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Mount Laurel Township Schools Mount Laurel, New Jersey

English as a Second Language Program Curriculum

Summer 2009

The English as a Second Language Program Curriculum is aligned with the revised New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards.

English as a Second Language Program Curriculum Committee Participants

English as a Second Language Staff Kimberly Corona Katherine Plunkett Alamelu Sundaram-Walters

English as a Second Language Program Coordinator Alexis Bonavitacola, Supervisor of Instruction

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Table of Contents

Statement of Purpose

4

Philosophy

5

Why the WIDA Standards

6

About the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

7

Performance Definitions for the Levels of English Language Proficiency

9

Kindergarten Curriculum

10

Kindergarten WIDA Example Topics

22

Kindergarten Sample Unit

23

Grade Cluster 1-2 Curriculum

25

Grade Cluster 1-2

WIDA Example Topics

38

Grade Cluster 1-2 Sample Unit

39

Grade Cluster 3-4 Curriculum

41

Grade Cluster 3-5 WIDA Example Topics

53

Grade Level 3-4 Sample Unit

54

Grade Cluster 5-8 Curriculum

56

Grade Cluster 6-8 WIDA Example Topics

74

Grade Cluster 5-8 Sample Unit

75

Additional Resource Graphic Organizers across the ELP Standards

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Refer to District Homepage (www.mountlaurel.org) For E.S.L. Electronic Folder and Scope and Sequence.

Refer to New Jersey Department of Education Website (www.state.nj.us) for New Jersey State Standards.

Refer to New Jersey Department of Education/ Bilingual (www.nj.gov/education/bilingual) for Additional Information and Resources.

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Mount Laurel Township Schools English as a Second Language

Statement of Purpose

This English as a Second Language (ESL) curriculum is designed to provide learning opportunities in the English language and the American culture for students in grades K to 8 who are identified as Limited English Proficient (LEP) or English Language Learners (ELLs). It is created to meet the needs of such students regardless of the English language proficiency level they demonstrate upon entering the Mount Laurel school system.

Learning to speak, read and comprehend spoken and written English is crucial for newcomers to the American education experience. Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that “children who are limited English proficient attain English proficiency, develop high levels of academic attainment in English, and meet the same challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards as all children are expected to meet.”

Students come to classrooms with different interests and varying intelligences and learning styles.

and assessments should reflect these needs. Basing instruction on meaningful communicative tasks motivates students to learn a second language. The teacher’s role is to facilitate genuine interaction among students through classroom activities that are embedded in authentic real-life contexts.

Culture is an integral part of learning a new language. Communication is actually the ability to use language in culturally sensitive ways. Teaching the everyday culture of native speakers of the language not only makes the language come alive but also fosters respect and appreciation of cultural diversity. Students learn to recognize that they are products of their own culture and learn how to assimilate into the American culture without denying their cultural roots.

This curriculum is based on the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for English Language Proficiency. The State Standards are derived from the standards developed by the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium. New Jersey standards focus on the use of English to achieve academically in all content areas. The State Standards also reflect the State Standards for Language Arts Literacy but from the perspective of second language acquisition.

Students enrolled in the ESL Program will be tested annually with the ACCESS for ELLs language proficiency assessment to determine their level of English language proficiency. The district goal, as determined by the State, is for all students to show growth of at least one proficiency level.

Instructional activities

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Philosophy

The philosophy of the Mount Laurel Township School’s ESL Program is founded upon the need to ensure that all English language learners have access to high quality instruction, and to provide better access for ELLs to the general education curriculum. In addition to the language proficiency needed for interpersonal, intercultural and instructional purposes, English language learners need to develop academic language or CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) in order to succeed in American society. This focus on academic language is supported by research on effective language instruction as well as the provisions of No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

Native language literacy promotes second language acquisition:

Native language literacy facilitates second language development. The academic achievement of English language learners is significantly improved when students are able to use their native language to learn in school. Therefore, retaining native language and culture serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and academic development. While students make the transition from their native language literacy to English literacy, the emphasis of second language instruction is on developing academic skills that meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, as well as state, and national requirements for ELL’s.

