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Table of Contents
LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES.................................................................3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................4
PURPOSE OF STUDY..................................................................................................... 4
METHODS.................................................................................................................. 4
FINDINGS................................................................................................................... 5
INTRODUCTION......................................................................................6
SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS...........................................................................7
BACKGROUND............................................................................................................. 7
History/Mission.................................................................................................... 7
Current Status..................................................................................................... 7
The Issue............................................................................................................. 8
Strengths/Weaknesses........................................................................................ 8
Future Plans........................................................................................................ 9
Competing Associations...................................................................................... 9
TARGET PUBLICS....................................................................................................... 12
Demographics................................................................................................... 13
Psychographics................................................................................................. 13
Sociographics.................................................................................................... 14
Behaviors.......................................................................................................... 14
Communication Behaviors................................................................................. 14
EVIDENCE/RATIONALE................................................................................................. 14
ISSUE/OPPORTUNITY................................................................................................... 15
SUMMARY................................................................................................................. 19
SAMPLE & SAMPLING METHOD..............................................................20
QUALITATIVE METHOD................................................................................................ 20
QUANTITATIVE METHOD.............................................................................................. 20
RESEARCH GOALS...................................................................................................... 23
RESEARCH OBJECTIVES............................................................................................... 23
RESEARCH QUESTIONS............................................................................................... 23
RESEARCH HYPOTHESES.............................................................................................. 24
QUALITATIVE METHOD USED........................................................................................ 25
QUANTITATIVE METHOD USED...................................................................................... 25
QUALITATIVE FINDINGS.........................................................................26
MEMBERSHIP............................................................................................................ 26
ORGANIZATION MEMBERSHIP........................................................................................ 26
COMMUNICATION RECEIVED......................................................................................... 26
CONVENTIONS........................................................................................................... 27
EMAILS.................................................................................................................... 27
PERSUASIVE MESSAGES.............................................................................................. 28
WEBSITE ................................................................................................................. 31
QUANTITATIVE FINDINGS.......................................................................31
DEMOGRAPHICS......................................................................................................... 31
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ORGANIZATION MEMBERSHIP....................................................................................... 32
COMMUNICATION RECEIVED......................................................................................... 32
PERSUASIVE MESSAGES.............................................................................................. 34
WEBSITE.................................................................................................................. 37
IMPLICATIONS OF THE RESULTS.............................................................39
PROPOSED PUBLIC RELATIONS PLAN.....................................................40
GOALS..................................................................................................................... 40
OBJECTIVES.............................................................................................................. 40
STRATEGIES AND TACTICS........................................................................................... 40
Increase Brand Management and Operations...................................................41
Build Brand Exposure........................................................................................ 42
Enhance Brand Content.................................................................................... 46
TIMELINE.................................................................................................................. 48
BUDGET................................................................................................................... 50
EVALUATION PLAN...................................................................................................... 51
CONCLUSION & RECOMMENDATIONS......................................................52
LIMITATIONS.............................................................................................................. 55
REFERENCES........................................................................................56
APPENDICES.........................................................................................57
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List of Tables and Figures


Image 1: Homepage of PNAJE Website..
...10,38
Image 2: Homepage for CMA Website.
..11
Image 3:. JEA website homepage. .....
17
Image 4: AEJMC newsletter..
17
Image 5: Example email subject
line..28
Image 6: Example email subject
line..28
Image 7: Example email subject
line..28
Image 8: Example of potential newsletter
template45
Image 9: Screen shot of potential updated website
homepage..47
Image 10: Screen shot of potential updated Facebook group
page.47

Graphic 1: Example persuasive graphic used for brand


messaging..30,35
Graphic 2: Example persuasive graphic used for brand messaging
.30,36
Graphic 3: Example persuasive graphic used for brand messaging
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Table 1: Professional Title vs How Many Organizations They Belong


To..33
Table 2: Proposed
Budget
..51

Figure 1: Survey Responses by


State
21
Figure 2: Survey Responses by College or
University22
4

Figure 3: Newsletter Data .


33
Figure 4: Average Ratings of Graphic
135
Figure 5: Average Ratings of Graphic
2...36
5

Executive Summary

Purpose of Study. The Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators

has noticed a significant decline in attendance at their annual conference, a

decline in membership and ineffective retention of members. In order to

determine problems and find solutions, PNAJE has asked 247 PR, a

Washington State University public relations campaign class, to develop a

public relations plan to help their problem. In this report, collegiate

professors and graduate students from the Pacific Northwest were asked

about their experiences with professional associations and conferences, as

well as their preferences of content.

Methods. To answer the research questions, qualitative and quantitative

research methods were completed:

For the qualitative research method, eight Washington State University

professors were interviewed by members of 247 PR during the week of

October 3rd, 2016. Dates and times were based on each professors

availability during that week. Each interview was conducted in each

professors office on the Pullman campus of Washington University with at

most two members from the agency present. Interviews lasted between 15

to 60 minutes, depending on how much time each professor had to

participate and their length of responses. Out of the 19 WSU professors that

were contacted, 8 were available to be interviewed.


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For the qualitative research method, a 23 question survey was

distributed to assistant, adjunct, associate, and full professors within

journalism, communications or media departments at the collegiate level in

Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Washington. The survey was designed to take

no longer than 10 to 15 minutes. The survey addressed website design,

persuasive messaging, and behavioral questions regarding association

membership, conference incentives and restrictions.

Findings. After an analysis of the research data, a noticeable trend

discovered regarded the main incentive for professors to attend conferences.

This is the opportunity to present research to their peers and colleagues.

Professors feel that if they were to collaborate, participate or learn more

about industry research at a conference it would be worth the time and cost.

Another significant finding was that some form of quarterly newsletter

would be preferred and invited by professors if they were to join an

association. Respondents reported that they would want to see calls for

papers, conference updates, organizational news and job postings in the

newsletter.

Similarly, respondents also use communication channels such as

Facebook, email or a website updates to find information about an

organization. These channels are most frequently used by professors, making

them the best way to communicate with potential new members for PNAJE.
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Regarding content and graphics, respondents reported feeling

uninterested when looking at the current website landing page for PNAJE. To

encourage new potential members to click around on their website it was

suggested to add visuals, informational text, more links and tabs, as well as

the addition of a supplemental accent color to give the website more life.

Lastly, when asked about content that could be used to encourage new

members to join PNAJE. The data concluded that the use of professional text

and meaningful graphics were preferred. Although some did like the

simplicity of one of the messages, the majority of the data did not reflect

this.

Introduction

When looking at the Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism

Educators we, 247 PR, see an organization that exists to help educate and

mentor current and new journalism educators and media advisors. However,

since its founding in 1970, PNAJE has experienced a major loss in

membership and retention. PNAJE saw their annual conference attendance

start at upwards of 60 people and drop, over recent years, to around 10-15

attendees. Our client, clinical professor at Murrow College and current board

member for PNAJE Roberta Kelly, informed us that they witnessed this drop in

membership as the Internet and digital age was introduced to the journalism

profession. As school newspapers and print journalism began to decrease, so


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did the involvement in PNAJE. We just do not know if we are needed

anymore, said Kelly, everything people need, they can find on the

internet. The they she is referring to is new and current journalism

educators. Having this problem clearly stated, our firm 247 PR wants to help

push PNAJE to become more involved in their brand management, content,

and engagement, which we hope will increase membership and retention of

members. As it stands, the association has virtually no updated

communication channels. Their website reflects officers from 2013-2014,

their Twitter shows one tweet from 2011, and their Facebook does not reflect

the current culture of their organization. Moving forward with PNAJE, we want

to gain awareness for their association and help them engage with their

current members. This will mean introducing them to the benefits of carefully

organized brand management and brand engagement techniques.

Throughout this analysis, we will show how retaining an upkeep of their

communication channels is vital for success and longevity.

Situational Analysis

Background

History/Mission. The Pacific Northwest Association for Journalism Educators

was founded in 1970 with a focus on teaching, educating and connecting

individuals with resources and information within the realm of journalism.

The association is made up of several individuals who are either journalism

instructors or media advisors at 4-year universities or community colleges.


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Members are from Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Alaska and

meet annually for a conference each fall where members can socialize with

others who understand the area of journalism education. Within their annual

conference, PNAJE organizes workshops and panel discussions to improve

their teaching skills. The members of PNAJE learn from publishers, editors,

journalism scholars, government officials and citizen groups about new

challenges facing journalism and those who teach future journalists.

Current Status. Although PNAJE has a focus on teaching and educating, they

are also involved in networking, research and connecting students with jobs

and other resources to be successful within journalism. The association has

several officers including a President, Vice President, Secretary and a

Treasurer, each of whom is elected by the Board of Directors each year.

According to Kelly, there were nine members in attendance at last years

conference, and this years conference is expecting around 20-30 people.

Kelly also mentioned that people do not have to be a member to attend the

conference. The 2016 conference will be held at Pierce College where a

roundtable discussion will be held regarding new teaching tips, as well as a

non-verbal workshop involving body language. The main event that Kelly

expressed a lot of excitement about is a drone demonstration.

The Issue. The largest issue PNAJE is currently facing is membership and

retention of members. Kelly says that PNAJE had higher membership before

computers became a standard norm. People no longer feel the need to meet
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face-to-face and can search the internet for resources they need. Since the

association is comprised of individuals throughout several very large states,

travel and funding for conferences and meetings can be difficult. PNAJE

wants to show potential members the relevance, practicality and benefits of

their organization to help educators be successful.

Strengths/Weaknesses. Weaknesses of PNAJE include their communication

and online presence. At this current time PNAJE has a website through

WordPress, Facebook and a Google Plus account that they use to update

members and followers about what is happening. Most of this information is

not updated so it doesnt provide accurate dates, times, officer positions, or

useful information. This doesnt provide any information for new potential

members to reach out to PNAJE.

Strengths of the organization include what lies within the mission and

values held by each member. Kelly says that every member values

education, teaching journalism well and giving students new connection

whether it is a job or new resources.

Future Plans. Future plans for PNAJE align with their current goals and

weakness, which are membership and retention. In order for PNAJE to

continue their organization, they must create a larger scale group to meet
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the goals of their mission. Kelly says their potential member has 10-15 years

left of teaching, attains professional skills and is passionate about journalism.

Competing Associations. When speaking with Kelly, she mentioned that the

College Media Association was an organization that PNAJE followed after.

However, CMA is a national organization opposed to regional. When looking

further into what the College Media Association had to offer, we found them

to be quite more extensive than PNAJE. Looking at CMAs website, there is

more inviting activity. There are photographs, a live Twitter feed, and an

attention grabbing call to action point. Here it says, Join Us, as to invite

website visitors to join the association. In the top bar of the website, each

tab has a long drop down menu. (Fig. 2) Everything a visitor of the website

wants to know can be easily found.


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Image 1: Homepage of PNAJE Website


Taken from pnaje.org
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Image 2: Homepage for CMA Website.


Taken from collegemedia.org

Besides the difference in the visual designs, there are a couple

distinguishing factors about how the associations are ran. Compared to

PNAJE, CMA serves both advisors and students. Whereas, PNAJE excludes

students, undergraduate and graduate. CMA also houses more than 700

members. On their about page, they state, CMA members maintain strong

lines of communication through print and electronic media. CMAs website

and social media outlets inform members and collegiate media staffs of

trends and news,(CMA, 2016). CMA also has a clearly stated mission

statement that is well-defined and precise. Whereas PNAJE is still struggling


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to find a solid mission statement that is refined and short in length. On CMAs

board of directors, they have duties split between six members. All of the

responsibilities do not fall upon one member. Along with their two national

conferences, one during spring and one during the fall, CMA also holds

workshops throughout the nation throughout the year.

Target Publics. We discussed with Kelly who the ideal member for PNAJE

would be, and those fitting that description will be the target public we focus

our research on. Based on the interview, we are interested in college

professors of various levels in journalism departments with 10-15 years of

teaching experience and professional skills (Personal Interview, 2016). We

want to target individuals who share the values and interests of current

members as well as PNAJE. Based off of their website, PNAJE encourages

public discussions of issues related to freedom of the press and open

government and panel discussions to improve our teaching skills (About

PNAJE), indicating that our target public should also value those things.

PNAJEs Google+ page contains journalism news content, so we can assume

that is an interest of current members. Since PNAJE is a close-knit group with

a networking convention, the individuals in our target public should enjoy

discussion and networking with others. At the annual PNAJE conference,

members talk Friday nights at social sessions, Saturday at organized

sessions and discuss business on Sundays at breakfast meetings,(Personal


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Interview, 2016), so new members should be enthusiastic and willing to

participate in normal organization functions. These professors are most likely

already published, so they should enjoy reading other professional works and

writing their own concepts and theories. These individuals should be looking

to join an educator or journalism group, and could be apart of another group

already.

After looking into the benefits of membership for Association for

Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and the Journalism

Educators Association, our members should want to join for similar

incentives. PNAJE, AEJMC and JAE all offer networking and an annual

conference as benefits to becoming a member, however AEJMC and JAE have

a full list of more benefits, such as free subscriptions to their publications

and job listings (AEJMC, 2016), awards (JEA Benefits, 2016), and more that

could contribute to their extensive development. Discussing more incentives

for potential new members, such as potential awards or recognition, could

help to bring more attention to PNAJE from the individuals we want to join.

The following info is PNAJEs current target market:

Demographics

o Washington, Idaho, Montana and Oregon

o Distinguished, Endowed or University Professors


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o Full professor (the destination of the tenure track, upon

exhausting all normally-expected promotions)

o Associate Professor (mid-level, usually tenured)

o Lecturers and Instructors (usually non-tenure-track positions)

o Adjunct Professor (often part-time)

o Other (Clinical Professor, Professor of Practice, Research

Professor)

Psychographics

o Values

Culture

Collaboration

Education

Objectivity

o Beliefs

Believes in the importance of education, open government,

free speech, and objectivity.


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o Lifestyle

Teaches, lectures, conducts research

Stays up to date with current events and journalistic news

Enjoys discussion and teaching others

Sociographics

o Professional Skills

o 10-15 years of teaching experience

Behaviors

o Writing articles or their own books

o Reading publications from other journalism professionals

Communication Behaviors

o Actively participates in discussion and responds/interacts via

Email, direct mail and phone calls

Evidence/Rationale. Our main goal is to increase membership for PNAJE and

to attain higher membership retention. During our interview with Kelly and

from our research of PNAJE, it was clear to us that in order to achieve the

collective goal, first we need to develop stronger communication and


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management for PNAJE. Kelly made it very clear that focusing on increasing

members was the group's main focus.

We were able to ask her opinion on introducing a stronger online

presence. She agreed, however, she expressed concern about a member

having the time or willingness to put in the effort. Since they have such few

members and are lacking constant communication within the group, the

president of the organization holds 90% of the responsibilities. After

researching into PNAJE online, we found a simple website, a Facebook group,

and a Google+ account. The status of these platforms reflects a lack of

importance. When assessing these platforms, we also compared them to

competing groups. When looking at the format of The College Media

Association and Association for Education in Journalism and Mass

Communications home pages on their websites, we found distinctive

differences. (Refer back to Fig.1&2) At first glance, not only did the home

pages seem more inviting, immediately a visitor would know where to find

the information they needed to know. Looking more closely, you can see that

CMA and AEJMC both have a call to social media. In their websites there are

links to Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Email, Pinterest, and YouTube. Looking

at PNAJEs homepage, we see none. In fact, PNAJE does not have half of

these networking platforms.

After our meeting with Kelly, it is clear to us that in the end, the overall

goal is to increase membership. With the evidence that we have gathered


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through our interview with Kelly and researching the organization and its

competitors, it is clear that in order to achieve our goal we must first build

effective communication channels for its members and create a

management strategy to ensure constant communication is achieved.

Issue/Opportunity. The main problem that PNAJE faces is a lack of members

in their association. This is due to poor brand content and management, not

only affecting the attraction of new members, but also retaining members

long term. In the early years of the organization, you see upwards of 60

members, but last year there were as few as nine. PNAJE exists as an outlet

for educators and advisors to come together and discuss valuable

information and resources they have learned during their time as educators.

More recently PNAJE has seen a decline in membership and retention due to

their lack of brand content and management. There are several factors that

contribute to the poor management of PNAJE and their communication

outlets. They have a very outdated website, weak communication and social

media outlets and a lack of awareness of the organization for potential new

members.

If you look at similar associations that focus on journalism education,

you can observe a strong online presence, current newsletters and appealing

content that drives engagement within members. In the examples below you

can see The Journalism Education Association has a very interactive website

highlighting their association, upcoming events, and latest news right on


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their homepage. Another example comes from the Association for Education

in Journalism and Mass Communication. AEJMC has a newsletter published

five times a year and it contains news of AEJMC and other relevant content

concerning members.

Image 3:. Screen shot of JEA website homepage.


Taken from jea.org/
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Image 4: Screenshot taken of an AEJMC


newsletter.
Taken from aejmc.org/home/publications/aejmcnews/

Why would having a better brand management increase

membership/retention?

