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Research Article 1

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Xiaoxu Wang

Jia Gao

Jianshu Zhang

Xiaopeng Zhang

Ruili Guo

Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang Bingtuan, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shihezi University, Shihezi, Xinjiang, China.

Theoretical and Experimental Studies on Acetylene Absorption in a Polytetrafluoroethylene Hollow-Fiber Membrane Contactor

The separation of acetylene from a gas mixture was investigated using a polytetra- fluoroethylene hollow-fiber membrane contactor and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone as absorbent. The effects of the gas velocity, the liquid velocity, the feed gas con- centration, and the module length on the acetylene mass transfer were investi- gated. The results showed that the acetylene mass transfer flux increased with in- creasing liquid velocity, gas velocity, and feed gas concentration, but decreased with increasing membrane module length. A mathematical model was used to predict the wetting extent of the membrane and the mass transfer resistance in the acetylene mass transfer process. The wetting extent of the membrane was found to increase with increasing liquid velocity and to be effectively restrained with increasing gas velocity. The liquid phase resistance and the wetted-mem- brane phase resistance controlled the acetylene mass transfer in the acetylene absorption process. The acetylene absorption efficiency was maintained at 90 % for 114 h of the C 2 H 2 membrane absorption–thermal desorption cycle process.

Keywords: Acetylene absorption, Hollow-fiber membrane contactor, Membrane wetting, 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, Polytetrafluoroethylene

Received: May 31, 2014; revised: September 23, 2014; accepted: November 27, 2014

DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400338

1 Introduction

Acetylene is a basic organic raw material used in various fields, which can be produced by the calcium carbide process, the hydrocarbon cracking process, and by plasma pyrolysis of coal. The content of acetylene in the pyrolysis gas produced by the hydrocarbon cracking process and by plasma pyrolysis of coal is 5–30 %. The separation and enrichment of acetylene is highly necessary. Acetylene has been primarily separated in gas sepa- ration processes by adsorption and absorption methods. The tower solvent absorption method is mainly applied in the in- dustry. However, this method has many drawbacks, such as flooding, entrainment, channeling, large-scale equipment, etc. [1]. In contrast, a gas-liquid hollow-fiber membrane contactor allows two phases to come into direct contact with each other for mass transfer, without dispersion of one phase into the oth- er [2]. This device offers several advantages, including a high interfacial area per unit volume, no flooding at high flow rates,

Correspondence: Prof. Ruili Guo (grli@shzu.edu.cn), Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Chemical Engineering of Xinjiang Bingtuan, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shihezi University, Shihezi, Xinjiang 832003, China.

no unloading at low flow rates, and operation at low pressure [3, 4], thus showing good prospects for gas absorption. Hollow-fiber membrane contactors have been used to sepa- rate CO 2 , SO 2 , H 2 S, benzene, and propylene from flue gas, nat- ural gas, and gas mixtures. For example, Rahbari-Sisakht et al. [5] investigated CO 2 stripping in polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber membrane contactors using diethanol- amine as absorbent. The results displayed that a CO 2 stripping efficiency of 82 % could be reached. Albo et al. [6] and Albo and Irabien [7] studied CO 2 absorption in a polypropylene hol- low-fiber membrane contactor using the ionic liquid, 1-ethyl- 3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate, as the absorption liquid. The results showed that around 28–35 % of the carbon dioxide can be recovered. Park et al. [8] performed experimental stud- ies on the removal of SO 2 using a 2 M NaOH solution as ab- sorbent in PVDF hollow-fiber membrane contactors. The SO 2 removal efficiency could reach 85 %. Membrane gas absorption provides an efficient way for acid gas separation. In addition, gas molecules can diffuse through membrane pores to the other side of the membrane at low pressure, which is suitable for the safe operation of acetylene. Therefore, membrane gas absorp- tion is a promising technology for the separation of acetylene from pyrolysis gas mixtures. At present, many mathematical models have been developed for the analysis of mass transfer in membrane gas absorption processes, such as the two-dimensional mathematical model