Language acquisition is long-term process:

Language acquisition is a long-term process involving a progression through developmental stages of increasing language proficiency. English language learners move through these stages at individual rates of acquisition. Language learners vary in their productive and receptive skills. Receptive language skills generally develop prior to and often to a higher level than the productive language skills. Therefore, English language learners may not be at an equal level of English language proficiency across the four language domains (reading, writing, speaking and listening). The differential language acquisition levels of these students in the language domains must be taken into consideration for instructional planning and assessment. Achieving the academic standards for ELL’s is possible if there is shared responsibility and collaboration based on common understanding and mutual goals among all teachers who serve English language learners. Throughout this process, BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills) and CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency) must be kept in mind for each ELL. That is to say, based on the current research, social language (BICS) always precedes the acquisition of academic language or CALP.

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Why the WIDA Standards?

Vision of language proficiency has expanded to encompass both social contexts and academic contexts.

Standards-based instruction that integrates language and content reflects the construct of “cognitive academic language proficiency”

NCLB mandates that ELP standards be aligned to academic content standards and the ELP tests be standards based.

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About the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

WIDA’s English Language Proficiency Standards for English Language Learners in Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12:

Frameworks for Formative and Summative Assessment and

Instruction, 2007 edition, is a key component of the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium’s

assessment system

encompasses both social and academic contexts tied to schooling, particularly to standards, curriculum, and instruction.

By developing these English language proficiency (ELP) standards, first published in 2004, the WIDA Consortium has responded to this emergent vision to link language learning with academic content. Furthermore, these ELP standards guide the development of test blueprints, task specifications, and ELP measures, primarily WIDA’s ACCES for ELLS’s ® test.

WIDA’s vision of language proficiency

Originally developed by consortium members with funding from a U.S. Department of Education Enhanced Assessment Grant, the standards are designed for the many audiences in the field of education who are impacted by English language learners (ELLs). This second edition reflects an evolving understanding of the needs of ELLS and their educators in the use of the ELP standards as an instructional and assessment tool.

Organization of the Standards

There are five WIDA ELP Standards, which appear in two frameworks: Summative (the outcomes of learning) and Formative (the processes of learning). The standards, identical for both frameworks, reflect the social and academic dimensions of acquiring a second language that are expected of ELLs in grade levels PreK-12 attending schools in the United States. Each ELP standard addresses a specific context for English language

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development. Overall, the standards center on the language needed and used by ELLs to succeed in school.

Each standard is organized by grade level cluster (PreK-K, grades 1-2, grade 3-5, grades 6-8, and grades 9-12) and by language domain (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Within each grade cluster and domain, there are fived model performance indicators (MPIs), one for each language proficiency level from 1, Entering, to 5, Bridging. All five MPIs focus on the same example topic from a content area reflected in the standard, forming a “strand” that illustrates the language development continuum. Each MPI contains three elements: a language function (e.g., describe, justify), an example topic (e.g., weather, human populations), and a form of support through level 4 (e.g., pictures or illustrations, working in small groups). The components of the ELP standards, from frameworks down to the elements of an MPI, work together to form the standards document, a critical too for educators of ELLs for curriculum development, instruction and assessment.

The WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards

English Language Proficiency Standard 1: English language learners communicate for Social and Instructional purposes within the school setting.

English Language Proficiency Standard 2: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Language Arts.

English Language Proficiency Standard 3: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Mathematics.

English Language Proficiency Standard 4: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Science.

English Language Proficiency Standard 5: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies.

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The ELP standards are often abbreviated as Social and Instructional language, the language of Language Arts, the language of Mathematics, the language of Science, and the language of Social Studies.

The Language Proficiency Levels and Performance Definitions

The five language proficiency levels outline the progression of language development implied in the acquisition of English as an additional language, from 1, Entering the process, to 6, Reaching the attainment of English language proficiency. The language proficiency levels delineate expected performance and describe what ELLs can do within each domain of the standards. The Performance Definitions define the expectations of students at each proficiency level. The definitions encompass three criteria:

linguistic complexity –the amount and quality of speech or writing for a given situation; vocabulary usage—the specificity of words r phrases for a given context; and language control—the comprehensibility of the communication based on the amount and types of errors.