1. The most important part of brand management is ongoing

maintenance and control. Proper brand management involves making

sure that each promotional piece, touch point and every usage of your

name, logo and message supports your organization and goals.

(Revenew, 2016)

2. For customers, clear communication can help manage their

expectations about issues or even about how best to interact with the

organization. (Chron, 2016)


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3. Online reputation is where many companies have the most impact

from customers. (Green Geek, 2016)

4. Social profiles can also play a role in exposure on sites such as

Google. These profiles are appearing in search results when consumers

are looking for brands or products. Developing a social presence may

serve to improve your placement in these results as content is crawled

by the search engines. (Green Geek, 2016)

These statements indicate the importance of an organizations online

presence, communication outlets and overall importance in marketing a

brand. For PNAJE to be successful in gaining new members and retaining

them, they must update their website and social media, add more

communication outlets like quarterly newsletters and create stronger brand

content that is engaging to members. In order to take these first steps, we

suggest PNAJE create a communication officer to help manage their

communication channels and brand management.

Summary. In dealing with a membership and membership retention issue,

we have indicated that an organizations communication outlets,

management and engagement are important when marketing a brand. When

looking at ways we can make that possible, we run into many issues

regarding who would take on that responsibility and whether any of their

current members have to the time to take on that responsibility. During our
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one-on-one time with Kelly we felt as though she knew what needed to be

done, but did not know how to achieve it.

Moving forward with our data collection and research, we are going to

focus on what makes educators and advisors join associations and society

groups. No matter the academic field, each educator identifies with at least

one association. There is an aspect about that association that benefits its

members enough to make them return year after year. After we discover

what excites members about their associations, we can then evaluate what

PNAJE does that is similar and what they could do that would help.

Another area of research that we will need to explore is the leadership

of existing associations. Looking into the PNAJE structure, Kelly mentioned

that the president holds 90% of the duties and responsibilities. We want to

find out what makes members willing to hold a position within their

association. How do other educators make time for their association

positions?

Lastly, in our research we will learn what type of content and

communication is effective to members seeking new professional and

educational groups. When looking at the communication PNAJE gives its

current members we see a lack of consistency. Do members like to receive

content from their organizations frequently or only once a year?

In closing, PNAJE has a problem with a comprehensible solution.

However, this solution will need to take effort and time from the

organizations leadership. With the effort of existing members, we see PNAJE


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regaining their members and keeping them long-term. At this point, we do

not see a reason for PNAJE to disband.

Sample & Sampling Method

Qualitative Method. Professors at Washington State University were

interviewed by each member of our agency. We contacted 19 professors

within the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, but because we had

a week to conduct these interviews we met with a total of 8 professors due

to availability constraints. A total of 4 men and 4 women between the ages

30-65.

Our agency chose to reach out to assistant, adjunct, associate, and full

professors at the university because many of them work closely with

journalism educators. Because journalism is a department within the

communication college, we broadened our interviews to the other

departments such as Strategic Communications, Media Production and

Communication and Society. One male professor interviewed is from the

Carson College of Business in the Marketing department.

Quantitative Method. 74 professors in the Pacific Northwest were contacted

to participate in a 23 question survey. The survey was distributed to

assistant, adjunct, associate, and full professors within journalism,

communications or media departments at the collegiate level in Idaho,

Oregon, Montana and Washington. The survey was distributed to males and
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females between the ages 25-65. This sample was chosen because these

individuals are the most likely to have an interest in joining PNAJE due to the

research we conducted for their target public.

Figure 1: Survey Responses by State


This graph shows the percentage of respondents to the survey based on their
geographical location.

The colleges and universities that were contacted by our agency included:

University of Montana, Montana State University Billings, Carroll College,

Flathead Valley Community College, Rocky Mountain College, Miles

Community College, Little Big Horn College, University of Idaho, Boise State

University, Idaho State University, North Idaho College, College of Southern

Idaho, College of Idaho, College of Western Idaho, Lewis-Clark State College,


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Northwest Nazarene University. Universities and colleges from Washington

and Oregon were contacted by another agency. Their data was also included

in our research.

Responses per College or University

Column1

Figure 2: Survey Responses by University or College


This graph shows the school each of the respondents for the survey teach or
work.

1. Total Sample Size: 74


2. Valid Sample Size: 74
3. Response Rate: 34
4. Refusal Rate: 40
5. Noncontract Rate: 40
6. Completion Rate: 34

Research Goals.

Determine what messaging methods, content and vehicles are best

suited to reach our target public.


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Reveal a better sense of how to communicate with PNAJEs desired

publics.
Obtain a greater understanding of the incentives and restraints to

joining an organization and attending their conferences from our

publics point of view.


Determine which characteristics of persuasive messages are best

received by our target public.

Research Objectives. To achieve our goals, our agency conducted in-depth

interviews and distributed a survey asking participants about their

experience with professional academic organizations and their attitudes

towards messaging and content, as well as their behaviors regarding social

media, participation and attendance to conferences, and their incentives and

constraints for joining associations and attending their annual conferences.

In-depth interviews were conducted from October 3rd-October 7th and the

survey was open from October 17th-October 31st. The best way for us to

understand the target public is to directly ask its members so we can better

predict the behaviors and preferences of the entire public.

Research Questions.

How do professors prefer to be communicated with and how often?


What are incentives for professors to attend annual conferences?
What are constraints that prevent professors from attending annual

conferences?
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What characteristics of a persuasive message are engaging and

aesthetically pleasing for a professor?


What aspects of a professional website deter professionals from

interacting with it?


What social media platforms and communication channels do

professors use the most?

Research Hypotheses.

If we ask participants how they would like to be contacted by an

organization and how often, they will prefer e-mails twice a month

because E-mails are convenient and because of the high amount of e-

mails professors already receive.


If we show a sample population the website, they will react negatively

because as a group we believe the homepage is underdeveloped and

outdated.
If we show participants persuasive messages they will most likely

choose a message with colorful graphics because it will catch their

attention.
If we ask participants what social media platforms they use the most,

Facebook will be the most popular answer because it has been active

the longest and is often utilized by adults and older generations.


If participants are asked what incentives would prompt them to attend

a conference, they will say research and presenting opportunities

because those are often aspects of conferences held by national

organizations.
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If participants are asked what constraints would prevent them from

attending a conference, they will say time and place because many

professors arent able to travel during the academic year.

Qualitative Method Used. Eight Washington State University professors

were interviewed by members of our agency during the week of October 3rd,

2016. Dates and times were based on each professors availability during

that week. Each interview was conducted in each professors office on the

Pullman campus of Washington University with at most two members from

our agency present. Interviews lasted between 15 to 60 minutes, depending

on how much time each professor had to participate and their length of

responses. We reached out to 19 WSU professors and were able to interview

8 of them.

Participants were asked 28 predetermined questions regarding PNAJE

and their previous experience with professional organizations. Each member

brought a laptop to show 3 different example e-mail subject lines, 3 different

example persuasive messaging graphics, and the current website landing

page of PNAJE. Participants were asked which subject line and persuasive

message they preferred the most and why, as well as their opinions on the

other examples and the website.

Quantitative Method Used. A 23 question survey was distributed to

assistant, adjunct, associate, and full professors within journalism,


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communications or media departments at the collegiate level in Idaho,

Oregon, Montana and Washington. The survey was designed to take no

longer than 10 minutes. The survey addressed website design, persuasive

messaging, and behavioral questions regarding association membership,

conference incentives and restrictions.

Participants were asked their sentiments towards each graphic, e-mail

subject line, and the website homepage which was shown in our in-depth

interviews. The content of the survey closely mirrors the questions asked in

the in-depth interviews. Participants were asked to provide demographic

information such as age, gender, level of professorship, state, and place of

employment.

Qualitative Findings

Membership. Of the professors interviewed each are a part of at least one

national organization. No participants were a part of any type of organization

that was regional. Only one respondent was more than just a member of

their organization. This respondent is the regional advisor for PRSSA.

Organization membership. When asking why these interviewees are a part

of professional organizations a majority responded that research

collaboration and presentation at conferences is an incentive to join. Another

popular incentive we found was the opportunity to enhance their professional


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career, whether this is through networking, credibility or just making

connections with educators from all over.

Communication Received. When asked questions regarding preferred

communication channels all participants constantly reported receiving emails

from their organizations. The information that the respondents like to see in

these emails is about upcoming events, job listings, class materials and

relevant news.

Email is nice because it looks a little more official and easier

to get back to it since its in your inbox.

Another communication channel that participants use to receive

information from their organization is Facebook. Some participants did report

they did not have a Facebook but they would get information through friends

that they saw online. A surprising outlying response was about hard copy

newsletters received in the mail. Two of the participants said they receive

monthly newsletters in the mail and it catches their attention.

And I actually kind of like this because, you know, while Im

eating lunch or something I can kind of (flips through) and

with this Im actually more likely to parooze through this than

email because I dont want my inbox cluttered.

Conventions. During the informal interviews participants were asked what

would draw them to attending conferences. Corresponding with the answers


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on why people join professional organizations, most participants said

research and research collaboration are the main reasons why they attend

conferences. Another main pull to attend conferences is the available

workshops and the keynote speaker. Academics seem to attend conferences

for their own professional benefits as curriculum enhancement and the

ability to serve on a panel were also reported in the top reasons to attend a

conference.

Emails. Since email is the main form of communication that our interviewees

receive, we wanted to ask them what kinds of email subject lines they would

click on for more information. They all really enjoyed one email (see Image 7)

which the subject line read The past, the present, and the future walk into a

bar it was tense.

The first one is kind of cute. Yeah thats like a teaser, kind of fun!

We previewed two other email subject lines (see Image 5 & 6) which

did not necessarily have negative reviews but not as many positive reviews

as the first (see Image 7). Although many did like the catchy phrasing of the

first email, it was reported that they may only open that if they had time.

The participants stated that they would probably prefer emails with more

information.
33

Image 5: Example Email Subject Line

Image 6: Example Email Subject Line

Image 7: Example Email Subject Line

Persuasive Messages. To find input on what types of persuasive messages

work for an older academic demographic we showed three graphics and

received positive reactions on two of them. When asking about reactions to

Graphic 1 (see Graphic 1) there was some positivity about the simplicity. One

participant suggested changing work with to collaborate with. They also

suggested removing the exclamation point and moving towards more

professional wording.

Yeah and would you click on the link if it said especially if it's

to collaborate because then to me that looks like if I'm going

to spend more time doing something I want to somehow at

least be beneficial to my bottom line.

Graphic 2 (see Graphic 2) also received positive reactions. Participants

liked the graphic because of the typewriter in the image that paid homage to

old school journalism. Participants thought the message of Never stop


34

learning was strong. The only negative responses were regarding the

opacity of the image and the lack of contrast with the text.

There was a good amount of negative feedback regarding Graphic 3

(see Graphic 3). Participants thought the image was too busy and the word

talent was leading. Because of this negative feedback, when moving

forward with our formal data collection we took this option out.

Yeah I dont like it. Talent, you know whats talent. I find it

kind of too wide and none of the text really jumps out at me. It

just looks really complicated and busy.

I would find the word talent like slightly intimidating. I think it

makes it sound like theyre asking for a lot.

I dont know if you say looking for talent if youre sort of

appealing to my ego which I dont really have a big ego so I

would shy away from that because I feel like Im going to be

manipulated a little bit.

For that one Im not sure. If theyre looking for talent or if Im

looking for talent. In other words, if its looking for talent,

question mark, because Im not hiring people, I would

probably ignore that.


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Graphic 1: Example Persuasive Graphic Used for Brand Messaging

Graphic 2: Example Persuasive Message Used for Brand Messaging

Graphic 3: Example Persuasive Graphic Used for Brand Messaging

Website .At the end of the interviews the participants were asked about

their reactions to the current state of PNAJEs website landing page. Many of
36

the participants recorded feeling disinterested and unlikely to click around

when presented with the webpage. There was a common theme of a lack of

informative text and intriguing graphics that were brought up time and time

again.

Its boring, really boring. Theres just not a whole lot there.

Quantitative Findings

Demographics. After analyzing data complied from 30 survey responses

from academics from Washington, Idaho, Oregon and Montana we have

comprised some themes and trends. Of the 30 respondents as of October 30,

2016 75% of the contacted individuals were from Washington, 12.5% from

Idaho and 12.5% from Oregon. No responses from Montana were recorded.

Respondents also reported their professional title: 16.67% were full

professors, 12.5% were associate professors, 16.7% were assistant

professors, 4.2% were adjunct professors, 20.8% were graduate students,

8.3% were undergraduate students and 20.8% of respondents recorded

other as their professional title. The population that was recorded as

undergraduate students were removed from all data collected.

Undergraduate students are not a part of our target market. 58.3% of the

respondents were female, 37.50% of the respondents were male and 4.17%

preferred not to reveal whether they were female or male.


37

Organization Membership. Within the survey we asked a series of

questions regarding what interests people when they are a part of

professional organizations. Of 30 respondents that were asked how many

professional organizations they belonged to, 55.17% said 2, 13.79% said 1,

10.34% said 0, and 20.69% said 3 or more.

Table 1: Professional Title vs How Many Organizations They Belong To


This table displays how many professional organizations people belong to
cross referenced with their professional titles.

Communication Received. After preforming our individual interviews, a

theme appeared regarding which kinds of communications people preferred

to receive from professional organizations. The common response was

emails, but we also received some insight as to why some like hard copy

newsletters. As an agency, we agreed that newsletters (which can be sent as

email or hardcopy) is a way to increase brand awareness and internal

organizational communication. Therefore, we asked how often people prefer

to receive newsletters from the organizations they belong to and a large


38

majority responded quarterly (see Figure 1), the second largest response was

monthly.

Figure 3: Newsletter Data


This graph displays how often the sample population prefers to receive
newsletters from the organizations they belong to

From this we can deter that members of organizations like to hear

from/about their organization consistently. We then asked what people liked

to see when they receive these newsletters. The majority responded they

look for a call for papers, organizational news, job postings, and conference

updates in newsletters. Awards and resume and CV enhancing tips were

reported a lower amount.


39

Persuasive Messages. We decided to test out two different types of

promotional/persuasive messages that could potentially be used when trying

to gain new members for PNAJE (see Graphics 1 & 2). We tested out one

visual that was plain and less graphically mature and one that had more

graphical context to the message. Half of the population who took the survey

were shown one message and the other half were shown the other. After

analyzing the data, we found that more respondents preferred the graphic

with more context over the simpler graphic (Figures 7 and 8). They found

Graphic 2 (see Figure 3) (6.07/7) statistically more convincing that Graphic 1

(see Figure 1) (2.25/7). All respondents were given the opportunity to give

feedback on the images. The biggest complaint with Graphic B was the

illegibility. The contrast between the text and the image is very small making

it hard to read. There was also a debate between whether or not the

typewriter in the image was appropriate. The older respondents and those

with higher ranking professional titles (i.e., full professors vs adjunct

professors) liked the homage to old journalism. However, there were some

associate professors in their mid-50s who believed the image was

inappropriate for new age journalism. They believed there should be new

media graphics. However, those who responded more negatively still gave

high ranking scores when asked their opinions on a Likert scale.

(Regarding Graphic 1)The visuals are very old fashioned. No

journalist or journalism professor uses a typewriter anymore.

Also, having such a large background photo makes the logo


40

very inflexible. Can you imagine fitting this on an envelope?

Logos rarely have a background image. That way, you can

change up the images that are used with the logo. Lastly, the

name of the organization is a bit hard to read on this image

because of the vertical black lines behind the black letters. So

I suggest removing the background photo and making the text

within the diamond bolder and possibly larger. The "Never stop

learning" tagline is good.

Graphic 1: Example Persuasive Graphic Used for Brand Messaging


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Figure 4: Average Ratings of Graphic A


This graph shows the ratings of Graphic A under each category given on a 7
point scale. (Likeable vs Unlikeable, Convincing vs Unconvincing, Memorable
vs Unmemorable, and Weak Visuals vs Strong Visuals

Graphic 2: Example Persuasive Graphic Used for Brand Messaging


42

Figure 5: Average Ratings of Graphic B


This graph shows the average ratings of Graphic B under each
category given on a 7 point scale. (Likeable vs Unlikeable,
Convincing vs Unconvincing, Memorable vs Unmemorable, and Weak
Visuals vs Strong Visuals)
Website. While analyzing our in-depth interviews we found a trend regarding

the current state of PNAJEs website. Due to the feedback, we decided to

include questions regarding PNAJEs website content and aesthetic (see

Image 1) . We found, when asking respondents how they felt about the

trustworthiness, information, likeness, and convincingness of the website

landing page the average of the results concluded at 3.00/5.00. This showed

us that respondents did not feel strongly either way. However, when asked

about the visuals, the average response was about a 2.65/5.00 which means

people reported more times that the website contained weak visuals. When

asked if the survey respondents had any advice on improving the website
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many suggested adding more information, adding visuals, and enhancing the

site in a way that would make people want to look further. More than once

the addition of an accent color was suggested. We also asked what people

liked to see when looking at an organizations website, the top responses

included: conference information, articles, organizational news, and a call for

papers.