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[9, 10], the three-dimensional mathematical model [11], the rate-based model [12], the plug flow model and Happel’s regu- lar free-surface model [13–15], and the resistance-in-series model [16, 17]. The resistance-in-series model is widely used to research changes in the extent of membrane wetting and resist- ance in membrane gas mass transfer processes. In the industry, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) is widely used as a solvent for the absorption of acetylene. NMP is also a good solvent for most polymer membrane materials, such as polypropylene, polyethylene, PVDF, polysulfone, etc. However, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) material shows a remarkable chemical resistance and is insoluble in all known solvents. In this work, acetylene was separated from a gas mixture by a PTFE membrane contactor using NMP as absorbent. The effects of the liquid velocity, the gas velocity, the feed gas con- centration, and the module length on the acetylene absorption efficiency and the mass transfer flux were investigated by a one-way absorption process. A mathematical model correlating the resistance-in-series equation is proposed to investigate membrane wetting and the mass transfer resistance of PTFE hollow-fiber membranes for acetylene absorption. Additionally, an absorption–thermal desorption cycle process was performed to detect the acetylene absorption performance and the solvent resistance of the PTFE membrane.

2

Theory

2.1 Mass Transfer in the Membrane Contactor

The change of heat in the acetylene absorption process was minimal and could be neglected. Thus, the process was re- garded as an isothermal operation. Meanwhile, there is no acet- ylene-NMP chemical reaction. The resistance-in-series model was used to describe the mass transfer of the gas-liquid contac- tor system. Mass transfer between the gas and the liquid through the hollow-fiber membrane contactor occurs in three parts: the gas film, the membrane, and the liquid film [18]. In the partial wetting operation mode, the mass transfer flux J i 1) of the acetylene component is given in Eq. (1). The overall mass transfer coefficient shown in Eq. (2) is a function of the mass transfer coefficients in the gas, membrane, and liquid.

J

¼

k

G

RT ð p i;g p i; m Þ ¼

k

M

RT ðp i ;m p i ;int Þ

¢

M

¼ k

H

ð C i;int C i;m Þ ¼ k L

H

ð C i; m C i; L Þ

1

K

G

¼ RT þ RT

k

G

k

M

þ H þ H

k

¢

M

k

L

(1)

(2)

where p i ,g , p i ,m , and p i ,int are the acetylene partial pressures in the bulk gas phase, the gas-membrane interface, and the gas- liquid interface, respectively; C i ,int , C i ,m , and C i ,L are the acety- lene concentrations at the gas-liquid interface, the liquid-mem- brane interface, and the liquid bulk, respectively. K G is the

1)

List of symbols at the end of the paper.

¢

overall mass transfer coefficient, k g , k M , k M , and k L are individ- ual mass transfer coefficients of the gas side, the dry mem- brane, the wetted membrane, and the liquid side, respectively. T is the temperature, R is the gas constant, and H represents Henry’s constant. Eq. (2) can also be expressed in terms of re- sistance, as shown in Eq. (3)

¢

R T ¼ R G þ R M þ R M þ R L

(3)

¢

where R T , R G , R M , R M , and R L are the total resistance, the gas phase resistance, the dry-membrane phase resistance, the wet- ted-membrane phase resistance, and the liquid phase resist- ance, respectively.

2.2 Individual Mass Transfer Coefficients

The mass transfer coefficient for the gas flow in the lumen side can usually be described by Leveque’s correlation [19]:

Sh ¼ k g d i ¼ 1 : 62

D

i :G

d

i

L

ReSc

0: 33

(4)

where Sh, Re , and Sc are the Sherwood number, the Reynolds number, and the Schmidt number, respectively. L is the effec- tive length of the membrane. D i ,G is the diffusivity of acetylene in the gas phase. The mass transfer coefficient for the liquid flow in the shell side is calculated by the following equation [20]:

Sh ¼ k L d h ¼ 5 : 85ð 1 j Þ

D

i;L

d h Re 0: 6 Sc 0:33

L

(5)

where d h and j are hydrodynamic radius and the packing frac- tion of the module, respectively. D i ,L is the diffusivity of acety- lene in the liquid phase. In the non-wetted mode, the mem- brane mass transfer coefficient k M is predicted using the following equation:

1 td non-wetted

k

M

¼

D i;M e M

(6)

In the membrane-wetting mode, the membrane mass trans- fer coefficient can be expressed using the following equation:

1

¢

¼ htd wetted

D i;L e M

(7)

k M

where e M is the membrane porosity, d non-wetted and d wetted are the thicknesses of the non-wetted and wetted parts of the membrane pores, respectively, t is the tortuosity, and D i ,M is the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas in the pores, which is calculated by the combination of the molecular and Knudsen diffusivities in the following equation:

1

D

i ;M

¼

1

D

i; g

þ

1 a

D

K

(8)

where D K is the Knudsen diffusion coefficient.