The Performance Definitions (see page 3) are a key component of the standards documents, and the use of the standards and corresponding MPIs must be in conjunction with the Performance Definitions. The MPIs, delineated by language proficiency level, give expectations for what students should be able to process and produce at a given proficiency level. The Performance Definitions describe how well the student can or should be expected to do so. For example, the language function “describe” appears in MPIs at levels 1-4. What language does a student at language proficiency level 2 need to produce in order to “describe”? What can he or she reasonably be expected to process to understand a description? How does this compare with a student at language proficiency level 4?

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The language function “describe” for a level 2 student may mean producing or comprehending phrases or short sentences using common adjectives and modifiers, whereas a level 4 student may be expected to process or use extended discourse incorporation relative clauses, similes or metaphors. This example illustrates how the Performance Definitions are an essential companion to the strands of MPIs.

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Performance Definitions for the Levels of English Language Proficiency

At the given level of English language proficiency, English language learners will process, understand, produce, or use:

 

Specialized or technical language reflective of the content area at grade level

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A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse as required by the specified grade level

Reaching

Oral or written communication in English comparable to proficient English peers

 

The technical language of the content areas;

5

A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse, including stories, essays, or reports;

Oral or written language approaching comparability to that of English proficient peers when presented with grade level material

Bridging

 

Specific and some technical language of the content areas;

A variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral discourse or multiple, related

4

paragraphs;

Expanding

Oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning of the communication when presented with oral or written connected discourse with occasional visual and graphic support

 

General and some specific language of the content areas;

3

Expanded sentences in oral interaction or written paragraphs;

Developing

Oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that may impede the communication but retain much of its meaning when presented with oral or written, narrative or expository description with occasional visual and graphic support

 

General language related to the content areas;

Phrases or short sentences;

2

Beginning

Oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede the meaning of the communication when presented with one to multiple-step commands, directions, questions, or a series of statements with visual and graphic support

1

Pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content areas;

Entering

Words, phrases, or chunks of language when presented with one-step commands, directions, WH- questions, or statements with visual and graphic support

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards and NJCCCS Elementary Program Kindergarten Reading

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-Descriptors

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

ELP Levels

Resources

Evaluation

Language Domains

Standard 3.1 Reading All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds, letters, and words in written English to become independent and fluent readers and will read a variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.

Big Idea: The ability to read a variety of texts requires independence, comprehension, and fluency.

Understanding a text’s features, structures, and characteristics facilitate the reader’s ability to make meaning of the text.

Concepts About

*See WIDA Can Do Descriptors/ ELP Levels p.12

Leveled

Teacher

Print

Literature

Observation

Phonological

Graphic

Oral

Awareness

All About Me Unit:

Organizers

Questioning/

Focus on student individuality and forming a cohesive group.

Response

Decoding and

Professional

 

Word Recognition

Books

Response to

How does understanding a text’s structure help me better understand its meaning?

 

Stories

Words are made of sounds.

Fluency

 

• Oral

Seasons:

• Written

 

Reading Strategies (before, during, and after reading)

Holidays

Good readers employ strategies to help them understand text. Strategic readers can develop, select, and apply strategies to enhance their comprehension.

Calendar

Portfolios

Colors

 

Clothing

Anecdotal

How are sounds represented by letters?

 

Weather

Records

Vocabulary and

Environment

 

Concept

ELP Standard:

 

Development

Promote awareness of cultural differences/ traditions

Reading Students will be able to read (decode and comprehend) text

How do I figure out a word I do not know?

Comprehension

Skills and

 
   

Responses to

How does fluency

Good readers

Text

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for recreational

affect

compare, infer, synthesize, and make connections (text to text, text to word, text to self) to make text personally relevant and useful.

 

and academic

comprehension?

Inquiry and

purposes.

Research

How do readers construct meaning from text?

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Kindergarten Writing

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.2 Writing All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea: Writing is the process of communicating in print for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Good writers develop and refine their ideas for thinking, learning, communicating, and aesthetic expression.

Writing as a Process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, post writing)

*See WIDA Can Do Descriptors/ ELP Levels p. 15

Professional Materials – Kid Writing

Teacher

Observation

• Shared

   

• Interactive

All About Me Unit:

Selected

Focus on student individuality and forming a cohesive group.