Image 1: Screenshot of current website landing page for PNAJE


Taken from PNAJE.org

Needs some pictures and links to various resources.

More information above the fold. The logo overpowers the

information. I have to click through too much. I need

information quicker and in a fuller form.


44

Add some explanation of what the organization is, what it

does, and who it serves. Create a new logo that is not so stark.

Move the details about the conference to the side (or to a

secondary page and replace them with a link to the

conference info) and use most of the space on the home page

to communicate what the organization is all about. This could

take the form of a welcome note from the current president of

the organization, along with his/her photo, or a set of links to

other parts of the site that are enhanced by relevant photos.

Include some reasons why a professor would want to join the

organization. (Once a professor joins, he or she is much more

likely to become interested in attending the conference.)

Implications of the Results

Before we conducted our survey and personal interviews, we originally

had a problem statement that stated: The main problem that PNAJE faces is

the lack of a substantial online presence. This not only affects the attraction

of new members, but also retaining members long term. Our research has

shown us that online presence isnt the main problem PNAJE faces, but an

implication of the lack of members and membership retention. Our new

problem statement now states: The main problem that PNAJE faces is a lack

of members in their association. This is due to poor brand content and

management, not only affecting the attraction of new members, but also
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retaining members long term. The responses from our survey and personal

interviews showed us a broad issue and after an initial analysis of our

research we were able to focus on the implications. In order address the

overall problem of membership and membership retention we have created

a plan that could increase membership, membership retention and brand

exposure. Our findings showed us a realm of opportunity within topics such

as communication outlets, conferences, content, organizational structure and

social media. Our proposed campaign plan describes goals, objectives and

tactics surrounding three topics: increasing brand management and

operations, building brand exposure and enhancing brand content.

Proposed Public Relations Plan

Goals

1. To educate journalism professors in the region about developments

and current events within the industry.

2.To provide innovative research opportunities for journalism educators

so they can enhance their academic achievements and develop their

careers.

3.To empower journalism educators with thought provoking lectures

and industry developments that they can implement in their own

curriculum.

4.To strengthen the collaboration between journalism educators by

developing convenient means of communication.


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Objectives

1.To increase conference attendance and registration by 10 new

members by July 2017.

2.To improve involvement from Idaho and Oregon with at least 3 new

members or newsletter subscriptions from each state.

3.To recruit at least 5 members to submit and present research at the

2017 conference.

4.To drive at least 50 visitors to PNAJEs Facebook page and gain 15

new likes by August 2017.

Strategies and Tactics. In order address the initial and overall problem of

membership and membership retention we have created a plan that could

increase membership, membership retention and brand exposure.

Increase Brand Management and Operations. During our initial interview with

PNAJE board member Kelly, she mentioned that a main reason there is a

disconnect between the organization and its online presence is due to the

overload of responsibility on the president. She also mentioned that no one is

willing to volunteer to help with the position because all members are very

busy.

Our first suggestion would be to delegate responsibilities off of the

President and onto the Vice President and Secretary. This would

alleviate stressors on the President and create a way for content to be

updated for the organization without it being much of a burden.


47

o Secretary: The secretary would be in charge of inputting content

into the quarterly newsletter and sending it to respective

recipients. Because there are companies and websites that can

make this job easy, all the secretary would have to do is create

the written content and provide a mailing list.


o Vice President: The VP would be in charge of keeping up with

website and Facebook content. He or she would make sure all

information on the website is up to date and that important

reminders and content is being shared by the organization on

Facebook. We recommend to check the content on the website

quarterly. We recommend that Facebook be updated more

frequently to let members know the organization is still active

and engaging. We recommend at least one post a month. The

posts can be pre-planned and scheduled using a website like

Hootsuite.com.
Our second suggestion would be to remove Montana from the

organizations target audience. After sending our survey to all

journalism departments in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana,

we saw no responses from Montana schools. We took this as a general

disinterest by the journalism educators in that state. Kelly mentioned

that travel expenses are a main issue for members to attend the

conference. By eliminating Montana from the target reach PNAJE can

focus its efforts on gaining more members from states that are more

likely to engage and travel.


48

Our third suggestion is to move the conference date from October to

August. In our in-depth interviews many respondents mentioned they

attend conferences where the weather is warm and when they have

time. Seeing that October exists as a busy time in the academic

schedule, we see the month before the academic calendar begins for

most colleges and universities as a prime time to hold the annual

conference.
Our fourth suggestion is to keep the conference in the Greater Seattle

area every year. Keeping the location in Seattle would encourage more

members to travel as the area has more to see and do. Seattle in the

summer months is beautiful and there are many places to stay, eat,

and experience. Holding the conference in a popular tourist spot would

attract new people to the conference as they could use it as a small

vacation.

Build Brand Exposure. We see that PNAJE as a brand and organization does

not receive enough exposure. Amidst our formal and informal research when

the name Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators was

mentioned, many said they had never heard of the organization. They also

followed in saying that they should be a part of this organization however

they did not know it existed.

Our first suggestion would be the addition of a quarterly hard copy and

digital newsletter. We found that members like to hear from their


49

organizations regularly. A way to do this would be to send a newsletter

via email and mail in January, April, July, and November. The template

would be simple and the month before the send date the Secretary of

PNAJE will input important organization information and have it sent to

current members as well as potential new members. An email list

would be compiled of all current members and people they think might

be interested. The newsletter would be inserted through

MailChimp.com or any similar newsletter site and sent. The hard copy

newsletter would be almost exactly like the email, but sent to all

Journalism/Communication departments in Washington, Idaho, and

Oregon. The mailing of these letters can be delegated to a company

who will stuff, mark, post, and mail for a small fee.
o January Newsletter: A Happy New Year note. Could include new

information about the year. Encourage existing members to

invite colleagues to register as a member. Release date for the

2017 conference and release early bird registration.


o April Newsletter: Send out registration for 2017 conference.

Include deadlines and a call for papers. Include 2017 location

and keynote speaker for the conference.


o July Newsletter: Release full itinerary for the conference in

August 2017. Including all speakers, events, research, and

networking time. Include places to eat and places to experience

in Seattle while there.


o October Newsletter: Provide a summary of the 2017 conference.

Offer a chance for people to give suggestions for the 2018


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conference. Introduce the new officers and board members in

detail.

Image 8: Example Newsletter Template

Our second suggestion would be to limit communication channels used

to Facebook, email, and WordPress website. We see no reason for

PNAJE to be active on all other social media platforms due to their


51

current target market. We suggest deleting all other accounts to avoid

confusion and remain consistent.


o Facebook: The Facebook group page would be used to share

relevant content from the organization, news about journalism,

media and communication, collaboration on projects, and advice

on research and curriculum. This could be more informal than the

website, however, any posts made by the organization should

still use a professional and genuine tone.


o Email: Email should be used to update current and new members

on what is happening within the organization. This should include

all content regarding the annual conference, content regarding

award submissions, meeting dates, events, and important

internal news.
o WordPress Website: The website should be the most professional

of all outlets. All content published to the website should reflect

current board members and executive council members. The

content should reflect the culture and personality of the

organization. We recommend adding news articles that are

important for the group to the page. We also recommend adding

more visuals to the page to invite people to click around and

seek out more information.

Enhance Brand Content. After our initial analysis of PNAJEs current brand

content that exists on their website and Facebook page, we find there are

some inconsistencies. In order to engage new members and keep existing


52

ones PNAJE should consider enhancing their brand content and reflect

current information.

Our first suggestion would be to select an identity for the group and

make it consistent across all platforms. After our research we found

that people responded more favorable to simple, clean, and genuine

images and content. For PNAJE, we see an opportunity to enhance their

current website. We suggest enhancing the existing green accent color.

We would also add content that includes visuals and graphics.

Image 9: Screenshot of potential new PNAJE website homepage


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Image 10: Screenshot of potential new Facebook group page

Our second suggestion would be to update content to reflect current

information about PNAJE. When accessing the website, the content is

outdated. We recommend editing the website to reflect current

conference information, contact information, organizational

information, and news. We would remove the conference from the

initial homepage and add a section that includes news. This would

reflect the consistency of the organization in showing that certain news

in journalism and media is important. We would include a blog about

what happened at the conference from October 2016. This would

include any interesting key note speakers, awards given, and any

research presented.
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Our third suggestion would be to include research in the annual

conference. After our market research we found that a large majority of

academics in journalism and communication look for conferences

where they can present and collaborate on their research. This

attribution could create a larger attraction to the annual conference.

Among the distribution of information about the conference, we would

include a section calling for papers. People could then email their

research to the President of PNAJE and he or she could then choose

who will be presenting their research at the upcoming conference. This

will be able to give the organization more exposure as well as the

member.

Timeline

January 2017:

Send out newsletter via mail and email.


Post on Facebook at least once.
Update website Content
Release early bird registration for 2017 conference.

February 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

March 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

April 2017

Send out newsletter via mail and email.


Post on Facebook at least once.
Update website content if needed.
55

May 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

June 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

July 2017

Post on Facebook a couple times to remind people about the annual

conference in August.
Send out newsletter via mail and email.
Update website content for the conference.
Registration closes for 2017 Conference.

August 2017

Annual conference in Seattle, WA.


Facebook Posts frequently the day of the conference to update

attendees on events happening.


Update website content in the latter part of the month to reflect newly

elected officers.
Elect new officers.

September 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

October 2017

Send out newsletter via mail and email.


Update website content if needed.
Post on Facebook at least once.

November 2017

Board members meet to decide location and date for 2018 conference

and create new budget.


56

Post on Facebook at least once.

December 2017

Post on Facebook at least once.

Budget
To cover the PNAJE budget, we had to make assumptions as to how many

members are paying their membership fees. The only fee is 75 dollars and

that covers the conference and the price to become a member. We made a

guess that there would be about 25 people that would pay that fee and with

that many members it would come out to a total budget of $1,875. With this

budget we were able to plan out how much covering the conference and all

other yearly dues that need to be paid. We came up with the price to rent a

conference room and cover the food and miscellaneous costs to be around

$1,000. We then calculated that the MailChimp account to create and send

out newsletters to be $120 and then the cost to print and mail out the

newsletters to be $300. With this budget and those expenses there would

still be a surplus of about $455 which could be used for any other expenses

that may arise as the organization goes through the year or for the

conference. With this small of an organization it makes it a little easier

because they dont have many costs to begin with.


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Table 2: Proposed Budget

Evaluation Plan. To determine whether or not our campaign for PNAJE

was successful we will refer back to our campaign objectives and goals. The

main overall problem from the beginning of this campaign was membership

and membership retention. Therefore, a lot of our success will be evaluated

by how many members PNAJE gains and how many members they lose in the

next year.

For a successful campaign we hope to see a gain of about 10 new

members for PNAJE and a loss of none. PNAJE will update their current

website platform with new information, colors, and graphics. Their Facebook

page will reflect updated information as well, and constant communication

between the organization and its members. We also hope to see an addition

of 10 emails to their emailing list to receive the quarterly newsletters. We

would see an increase of 3 new members from Oregon and Idaho at the

annual conference to make this organization truly regional. We would like

to see at least 5 members submit research to present at the 2017

conference. Lastly, using Facebook analytics we would like to see 50 new

page visitors and at least 15 new page likes.


58

For a mildly successful campaign we hope to still see a gain of about 5

members. We would also hope to see a loss of none or only one current

members. The information on the website would be updated, but the

aesthetics of the website may not. The Facebook would be posted to less

frequently than once a month. An attempt of one newsletter sent via email

would be made, and no hard copy newsletter would be distributed. We would

hope to see a gain of at least one new member from the neighboring states

combined. We would see only one submission for research in the 2017

conference. Regarding Facebook, we would see only about 20 new page

visitors and 5 new page likes.

For an unsuccessful campaign we would see no change or a loss of

members. We expect that if at least one of our recommendations is used we

will see a slight increase of involvement within the organization. If there is no

change or a continued loss of members we expect that in the organizations

best interest it would be time to disband.

Conclusion & Recommendations

1. Our first recommendation concerns conferences. We

recommend that the annual PNAJE conference be changed from

October to August and that individuals who attend should be

given the opportunity to present research. During our personal

interviews most respondents said conferences they attended in the

past were during late summer while school was not in session. This
59

allowed for them to attend because they werent busy with

responsibilities back at school. During personal interviews most

respondents said they would like to see research presentations and

collaboration included at conferences. In regards to conferences,

respondents would like to partake in research collaboration and see

more calls for paper in information they receive from their

organization. This recommendation refers back to our research

question asking what constraints prevent professors from attending

annual conferences. Upon our research we found that conference

attendees want to be given the opportunity to present or hear

research. This is an incentive for them, so if professors arent seeing

what they want at a conference, they will not attend.


2. Our second recommendation concerns the type of

communication received. We recommend that PNAJE send out a

digital or hard copy newsletter on a quarterly basis. When

respondents were asked how often they prefer to receive newsletters

from professional organizations, 45% said quarterly. When respondents

were asked to choose what they would like to see in a professional

newsletter, the top three results were calls for papers, conference

updates, and organizational news. In regards to the type of

communication individuals would like to receive, respondents would

like to see a quarterly newsletter including a variety of information.

This recommendation refers back to our research question asking how

professors prefer to be communicated with and how often. Originally


60

we thought professors would like to hear from their organizations bi-

weekly, but upon interviewing and analyzing our survey responses we

know that professors would like to receive a newsletter on a quarterly

basis.
3. Our third recommendation concerns organizational content.

We recommend that any content published or sent out by

PNAJE include visuals. In both our personal interviews and survey

responses, most respondents said they liked graphics and visuals to

help give meaning and context to messages. This recommendation

refers back to our research question asking what makes a persuasive

message engaging and aesthetically pleasing. Our hypothesis said that

professors would most likely choose a message with colorful graphics

because it will catch their attention. Upon interviewing and analyzing

our survey responses, we can confirm this hypothesis. In a self-

response question asking what aspects of a professional website deter

professionals from interacting with it, we generated mostly unanimous

responses calling for images and a hint of color to enhance the

websites engagement and aesthetic. This recommendation is similar to

our persuasive message hypothesis. We said that if we show a sample

population the PNAJE website, they will react negatively because we

believe the homepage is underdeveloped, outdated and dull. Survey

responders want to see more images and hints of color throughout the

website.
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4. Our fourth recommendation concerns communication channels.

We recommend that PNAJE use the following communication

channels: Facebook, Email, and a WordPress Website. When

respondents were asked which of the following social networks they

visit monthly, the top choice was Facebook with 84% of responders. In

our personal interviews, many respondents said email was the best

communication channel because of its convenience and accessibility.

Our last research question was what social media platforms and

communication channels do professors use the most. Our hypothesis

was that Facebook would be the most popular answer because it has

been active the longest and is often utilized by adults and older

generations. We can confirm this hypothesis because of the high

percentage of responders using Facebook at the present time.


5. Our fifth recommendation concerns responsibilities within

brand management. We recommend that PNAJE distribute and

delegate brand management responsibilities to the Secretary and Vice

President of PNAJE. Currently, the PNAJE President holds all

responsibility for the distribution and management of the

organizations communication outlets. In our initial interview with Kelly,

she mentioned that the President is responsible for all communication

and doesnt get completed due to the amount of responsibilities he/she

holds. By distributing the tasks, this will ensure all members will

receive quality content and information in a timely manner.


62

Limitations. Results of our survey do not account for anyone in

Montana, because no one completed the survey from that state.

Montana is a part of PNAJEs geographic outreach, but hasnt been

consistently involved with the association in the past. This is a threat to

our internal validity, but is a limitation that is expected. Kelly informed

us that individuals from Montana werent very involved in the

association due to their location, making communication and travel

difficult.

References
1. College Media Association. (2016). Retrieved September 13, 2016,
from collegemedia.org
2. By putting effort into building your online presence, users are capable
of finding your company and content when searching this continuously
growing database. (2016). Heres Why Social Media Marketing is
Critical in 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2016, from
https://www.greengeeks.com/blog/2016/02/02/heres-why-social-media-
marketing-is-critical-in-2016/
3. DeMyers, J. (2014, August 11). The Top 10 Benefits Of Social Media
Marketing. Retrieved September 14, 2016, from
http://www.forbes.com/forbes/welcome/?/sites/jaysondemers/2014/08/1
1/the-top-10-benefits-of-social-media-marketing/
4. "PNAJE Client Interview with Roberta Kelly." Personal interview. 2 Sept.
2016.
5. "About PNAJE." Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators.
Wordpress, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016.
6. " PNAJE - Google+." Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism
Educators PNAJE - About - Google+. Google+, n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2016.
7. AEJMC AEJMC News. (2015). Retrieved October 30, 2016, from
http://www.aejmc.org/home/publications/aejmcnews/
8. http://jea.org (n.d.). Retrieved October 30, 2016, from http://jea.org/
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9. By putting effort into building your online presence, users are capable
of finding your company and content when searching this continuously
growing database. (2016). Heres Why Social Media Marketing is
Critical in 2016. Retrieved September 14, 2016, from
https://www.greengeeks.com/blog/2016/02/02/heres-why-social-media-
marketing-is-critical-in-2016/
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Appendices
Appendix A: Survey Questionnaire
1. How many professional organizations do you belong to? Examples: Public Relations
Society of America (PRSA), National Communication Association (NCA)

2. What incentives are the most beneficial for you when choosing to join a professional
organization? (Please check all that apply)

3. Why would you choose to join an academic or professional organization?

4. How often do you prefer to receive newsletters from professional organizations?

5. Which of the following items do you like to see in professional newsletters? Please check
all that apply:

6. This is a screenshot from PNAJE's website. Please rate your feelings about this
homepage using the following scales:

7. How would you suggest we make this webpage better?

8. Please rank the following options from most important (1) to least important (7) for a
professional organization's website.