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3 Experimental

3.1 Materials and Methods of Analysis

The NMP used in the experiments was purchased from Tianjin Guangfu Science and Technology Development Co., Ltd., and the purity was 99 %. The solubility of acetylene in NMP was 2.8 g mL 1 by bubble absorption under the conditions of 20 C and 0.1 MPa. The hydrophobic porous PTFE hollow-fiber membrane used in the experiments was provided by Zhejiang DD Water Industry Co., Ltd. (Zhejiang, China). Tab. 1 shows the characteristics of the membrane. The gas concentrations of acetylene in the feed and outlet gases were measured by a thermal conductivity detector gas chromatograph (GC-2014C; Shimadzu), and the liquid concen- trations of acetylene were determined by a hydrogen flame ion- ization detector gas chromatograph.

3.2 Experimental Unit and Procedures

According to the solubility in NMP and the composition of the pyrolysis gas, in the membrane absorption process, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and acetylene were mixed to simulate the pyrolysis gas. Fig. 1 is a schematic representation of the experimental setup for acetylene absorption. In the hollow-fiber membrane con- tactor, the gas stream flows through the inside of the hollow fi- bers and the absorption liquid flows countercurrently through the shell side considering the higher absorption liquid pressure,

Table 1. Specifications of the hollow-fiber membrane module.

Parameter

Value

Module outer diameter, D o Module inside diameter, D i Fiber outside diameter, d o Fiber inside diameter, d i Effective fiber length, L Fiber wall thickness, d Number of fibers, n Outer membrane area, A · 10 4 Average pore size, d p Fiber porosity, e Packing density

0.014 m 0.01 m 2.3 · 10 3 m 8 · 10 4 m 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 m 7.5 · 10 4 m

7

5.06, 10.1, 15.17, 20.2 m 2 0.22 m m 52 % 37.03 %

which results in easy wetting of the membrane pores. Each gas stream was mixed in the mixer by turning each valve of the chromatograph to the desired velocity, and was then fed into the hollow fiber membrane lumen side. The treated gas stream was released at the other end of the module. Adjusting the pressure control valve resulted in an increase in the gas phase pressure to about 0.001 MPa higher than that of the liquid phase. The rich absorbent entered the solution tank 1 in a non-

The rich absorbent entered the solution tank 1 in a non- Figure 1. Scheme of the

Figure 1. Scheme of the experimental setup for acetylene absorption.

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liquid-circulated manner. When the process was operated in the liquid-circulated mode, the rich ab- sorbent entered the stripper through a heater ex- changer and was hot-regenerated. The temperature of the heater exchanger was controlled at about 173 C by an oil bath. In order to ensure that the acetylene was fully regenerated from the rich ab- sorbent, the stripper was heated to 173 C by an electric heating tape. The regenerated acetylene could reach a purity of 99 %. The regenerative ab- sorbent was cooled through a water cooler and was then once again introduced into the shell side of the membrane contactor. The operation continued for about 1 h to allow the system to reach a stable state. Stable-state conditions were indicated by a constant acetylene concentration of the treated gas.

by a constant acetylene concentration of the treated gas. 3.3 Treatment of Experimental Data Figure 2.

3.3 Treatment of Experimental Data

Figure 2. Effect of the liquid velocity on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency.

In the present paper, the acetylene mass transfer

were used to indi-

cate the process efficiency, which can be experimentally calcu- lated from the following equations:

flux J C 2 H 2 and the absorption efficiency h C

2

H 2

J C 2 H 2 ¼ ð Q G :in C G :in Q G :out C G :out Þ · 273 · 60 · 1000

22

: 4 TA

(9)

h C 2 H 2

¼

Q G: in C G :in Q G : out C G :out

Q G: in C G :in

· 100%

(10)

C G.in and C G.out are the acetylene concentrations of the feed gas and the treated gas, respectively. Q G.in and Q G.out are the gas velocities of the feed gas and the treated gas, respectively. T is the operation temperature and A is the mass transfer area.