Literature

Independent

 

Writing

How do good writers express themselves?

Good writers use a repertoire of strategies that enables them to vary form and style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts.

Writing as a Product (resulting in a formal product or publication)

Kid Writing

 

Pictures

Seasons:

   

Holidays

Readers

 

How does process shape the writer’s product?

Mechanics,

Calendar

Response

ELP Standard:

Spelling, and

Colors

Writing Students will be able to write for personal and academic purposes.

Handwriting

Clothing

Portfolios

 

Weather

How do writers develop a well- written product?

Writing Forms, Audiences, and Purposes (exploring a variety of writing)

Environment

Editing

Promote

Anecdotal Notes

 

Rules,

awareness of

 

How do rules of language affect communication?

conventions of

cultural

language, help

 

differences/

readers

traditions

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understand what

Why does a writer choose a particular form of writing?

is

being

communicated.

A

writer selects a

 

form based on

audience and

purpose.

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Kindergarten Speaking

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.3 Speaking All students will speak in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea: Oral language is a tool for communicating, thinking, and learning.

Oral discussion helps to build connections to others and creates opportunities for learning and English Language Development.

Discussion

*See WIDA Can Do Descriptors/ ELP Levels p. 18

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Teacher

Observation

Questioning

 

(Inquiry) and

 

Student

Contributing

All About Me Unit:

Participation

Word Choice

Focus on student individuality and forming a cohesive group.

Student

How can

Response

discussion

 

Oral Presentation

increase our

Questioning and contributing help speakers convey their message, explore issues and clarify their thinking.

 

Questioning

knowledge and

Seasons:

understanding of

Holidays

Oral response

 

an idea(s)?

Calendar

ELP Standard:

Colors

Anecdotal Notes

Speaking Students will be able to speak English in both a social and school setting.

When is it appropriate to ask questions?

Clothing

Weather

 

Environment

How do speakers express their thoughts and feelings?

A speaker’s choice of words and style set a tone and define the message.

Promote

awareness of

 

cultural

differences/

   

traditions

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How does the choice of words

A speaker selects

a form and

 

organizational

affect the message?

How does a speaker communicate so others will listen and understand the message?

pattern based on the audience and purpose.

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Kindergarten Listening

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes and

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Instructional

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

Strategies

ELP Levels

 

Language

 

Domains

Standard 3.4 Listening All students will listen actively to information from a variety of sources in a variety of situations.

Big Idea:

Listening is the process of receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and/nonverbal messages.

Active Listening

*See WIDA Can Do Descriptors/ ELP Levels p. 20

Selected

Teacher

Listening is an active process to gain understanding.

Literature with

Observation

Listening

Tapes/CDs

Comprehension

 

Teacher

All About Me Unit:

Professional

Developed

 

Focus on student individuality and forming a cohesive group.

Materials:

Questions

Can one hear but not listen?

Oxford Picture

Dictionary

Student

   

Series, (i.e.,

Participation

ELP Standard:

How does a listener understand a message?

   

Teacher Scripts)

Listening Students will be able to aurally comprehend spoken English in both a social and school setting.

Effective listeners are able to interpret and evaluate increasingly complex messages.

Seasons:

Oral Questions/

Holidays

Response

Calendar

 

Colors

Student

Clothing

Participation

Weather

Environment

Response to

   

Promote

Stories

awareness of

• Oral

cultural

• Written

differences/

traditions

Anecdotal Notes

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Kindergarten Viewing and Media Literacy

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

Language

 

Domains

Standard 3.5 Viewing All students will access, view, evaluate, and respond to print, nonprint, and electronic texts and resources

Big Idea:

People experience the same media message differently.

Constructing

Illustrations of characters and sequence of story. (e.g. Kindersite.org)

Films

Verbal, auditory

A media literate person can evaluate how words, images, and sounds influence a message.

Meaning

and kinesthetic

Taped T.V.

interpretation

Visual and Verbal messages

Commercials

Teacher

   

Leveled Books

observation of

Discussion of Video, CDs. (e.g. Elmosize.com)

participation and

Leveled Videos

performance

ELP Standard:

What’s the media message?

Use Body Language in a pantomime. Verbal production.