9. How would you rate this graphic on the following scales:

10. How would you suggest we make this graphic better?

11. How would you rate this graphic on the following scales:

12. How would you suggest we make this graphic better?

13. Which of the following social networks do you visit monthly? (please select all that
apply):

14. What state do you live in?

15. How old are you?

16. What college/university/community college do you work and/or study at?

17. Sex - What is your sex?

18. What is your professional title?


65

Appendix B: Interview Questionnaire


BEFORE STARTING ASK IF YOU CAN RECORD.
Introduction:
Hi, my name is Willow Neely and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns class. I am here
to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not belong
to a professional organization, such as Public Relations Society of America, American
Marketing Association or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that
we are gathering this information for. When analyzing this interview your name will not be
disclosed.

Introduction questions:
Are you a part of any professional organization?
o If so, how many and which ones?
Whats your role in this organization?
Why did you join this organization?

Transition questions:
What kind of communication do you receive from the groups youre a part of?
o If not a member of groups: what would you want to receive?
o What would you ignore/avoid from an organization?
Do you pay attention to your organizations social media?
o Which social media platforms do you follow?
Why?
What was the last professional conference you attended?
What was your role at this conference?
How did you find out about this conference?
What drew you to attending this conference?
Where was this conference?
How many of your colleagues also attended?
What were some of the key benefits to attending this conference?
Key questions:
What do you think is a strong way for an organization to communicate to its members?
I.e.: email, facebook, twitter, LinkedIn
o Why?
(Show two different email subjects) Which email would you open?
o Why?
o Why would you not open the others?
(Show advertisement for PNAJE) Which of these persuasive messages did you pay
more attention to?
o What kind of organization do you think this message is for?
What about these messages did you like?
o Not like?
(Show website homepage): What is your initial reaction to this page?
o Where is the first place you would click to explore the page/get info?
66

Ending question:
Based on what you have seen during our conversation today, would you consider joining
this organization if it fit into your profession?
Do you have an advice for this organization moving forward?

Appendix C: Frequency Table Including All Variables

Consent - This research is being conducted by


undergraduate students at Washington State University to
inform a PR campaign. We are working on a campaign for
the organization PNAJE (the Pacific Northwest Association
of Journalism Educators). This is an association of
professionals and educators who help mentor the next
generation of journalism educators. The researchers
are interested in your opinion regarding PNAJE's current
and future branding and messaging. We will not ask for
any identifying information in this survey and your
answers will remain anonymous. It is your right to decline
to participate in this research. If you agree to participate
in this survey, you can change your mind later and leave
at any time. Please click here for the full consent form.

# Answer % Count

2 I do not agree to participate in this research 0.00% 0


I am over the age of 18 and I agree to participate in this 100.00
1 39
research %
Total 100% 39
67

How many professional organizations do you belong to?


Examples: Public Relations Society of America (PRSA),
National Communication Association (NCA)

# Answer % Count

2 1 20.00% 7
3 2 45.71% 16
4 3 5.71% 2
5 4 11.43% 4
6 5+ 2.86% 1
7 0 14.29% 5
Total 100% 35
68

What incentives are the most beneficial for you when


choosing to join a professional organization? (Please
check all that apply)

# Answer % Count

1 Resume Enhancer 34.62% 9


2 Awards 7.69% 2
3 Conventions 73.08% 19
4 Presenting 34.62% 9
5 Networking 61.54% 16
6 Research Collaboration 26.92% 7
7 Social Aspects 34.62% 9
8 Other 19.23% 5
Total 100% 26
69

How often do you prefer to receive newsletters from


professional organizations?

# Answer % Count

1 Yearly 11.11% 3
2 Bi-Yearly 7.41% 2
3 Quarterly 44.44% 12
4 Monthly 25.93% 7
5 Weekly 7.41% 2
6 Never 3.70% 1
7 Other 0.00% 0
Total 100% 27
70

Which of the following items do you like to see in


professional newsletters? Please check all that apply:

# Answer % Count

15 Awards and accolades 44.44% 12


12 Calls for papers 77.78% 21
13 Conference updates 70.37% 19
14 Resume or CV enhancing tips 29.63% 8
11 Organizational news 66.67% 18
10 Job postings 66.67% 18
Total 100% 27

# Answer % Count

Total 100% 27
10 Job postings 66.67% 18
11 Organizational news 66.67% 18
12 Calls for papers 77.78% 21
13 Conference updates 70.37% 19
14 Resume or CV enhancing tips 29.63% 8
15 Awards and accolades 44.44% 12
71

8 - This is a screenshot from PNAJE's website. Please rate


your feelings about this homepage using the following
scales:

Tot
Question 1 2 3 4 5
al
Trustworthy:Untrustw 32.00 28.00 28.00 8.00 4.00
8 7 7 2 1 25
orthy % % % % %
Infromative:Uninform 7.69 15.38 34.62 34.62 7.69
2 4 9 9 2 26
ative % % % % %
Convincing:Unconvin 4.00 32.00 40.00 1 20.00 4.00
1 8 5 1 25
cing % % % 0 % %
4.00 24.00 52.00 1 20.00 0.00
Likeable:Unlikeable 1 6 5 0 25
% % % 3 % %
Strong Visuals:Weak 0.00 24.00 24.00 40.00 1 12.00
0 6 6 3 25
Visuals % % % % 0 %
72

9 - How would you suggest we make this webpage better?

How would you suggest we make this webpage better?

Needs some pictures and links to various resources.


Add some explanation of what the organization is, what it does, and who it serves.
Create a new logo that is not so stark. Move the details about the conference to
the side (or to a secondary page and replace them with a link to the conference
info) and use most of the space on the home page to communicate what the
organization is all about. This could take the form of a welcome note from the
current president of the organization, along with his/her photo, or a set of links to
other parts of the site that are enhanced by relevant photos. Include some
reasons why a professor would want to join the organization. (Once a professor
joins, he or she is much more likely to become interested in attending the
conference.)
Include an image?
I like the colors and the logo. The black and white is simple and the layout looks
user-friendly and professional. The date from this screenshot makes me think that
this organization has not updated their website in awhile. Things I like to see
about an organization on their website include conference information, calls for
papers and submissions, and an about us section. Also, is this organization
affiliated with a larger group or conference?
Include something more attention grabbing like a relevant image. It doesn't
currently have much to grab my attention or make me motivated to seek more
info by clicking on a link.
Photo
More information above the fold. The logo overpowers the information. I have to
click through too much. I need information quicker and in a fuller form.
theme
More information blocks.
more information about the conference -- dates, times, info about the keynote
speaker or primary session topic, or conference topic. I can only assume the type
is larger on the real website.
Get rid of the exclamation point. Have updated information.
73

How would you rate this graphic on the following scales:

Tot
Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
al
12. 12. 12. 12. 12. 12. 25.
Likeable:Unlike
50 1 50 1 50 1 50 1 50 1 50 1 00 2 8
able
% % % % % % %
37. 25. 25. 12.
Unconvincing:C 0.0 0.0 0.0
50 3 00 2 00 2 0 50 1 0 0 8
onvincing 0% 0% 0%
% % % %
25. 25. 25. 25.
Memorable:Un 0.0 0.0 0.0
0 0 0 00 2 00 2 00 2 00 2 8
memorable 0% 0% 0%
% % % %
Weak 50. 12. 12. 12. 12.
0.0 0.0
Visuals:Strong 00 4 50 1 0 50 1 50 1 50 1 0 8
0% 0%
Visuals % % % % %
74

How would you suggest we make this graphic better?

How would you suggest we make this graphic better?


move toward professional language, and font -- lose the exclamation point, which
would not be needed with a strong greeting -- and who needs a greeting such as
hi there with a call for journalism educators?
Remove exclamation mark. Remore the overused and meaningless word
"awesome."
75

How would you rate this graphic on the following scales:

Tot
Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
al
42. 28. 21.
Convincing:Unc 0.0 0.0 7.1 0.0
86 6 57 4 43 3 0 0 1 0 14
onvincing 0% 0% 4% 0%
% % %
50. 28. 14.
Likeable:Unlike 0.0 0.0 7.1 0.0
00 7 57 4 29 2 0 0 1 0 14
able 0% 0% 4% 0%
% % %
28. 28. 14. 14. 14.
Memorable:Un 0.0 0.0
57 4 57 4 29 2 29 2 0 29 2 0 14
memorable 0% 0%
% % % % %
Weak 14. 28. 35.
7.1 7.1 7.1 0.0
Visuals:Strong 1 1 29 2 1 0 57 4 71 5 14
4% 4% 4% 0%
Visuals % % %
76

How would you suggest we make this graphic better?

How would you suggest we make this graphic better?


Text needs to stand iut better on your background. Add an opaque layer under the
text to make it pop. Something else is needed to make it unique.
The visuals are very old fashioned. No journalist or journalism professor uses a
typewriter anymore. Also, having such a large background photo makes the logo
very inflexible. Can you imagine fitting this on an envelope? Logos rarely have a
background image. That way, you can change up the images that are used with
the logo. Lastly, the name of the organization is a bit hard to read on this image
because of the vertical black lines behind the black letters. So I suggest removing
the background photo and making the text within the diamond bolder and
possibly larger. The "Never stop learning" tagline is good.
No suggestions. Love it.
Font is hard to read. Typewriter suggests old media rather than new skills
journalism educators should be teaching.
Not sure I love the diamond--it looks a bit odd with the vertical wood panels, but
the visual and fonts are pretty solid.
Add some new media graphics
77

Which of the following social networks do you visit


monthly? (please select all that apply):

# Answer % Count

1 Twitter 73.91% 17
2 Facebook 86.96% 20
3 Youtube 82.61% 19
4 Instagram 47.83% 11
5 Snapchat 39.13% 9
6 Tumblr 13.04% 3
7 Pinterest 17.39% 4
8 Reddit 17.39% 4
10 Other 17.39% 4
Total 100% 23

Other

Telegram
Linkedin
BBC, CNN
78

What state do you live in?

# Answer % Count

1 Washington 72.73% 16
2 Idaho 13.64% 3
3 Oregon 13.64% 3
4 Montana 0.00% 0
5 Alaska 0.00% 0
6 Other 0.00% 0
Total 100% 22
79

How old are you?

How old are you?

26
54
38
28
35
37
31
mid 50s
36
53
45
31
51
29
63
45
64
62
44
80

What college/university/community college do you work


and/or study at?

What college/university/community college do you work and/or study at?

WSU
Linfield College
Idaho State University
Washington State University
Central Washington University
Washington State University
WSU
Seattle area
Seattle University
UO
Univ of Idaho
Washington State University
College Western Idaho
WSU
Gonzaga University
Murrow
Cwu
Pacific Lutheran University
Eastern Washington University
WWU
81

What is your sex?

# Answer % Count

1 Male 36.36% 8
2 Female 59.09% 13
3 Self-Identified 0.00% 0
4 Prefer not to Say 4.55% 1
Total 100% 22
82

What is your professional title?

# Answer % Count

1 Professor Emeritus 0.00% 0


2 Professor 18.18% 4
3 Associate Professor 13.64% 3
4 Assistant Professor 18.18% 4
5 Adjunct Professor 4.55% 1
6 Graduate Student 22.73% 5
7 Other 22.73% 5
Total 100% 22
83

Appendix D: Sample Consent Form

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY


Edward R. Murrow College of Communication

Research Study Consent Form

Study Title:
PNAJE Research Study

Researchers:
You are being asked to take part in a research study carried out by a Comstrat 485 class at
Washington State University. This form explains the research study and your part in it if you
decide to join the study.

What is this study about?


This research is being conducted by undergraduate students at Washington State University to
inform a PR campaign. We are working on a campaign for the organization PNAJE (the Pacific
Northwest Association of Journalism Educators). This is an association of professionals
and educators who help mentor the next generation of journalism educators.

The researchers are interested in your opinion regarding PNAJE's current and future branding
and messaging. We will not ask for any identifying information in this survey and your
answers will remain anonymous. It is your right to decline to participate in this research. If you
agree to participate in this survey, you can change your mind later and leave at any time. Please
click here for a copy of the full consent form.

To participate in this study, you must be over the age of 18.

What will I beasked to do if I am in this study?


If you take part in the study, you will be asked to answer survey questions regarding branding
and marketing of a professional organization.

Arethereany benefits to meif I am in this study?


There is no direct benefit to you from being in this study.

Will my information bekept private?

The data for this study are being collected anonymously. Neither the researcher(s) nor anyone
else will be able to link data to you.

Arethereany costs or payments for beingin this study?

There will be no costs to you for taking part in this study.

Who can I talk to if I havequestions?

Page 1 of 2
Version: February 2008
84

Appendix C: Focus Group Transcripts


INTERVIEWS

Ryan Risenmays informal interview

10/4/16

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, Murrow

Thomas, Kylie, Kirsten, Willow

RyanRisenmayInterview.mp3

Moderator: Hi, my name is Thomas Davidson and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns
class. I am here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not
belong to a professional organization, such as Public Relations Society of America, American Marketing
Association or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that we are gathering
this information for. When analyzing this interview your name will not be disclosed. So, are you a part of
any kind of professional organization?

Ryan: I used to be.

Moderator: Okay, and which organization were you a part of?

Ryan: Society of Professional journalists

Moderator: Okay great, and what was your role in that organization?

Ryan: It was way back when I was in my undergrad studies as well so I coordinated a little bit of event
coverage and just participation basically in the club. After I got my undergrad I kind of stopped my
membership.

Moderator: Okay cool. Now why did you join this organization?

Ryan: Mostly for the connections and the experience that it would add. Also it added credibility to my
resume.

Moderator: Thats awesome. So what kind of communication (inaudible) did you receive from this
group that you were a part of?

Ryan: Not much. It was simply to identify upcoming events. There was a symposium that happened and I
remember being asked to go cover that on behalf of the organization. Then I was to report back. But it
was very light actually.
85

Moderator: Great, so did you, while you were a part of this organization and if you were a part of
another organization, would you pay attention to the organizations social media platforms?

Ryan: Yeah. I would definitely follow them, have them in my feed. Yeah, I find good value in that. I
mean since my participation in that group Ive been associated with other groups outside of the profession
but still kind of related in the industry and I track those news items just as well.

Moderator: Okay cool. So what was the last professional conference that you attended?

Ryan: I could answer in two ways I suppose. One way is I did attend an event on behalf of a grant that
Im working on. And that isnt necessarily my first choice on where I would go for my profession but it
was because of the grant. Thats I was required to go. So if thats the answer youre looking for it was
(mumbling under his breath, inaudible) National Managers of Wildlife and Fish Administration.

Moderator: Okay I gotcha.

Ryan: (Laughing) It is not something I would initially go for. Its just that I had a role to play in a project
that were working on. Building a website for environmental DNA. Detection technology. So we had to
present there.

Moderator: Okay so it makes sense to go to that conference. That specific one, although its not really
you.

Ryan: (Laughing) Yeah, its not me. I mean outside of that I was looking to go to Adobe Max and go to
the annual Adobe conference which is certainly the sweet spot of where I want to be.

Moderator: Okay cool. So Obviously with the grant one, you knew about that because you were
working with it. But how did you find out about, or how do people find out about the Adobe one? I mean,
how do you find out the information about how to go and when to go and all of that?

Ryan: So Adobe, they were just here vistiting on campus and so I had a face to face meeting. I learned
about it in person and some of the workshops theyre hosting which seemed exactly what I was going to
be looking for. Outside of that, people usually find out by subscribing to their notices. They get
newsletters and such from Adobe. If you subscribe to the creative suite, youre usually put on their
mailing list and that usually includes just notifications about these conferences.

Moderator: Gotcha. So what would be the main draw kind of to you attending this Adobe conference?

Ryan: Yeah, for me it was definitely one of the few workshops that I see as being valuable. More digital
media training that I want to incorporate in the classes that I teach. But also with the potential study
abroad in the summer. I was looking to incorporate more effective and efficient digital media through
online engagement than Adobe offers through their suite and so for remote, around the world, to not be
86

so you know needing to have all the software suite built onto the laptops, you could actually go
remotely through the web. And use Adobes tools, thats what I was looking for.
Moderator: Okay, cool. Where was this conference?