The C 2 H 2 mass transfer was analyzed by the mathematical

model at various liquid velocities (Fig. 3). The results show that the mass transfer resistance of the C 2 H 2 membrane absorption process was mainly composed of the liquid phase resistance and the wetted-membrane phase resistance. The percentage of the liquid phase resistance decreased from 80.95 to 43.9 % with

the liquid velocity increasing from 0.00361 to 0.0167 m s 1 , which led to a decreased total mass transfer resistance. However, the membrane wetting extent increased from 33 to 43 % with in- creasing liquid velocity, resulting in an increase in the wetted- membrane phase resistance from 17.82 to 53.44 %. When the liq- uid velocity increased from 0.0135 to 0.0167 m s 1 , the wetted- membrane resistance was higher than the liquid phase resistance. The increased wetted-membrane resistance led to a slight de- crease in the total resistance. Thus, the C 2 H 2 mass transfer flux increased only 0.293 times with the liquid velocity increasing from 0.00361 to 0.0167 m s 1 because of the wetted membrane.

4 Results and Discussion

4.1 Effect of the Liquid Velocity on the Acetylene Mass Transfer

Fig. 2 shows the effect of the liquid velocity on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency at a membrane module effective length of

30 cm, a C 2 H 2 content of 8 % in the feed, and a gas velocity at 0.4739 m s 1 . When the liquid velocity

0.00361 to 0.0167 m s 1 , the

acetylene mass transfer increased slightly and the acetylene absorption efficiency increased from 65.17 to 92.79 %. A high liquid velocity decreased the thickness of the liquid membrane side boun- dary layer. In addition, a good correlation can be seen between the experimental and the simulated profiles for the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency. The maximum deviation was less than 10 %.

was increased from

The maximum deviation was less than 10 %. was increased from Figure 3. Membrane wetting extent

Figure 3. Membrane wetting extent and mass transfer resistance at various liq- uid velocities.

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4.2 Effect of the Gas Velocity on the Acetylene Mass Transfer

Fig. 4 shows the effects of the gas velocity on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency at a membrane mod- ule effective length of 30 cm, a C 2 H 2 content of 8 % in the feed, and a liquid velocity at 0.01679 m s 1 . The acetylene mass trans- fer flux increased significantly from 0.577 to 2.424 mol m 2 h 1 when the gas velocity was increased from 0.237 to 1.4217 m s 1 . The increase in gas velocity increased the acetylene concentra- tion and accelerated the renewal of acetylene at the gas-liquid in- terface. However, the higher gas velocity decreased the residence time of the gas in the membrane, which resulted in a decline of the acetylene absorption efficiency from 95.48 to 58.52 %. The C 2 H 2 mass transfer was analyzed by the mathematical model at various gas velocities (Fig. 5). The results also showed

that the mass transfer resistance of the absorption process was mainly controlled by the liquid phase resistance and the wet- ted-membrane phase resistance. The increase in the gas veloc- ities had no effect on the liquid phase resistance and had a minimal influence on the gas phase resistance. However, mem- brane wetting was effectively restrained by increasing the gas velocities because the wetting extent of the membrane de- creased from 45 to 42.5 %.

4.4 Effect of the Feed Gas Concentration on the Acetylene Mass Transfer

Fig. 6 shows the effects of the feed gas concentration on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency at a membrane module effective length of 30 cm, a liquid velocity of 0.0167 m s 1 , and a gas velocity of 0.4739 m s 1 . The acetylene mass transfer flux increased with in- creasing feed gas concentration. The increase in the feed acetylene concentration enhanced the driving force of the system. The acetylene absorption effi- ciency increased with increasing feed gas concen- tration from 7 to 9 % and then slightly dropped with further increasing the feed gas concentration to 10 %. The C 2 H 2 absorption was balanced in the gas- liquid interface when the feed gas concentration was increased from 7 to 9 %. Thus, additional acetylene could not be absorbed when the acetylene concentra- tion in the feed gas increased from 9 to 10 %.