Class or small group discussion

Viewing and Media Literacy Students will be able to view for personal and academic purpose.

What values, lifestyles, and points of view are represented in, or omitted from, media messages?

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ESL Grade Cluster K Unit: Big Idea: Spring

Established Goals:

Write in clear, concise, organized language 3.2.

Speak in clear concise, organized language 3.3

Active listening 3.4

Respond to print and resources 3.5.

ELP Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, Viewing & Media Literacy

Enduring Understanding: The Student will understand:

Life cycle of a butterfly

Days of the week-butterfly poem

Counting

Recycling

Parts of a plant

Earth Day

Essential Questions:

How do the various seasons impact our lifestyle choices?

How do our life choices affect our environment?

Skills: TSWBAT:

Handwriting

Sequencing

Punctuation

Navigating the computer

Decoding/fluency

Performance Task:

Discussion-web spring

Spring Packet

Activity Sheets- A Butterfly Came out Growing Plants Parts of Plants How Seeds Travel Cut & Paste activity:

Make a seed

Pond life

Choral Reading-Spring Poems

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Plant a garden

Phonics/Fluency games (Starfall)

Listening Activities-Spring Poems on tape

Learning Activities:

Discussion Oxford Dictionary-Activity Sheets: Spring is Here, flashcards, Beats, We Planted a Garden

Read Aloud(s)

When Will Spring Be Here?

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Flower Garden

Video-Magic Schoolhouse-A Seed Goes to Plant

Computer Activities-

www.kindersite.org Grow Your Own Tomatoes www.Starfall.com Earth Day Flower Pond recycling http://earthday.net/lessonplans Jeopardy game-vocabulary builder

Assessment:

Teacher observation of student participation and performance

Completed writing assignments

Completed activity sheets

Resources:

http://www.epa.gov/region5/publications/happy/happy.htm (coloring book)

http://www.first-school.ws/activities/occasions/earth1.htm

www.edhelper.com (reading material)

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program

 
 

Grade Cluster 1-2 Reading

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.1 Reading All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds, letters, and words written in English to become Independent and fluent readers, and will read a variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.

Big Idea: The ability to read a variety of texts requires independence, comprehension, and fluency.

Understanding of a text’s features, structures, and characteristics facilitate the reader’s ability to make meaning of the text.

Concepts About

*See WIDA Can-

Leveled Literature

Teacher

Print/Text

Do-Descriptors p.

Observation

27

Graphic

Phonological

Organizers

Oral

Awareness

All About Me Unit:

Questioning/

(includes

Focus on

Professional

Response

phonemic

individuality and

Books

 

awareness)

forming a

Anecdotal

How does understanding a text’s structure help me better understand its meaning?

Words are made of sounds.

Decoding and

cohesive group.

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Records

Word Recognition

Family Unit

Portfolios

Readers use language structure and context clues to identify the intended meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text.

Fluency

Seasons:

Journals

Poems

 

Reading Strategies (before, during and after reading)

Rhyming

How are sounds represented by letters?

Fairytales

Fables

Informational

       

Text

ELP Standard:

How do I figure out a word I do not know?

Vocabulary and

 

Reading Students will be able to read (decode and

 

Concept

Living with

Fluent readers group words quickly to help

Development

everyday print

 

(signs, posters,

How does fluency

Comprehension

etc.)

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comprehend) text

affect

them gain meaning from what they read.

Skills and Response to Text

 

for recreational

comprehension?

Environment

and academic

 

purposes.

What do readers do when they do not understand everything in the text?

How do readers construct meaning from text?

 

Inquiry and

Community

Good readers compare, infer, synthesize and make connections (text to text, text to world, text to self) to make text personally relevant and useful.

Research

Why conduct

research?

 

Researchers gather and critique information from different sources for specific purposes.

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 1-2 Writing

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.2 Writing All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea: Writing is the process of communicating in print for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Good writers develop and refine their ideas for thinking, learning, communicating, and aesthetic expression.

Writing as a Process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, post writing)

Writing as a Product (resulting in a formal product or publication)

*See WIDA Can-

Professional

Journal Entries

Do Descriptors p.