Ryan: It is going to be in November and it will be in San Diego.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So how many of colleagues well, your colleagues will be attending this
conference, if you know?

Ryan: Yeah, so you know, I was actually thinking of arranging for me and one more to go. Because we
would be going on a (inaudible) trip. So for him, there were courses like drone journalism, you know,
using drones. Also, other creative photography and video editing. So that would be right up his alley for
what hes teaching. And for me, its the PR oriented stuff. The online and social media engagement.

Moderator: Okay, gotcha. So what kind of key or benefits I guess are tied in with going to this
conference.

Ryan: So there is one more opportunity. And that is to go to their exclusive Adobe Edgemax. Now
that is not something that they advertise or promote. But it is an invitation only, special group for about 30
to 40 educators to come and get collaborative experience. Ideas from other educators on what their doing
with Adobe suite. Its really where I want to be. And they bring in student teams that have done pretty
creative things lately with Adobe which I wanted to see also. So that is I think that happens in the
summer or into fall. It just happened actually this year. So if you get in the circle then hopefully you
become available for them to invite you to that too.

Moderator: Oh yeah thats really cool. So jumping into a couple of key questions here, what do you
think is a strong way for an organization to communicate to its members? At this day in age, and not only
for us college kids but for adults Like educators like yourself, what do you think the best form of
communication is?

Ryan: Yeah, the key is you have to address what your audience wants to pay attention to so if there was a
LinkedIn group, I would probably be more apt to follow that or a Facebook group. Email is nice because
it looks a little more official and easier to get back to it since its in your inbox. I would have to say those
would be my three preferences. Others may choose Twitter because its pretty immediate, short and easy
links to go read more. That isnt necessarily my thing, so I would say LinkedIn because it looks more
professional and you can have a group of educators that opt in and collaborate together in a collaborative
space. Email I think is the go to standard.

Moderator: Cool, so Im going to show you different subject Email subject lines, just to get an idea of
what you would want to click on. So out of these subject lines, which one would you feel most likely to
open and why?

Ryan: Okay sounds good.


87

(Long pause as he looks through and reads the subject lines)


Ryan: So what I would be most inclined to click on, would be probably a combination of Actually it
would probably be the third one all together because it has a shorter name which is easier to process
without the association written in it. The acronym is not something to even digest. I probably would know
what it is if I was following the group. The subject line is a little more intriguing in this third case because
the past, the present and the future walk into a bar, it was pretty tense, I kind of like that. Especially if I
know who the sender is. I would know kind of the content I would be getting if I open that and thats a
little more intriguing.

Moderator: Okay cool, awesome. So now I am going to show you an advertisement for this and which
one of these persuasive messages would you be most inclined to look into and getting more information
about?

(Long pause as he looks at the messages)

Ryan: Probably the looking for talent right in the middle. It seems a little more inviting. It implies that I
could be one of those talented individuals theyre looking for. The other is, I like the call to action to join
us as educators and add to the discussion, thats a very nice invitation. Whereas Im a little not wanting to
pay attention to the never stop learning. That one doesnt grab my eyes very much. It looks rather
secondary and lost. Im more inclined to look at the graphics surrounding it all. Its not that attractive of a
sign for me, you know? The hi there is okay but looking for talent for sure for me.

Moderator: Okay cool, perfect. So now Im going to show you the website homepage for PNAJE
currently just to get an idea of what you think about it. So go ahead and look through it and let me know
what your first initial reaction to the page would be.

(Long pause as he looks at the homepage)

Ryan: That it is rather plain. And maybe that stark black and white with a little bit of green for the links is
intended as part of the feel that they want as a journalism organization. But it does look pretty plain and
probably secondary to other organizations that I could join and affiliate with. It isnt as attractive because
it looks so plain to me.

Moderator: Great. So just a couple of ending questions here Based on our conversation here today and
based on what you have seen, would you consider joining this organization if you were a journalism
educator?

Ryan: I would consider it if they indicated to me that there was something new coming. This does not tell
me there is anything new coming so why would I spend some dollars to join an organization that I dont
perceive Im going to get value out of? This is a year plus old so its not there for me.

Moderator: Yeah, cool. So do you have any kind of lasting advice for this organization moving forward?
88

Ryan: I would say turn it into a digital newsletter. I mean, youve got a lot of examples out there of
emagazines or some type of treatment that way. Display your craft. Make it show like you would have
professionals doing this work already. There is just so many examples out there. If youre asking any
journalism professional what they do when their going online. Theyre taking their stories and making a
digital engagement experience. This is not engaging. So in a nutshell that would be it.

Audio ends, end of transcript.

Bruce Pinkletons Informal Interview

10-3-16

Washington State University Campus, Pullman, WA, Goertzen

Kylie Terrana

BrucePinkleton.mp3

Moderator: Okay, so, my name is Kylie Terrana and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns class I
am here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not belong to
a professional organization such as Public Relations Society of America, America Marketing Association,
or anything smaller.

Pinkleton: Sure.

Moderator: Um, we dont work for the company we are gathering this information for when analyzing
this interview your name will not be disclosed.

Pinkleton: Okie Doke.

Moderator: First question, are you a part of any professional organizations?

Pinkleton: I am, um (small laugh) the Public Relations Society of America, as well as (pause) on the
academic side uh, two organizations, International Communication Association a

Moderator: mhm

Pinkleton: and the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, which is a
big one.

Moderator: Yeah, what are your roles within these organizations?


89

Pinkelton: Um, well, frankly, for the most part Im just a member. I do for the educational
organizations I belong to, I typically present research. And um, (pause) in fact, routinely. (clears throat)
So, ICA was in Japan this year so I was in Japan presenting research there, and AEJ was in Indianapolis in
that case I just attended I didnt actually present research. But I typically do present research. For PRSSA
for the most part I am just a member, although, um, I have faculty advise the the student, the student
public relations society here. And I also, uh, will likely be presenting in Spokane at their chapter, uh,
meeting next year, in spring. And I have presented before in Puget Sound as well. So it just kind of
depends.

Moderator: yeah.

Pinkleton: But those presentations, thats one every several years kind of thing. So.

Moderator: Mhm. Cool. And why in particular, like pick one, why you joined this organization? And
key benefits.

Pinkleton: Sure. Well, Its basically career enhancement essentially. So, um for students, in
particular, an organization, like the Public Relations Society of America those meetings are a great way to
meet people and build a network. As you, (pause) are looking for a job, its really helpful to have a place
to sort of, I mean, get to know people and have them get to know you. Ill tell you the truth, you can
actually really further your career through those associations. Ill give you an example. I have a former
student (pause) in fact I will be visiting him in the Bay Area I think on Friday, uh hes a donor to our
college now, and um, he got involved in the Puget Sound chapter of the Public Relations Society of
America those organizations, all of them, they need people to do work. Theyre pretty much volunteer and
so um, so, he got involved doing work and um, because of that he met people uh, they saw his writing
skills he had, he built a great reputation and actually I think he received an award from the chapter and
things like that. And so its a really good way for people to, to see you. A lot of jobs in our field are
circulated, are circulated at a very low level because they dont want to attract a lot of attention. And they
want to be selective in their process basically. And so um, when organizations have jobs, and they know
you, and theyve seen your work through something like the Public Relations Society of America they
might um, send something your way, recommend you for a position, those types of things. So, its a
strategy. Its kind of what I call a longer term strategy. (ding in the background) Sometimes it takes a while
to find a job anyways, so its a great idea.

Moderator: Mhm, totally. Um, what types of communications do you receive from these groups?

Pinkleton: Oh you know, I get all types of things. Most things are electronic these days. There are
some hard copy pieces that come from (pause) two of the three organizations. Its everything from um,
you know professional trade publication types of things. So, um, advice on digital communication
strategies or improving your writing skills, those kinds of things. Determining return on investment to
jobs and things like that. None of that at this point, is terribly useful for me currently. But in the past it
may have been useful for me, it just kind of depends. And certainly, um, its stuff that I use for when I
teach classes, and for students some professional things, uh or for my grad students about jobs and things
like that.
90

Moderator: Do you pay attention to their social media at all? Or do you follow it on Facebook

Pinkleton: Thats a great question and the answer is it depends. So um, when I was teaching, uh I
routinely followed the um, Public Relations Society of America, they have like a, mini blog they would
send out every week or every other week. And really what it was was a compilation of trends and links
basically. And that was very helpful when I was teaching class because uh I like to start class with that
kind of current events in public relations thing. And so it helps me to keep up on crisis communication,
trends on digital technology, whats happening in politics, whats happening in public affairs, but it um, it
really has been a ton useful for me. Um, the, other stuff, like from the educational associations I belong
to, most of what they send me are jobs. Uh, I typically open them and take a look at it, and if its
something for my grad students, Ill forward it on, um, if it involves submitting research papers for
conferences I usually do pay attention to that. So we have a big one coming up this month actually, so Im
kind of watching for that. So

Moderator: Cool.

Pinkleton: Yeah!

Moderator: So now moving on to conferences, like you just mentioned, which was the last
conference you attended?

Pinkleton: Uh, the, AEJMC, so the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass
Communication conference I attended in Minneapolis in August, and previous to that was the ICA,
International Communication Association, conference in June which was in Japan.

Moderator: What, uh, how did you find out about this conference? Through email or

Pinkleton: Email, yeah. And those conferences I look for they happen every year. If youre an
academic professionally those presentations are a way to build your career, so theyre actually quite self-
serving from that perspective.

Moderator: Totally. Ok now, Im going to show you a few examples. Im going to show you a few
email subject lines and if you could tell me what you would click past or what you would open, if you
wouldnt open any of them, and why? Or why not. (Shows email subject lines on computer screen)

Pinkleton: Sure.

(Long pause while looking at email examples)

Pinkleton: Mmm! The first one is kinda cute. Yeah, thats like a teaser, kinda fun. Uh, (long pause)
mm the second one I would probably open the second one as well. (long pause). The third one doesnt
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apply to me as much because Im not new to town. Although, uh (deep breath) it just kind of depends on
the situation. So, um, you know a lot of times subject lines say a lot. So if you had a subject like about a
new educational opportunity, important conference, the next meeting coming up, who a speaker might be,
so, Jay Inslee is coming up to speak to the whatever, that might catch your attention as well I think.

Moderator: Yeah. Do you think that email headlines that are more cute or more informational work?

Pinkleton: Mmm, thats a really good question. (Pause). Uh, (stutter) it might depend on my mood
and how much time I have. Probably informational on the whole. But the information has to be relevant
to me. So, and I think thats true to for most people. Um, although I have to say that teaser is a good one
and if I thought it was interesting and especially if I clicked on it and I thought the first one was good I
would probably click on another teaser as well.

Moderator: Cool. Now Im going to show you a series of three persuasive messages for this
organization.

Pinkelton: Sure

Moderator: And the same thing, tell me if you would pay attention, follow the link, why or why not?
And tell me when your ready and Ill click next. (Pulls up first example)

(Long pause while looking at first example)

Pinkelton: Id probably follow that link. Its hard to say, it depends on my schedule but I suspect I
would.

Moderator: Um, theres that one. (Pulls up second example)

(Long pause while looking at second example)

Pinkleton: Mmmmm for that one Im not sure. If theyre looking for talent or if Im looking for
talent. In other words, if its looking for talent question mark uh cause Im not hiring people I would
probably ignore that. Or if they are looking for talent as they want people to contribute uh like so
exclamation point maybe or whatever, uh (pause) if I was in the field and looking to hire someone that,
uh, that might be my cause to click. But in my position currently it doesnt really apply to me so much I
think at the end of the day.

Moderator: And uh, this is the last one. (Pulls up third example)

(Loud hit)

Moderator: This is more branding.

Pinkleton: Mhm!
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(Long pause while looking at third example)

Pinkleton: Uhm, I would be less likely, I actually like that one, but Im not sure what Im clicking
like, so why click basically. Its just a little busy, the white on the washed out wood, you kind of loose a
little bit there. But I love, I like the graphic its kind of (laugh) its kind of my history actually (laughter).

Moderator: (mumble)

Pinkleton: Yeah yeah, well yeah, I learned to type on a typewriter thats probably about like that
actually.

Moderator: So what would draw(s) you to persuasive messages about lets say, new organizations,
you havent heard of. What would make you pay attention?

Pinkleton: I would probably pay attention the first time in my job because its partly my job to pay
attention. Um, in addition, uh after that, only if I find it particularly useful. For example, if they have jobs,
and if I think Ah! Thatll be benefical for my students I will definitely follow the link and I would
forward that to a person on facebook or things like that. If it was an educational opportunity that I thought
that might be relevant to our faculty members I would probably click on that. So, in this role, I am sort of
constantly on the lookout for things that would benefit the college at the end of the day. So, yeah.

Moderator: Cool. So Im going to show you one last thing. (Pulling up PNAJE home website) This
will close it out.

Pinkleton: I like what youre doing this is good!

Moderator: Oh, Thanks! This is um the website homepage. Where would you first click when you
looked at this page? Or would you click anywhere for more information? Or just click out?

Pinkleton: Yeah, I like it. Um, I am not likely to click on register now. In other words, that would
tend to me the most common one. One of the things that is very important for marketing communication
is your audience self interest. So to me register now, doesnt tell me, what the benefit is. In other words,
why whats going to happen there that is going to make it beneficial for me. So it might be, advance your
career, or connect with others in the field, or learn how to use and important software package, or those
kinds of things or all those. So you might start with three or four bullet points and then register now. So,
and a lot of marketing messages do that. They talk about the organization, they talk about the audience
and how the organization meets the audience needs. And we talked about the in public relations 312 we
call it receiver oriented or audience oriented. So I think, and the research your doing is a part of that
audience orientation. The other thing I see is the PNAJE or PNJE Pullman. Cuz theres a local angle, so is
there something happening here that I should know about, is this something I can go to, should go to.
(some mumbling)
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Moderator: Cool. Thank you, and then closing out, based on what youve seen today would you
consider joining this organization if it fit to your professional goals?

Pinkleton: Yeah sure, yeah. I might even consider joining in this goal. I probably should as a matter
of fact. So, yeah, its just, ya know, Ive tended to focus, well you know this is such a busy job, I tend to
focus on what I always have basically. But yeah I think for something like that, it would make a lot of
sense. A lot of this is really about self serving benefit to people, thats just sort of the way we all operate.
So, to the extent that this is proved to be a benefit I think there is some good opportunity there. And these
days frankly for media organizations its a lot about survival these days especially in this constantly
moving environment. Theres a lot of good possibilities. And I like your landing page that looks nice.

Moderator: Thank you so much!

Pinkleton: You bet!

Audio ends, end of transcript.

Alison Boggs Informal Interview

10/7/16

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, Murrow

Thomas, Kylie, Kirsten, Willow

AlisonBoggsInterview.mp3

Moderator: Hi, my name is Thomas Davidson and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns
class. I am here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not
belong to a professional organization, such as Public Relations Society of America, American Marketing
Association or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that we are gathering
this information for. When analyzing this interview your name will not be disclosed.

Alison: Okay sound great.

Moderator: So, are you a part of any professional organization?

Alison: No, I am not.


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Moderator: Okay, if you were a part of some organization, what do you think would be
something that would interest you as far as being in an organization with other educators such as
yourself?

Alison: Well Im a brand new instructor here so professional organizations I have been involved
in are professional journalism organizations like the society of professional journalist. But to be involved
in a journalism educators organization, I think there would need to be Something I would be really
interested in is information about different teaching styles. Different exercises or assignments. Any sorts
of things that would broaden my horizons of tools that I could use to help students in class. And
sometimes when you go to websites you go looking for information like that and it can be not very easy
to find. So I think that would be really helpful, if there were a website that was very user friendly the
compiled ideas and thoughts and resources that would be useful to me in the classroom.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So you said you were a part of organizations in the past.

Alison: I was a part of the society of professional journalists.

Moderator: Okay, what was your role in that organization?

Alison: Just a member. No, I was never an officer or anything like that, only a member.

Moderator: Okay cool. So what kind of communication, when you were a part of that
organization, what kind of communication did you receive from the organization itself?

Alison: I would say it was mostly Email. I received most information via Email, also a woman in
my newsroom was the president for a while so she would talk to me in person and then also social media
(mostly Facebook).

Moderator: Okay, cool. So looking back on that, what would you, if you were a part of an
organization in the future, what kind of mediums would you want to receive and which would you not?

Alison: I guess I generally think that Email is the best way to receive it even though a lot of the
time it is really easy to dismiss it. I find Facebook pretty useful because then I have a choice of whether
or not to I can just see that and nobodys filling up my inbox or (laughing) polluting my personal ways
of communicating. But, and I have a choice to look at it. But the downside of email is that I might miss it
because I have so many and its so easy to dismiss. But I generally feel that Email is my preferred method
of communication I would say. I do not like to receive calls.

Moderator: Perfect. So what was the last professional conference that you attended?