4.5 Effect of the Module Length on the Acetylene Mass Transfer

The effects of the membrane module effective length on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency were investigated at 8 % C 2 H 2 concentration in the feed, a liquid velocity of 0.0167 m s 1 , and a gas velocity of 0.4739 m s 1 . As shown in Fig. 7, the acetylene mass transfer flux de- creased with increasing module length. The wetting extent of the membrane increased from 28.1 to 66 % with the membrane module length increasing from 10 to 40 cm (Fig. 8). The wetted membrane resistance and the total membrane resistance in- creased with increasing module length. In addition, Fig. 7 shows that the acetylene ab- sorption efficiency increased when the module length increased from 10 to 30 cm and slightly dropped when the module length increased to 40 cm. The mass transfer area and residence time effectively increased with increasing module length, while the total mass transfer coefficient declined with increasing module length due to the increase in the wetted-membrane resistance (the fixed ratio of the outer membrane area to the lumen volume is 1437). Therefore, the mass transfer flux of acety- lene declined noticeably when the membrane mod- ule effective length increased from 30 to 40 cm.

mod- ule effective length increased from 30 to 40 cm. Figure 4. Effect of the gas

Figure 4. Effect of the gas velocity on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency.

acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency. Figure 5. Membrane wetting extent and mass transfer

Figure 5. Membrane wetting extent and mass transfer resistance at various gas velocities.

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6 Research Article Figure 6. Effect of the feed gas concentration on the acetylene mass transfer

Figure 6. Effect of the feed gas concentration on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency.

acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency. Figure 7. Effect of the module length on

Figure 7. Effect of the module length on the acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency.

acetylene mass transfer flux and the absorption efficiency. Figure 8. Effect of the membrane module effective

Figure 8. Effect of the membrane module effective length on membrane wet- ting and the mass transfer resistance.

4.6 C 2 H 2 Absorption–Thermal Desorption Cycle Process in the PTFE Hollow-Fiber Membrane Contactor

The membrane absorption–thermal desorption cycle process was investigated using NMP as ab- sorbent at a membrane module effective length of

30 cm, 8 % C 2 H 2 concentration in the feed, a liquid velocity of 0.0167 m s 1 , and a gas velocity of

0.4739 m s 1 . The system

ated for 114 h. Fig. 9 presents the acetylene absorp- tion efficiency as a function of the operation time. The acetylene absorption efficiency remained at 99 % within the first 8 h. After this, the absorption efficiency slightly declined and remained at more than 90 % in the last 106 h. This decrease was at- tributed to the increased wetting extent of the membrane and the increased C 2 H 2 concentration in the feed. The rich absorbent was heated to 173 C for C 2 H 2 desorption. The content of C 2 H 2 in the regenerated gas reached 99 %, which met the production requirements of the downstream prod- ucts. The C 2 H 2 concentration in the regenerative absorbent was 2.04 · 10 6 g mL 1 . A comparison between the operation of gas absorption column and membrane gas absorption processes for the separation of acetylene is shown in Tab. 2. The results show that the membrane gas absorption process, as compared to the column absorption process for the separation of C 2 H 2 , presents a lower absorption efficiency of C 2 H 2 . However, membrane gas absorption is operated at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure. Therefore, membrane gas absorption is a potential technology for the separation of acetylene from pyrolysis gas mixtures. Further research will be focused on the decrease of membrane wetting and the enhancement of mass transfer on the liquid side.

was continuously oper-

5 Conclusions

The PTFE hollow-fiber membrane absorption– thermal desorption process was used to separate and purify acetylene from simulated plasma pyrol- ysis gas streams using NMP as absorbent. The re- sults were as follows:

– The C 2 H 2 one-way absorption efficiency reached was as high as 95.48 %. The C 2 H 2 absorption– thermal desorption cycle process revealed that the absorption efficiency was higher than 90 % during 114 h and the C 2 H 2 concentration of the regener- ated gas was 99 %. The C 2 H 2 concentration of the regenerative absorbent was 2.04 · 10 6 g mL 1 .