Materials:

30

Lucy Calkins Units of Study

Teacher

Observation

Sequencing

 

Checklist

Super Sentences

Selected Pieces of Literature

Shared Writing

How do good writers express themselves?

Good writers use a repertoire of strategies that enables them to vary form and style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts.

Descriptive

Stationery Studio

Interactive Writing

Writing

Portfolios

   

Letter Format

 

How does process shape the writer’s product?

Mechanics,

Anecdotal Notes

ELP Standard:

Spelling, and

Writing Students will be able to write for personal and academic purposes.

Handwriting

How do rules of language affect communication?

Writing Forms, Audiences, and Purposes (exploring a variety of forms)

Rules,

 

Why does a writer choose a

conventions of

language, help

 

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particular form of writing?

readers

understand what

 

is

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communicated.

A

writer selects a

form based on audience and purpose.

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 1-2 Speaking

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.3 Speaking All students will speak in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea: Oral language is a tool for communicating, thinking, and learning.

How can discussion increase our knowledge and understanding of an idea (s)?

Discussion (small group and whole class)

*See WIDA Can-

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Teacher

Do-Descriptors p.

Observation

33

 
 

Oral Response

Questioning

All About Me Unit:

(Inquiry) and

Focus on

Oral Presentation

   

Contributing

individuality and

How can discussion increase our knowledge and understanding of an idea (s)?

How can I clearly express myself?

forming a

Class or Small Group Discussion

Word Choice

cohesive group.

When is it appropriate to ask questions?

Oral Presentation

Family Unit

 

Seasons:

ELP Standard:

   

Poems

Speaking Students will be able to speak English in both a social and school setting.

How can I clearly express myself?

How do speakers express their thoughts and feelings?

Rhyming

Fairytales

 

Fables

When is it appropriate to ask questions?

Informational

   

Text

How can I clearly express myself?

Living with

 

How do speakers express their

everyday print

How does the

(signs, posters,

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thoughts and

choice of words affect the message?

etc.)

feelings?

Environment

How does the choice of words affect the message?

How does a speaker communicate so others will listen and understand the message?

Community

How does a speaker communicate so others will listen and understand the message?

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 1-2 Listening

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.4 Listening All students will listen actively to information from a variety of sources in a variety of situations.

Big Idea:

Listening is the process of receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and nonverbal messages.

Active Listening

*See WIDA Can-

Literature with Tapes and CD’s

Teacher

Listening is an active process to gain understanding.

Do Descriptors p.

Observation

Listening

36

 

Comprehension

All About Me Unit:

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Written Response

 

Focus on

Oral Response

Can one hear but not listen?

individuality and

Teacher Scripts

forming a

Class or Small Group Discussion

   

cohesive group.

ELP Standard:

How does a listener understand a message?

   

Listening Students will be able to aurally comprehend spoken English in both social and school setting.

Effective listeners are able to interpret and evaluate increasingly complex messages.

Family Unit

Seasons:

 

Poems

Rhyming

Fairytales

Fables

   

Informational

 

Text

Living with

everyday print

(signs, posters,

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etc.) Environment Community
etc.)
Environment
Community

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program

 
 

1-2

 

Viewing and Media Literacy

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

Language

   

Domains

Standard 3.5 Viewing All students will access, view, evaluate, and respond to print, nonprint, and electronic texts and resources

Big Idea:

People experience the same media message differently.

Constructing

Illustrations of characters and sequence of story.

Films

Rubric

A media literate person can evaluate how words, images, and sounds influence a message.

Meaning

Taped T.V.

Oral Presentations based on illustrations.

Visual and Verbal messages

Discussion of

Commercials

 

films.

Leveled Books

 

Verbal

Use body language in a pantomime.

Leveled Videos

Interpretation

What’s the media message?

Teacher

ELP Standard:

 

Observation

Viewing and Media Literacy Students will be able to view for personal and academic purpose.

What values, lifestyles, and points of view are represented in, or omitted from, media messages?

Watch children’s news for English verbal production.

Conferences

Written Response

Class or Small Group Discussion

   

Anecdotal Notes

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ESL Grade Cluster 1-2 NJCCCS: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 – WIDA The Language of Language Arts; The Language of Science; The Language of S.S.; The Language of Math Big Idea: Environment
(Rainforest)

Essential Question(s):

How can we have a positive impact on our environment? What is the rainforest and why do we need to appreciate the value of this worldwide resource? How does nature and man coexist?