Alison: (Slight chuckle) Well I worked in the newspaper industry so we ran out of money for
professional conferences a long time ago. (Both laughing) But probably a journalism conference but it has
been a very long time. Actually I went on a couple of fellowships but they were competitive so they were
things that I applied for and was accepted to. I attended a They called it like a multimedia boot camp
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down at the University of California Berkley. That was probably in December of 2011 so 5 years ago is
the last time I went to some kind of conference.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So how did you find out about this last conference that you went to?

Alison: So, conferences, when I worked at the Spokesman Review, our top editor was very
proactive about informing people she thought would be interested in various conferences. Especially ones
that she thought they would have a chance of winning. So she had informed me about that and
encouraged me to apply.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So what kind of drew you into attending? Was it incentives or was
there something you really wanted to get out of it?

Alison: To that particular conference and then other ones that have been competitive fellowships,
it has been to advance my skills specifically. Either I was Another one I attended at the University of
Maryland a number of years ago and it was sponsored by the Knight Foundation, which is a journalism
foundation, and that was a competitive conference about aging. I had just started writing about social
media services at the newspaper and I thought aging was a new topic that not a lot of media organizations
were covering or covering very well. So I thought it would be a great opportunity to expand my skills and
knowledge. Then with the one in Berkley, it was purely an interest in expanding my skill set.

Moderator: Okay I can understand that. So how many of your colleagues attended the
conference?

Alison: It was actually just me. So it was myself and other journalists from around the country.
So there were journalism educators, working broadcast and radio and print journalists there.

Moderator: Okay, I gotcha. So what were some of the key benefits to attending this
conference?

Alison: That particular one, in a way I didnt become proficient at any of the skills because it was
more of an overview of all of the skills but I saw the full array of what schools are teaching these days
and should be teaching. Because when I went to journalism school 20 odd years ago, I was print focused
and news papers were the big thing. So I just focused on print and I didnt do much in the way of
multimedia. Okay? Now you guys are thankfully learning everything, learning the full array of skills and
that is as it should be. So I would say my takeaway from that conference is mostly broadening my
horizons as far as seeing everything that students were learning these days.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So what do you think is the strongest way for an organization to
communicate with its members is.

Alison: You know, I guess I really think its email even though it has its downsides. Although I
do think that is something that should be in conjunction with word of mouth. So yeah.
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Moderator: Absolutely. Okay so Im going to show you a couple of Email subject lines. Just
to get an idea of which one you would open and which one you wouldnt and why.

Alison: Okay!

(Long pause while looking at email subject lines)

Alison: You know, I feel drawn to both the first one that says new to town and the last one
because I think its funny. I mean I might open that just to see where theyre going with the joke. New to
town one really appeals to me because I am new to town. I am interested in knowing what resources are
available to me. But purely in terms of click bait, I would probably open the last one just because I really
enjoy laughing and (smiling) there might be a joke there and so you might hook me in with that. If I were
really busy, I would probably The last one would be the only one I would open just in terms of click
bait type of thing.

Moderator: Okay, cool! So now Im going to show you a couple of different advertisements
that we have also created. So take a look and let me know which persuasive messages you like the best
and why.

(Long pause while looking at persuasive messages)

Alison: Well, because Im a grammar nerd, I dont really like this one because it ends with a
proposition. (Laughing) Sorry, Im just a total grammar nerd. So of the other two, I think its cute but in
terms of visual alone too, the other two appeal to me more. I dont know if you say looking for talent if
youre sort of appealing to my ego which I dont really have a big ego and so I would kind of shy away
from that because I feel like Im being manipulated a little bit. In the last one, its a romantic image of a
typewriter there and I like the tagline or the phrase, never stop learning. So Im not crazy about the word
talent, I dont really know what the image is conveying as much on middle one. But I like the join us as
journalism educators and add to the discussion. I like that, add to the discussion phrase, okay? And I like
the phrase, never stop learning. I think so visually, the final one appeals to me the most and those are the
phrases that I like the most. (Sounding a bit nervous) Does that help?

Moderator: Oh yeah, absolutely! So Im going to show you their website homepage and get
your thoughts on this. So take a look at it and when youre done looking Ill get your thoughts.

(Long pause while looking at website homepage)

Alison: Okay, well theres not really a whole lot to it.

Moderator: Yeah, so what was your kind of initial reaction to the homepage.

Alison: Its kind of boring. Theres not a lot going on. Even in the text I mean theyre
journalists, they should Theyre good writers. If youre going to try to entice someone to come to a
conference they should write a better lead than that. You know? Just registration is open, I mean tease me
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a little bit. Its a relatively small world that we exist in and I would recognize the names if they had
relatively big names in there. At least tell me where its going to be. Maybe I want to go to that place you
know? (Smiling) I do have money for training so I am in the market for a training opportunity. I mean I
might click through just to see, just out of curiosity, but the website itself is clean, okay? But its boring. It
doesnt really do anything for me and again, just having the acronym up there kind of annoys me again.

Moderator: Okay, yeah thats great. So a couple of ending questions here for you. Based on
what you have seen; would you consider joining this organization if it was something that tied directly in
with your profession?

Alison: I would consider joining it, purely because Im a brand new educator and I am seeking
resources and training opportunities. But its not really based on the visuals or the enticement that I have
seen. Its based purely on the fact that I didnt know they existed and now I do.
Moderator: Okay gotcha, yeah thats great. Okay, so is there any kind of ending advice that you could
give to our group to help better the organization?

Alison: I would totally get them up on social media. I mean Facebook, Twitter, I think in a way
you can only go up because it doesnt seem like theyre doing very much at all. And you know having
been an online producer for the newspaper, having done social media marketing for the newspaper. I
would just be careful I would be deliberate about the voice that you choose and the tone that you put
out there on social media. Obviously, and just having that be really consistent across all of their platforms.
Its a blank slate almost and its a great, great opportunity for you guys to beef it up. Im actually very
glad you guys are doing this.

Moderator: Okay awesome, that is all I have, thank you so much for doing this here today.

Audio ends, end of transcript

Jay Hmielowski Informal Interview

10/7/16

Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, Murrow

Thomas, Kylie, Kirsten, Willon

JayHmielowskiInterview.mp3

Moderator: Hi, my name is Thomas Davidson and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR


Campaigns class. I am here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or
may not belong to a professional organization, such as Public Relations Society of America, American
Marketing Association or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that we are
98

gathering this information for. When analyzing this interview your name will not be disclosed. So are you
a part of any kind of professional organization right now?

Jay: Academic ones yes. So Im not a part of any student ones like PRSSA. Im a member of
the association for journalism and mass communication education which is an academic conference
membership.

Moderator: Okay, cool and what is your role in that organization?

Jay: Usually its just as a professor submitting research so usually what we do is we submit
research to these conferences. They either accept or reject our papers. We also serve as reviewers so
review the papers that get submitted. For the association for journalism and mass communication Im
actually running a division or in the process of moving up the chain to run a division so essentially I
manage what things get accepted or rejected, manage budget and what things we are going to present at
the conference.

Moderator: Okay, cool. So as far as the organization goes, what kind of communication do
you receive? Like emails, social media, that kind of stuff.

Jay: Yeah I get emails from them. I dont do as much social media. I mean I have a
Facebook account but I havent checked it in years at this point. So most of what I get is emails from
people. Newsletter type articles, announcements, if they have a big push for something Ill hear about
that. Or my friends will tell me about something and will say oh I saw this posted on Twitter or on
Facebook. So if I am getting things that are tied to social media, its through someone else.

Moderator: Okay, yeah cool. So what was the last professional conference that you attended?

Jay: I attended the association for journalism and mass communication one in August.

Moderator: Okay, cool. And how did you find out about this conference?
Jay: Since Im a member they sort of tell you about it. Also, those ones they basically have
Theres three big ones, theres the two I mentioned and one more that I dont submit to. But those are the
three that most professors know about. And so you just sort of know when the deadlines are for these
things. Its sort of engrained into your work schedule. I know the deadline for this ones coming up. So I
first learned about it when I became a grad student and it just sort of stuck.

Moderator: Cool, cool So did anything specific draw you into that conference? Or did you
just hear about it and decided to go?

Jay: It is largely tied in with who youre working with for this. So when I did my masters
degree here and a lot of them went to that journalism mass communication one and so I started sort of
getting engrained in that one. When I went and did my PHD a lot of people were still doing that one and
so it sort of became thats the one I was going to. It was largely tied to the people that were around me but
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the professors were submitting, other grad students were submitting and that sort of just drew me in
because it was like oh, all my friends are submitting to this conference so I will as well.

Moderator: Cool, so where was the conference held?

Jay: Minneapolis, Minnesota

Moderator: Okay, great. How many of your colleagues also attended?

Jay: Yeah, so I think of the professors here there was like 5 or 6 of us that ended up going.
And I think were only like 15 or 18 faculty. So you know, getting about a third to a little over a third is
pretty good.

Moderator: Oh thats great that you had that many go with. What were some of the key
benefits to attending this conference?

Jay: The professional stuff. So being able to say that Im doing this for (inaudible) is probably
the biggest reason that I went. Seeing people that I know, sort of like friends that you knew in high school
when you go back home, that sort of mentality. Going for students here, for grad students that we advise
to get them to start meeting people so they can go to other institutions for their doctorates or go get jobs
are probably the main reasons that I went.

Moderator: Cool. So what do you think is a strong way for an organization to communicate
with its members?

Jay: I think it would have to be all of them. I mean it really is going to depend on what your
demographics of your organization. So, I dont know this, but I think older people are still tied to email,
while younger people dont use email as much. Theyre using more social media type things. So if youre
an organization thats really trying to aim for younger people, so organizations here, I dont know if email
is going to get through as much. I think the social media ones are probably going to be the better route.
Youre going to just have to get people involved and following your social media accounts.

Moderator: Yeah, cool. So Im going to show you a couple of email subject lines and just get
your thoughts about them. So when youre done, just let me know which one you would prefer to click
on, which you would kind of avoid and why.

Jay: Okay sounds good.

(Long pause while looking at email subject lines)

Jay: I mean if I was going to click on any of them, I would probably click on the last one just
because it catches your attention a little bit more. But I mean I could see the first one working if someone
did just move into an area. The Journalism educations, you know, I might click on I dont do journalism
as much if it was communication educators or something a little broader I would be more likely to click
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on it. But I think that a lot of people who do journalism here, my guess is they would probably click on
something like that (points to first one). But for me, I would most likely click on the last one because it
seems like something funny to me and I would click on it to see whats inside the email. (Jays phone
goes off) Oh, sorry. Thats actually my reminder for you.

Moderator: (Laughing) Oh no worries. So now Im going to show you three different


persuasive messages that we have created for this organization. So take a look at those and let me know
which ones make you want to search for more data and which ones dont.

(Long pause while looking at messages)

Jay: Mmm Probably the last one.

Moderator: And why that one?

Jay: I guess I like the graphic in that one a little bit more. I think it would be tied If youre
talking to a journalism person, the typewriter would connect with people. The idea of never stop learning.
If youre talking to educators, they usually all have advanced degrees and are continuing to learn sounds
like something that people who are looking at this will be more open to clicking on. So theyre entrusted
in learning, theyre entrusted in teaching. So to me if I saw something like that, I would be more willing
to click on that one, rather than the other two.

Moderator: Okay, I gotcha. So now Im going to show you their website homepage. Just to
get your initial reaction and thoughts about it.

(Long pause while looking at website homepage)

Jay: Its boring. Its really boring. If I went to it I would still click on the about and the
upcoming conference if I was a part of the organization and I would definitely click on those things. But
theres just not a whole lot there. You know, I know One of the things that would get people to go is to
sort of have Yeah they dont really have a resource area. So to me, theyre talking about and I dont
know how big the organization is but if youre trying to get new people, having some sort of syllabus sort
of information right? So if theyre trying to get people who are journalism educators, you could have
example of syllabi or something that people have used. So do more to sort of get information out to
people, rather than Its just very basic. Heres what we do, heres a very short history, heres where we
have held conferences, here is where our upcoming conference is. There is just not a whole lot there. I
think a resource area would be great for people to have a chance to share their work (syllabi, teaching
techniques, assignments, tests, etc.) with others so new potential members looking at this feel like they
are going to actually get something out of this organization.

Moderator: Cool, so a couple of ending questions now. Based on what you have seen during
our conversation today, would you consider joining this organization if it fit into your profession?
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Jay: Yeah, I would definitely consider joining. I think if I was more on a teaching track rather
than a researching kind of track And I was teaching others how to be journalists I would look into
that But I would be more willing to look into it if they had more things on there that were useful to me.
Because right now they dont seem to be offering me a whole lot. If there was more to it, I would feel
much more comfortable and would want to become a member.

Moderator: Gotcha, so do you have any kind of lasting and ending advice for us to help this
organization?

Jay: Just to liven up the website. Its very black and white and boring and the initial reaction
isnt going to say that it is very eye appealing. Its sort of just a dull sort of thing. Even for someone who
is a professor and isnt necessarily Some people wouldnt think its dull stuff but I see it as something
that could be a lot more exciting than how its being presented. I mean I read papers for a living and a lot
of people think thats boring but I look at that website and think its very boring. And think about ways to
provide people with stuff that they can use. It can be up to members if they want to share stuff because
some will be very open to that and some will be quite sensitive. You guys could always take our syllabi
from online and post them onto the website too. Just thinking about how to get people more resources so
they feel more comfortable about getting involved and staying with this organization.

Moderator: Cool, awesome. Thank you so much for taking your time to do that.

Audio ends, end of transcript

Jeffery Joireman Informal Interview


10-5-16
Washington State University Campus, Pullman, WA Todd Hall
Kylie Terrana
JeffJoireman.mp3

(Inaudible scuffling)

Moderator: Okay, so, my name is Kylie Terrana and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns
class I am here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not
belong to a professional organization such as Public Relations Society of America, America Marketing
Association, or anything smaller. Ok, first, are you a part of any professional organizations?

Joireman: Uh, yeah, you know like the American Marketing Association, the Association for
Consumer Research some of those so you know.

Moderator: And are you just a number of those, or do you have any bigger role?
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Joireman: Uh, yeah Im just a member.

Moderator: And why did you join these organizations just for professional reason?

Joireman: (laughter) I really don't know honestly. I mean a lot of times you know if you go to their
conferences or whatever it's good to be a member because you get a discount on the registration so you
might as well. And you know a lot of times when you're part of these membership, these societies or
whatever you get journals. You know but you know today, I mean you can get all these journals for free
through the library. I would assume you don't really need to join them for that reason I guess you know
you get some information and some updates. I guess it's sort of expected that you would be part of these
memberships I don't know I mean it's really in some ways it's unclear to me why join these things to be
honest.

Moderator: And what kind of communication do you receive from these organizations? Emails, do you
follow any on social media?

Joireman: Yeah I just get e-mails. I don't follow anybody on social media.

Moderator: So, do you regularly open them or have you just kind of click past?

Joireman: (mumbling and shuffling through words) I dont open a lot. I mean if there's something
that I think might be kind of interesting for class then maybe I'll open it or if there's some information
about like a special journal that's being published, or a conference or something like that all of them for
that stuff you know. For the most part I really don't pay attention.

Moderator: And what was the last professional or educational conference you attended?

Joireman: Last conference I attended? (mumbling) Gosh I go to so many that sometimes forget but,
honestly, maybeee, I would have to look. I seriously don't, I mean, I travel a lot and I don't remember.
Thats so bad. (clicking on computer keyboard) Let me look. Probably Society for Consumer Psychology
or Association for Consumer Psychology one of those two.

Moderator: What drew to that conference particularly? What were the key benefits?

Joireman: The topics and the people that go, and the location a lot of times. we just go look at a
location you're like a Hey, it looks warm in February. Oh, I think I'll go to Florida. You know, sometimes
we do that you know and I like to bounce around to different conferences to you know. So one year I'll go
to one type of conference another time I go to another and just kind of get a little different exposure to a
different topics and stuff like that. So yeah does that make sense?

Moderator: Yeah that makes sense and do a lot of your colleagues also attend when you go?
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Joireman: Yeah oh yeah yeah yeah. People do. You know we're all getting ready to go to Berlin in
October. There's a big conference there so that will be really fun. So you it's fun to go together.

Moderator: Okay, so now Im going to show a few examples of email subject lines and if you could tell
me why or why not you would open one? (Pull

Joireman: I mean, I mean I'm not into journalism right.

(Long pause inaudible chatter in the background)

Joireman: (points to first example) This one has got the best label, an acronym doesn't tell me
anything. (points to second example) And this doesn't make any sense, Pacific Northwest of Journalism
Educators', that doesn't make any sense. (points to third example) Pacific Northwest Association of
Journalism Educators', that makes sense. This, really I mean I don't really need to fit in. And I have no
idea what that means, the past the present and the future walk into a bar. It was pretty tense. I don't like
that. Maybe I might because of the subject line, I might open the middle one, but because of this that I
would even know what I mean yeah. If I knew what it was then maybe I would do open it. I mean in
terms of the subject line. I think the middle ones probably would catch my eye the most. If I was a
journalism educator. You know.