– A mathematical model correlating the resis- tance-in-series equation was used to analyze the C 2 H 2 mass transfer. The results showed that the liquid phase resistance and the wetted-mem-

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Symbols used A [m 2 ] [mol m –3 ] C i ,int [mol m
Symbols used
A
[m 2 ]
[mol m –3 ]
C i ,int
[mol m –3 ]
C i ,L
[mol m –3 ]
C i ,m
]
D i ,G
D i ,L
D i ,M
]
]
D K
[m 2 s –1
[m 2 s –1
[m 2 s –1
[m 2 s –1
]

Figure 9. Long-term performance of the membrane contactor.

brane phase resistance constituted the main mass transfer resistance. The increased liquid velocity decreases the liquid phase resistance but increases wetting of the membrane and the wetted-membrane phase resistance. The increased gas velocity had little influence on the C 2 H 2 mass transfer resis- tance. Nonetheless, the wetting extent of the membrane could be restrained by increasing the gas velocity. – The wetted-membrane resistance was as high as 53.44 % of the total mass transfer resistance due to the wetted mem- brane. Therefore, developing a membrane material with low wetting extent for NMP is significantly valuable for acetylene membrane absorption and purification processes.

k

k

g

L

M

[m]

[m s 1 ]

[m s 1 ] [m s 1 ]

L [m]

p i ,g

p i ,int

p i ,m

Q

Q

G.in

G.out

[kPa]

[mL min 1 ] [mL min 1 ]

total outer surface area of the hollow fibers acetylene concentration at the gas-liquid interface acetylene concentration in the liquid bulk acetylene concentration at the liquid-membrane interface gas diffusion coefficient liquid diffusion coefficient membrane diffusion coefficient Knudsen diffusion coefficient of acetylene in the membrane phase hydrodynamic radius

mass transfer flux

d h

H [m 3 kPa kmol 1 ] Henry’s constant

J [mol m 2 h 1 ]

K G

k

[kmol m 2 s 1 kPa 1 ] overall mass transfer coefficient

gas phase mass transfer coefficient liquid mass transfer coefficient membrane mass transfer coefficient

length of a hollow fiber acetylene partial pressure at the bulk gas phase acetylene partial pressure at the gas-liquid interface acetylene partial pressure at the gas-membrane interface feed gas velocity outlet gas velocity

[kPa]

[kPa]

Acknowledgment

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps of Industrial Science and Technology Projects of China (no. 2010GG13), the National Technology Research and Development Program of China (no. 2012AA03A611), and the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Teams in University (no.

IRT1161).

The authors have declared no conflict of interest.

R

[m 3 kPa kmol 1 K 1 ] gas constant

Re

[–]

Reynolds number

Sc

[–]

Schmidt number

Sh

[–]

Sherwood number

T

[K]

temperature

Greek symbols

d non-wetted [m] d wetted [m]

e M

[–]

thickness of the dry membrane thickness of the wetted membrane surface porosity

Table 2. Comparison between the column gas absorption and membrane gas absorption processes for the separation of acetylene (DMF = dimethylformamide).

Method

Acetylene concentration in the feed [vol %]

Absorption

Operation

Operation temperature [ C]

C 2 H 2 absorption efficiency [%]

Reference

solvent

pressure [MPa]

Column gas absorption

1

DMF a)

1.0

–35

99.9

[21]

1–2

DMF

2.6

–12.2

99.1

[22]

10

DMF

0.8

–50

95

[23]

Membrane gas absorption

8

NMP

0.1

20–25

90–95

This study

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j

[–]

[–]

t [–]

h C 2 H 2

References

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tortuosity of the membrane pore

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Research Article: Acetylene is primarily separated in gas separation processes by adsorption and absorption methods. Membrane absorption technology was applied to purify acetylene gas from simulated pyrolysis gas. A mathematical model correlating the resistance-in- series equation was used to predict changes in the wetted membrane resistance and the mass transfer resistance during the acetylene mass transfer process.

Theoretical and Experimental Studies on Acetylene Absorption in a Polytetrafluoroethylene Hollow-Fiber Membrane Contactor

X.

Wang, J. Gao, J. Zhang, X. Zhang,

R.

Guo*

Chem. Eng. Technol. 2015 , 38 ( ¢ ), XXX K XXX

Chem. Eng. Technol. 2015 , 38 ( ¢ ) , XXX K XXX DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400338 Chem.

DOI: 10.1002/ceat.201400338