Enduring Understanding:

Social awareness and responsibility

We can all do our part to reduce, reuse, and recycle in order to save the environment and our earth for future generations

Stimulate interest in the sciences

Knowledge and skills:

 

The student will:

Identify the animals of the rainforest

Identify the plants of the rainforest

Identify the people of the rainforest

Identify layers of the rainforest

Sustainable harvest

Research on the internet

Read for comprehension

Build vocabulary

Read and discuss books

Listen attentively

Answer simple questions

Follow simple directions

Match oral words to printed words

Write brief descriptions

Performance Task for the End of this Unit:

Compose a scrapbook on the things they see in their travels through a rainforest, research, and write facts about animals, plants and the people.

Compose a poem about the rainforest

 

Diorama

Make a “Save the Rainforest” magnet

Make a Rain forest in a bottle. Place about 2” of potting soil into a two liter clear plastic pop bottle. Add a variety of seeds. Add about ¼ cup

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of water and place cap on the bottle. The bottle will act as a terrarium and the moisture will recycle from the soil into the air and back to the soil.

Oral Presentation-discuss and set goals for collecting money for “Save an Acre:” program.

Learning Activities:

Generate a KKWL Chart utilizing student’s responses to the topic of the rainforest

Preview and Predict, book walks

Read Aloud: The Great Kapok Tree

Shared Reading: About the Rainforest (NF), In The Rain Forest (NF & F)

Write and design pages for scrapbook and what they saw in their travels today.

Research websites- (animals, plants, medicine, people, endangerment)

Design a rainforest on the wall

Magic School Bus Video

Garbage Bag Lunch

Sell Rainforest treats. (Estimate, calculate cost and profit). Proceeds will go to “Save an Acre” program.

Assessments:

 

Teacher observation of participation and performance Completed activities Rubric for scrapbook

 

Books, Materials:

The Great Kapok Tree by About the Rainforest by Heather Johanasen In the Rain Forest (Ricter) Websites:

www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/rainforest/

 

Rainforest animal book and crafts

http://www.earthsbirthday.org/explore/teachers/howto/diorama.htm Diorama

http://rainforestheroes.com/

teacher resources, Kids Take Action activities, About the Rain Forest-slide show, Jungle Gym-crafts & recipes

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 3-4 Reading

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.1 Reading All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds, letters, and words in written English to become independent and fluent readers and will read a variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.

Big Idea:

Understanding of a text’s features, structures, and characteristics facilitate the reader’s ability to make meaning of the text.

Concepts About

See WIDA Can Do Descriptors

Leveled Literature

Teacher

The ability to read a variety of texts requires independence, comprehension and fluency.

Print

Observation

p.43

Graphic

Phonological

Organizers

Anecdotal

Awareness

All About Me Unit:

Records

(includes

Focus on

Professional

phonemic

individuality and

Books

Conferring

 

awareness)

forming a

How does understanding a text’s structure help me better understand its meaning?

Readers use language structure and content clues to identify the intended meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text.

Decoding and

cohesive group.

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Listen to the student read

Word Recognition

Reader’s

Workshop:

Rubrics

Fluency

Guided Reading

Graphic

 

Reading Strategies (before, during and after reading)

Organizers

How are sounds represented by letters?

Independent

Reading

Effective

   

Questioning

ELP Standard:

 

Fluent readers group words quickly to help them gain meaning from what they read.

 

Literature Circles

Reading Students will be able to read (decode and comprehend) text for recreational

How do I figure out a word I do not know?

Vocabulary and

Oral Response

Concept

Development

Read and respond to literature

Portfolios

 

Comprehension

How does fluency

Skills and

 

Journals

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and academic

affect

 

Response to Text

purposes.

comprehension?

Good readers employ strategies to help them understand text. Strategic readers can develop, select, and apply strategies to enhance their comprehension.

Words powerfully

Inquiry and

What do readers do when they do not understand everything in a text?

Research

Why do readers need to pay attention to a writer’s choice of words?

affect meaning.

