neither cares nor watches. This is God who cares intimately for each creature that He brought to be, and sustains them, and who is grieved at the cost of the Fall of Creation.

That’s why Jesus entered into this world, because God recognised the problem of suffering, and wanted to bring it to an end. He did all that was required through His own suffering, death and resurrection.

Sometimes Spring doesn’t feel like even arrives, like we get days of 12 degrees one week, then 32 degrees the next. We gasp at the change and slowly make the adjustment. Jesus’ first coming changed everything about the way we know God, and His second coming will change the nature of Creation forever.

So I pray that you will enjoy this season of Spring, and may you remember the One who brings it around in the good years, and the hard ones. May it be a fond memory through the heat of the Summer to come.

Your local Rev,

Steve Weickhardt.

of the Summer to come. Your local Rev, Steve Weickhardt. The Strathfieldsaye Community Church has a

The Strathfieldsaye Community Church has a hall available for hire for small to medium size groups with heating, kitchen facilities and toilets all under the same roof, and plenty of parking. Contact details are on the sign on the front of our Church at 920 Wellington Street, Strathfieldsaye. Please note that no alcohol is permitted.

Community News

email us at axecreeknews@gmail.com
email us at axecreeknews@gmail.com
Community Gamelan group Mugi Rahayu is your local gamelan (Javanese music and dance) group. We

Community Gamelan group

Mugi Rahayu is your local gamelan (Javanese music and dance) group. We are from Eppalock and we practice weekly and perform at various cultural events and fund- raisers around the district. No experience required and its free.

New members Welcome Practice every Saturday 2:00 pm at 101 Carneys Rd, Eppalock.

Contact Nita or Aaron

every Saturday 2:00 pm at 101 Carneys Rd, Eppalock. Contact Nita or Aaron phone: 54392678 email:

phone: 54392678 email: aaronita94@gmail.com

Kids Corner

Easy jam drops

These jam drops are delicious and a great activity for the kids as well. You can make a whole biscuit barrel-full but I doubt they will last long. Choose your favourite jam!

makes: 30 | prep: 0:15 | cook 0:15

Ingredients.

6 tbs butter

1/2 cup sugar

1 egg

1/2 tsp vanilla essence

1 3/4 cups self raising flour, sifted

1 pinch of salt

1/2 cup raspberry jam

Method.

 1 pinch of salt  1/2 cup raspberry jam Method.  Preheat oven to 180°C



Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Cover 2 baking sheets with baking paper and set



aside. Cream the butter and sugar together until pale. Add egg and vanilla and beat well.



Add flour and salt and mix well.



Roll teaspoonful-sized balls of batter and place on the baking tray 2 fingers apart. Using the end



of a wooden spoon make a well in the centre of each ball. Fill each indentation with a quarter of a teaspoon of jam. Bake for 10-15 mins.

Happy Halloween Colour In.

Via coolmompicks.com

of jam. Bake for 10-15 mins. Happy Halloween Colour In. Via coolmompicks.com axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 18
of jam. Bake for 10-15 mins. Happy Halloween Colour In. Via coolmompicks.com axecreeknews@gmail.com Issue 52 18