Moderator: Next, I am going to show you a few persuasive messages. If you could just give me your
opinion on the graphic and also the message. (Pulls up first example)

(long pause)

Joierman: OK yeah it's nice. I think you know the color, it's inviting, it says awesome, and you
know they want to work with ya, thats positive. I think its a positive one.

Moderator: (pulls up second example)

Joierman: Yeah I dont like it. Talent, you know whats talent. I find it kind of too wide and none of
the text really jumps out of me it looks really complicated and busy.

Moderator: (pulls up second example)

Joireman: Yeah, I like the image. I like the image a lot. I like the image here better than I like the
first one. The white is a little hard to read. As is the black, so you know, if theres a way to make that
stand out a little bit. That might make it a little bit better. But I do like the graphic. Its kind of nostalgic
and everything. It makes me think of sort of the old days of journalism or something. I like that.

Moderator: I have one last thing to show you, this is the existing homepage for this association, what
are your first reactions?
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Joierman: (mumble) I dont like it. You can hardly even tell thats an N (referring to the PNAJE at
the top of the page). I mean you can kind of tell, but its really boring. I mean its just black and white.
And theres no images, yeah I dont like it.

Moderator: Would you be called to click anywhere on this page or would you click right out?

Joireman: Yeah I would close this, I wouldnt do anything with it.

Moderator: And closing out, after seeing all of this thing about joining?
Joireman: If it fit me, probably not, you just dont get much out of these (pause) memberships. Its
just not that important to me. So probably not.

Moderator: Do you have any advice for this organization moving forward?

Joireman: I mean they could definitely make it a lot more appealing visually. With images about
journalism and make it exciting, and I think a lot more tags and links and stuff like that. I couldnt even
really figure out where the links were. You know what I mean? That top thing is so bold and
overwhelming, thats the only thing that jumps out at me. Like oh theres these tiny little things, its not
even clear that theyre links and its not all that interesting. Make it more engaging. Make it really pop.
Not too busy, but, some images I would think.

Moderator: Well, that is it. Thank you for taking the time to speak with me.

Audio ends, end of transcript.

Rebecca Cooneys Informal Interview

10-3-16

Washington State University Campus, Pullman, WA, Goertzen

Willow Neely (Moderator 1) and Kirsten Fischer (Moderator 2)

RebeccaCooneyInterview.mp3

Moderator 1: Are you apart of any professional organizations?

Cooney: Yes, so I am a member of PRSA, which is Public Relations Society of America. And then with
that Im also, theres like a Spokane Marketing Association, or like, a Spokane Com Association, and so
like the local chapter, and so Im a member of that, but Im not very active. And then theres the AEJMC,
the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication, and Im, I think thats it. Yeah,
those are the two that Im currently in.
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Moderator 1: and then besides just kind of being a member do you have any specific roles in any of
those?

Cooney: No.

Moderator 1: No? Okay. Why did you join these organizations?

Cooney: Well PRSA I joined because I am the faculty advisor for PRSSA and also Ive been a part of
PRSA National since like, 94, I think. I dont even know if Ive ever lapsed. So its just, like, the one I
adopted a hundred years ago, so Ive just been a member of that for a long time. And then AEJMC I
actually joined because David nominated me for an award and in order to be eligible for the award I had
to be a member. Thats the truth. And then the other reason is its actually kind of the premiereany of
the faculty you talk to are probably members or should be. Its our sort of professional governing body.
Its our premiere of

Moderator 2: This is what you want to be a part of

Cooney: Yeah, and I actually did win an award from them in summer of 2015. Visiting for professor and
social media where I was a partnered with Zach Ruby. That was AEJMC.

Moderator 1: Okay cool. So what kind of communication do you receive from the groups youre a part
of? So any kind of messages.

Cooney: Its email email email. Actually PRSA sends out a paper. They both send like-

Moderator 1: A Newsletter? Direct mail?

Cooney: Yeah a newsletter. And I actually kind of like this because, you know, while Im eating lunch or
something I can kind of (flips through) and with this Im actually more likely to parooze through this than
email because I dont want my inbox cluttered. I just file it and then I forget. So here by doing this if I see
something that interests me I actually might go look online. Or fill out a form or something. Which is
weird. Doesnt it seem counter intuitive?

Moderator 2: Yeah because you would think with the digital age everyone would be going online.

Cooney: I know but everybodys super burned out. And they probably have social media that I just dont
pay attention to.

Moderator 1: Yeah that was the next question: Do you pay attention to your organizations social media?

Cooney: I do get their stuff in my feed, but on a rare occasion when a headline grabs my attention, if its
something relevant. But with AEJMC, I havent even looked. Im sure they do!

Moderator 1: Do you just follow Facebook and Twitter?


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Cooney: Not even Twitter, not even LinkedIn.

Moderator 2: Would you say its for more personal or professional or is it a mix?

Cooney: The reason for me to follow it?

Moderator 2: Mhm.

Cooney: Professional. I look at it to see if its something valuable for the curriculum honestly. If theres a
new stat or study if its relevant to what Im teaching. That and professional development. The only thing
Ive considered is getting my APR, which is the highest certification a PR pro can get. But it takes time.
And motivation.

Moderator 2: Like do I have to get this done today?

Cooney: Yes and its not their fault (regarding her looking at social media) its me.

Moderator 1: What was the last professional conference you attended?

Cooney: I dont go anymore. Because Im burned out on them like every young professional does at some
point right around early 30s.

Moderator 2: Theres only so much you can network.

Cooney: Well exactly, like am I looking for a job? Then I am all over conferences. Am I research faculty
looking to publish papers and meet up with peers or solidify grants? Then count me in. But if I'm going to
go to a conference its for professional development.

Moderator 1: Are most of them you would say are help for professional development?

Cooney: It depends on like AEJMC, they are very much like research faculty coming together to
collaborate and to share knowledge to have opportunities for all sorts of different benefits for sure. So
AEJMC is definitely more of a benefit for like, it literally will help them advance where if you go to one
like for American Marketing Association or PRSA or CASEthe Center for the advancement of blah
blah blah whateverits a governing body of all of the basically your administrators in higher education.
And those conferences are awesome. If you like when I was a director of marketing in pubs for peace. In
Colorado in the concert. That was great she gets to meet up with your peers and you and they there's all
case studies so they talk about something that they did and what the outcome was really bad for you. So
you sit through the perils of basically all of your peers presenting and stuff you do every day. So that's
awesome. The ones that sucks are the ones that it's just a big vendor fast vendors like oh and technology
and you also program ads every product service is very bad or the people who are out there just like free
agents and they're just trying to get your yeah they're just like the total sales pitch mode the entire time.
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So I just haven't I haven't been motivated to go but I also have four kids at home so for me to leave is an
ordeal and Chris and I would want to go together and so that means we orchestrate so for us to do it really
so a lot of it is like stage of life is why I don't go so that's a big piece of it. I have the money. Like I have
professional development dollars that have been allocated for such things. I don't use it so it just sits there.
So there's just a lot. I mean like I should be going to PRSA National as the faculty advisor for five years
and I don't I should I should be schmoozing. But the thought of sitting through those workshops is
horrible theyre so boring.

Moderator 1: So what do you think would like what would your ideal conference be; if you figured out
the situation for your children and you know and got them taken care of?

Cooney: I would I would want one that well either I'm serving on a panel and like participating. So I'm
contributing to content or one more like what CASE did where I'm going to go and like meet up with
other directors of online MA, or other people who are teaching online courses and designing online
courses or other clinical faculty industry based faculty who are learning new things and you know we're
going about hybrid classrooms are flipped classrooms are all that like it I wanted to be experience so I
wouldn't want to just be another you know presentation on products. So the idea of meeting up with like-
minded or like my peers that would interest me. But not to advance but to learn, to learn from others to
get more voices, that appeals. Yeah but like there was somebody who wrote me from AEJMC like the
STRATCOM lister-group. So some we got an email from a gal who was looking for panelists to talk
about professional development career opportunities and mentoring students and so I was like hand raised
for that so that I will do it and I will go and I didn't want just to go.

Moderator 1: What do you think is a strong way for an organization to communicate to its members?

Cooney: I think social media is probably their best because at least they can do it in smaller chunky
snippets where the emails. It's just state of overwhelm. I also think the emails that are specific to
something like to a conference or to an article is better than the newsletters. Newsletters I think really, I
understand why they do it and that from an economic standpoint and from getting information packaging
from it. I totally understand why. But if they're going to do that I'd like the idea that these are giving
their users the option of getting a paper version but if it's going to be weekly, it's too much. So I think
there's is monthly, AEJMC, and so monthly is manageable, weekly I think I'd go nuts. That's too much
then I'd say just do email but I think social media is probably their best and it's even better if they do it as
an event. Because I've noticed that if you just post things that are happening as a post and you don't attach
it to an event it's going to get it make it saved but it's going to get lost but if it's an event it shows up on
notification you haven't. So you can say you're interested. So if I may be interested in the conference
that's three months down the road. I'm going to forget about it. But if they are going to send me a
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reminder hey it late registration or early bird registration whatever. I'm going to get that notification
because I said I'm interested, so I think ways for them to get to be able to notify because we're all so
bombarded that we if we don't write it down. We don't put it on the calendar. It's gone and it's not their
fault. So if they're going to do it, if they really really want engagement or they really really really want
attendance or something. They have to do it a different way they have to remind they can't just throw it
out there hope for the best and then be annoyed that they didn't get the feedback because they probably
won't but if they remind and you know I also think surveys are effective especially if they have a little bit
of an incentive; Enter to win or that somehow it's helping something contributing to a study. Not that not
that might be it has to be on that study but if I don't contribute to a study I'm more apt to fill it out than if I
get there just like working for general info and things like five dollars gift cards to Amazon that kind of
stuff moderately a factor but I do think surveys can are effective for our group if they're short and if they
can do it pretty much almost in the you know OK and ultimate social too quick pulls

Moderator 2: OK so you mentioned those reminders. So let's say there's a conference in three months, in
your opinion how many reminders would you want vs. OK I get it, enough.

Cooney: Well we have to plan way ahead. So it's actually really and it's actually good for them to be
pretty far out. I mean most of our educational conferences we know we hear events because of the dates
location because then because with our teaching schedules and our research for those research faculty are
going to sort of appointments we're like we're annual we're annually scheduled basically and so if I'm
going to lobby to teach on site I would need to know when that conference is to see if there's conflict and
then figure out what I mean to do for that time that Im going to be gone. If I'm teaching online or
whatever I want to want to organize my curriculum around that you know to make sure I don't have a
bunch of questions is that they're happening during conference time so I think a year out and then
probably monthly reminders earlybird reg. It's probably what the three months prior. And I'm saying
monthly reminders up and so about early reg that we might be up it to a month or two or three. Some are
good it will reminders in there and once early right has passed then they can probably backing off a little
bit but then do a final push. Again like last chance I'd say but honestly they do need to be able they need
to be a good nine to twelve months out to start.

Moderator 2: They can't schedule an exam if you're going to be gone.

Cooney: Oh yeah well you know it's just important that they understand their audience is faculty. I'm
already getting signed next fall. We work way out like and we also are juggling kids and deadlines.
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Moderator 1: OK so now I'm going to show you some email subject headlines. So basically what one
would you go to first open, they're all from the same association and just which one would you pick to
open and why.

Cooney: But this one is intriguing (top one). You know if one is like my two o'clock in the morning. I
can't sleep. If I click on this one (middle one) Oh what's happening is there an opportunity for me at
publishers or an opportunity to present at a conference. The second one is too vague. Well, well I mean
unless I am new in town. It's because that to me that that some people implies you have an opportunity to
connect, youre new in town. So it really would depend there and they're not none of them are bad but
this one.

Moderator 1: And then this is the first of three advertisements that we have OK so I'll just show you all
three real quick.

Cooney: Visually they're all great. I like them. I don't know enough about their brand to know if it's like
matching in color scheme and font. But I'm assuming. The only thing that I don't like about this one is to
work with educate that's it to work with is of this very much a professional term. So with educators it
might be we're looking for us and journalism educators to contribute to I mean do you know what you
mean by work with?

Moderator 2: I think collaborate.

Cooney: That's a better word.

Moderator 1: OK great. Maybe to engage?

Cooney: Because are you looking for them to contribute content. Because work with it's very much
industry sounds like there's going to be work to do. Collaborate a really good word for educators to look
forward to. This one looking for talent Yeah it doesn't totally bug me it's a little bit. It's more
approachable. But you might be looking for experts. I mean I don't think that one doesn't really turn me
off that I mean you know the word talent sort of fits because we were new to her but if you saw I see what
you are like actors that might be a little turn off like they might be like oh for experts. But I like that one, I
would keep it. So this one is applying ongoing education for your continued education opportunity yeah I
like that you used a typewriter, its old school. Because a lot of especially journalism and really connect
with the old school.

Moderator 1: Which one do you think you would that calls to you the most, I guess because we're just
basically trying to see which of these you're going to pay more attention to.
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Cooney: I like the hi there. I like it I think it's because it's simple. Yeah I like some I like I like white
space. Yeah and would you click on the link if it said especially if it's to collaborate because then to me
that looks like if I'm going to spend more time doing something I want to somehow at least be beneficial
to my bottom line but I don't mean money as much as I mean like I have the money you know I have
evals every year and trying to get to associate you have to work it to be a full time searching for six years
before youre even eligible and so anything that I do that is outside of my normal work has to feed that.
So that's why so that might look like contributing to the original content, it might be editing or serving on
a panel or guest lecturing it might be you know that since all it's going to have to contribute to that is it for
me to just be a member isn't as immediately appealing as like learning about what that means. It has to be
you know meaningful and it has to be there has to be some reason for me if I'm going to take time to do
something it has to contribute to my development like it can't just be because of the feeling philanthropic,
there's just not enough time.

Moderator 2: Yeah very true.

Moderator 1: That's very true. Yeah. OK said this is the actual website for PNAJE. What is your initial
reaction to this homepage?

Cooney: It's OK It's just so dark. It's just they turn to go for the whole newsprint thing? Because I really I
really like that classic look of that third ad that would be that that's a fun look, the vintage kind of like
appreciating the legacy. Its not terrible, its clean. I think it's kind of just dark, it would be nice to see a
little splash of color, photos are good if they're good photos but they can also be off putting if theyre
crappy. Yeah but like if this conference happened before theres room for a photo you know something
people smiling, having fun. .

Moderator 2: So looking at this home page. What is the first thing your eyes go to?

Cooney: The .J. Yeah where there's no logo? They need a brand refresh. Yeah I'd rather be clean and
ugly. At least it's not cluttered and gross and like horrible off putting colors. Its just a little bit sad. You
know if they have a strong brand model that they can back up a black and white. Well I think you'd be
OK.

Moderator 2: But it should have more personality?

Cooney: Right.

Moderator 1: Well last questions here, based on what you have seen during our conversation today it
would you consider joining this organization if it fit into your profession?
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Cooney: Maybe I think I'd look more into it if it was if it was my area which is not really my area. I
would be curious because I kind of like the idea of a pac-Northwest Association of educators. So if it was
if it was a pac it was a sort of association of strategic com educators I would be very interested in looking
at that. So I love the idea of meeting up with like-minded people from my own area and I dont know if
that exists over there. CASE is the closest thing to it, but CASE is really for administrator journalism and
media something, but if they expanded

Moderator 1: Yeah because that is pretty specific right now.

Cooney: That's another opportunity for them is to expand them into all of communication so they can
incorporate more of com and society, environmental com, political com, strat com. That would be a way, I
mean why not?

Moderator 1: Do you have any advice for this organization moving forward?

Cooney: Rebrand and expand. Yeah because I think there's a lot across these the Pacific Northwest
universities there are a ton of these professors of practice and clinical struggle because we don't really see
as rich as rich with research faculty so we feel a little bit out of place, so we don't really have a good
home right now. So like embracing the whole thought industry based faculty is a really good opportunity.
Yeah it's a huge opportunity there's a lot of us and we do we don't really have a good spot.

Moderator 1 & 2: Alright thank you so much!

Cooney: Youre welcome!

Lucrezia Paxsons Informal Interview


10/6/16
Washington State University, Pullman, WA, Murrow 326C
Willow Neely
Interview via note taking

Moderator: Hi, my name is Willow Neely and I am a part of a Comstrat 485 PR Campaigns class. I am
here to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not belong to a
professional organization, such as Public Relations Society of America, American Marketing Association
or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that we are gathering this
information for. When analyzing this interview your name will not be disclosed.

Moderator: Are you apart of any professional organizations?

Paxson: Yes, I am apart of two. When I was reporting in London I was apart of the Association of
American Correspondents. I am also apart of Society of Professional Journalists.
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Moderator: Why did you join this organization?

Paxson: I wanted to get input from other professionals in the field.

Moderator: What kind of communication do you receive from the groups youre a part of?

Paxson: I receive newsletters, emails and updates from social media.

