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Malawi Assembly 13th March 2017

Zikomo (zee-koh-moh) everyone! Our class, P2a, have been learning about a country
called Malawi, and would like to share what we have learnt with you today. Zikomo
means welcome in Chichewa (chih-cheh-wah), which is one of the languages spoken in
Malawi.

What else do we know about Malawi? We will use the name itself to help us explain.

(ALL SAY THE WORDS IN BOLD AS THE LETTERS ARE HELD UP)

M is for maize. Maize is a type of white corn that is grown in many parts of the world.
In Malawi, they use it to make a dish called nsima (en-see-ma) that is very much like
porridge.

Nsima is eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner with beans and vegetables, sometimes
even meat, if people can afford to buy it.

A is for Africa. Malawi is in Africa, the second largest continent in the world. Around
1.2 billion people live in Africa, which is 230 times as many as in Scotland!

There are 54 countries in the African continent with over 1000 different languages
spoken.

L is for Lilongwe (Lih-long-gway). Lilongwe is the capital city of Malawi, and is right in
the middle of the country.

It is named after the Lilongwe River and is very near the borders of two other African
countries, Mozambique and Zambia.

A is for animals. Malawi has many, many different species of animals, and some are
magnificient!

There are lions, leopards, giraffes, elephants, rhinos, buffalo, antelope and many more.
(PAUSE AFTER EACH ANIMAL AND CHILDREN HOLD UP MASKS AND MIMIC
ANIMAL SOUNDS AND MOVEMENTS)

W is for weather. Malawi has two seasons: the wet season and the dry season. The
wet season runs from December to March and is hot and humid.

The dry season runs from April to November and can be very cold at night.

I is for independence. Like much of Africa, Malawi has been ruled by different
countries throughout its history, including the British Empire.

Malawi became independent in 1964.


(CHILDREN HOLD UP MALAWI FLAGS)

This is the flag of Malawi which was adopted in 1964. The sun represents freedom and
hope, as many African countries were becoming independent at this time.

The black colour represents the native people of the continent.

The red colour represents their struggles.

The green colour represents nature.

(OTHER CHILDREN HOLD UP SCOTLAND FLAGS)

Scotland and Malawi have had strong ties to each other for over 150 years.

In 1859 Dr David Livingstone, an explorer and missionary, travelled to Malawi. Malawis


oldest city, Blantyre, is named after the birthplace of Dr Livingstone.

Dr Livingstone worked very hard to introduce Christianity to Malawi and stop slavery.

We are now going to sing a traditional folk song called Yesu Wanga (yeh-zuh wang-ga),
which means My Jesus.

(WHOLE CLASS)

As Fairtrade Fortnight only ended yesterday, we thought that we should let you know
about some of the Fairtrade products that you can buy that come from Malawi

There is Coffee, tea, rice, nuts, lentils and cola. You can find these products online and
in shops such as Rainbow Turtle in Paisley and the Co-op.

Thank you for joining us for this assembly. We hope you have enjoyed learning some
interesting facts about Malawi.

We are going to finish with a traditional tribal dance called Gule Wamkulu (goo-lay
wahm-koo-loo) or the Big Dance.

ALL CHILDREN DANCE AND SHAKE SHAKERS WHILE WALKING OFF THE STAGE
chttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5d1XHYLUrOs

Yesu Wanga

Yesu wanga wondisamalira ine


Yesu wanga wondisamala (x2)
Suyo! Yesu wanga
Wanditulutsa, wandisambitsa ine;
Wanditulutsa, wandisambitsa,
Wandiyeretsa, wandikwezeka
Suyo! Yesu wanga.