How do readers construct meaning from text?

Good readers compare, infer, synthesize, and make connections (text to text, text to world, text to self) to make text personally relevant and useful.

Researchers gather and critique information on a topic from a variety of sources for specific purposes.

Why conduct

research?

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Language Arts

 

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 3-4 Writing

 

Standards

Essential

 

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.2 Writing All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea:

Good writers develop and refine their ideas for thinking, learning, communicating, and aesthetic expression.

Writing as a Process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, postwriting)

*See WIDA Can

Professional

Teacher

Writing is the process of communicating in print for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Do Descriptors p.

Materials:

Observation

46

Guiding Readers

and Writers,

Rubrics

Writing Process

Grades 3-6,

Fountas and

Graphic

 

Graphic

Pinnell

Organizers

Good writers use

Writing as a Product (resulting

Organizers

Selected Pieces of Literature

Anecdotal Notes

How do good writers express themselves?

a

repertoire of

in a formal product or publication)

Editing

strategies that enables them to vary form and style, in order to write for different purposes, audiences, and contexts. Rules, conventions of language, help

 

Journals

 

Creative Writing

Stationery Studio

   

Mechanics,

Conferring

ELP Standard:

How does process shape the writer’s product?

Spelling, and

Figurative Writing

Writing Students will be able to write for personal and academic purposes.

Handwriting

Portfolios

Forms of Writing

 

Writing Forms, Audiences, and Purposes (exploring a variety of forms)

Effective

How do writers develop a well- written product?

Poetry

Questioning

Interactive

   

readers

Notebooks

How do rules of language affect

understand what

 

is

being

Writing Activities

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communication?

communicated.

Why does a writer choose a particular form of writing?

A writer selects a form based on audience and purpose.

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 3-4 Speaking

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.3 Speaking All students will speak in clear, concise, organized language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Big Idea:

Oral discussion helps to build connections to others and create opportunities for learning.

Discussion (small group and whole class)

*See WIDA Can

Oxford Picture Dictionary Series

Teacher

Oral language is a tool for communicating, thinking and learning.

Do Descriptors p.

Observation

49

 
 

Professional

Rubrics

Questioning

All About Me Unit:

Materials:

(Inquiry) and

Focus on

Guiding Readers

Oral Response

   

Contributing

individuality and

and Writers,

How can

Questioning and contributing help speakers convey their message, explore issues and clarify their thinking.

forming a

Grades 3-6,

Oral Presentation

discussion

Word Choice

cohesive group.

Fountas and

increase our

Pinnell

Anecdotal Notes

knowledge and

Oral Presentation

Writing Process

understanding of

Selected Pieces of Literature

Discussion

 

an idea(s)?

Literature Circles

ELP Standard:

 

Effective

Speaking Students will be able to speak English in both a social and school setting.

When is it appropriate to ask questions?

 

Group

Graphic

Questioning

A speaker’s choice of words and style set a tone and define the message. A speaker selects a form and organizational

Discussions

Organizers

Role Play

How do speakers express their thoughts and feelings?

Oral Presentations

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How does the choice of words affect the message?

pattern based on the audience and purpose.

How does a speaker communicate so others will listen and understand the message?

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Language Arts

ESL Curriculum Aligned to WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards Elementary Program Grade Cluster 3-4 Listening

 

Standards

Essential

Enduring

Learning

 

Activities

Materials

Assessment

(WIDA and

Questions

Understanding

Outcomes

Can-Do-

and

and

NJCCCS)

(What is the “big idea”?)

(How do you apply and use in real-life situations?)

Descriptors

Resources

Evaluation

ELP Levels

 

Language

Domains

Standard 3.4 Listening All students will listen actively to information from a variety of sources in a variety of situations.

Big Idea:

Listening is the process of receiving, constructing meaning form, and responding to spoken and/nonverbal messages.

Active Listening

*See WIDA Can

Literature with Tapes and CD’s

Teacher

Listening is an active process to gain understanding.

Do Descriptors p.

Observation

Listening

51

 

Comprehension

Professional

Written Story

All About Me Unit:

Materials:

Retellings

 

Focus on

Guiding Readers

Can one hear but not listen?

individuality and

and Writers,

Written