Moderator: What sorts of communication would you want to receive?

Paxson: I like getting information from social platforms like Facebook and Twitter. This forma of
communication is new and concise. Newsletters are old, but they are still an informative way of
communication.

Moderator: Do you pay attention to your organizations social media? Also, what do you think others
pay attention to?

Paxson: Yes I pay attention to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. These are the most highly watched
platforms with the highest engagement.

Moderator: What was the last professional conference youve attended?

Paxson: Long ago, in London. I dont like conferences very much unless they have guest speakers or
meaningful workshops.

Moderator: What would draw you to attending a conference?

Paxson: I like to look out for new trends and technology in the field, guest speakers, new teaching
technique and innovation.

Moderator: Now I am going to show you a few email subject lines. (Shows three different email
subjects) Which email would you open and why?

Paxson: I would open the first one because it is humorous and grabs my attention. The other lines look
like everything else I have seen in emails.

Interview ends, end of transcription.

Lisa Waananen Informal Interview


10-7-16
Washington State University Campus, Pullman, WA, Murrow
113

Kirsten Fischer
LisaWaananenInterview.mp3

Moderator: OK so my name is Kirsten and I am part of a COMSTRAT 485 P.R. campaign class. I'm here
to represent my agency to ask you a few questions regarding why you may or may not belong to a
professional organization such as public relations the Society of America American Marketing
Association or an organization of a smaller size. We do not work for the company that we are gadget
gathering this information for and when analyzing this interview your name will not be disclosed. So
right now are you a part of any professional organizations?
Lisa: Yeah so my background is in journalism so I am currently a member of AEJMC so
Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication so Im a member of that I'm
also a member of IRE which is Investigative Reporters and Editors there's a number of other
organizations that I like have been members of or that I follow but I don't think I'm I currently
like paid up member.

Moderator: Oh yeah. And what sparked your interest to get involved with like those so you're
kind of following?

Lisa: Almost all of the organizations that have been a part of at one point it was because I
attended a conference and so there was a discounted rate to join or you had to be a member to
present at the conference. So I don't think I've joined any organizations just for the membership I
think it's always been related to having some sort of event or you know I'm getting something for
it.

Moderator: What were those conferences like? What did you kind of enjoy about them or what
didn't you like about it?

Lisa: Yeah so for IRE they do two really big conferences each year and one of them is called
NICAR and it's related specifically to what used to be called the computer system reporting that
we call data journalism usually. And that's of particular interest of mine so I went to that last
year and in my interest I wasn't presenting at it I just had never gone and thought it would be a
good experience. There was also a conference immediately before it that was sort of an
invitation only that I got invited to so that was separate that was held through, um, are you
familiar with Tablo software?

Moderator: No Im not.
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Lisa: So it's a software program for data visualization and so they had sort of a hosted
conference in conjunction with it so that one I'm still a member and my husband and I have both
a number so we basically like trade off our membership but we always have the benefits without
having like both pay. So that was fun. So that conference was kind of a it's a become a pretty
big thing but it is a pretty specialized sort of topic. And then the other one, AEJMC, I just went
to there because they have a huge internal conference each year that one's largely geared toward
like professors and educators and this past year was in Minneapolis in August and my parents
live in Minneapolis. So it was nice a month there with my baby and it was free child care and I
also got to present a poster so that was the main motivation for going to that and I was not
previously a member. Although I had previously followed like their publications and stuff. I
didn't become a paying member until I had to for the conference.

Moderator: So are when they do it kind of invite you to these conferences how do they reach
out to you?

Lisa: Both of those that I've been to recently are pretty well known. They're the biggest
conferences that those organizations put on and so they always have them the same time of year.
So you start seeing messages even like a year in advance like they've already announced like
next year, join us in Denver or wherever. So it's already kind of like on your radar if you get
any communication from them and then like as it got closer I think I saw a lot of messages
mostly e-mails and on social media where they're like reminder: deadline for the early bird rate
kind of thing so I would say I didn't really seriously consider it until they started doing that kind
of message.

Moderator: And do you like getting in the emails or do you prefer to kind of look to social
media on your own or what's kind of your primary way or how would you prefer to be
contacted?

Lisa: All of those organizations and a few others that I just belong to like their e-mail lists send
emails fairly regularly. And I feel like it's about right. Like maybe once a week or something.
They have an update and it's not usually anything that's like too long. You know it is mostly just
like a newsletter and a lot of the time theres a blog and I'll have like links to our blog posts of
like probably don't read those really but occasionally there's something like written by
somebody I know about it but yes I just kind of skim it. And I feel like that's about appropriate
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like if they were sending stuff more often than that I would probably find it annoying but you
know I think it seems once every week or two weeks is about right for an email and then some of
the other organizations I just follow like on Facebook or Twitter and that's nice because I do have
just more control over you know if I want to check it I can otherwise it's pretty easy to ignore
with all the other stuff.

Moderator: So primarily Facebook and Twitter is kind of how you keep up to date?

Lisa: Yeah I think that's why I keep up to date with kind of the broader groups you know the
ones that I'm not necessarily a member in but I'm curious about what they're doing.

Moderator: And what's kind of so the organizations that you are like active membership some of
those ones that you just kind of keep in touch with kind of what's the difference between the two
like what really kind of caught you wanting to join one versus you know not as involved in the
other ones?

Lisa: I mean probably haven't been terribly strategic about this. It has literally just been like
that Oh I have to pay or membership comes with the conference rate if you pay like an extra
ten bucks or something and then it's like all right thats fine. So like there's a couple like there's
another one called Online News Organization and I'm actually very active with them. I like
participate a lot on their Facebook forum that's like a close group for professors and I help our
screen their entries for their annual contests and stuff so I actually do more for them but I'm not a
paying member because I've never been to their conferences I was right when school starts so
Im probably never going to go. And so I've never had an incentive to pay.

Moderator: So some of those conferences are like during school so are those are really hard to
go to?

Lisa: Yeah most of them are I mean AEJMC because it is specifically for educators they hold
that at the beginning of August every year and they do that on purpose because that's sort of like
the one gap and you know no one's really in a major part of the semester and all the other ones
are sort of a combination of like academics and professionals so they don't they just kind of hold
them whenever I guess. And so yeah some of them wind up like NICAR that I went to I really
like that I would go back home but it almost always corresponds with mid-terms during spring
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semester and this is just like enough of a challenge that like I probably am not going to go
regularly. So yeah that scheduling becomes a big issue.

Moderator: And so I know you've been to a few conferences but what was the last professional
conference that you attended and what was kind of your role there?

Lisa: Sure. So I guess the most recent one I've been to was the one in August the one in
Minneapolis for AEJMC and I went to that specifically because I was presenting a poster for a
panel. It was about teaching ideas so it was a it wasn't like a Research Panel it was more of just
like here's a cool thing I did in my class last year and you had to submit that back in April. So
then they pick finalists and then you go and present and then at the conference they present like
out of the twenty five finalists like someone gets awarded the last one also there's kind of an
incentive to go but part of it's just been named a finalist is like a big thing to pull a new annual
review. So yeah a lot of people apply even if they're not planning to go to the conference.

Moderator: So that's kind of what drew you into going?

Lisa: Yeah but that is something that a lot of other faculty here go to because of the research
emphasis but I'm a clinical faculty I don't do research. So it was something that was kind of on
my radar but I didn't really have anything to contribute until I saw this teaching thing and got
selected.

Moderator: Thats great. How many of your colleagues for your peers that you know also
attended that one?

Lisa: You know that one was really big so I think probably we had at least at that at least
probably at least ten other Murrow faculty and a lot of ability at least ten grad students as well
that was a pretty big, pretty big group the one I actually went to a conference that we
immediately the week before that in Portland. Which was a much smaller one and that was a
good example of one where I went and I led a panel there which is how I got to go but like that
one where no one else from here. Was there and I don't think they probably even knew about it
because it's very Narrow focus very you know news nerds and it's basically like people who code
in newsrooms. Yeah and I wouldn't have I would be surprised if anyone else here even like heard
of it.

Moderator: So they reached out to you and asked you to be on the panel? The smaller one?
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Lisa: Yeah that was one where that conference organizers did not but I have actually he was one
of my, someone advised when I was in after grad school so a friend I guess he was doing a panel
on parenting in the news industry and wanted to have also female perspective on the moderating
side of things so he invited me to join his panel.

Moderator: So did that small one have any benefits that they kind of announced to you?

Lisa: That one is really it's it's weird because it is such a niche thing but within the group of
people who care about that it's like everyone wants to go and they cap at it a really small number
of attendees I think it's only like two hundred. So that when there's actually a lottery to like be
able to go.

Moderator: OK it's sort of a little exclusive.

Lisa: Yeah that one's a little. So it's kind of weird is like yet most people don't even know it
exists for the people but if you really go there you go to and they do a lot of really it's like
sponsored by a lot of big companies then like the New York Times and Google and stuff and
they. So like among other things they provide like really nice food and they provide free child
care and so they do a lot to try to like make it more of an inclusive kind of very like workshop
focused instead of some of these bigger conferences that are a lot like somebody presents and
everybody else listens.

Moderator: Do you like the smaller kind of panel discussions or do you like the bigger kind of
presentations or what are kind of the pros and cons of both?

Lisa: It was fun going to both like writing a road just because it was such a big contrast. The
smaller one was a lot more fun in some ways but it was also kind of stressful because like there
was really like no downtime you were kind of like expect like it's a small enough group so
youre sort of expected to like just like make friends you know and right like even during breaks
it's like let's chat about stuff and I mean that's part of what's great about it but like is an introvert
it wears you down. And so it was kind of nice having like the bigger conference that after that
where it's just like oh. I can go do my thing I can stop and then apparently it's boring I can leave
to know it's going to be really nice to just kind of have enough other people that there is some
freedom but I do think that that probably most of the people it seems much more collaborative
the smaller one like instead of the bigger one does seem just kind of like everyone's trying to like
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say their thing to be able to put that on their resume. I mean some of the panels are still always
great but it's much more it feels much more like somebody planned it out in advance as far as
like what would be good for me to put on my list this year.

Moderator: What do you think as a strong way for an organization to communicate with its
members; on Facebook e-mail Twitter Linked In? And which ones do you think would be best
and kind of why?

Lisa: I mean I think Facebook's Facebook works pretty well and like I don't know I don't really
like spending that much time on Facebook but it is it makes the discussion really easy a lot of the
groups that I follow are more active on Twitter and in some ways I prefer that but it does make it
much harder to follow sort of these like longer conversations or it's just a lot more fragmented
the way that things like come up than or not so I mean Facebook's a really nice way. Just keep it
sort of organized. I don't use LinkedIn much. I imagine some of these groups are doing some
stuff there. I dont feel like I'm missing out that much by not checking in. Email works pretty
well I think for like getting information out but it doesn't do a great job of fostering discussion
and interaction and yeah I'm a good example of that I'm also a member of the Association for
faculty women here on campus which is a smaller. I mean I dont go to the meetings that often,
but it's a great group and that's when we're like as far as I know they have no social media so
everything's done through like the list serv an email. And that's good for getting on
announcements but occasionally it does turn into like a long conversation because there's no
other way to like do that and then it just let talks of your inbox and you're like All right. This is
probably good but I don't want to deal with this now that we have let me just make a Facebook
group.

Moderator: That makes sense! OK so I'm going to show you a few different email Subject lines
and then I would like you to just say which one you would open and you can rank however just
how do you feel about them.

Lisa: I like the middle one that would just strike me as like I should only see what it's about. The
top one feels a little bit like it's trying too hard. So like I would try to click on it but probably
would sort of like Alright convince me this is worth my time really. And the last one I think
seems fine if I was like new to the group but it would seem like if I had received multiple
messages from them already I would ignore it.
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Moderator: OK and then we're going to show you a couple of persuasive messages and we're
just curious which one you like and which one you don't.

Lisa: (When showed the first ad) that would be inviting, interesting to me.

Moderator: And then just the words just the way that we phrase it is there anything that you
would change or anything you dont like?

Lisa: I mean it comes off as pretty informal so it gives me the impression that this is sort of a
group that is either is sort of like you know new media tech minded or is trying to give that
impression which is not really a bad thing. But it might make me wonder if it was coming a little
bit more from like a marketing side than like strictly journalism. Be kind of wondering like you
know what is the end goal here? Yeah but I don't think anything about that message would
make me like uninterested or overly suspicious.

Moderator: Ok so heres the second message.

Lisa: I would find the word talent like slightly intimidating. I think like it makes it sound like
they're asking for a lot. So I think that one is still inviting but I would maybe feel less likely to
sort of look into it more I would maybe feel a little bit more like oh I should star that and come
back to it someday when I have a little more time.

Moderator: Gotcha, no thank you. (Shows final persuasive message).

Lisa: You know that's appealing I would consider that you know I mean it's fitting in with some
styles as far as visual stuff that would make me suspect that is, in some ways it's almost more
polished and I would expect from a group that is. They did make me wonder like is this more of
an association or is this like some sort of like business advertising. Like I don't know I mean I do
a lot of visual stuff in visual communication and I'm usually pretty like astonished at how bad a
lot of it is from a lot of groups but if it's too good you're also suspicious of like you must not be
the one doing this. Like somebody else must be must be helping out here. It would make me a
little bit more like what is you know what angle theyre going for. So I guess this one the visuals
combined with less information would make me feel a little bit like curious but also more
skeptical.
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Moderator: Oh yeah. Thank you. Yeah so Ill kind of show you our client's home page. So
we're representing the Pacific Northwest Association of journalism educators. And so this is
their home page and so just based on just first glance what's kind of your initial reaction?

Lisa: I would say this doesn't seem out of line with what I expect from other journalism related
organizations so I wouldn't necessarily think I would have any like necessarily Superbad
impressions for sure. I think I would be immediately looking for some of the things like the
about page and contact and stuff and so it's nice to see that listed right up front easy to find. I
think I would be curious sort of about like yeah the scope of the mission those would be the first
things I'd be curious about so as long as theyre easy to find, the style itself I don't you know
seems fine. I wouldn't it wouldn't make me surprised to see a website like that. So I would
probably sort of just ignore those cues and be looking for information.

Moderator: OK, and then does, I mean if you initially look and you see 2015 and all this stuff
what is that what impression does that have give you?

Lisa: Oh yeah if I was seeing like I would definitely be looking for more up to date stuff
otherwise I would assume that they just are either defunct or don't use this website or something.
I mean that recently we're friends looking for up to date stuff that would become pretty obvious.
Pretty soon you know they don't have like a little Twitter thing that hasn't been updated. But you
know yeah I would I would probably just write it off with a suit if it didn't seem like they were
active at all. I would maybe if I was looking for particular information I would probably keep
looking for it but if I was like sent a link to this and then it was old I would probably just be like
OK I don't really know it's going on.

Moderator: OK so color wise layout design?

Lisa: Yeah I mean I think it could be a little bit more engaging or attractive but you know this
looks like a you know Wordpress template or standard sort of template that you know other
websites use and that usually does the job for an organization like that.

Moderator: Thank you so much for looking at all of this stuff for a year and then just based on
kind of what you've seen today with the messages and then with the website, would you consider
joining this organization if they sent you those messages that you liked and then took you to this
website? Would you join?
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Lisa: It would depend what sort of benefits they were probably presenting and the cost and sort
of whether it seemed like there was something that was of immediate benefit to me but I think
knowing about it would be enough for me to sort of start paying attention and be fine with
receiving e-mails on I think I might not be immediately like oh yeah I totally want to join and be
involved right now but I would certainly be curious to kind of know what's going on outside.

Moderator: Awesome. Do you have any advice for this organization not moving forward?

Lisa: Well I think you point out you know the date thing is sort of an issue. And if you're going
to I mean that would be a really easy fix on this website to just put like the about stuff on the
homepage if theyre not going to blog real frequently but you know I haven't heard of this
organization so it does seem like some additional outreach wouldn't be that hard. There arent
that many journalism education is in the Pacific Northwest and all are contact information is
pretty publicly available. So I would consider I would wonder if it's just sort of like a start-up
thing that's never really gotten off the ground sort of what the deal is.

Moderator: And then if they did reach out to you or send you messages that all what kind of
sparked your interest or make you want to go visit if they had a conference what would kind of
make you go I want to go to that?

Lisa: Yeah I guess it would be I mean part of it is just logistics the schedule how much does it
cost and where is it and you know the other thing would be just you know I guess I am not that
well connected with like a lot of the journalism educators in like Seattle and Portland so that
sounds potentially interesting but I'd have to be sort of convinced by a specific you know
program or set of things that that was actually going to happen. You know if it's if I started
looking into it seemed like it was really such like the only people involved were in like Seattle
and it's not really that regional I probably wouldn't be as interested as if it is truly regional like
this.

Moderator: Gotcha. Well thank you so much for your time!


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Appendix E:

Appendix F

Appendix G:
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Appendix H:

Appendix I:

Appendix J:

Appendix K:
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Appendix L:

Appendix M:
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Appendix N: