Sie sind auf Seite 1von 9

Title

AS 1012.8.2-2000 Methods of testing concrete - Method of making and curing


concrete - Flexure test specimens

Licensee
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002

Conditions of use
This is a licensed electronic copy of a document where copyright is owned or managed by
Standards Australia International. Your licence is a single user licence and the document may not
be stored, transferred or otherwise distributed on a network. You may also make one paper copy
of this document if required.

Web Check-up
1 AS 1012.8.22000

TM
Australian Standard

Methods of testing concrete


AS 1012.8.2

Method 8.2: Method for making and curing


concrete Flexure test specimens

1 SCOPE
This Standard sets out the method for the making and curing of flexure test specimens of
concrete sampled in the laboratory or in the field.
NOTES:
1 This Standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This Standard
does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the
responsibility of the user of this Standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices
and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations before use.
2 Relevance of this Standard to fibre-reinforced concrete is to be further investigated.
Committee BD/42 is seeking information from all interested parties.
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

2 REFERENCED DOCUMENTS
The following documents are referred to in this Standard:
AS
1012 Methods of testing concrete
1012.1 Method 1: Sampling of fresh concrete
1012.2 Method 2: Preparation of concrete mixes in the laboratory
1012.3.1 Method 3.1: Determination of properties related to the consistency of concrete
Slump test
1012.8.1 Method 8.1: Making and curing concreteCompression and indirect tensile
test specimens
1012.11 Method 11: Determination of the modulus of rupture
1152 Test sieves
2758 Aggregates and rock for engineering purposes
2758.1 Part 1: Concrete aggregates

3 DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of this Standard, the definitions below apply:
3.1 Designer
The person, persons or organization responsible for the design of the structure.
3.2 Concrete supplier
The person, persons or organization responsible for the supply of the concrete mix.

www.standards.com.au Standards Australia


AS 1012.8.22000 2

4 SAMPLING
4.1 Field sampling
For concrete sampled in the field, the test sample shall be obtained in accordance with the
requirements of AS 1012.1.
4.2 Laboratory sampling
For concrete made in the laboratory, the test sample shall be prepared in accordance with
AS 1012.2.

5 SHAPE AND SIZE OF STANDARD TEST SPECIMENS


5.1 Shape
The shape of the standard test specimen shall be a rectangular beam.
5.2 Size
The standard test specimen shall either
(a) have a cross-section of 145 mm to 155 mm by 145 mm to 155 mm, with a length of at
least 500 mm formed with the long axis horizontal and the nominal maximum size of
the aggregate, in accordance with AS 2758.1, if the concrete does not exceed 40 mm;
or
(b) have a cross-section of 95 mm to 105 mm by 95 mm to 105 mm, with a length of at
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

least 350 mm formed with the long axis horizontal and the nominal maximum size of
aggregate, in accordance with AS 2758.1, if the concrete does not exceed 20 mm.
5.3 Limitations
The following limitations shall apply:
(a) Data from the 100 mm and 150 mm nominal size beam specimens shall not be
combined.
(b) If the nominal maximum size aggregate in the concrete exceeds that permitted for
standard test specimens, then either
(i) the project specification shall provide detailed clauses regarding the making,
curing and testing of appropriate test specimens; or
(ii) the concrete may be passed through an appropriate size of sieve, in accordance
with AS 1152, to remove the larger aggregate portions enabling the remaining
concrete to comply with the requirements for standard moulds.
NOTE: Test results from these specimens are not representative of the concrete as supplied,
but can provide comparative data for purposes of control.

6 EQUIPMENT
6.1 Moulds
6.1.1 General
The complete moulds, including baseplates, shall be capable of providing test specimens
complying with the requirements of AS 1012.11. They shall be made of non-absorbent
material, which does not react with cement paste, and their internal surfaces shall have a
smooth finish. Each mould shall be provided with a baseplate, which may be integral or
separate. The complete mould shall be substantial enough to prevent any spread or warp
during the casting of specimens and shall be leakproof. The moulds shall be constructed
with the longer dimension horizontal, and in such a manner as will facilitate the removal of
the moulded specimens without damage.

Standards Australia www.standards.com.au


3 AS 1012.8.22000

Moulds shall be provided with suitable covers that are designed to minimize the loss of
moisture from the specimens.
The moulds, when assembled, shall be capable of forming moulded specimens complying
with the following requirements:
(a) The height of the cast specimen at any point along its length shall not vary from the
average for that specimen by more than 1 mm.
(b) The width of the cast specimen at any point along its length shall not vary from the
average for that specimen by more than 1 mm.
(c) The angle between the sides of the specimen and the top and bottom planes of the
specimen shall be 90 0.5. The base and sides of the cast specimen shall be plane
surfaces within 0.1 mm in any 100 mm, and 0.2 mm overall. The ends of the
moulds may be sloped to facilitate removal of the cast specimen.
NOTE: It is desirable to mark each mould for identification.
6.2 Rod for hand compaction
The rod used for the hand compaction of concrete in flexure beam moulds shall comply
with the relevant requirements of AS 1012.3.1.
6.3 Vibrators
Internal vibrators used for the compaction of concrete shall have a frequency of vibration of
at least 115 Hz. The outside diameter of the vibrating element inserted into the concrete
shall be not more than 20% of the least dimension of the mould to be filled, and shall be at
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

least 15 mm.
External vibrators used for the compaction of concrete shall have a frequency of vibration
of at least 50 Hz. Provision shall be made for clamping the mould securely to the vibrator.

7 MOULDED SPECIMENS
7.1 General
The specimen shall be moulded in accordance with Clause 7.2. The aim is to achieve full
compaction of the concrete. As the method of compaction can have an influence on the
strength and density of the concrete, the method of compaction used shall be subject to the
following limitations:
(a) Rodding shall not be used for concrete having a slump less than 40 mm (see Notes 1
and 3).
(b) Internal vibration shall not be used for concrete having a slump less than 10 mm, or a
vebe value greater than 10, or a compacting factor less than 0.80.
(c) External vibrationno limitations (see Note 2).
NOTES:
1 For concrete having a slump of approximately 40 mm, compaction by vibration is
normally preferred to compaction by rodding.
2 Extreme care should be taken to avoid segregation when using vibration to compare
concrete with slump greater than 100 mm.
3 Other methods of measuring consistency are not appropriate for setting a limit on the
compacting method to be used.
7.2 Moulding procedure
The procedure for the moulding of flexure test specimens shall be as follows:
(a) Thinly coat the inside surface of steel moulds, steel baseplates and steel covers with a
concrete release agent to prevent adhesion of the concrete. Moulds, baseplates and
covers other than steel may not require oiling, depending on the material used in their
construction.

www.standards.com.au Standards Australia


AS 1012.8.22000 4

(b) Take the sample of concrete, as quickly as possible, to the place selected for
moulding the specimens.
(c) After mixing the test sample, to offset any segregation that has occurred during
transportation, commence casting without delay.
(d) Perform a consistency test, as appropriate.
(e) Place the concrete in the mould using a scoop. Distribute the concrete symmetrically,
taking care to avoid segregation within the mould.
(f) Compact the concrete without causing segregation or excessive laitance by the use of
rodding or vibration, as described in Clause 7.3 or Clause 7.4.
(g) Complete moulding within 20 min of the completion of mixing the composite sample.
7.3 Compaction by rodding
The procedure for the compaction by rodding shall be as follows:
(a) Fill the moulds in two approximately equal layers.
(b) Compact each layer by rodding and distribute the strokes uniformly over the area of
the beam. The number of strokes per layer shall be one for each 650 mm2 of surface.
This is equivalent to 115 strokes per layer for a 150 mm 150 mm 500 mm beam
and 55 strokes per layer for a 100 mm 100 mm 350 mm beam.
(c) After each layer is compacted, spade the concrete along the sides and ends of the
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

mould with a steel trowel or other suitable tool.


(d) Tap the sides of the mould with the mallet to close any voids.
(e) Place sufficient concrete in the last layer to overfill the mould when compacted;
however, if the mould is not completely filled after partial compaction of the top
layer, add some additional concrete and complete the compaction.
(f) After the top layer has been compacted, finish off and smooth the surface of the
concrete.
7.4 Compaction by vibration
The procedure for the compaction by vibration of flexure test specimens shall be as follows:
(a) Fill the mould in one layer.
(b) Vibrate until the surface becomes relatively smooth in appearance. Vibration should
not be prolonged beyond the point at which mortar commences to collect on the
surface.
(c) Where an internal vibrator is used, insert the vibrator at four approximately equally
spaced points along the centre-line of the specimen.
(d) If the mould is not completely filled after vibration, add some additional concrete and
complete compaction.
NOTE: The vibrator should not be allowed to rest on the bottom of the mould or touch the
sides of the mould. Exercise care when withdrawing the vibrator and ensure that no air
pockets are left in the specimen.
(e) After compaction, finish off and smooth the surface of the concrete.

8 IDENTIFICATION
Each specimen shall be identified by the mould marking or by other means that will not
adversely affect the strength of the concrete. Scratch markings shall not be used. As each
specimen is removed from its mould in accordance with the provisions of Clause 9, it shall
be identified by marking with a suitable indelible marking medium.

Standards Australia www.standards.com.au


5 AS 1012.8.22000

9 CURING AND DEMOULDING


9.1 Standard temperature zones
For the purpose of this Standard, Australia shall be divided into two zones, as follows:
(a) The Standard Temperate Zone which shall include Australian Capital Territory,
New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and that portion of Western
Australia south of latitude 25S.
(b) The Standard Troptical Zone which shall include Queensland, Northern Territory and
that portion of Western Australia, north of latitude 25S.
By agreement between the designer and concrete supplier, the requirements of the
alternative temperature zone may be applied.
9.2 Procedure
Flexure test specimens shall be stored, cured and demoulded as prescribed for compression
and indirect tensile test specimens in AS 1012.8.1, except that after initial curing the
flexure test specimens shall not be demoulded but shall be placed under standard
moist-curing in accordance with AS 1012.8.1.
At approximately 48 h from moulding, the flexure test specimens shall be removed from
standard moist-curing and demoulded. They shall be returned to standard moist-curing
conditions as soon as possible, but not later than 3 h after demoulding.
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

Transportation of the test specimens to the laboratory may either be


(a) after initial curing provided that they are not demoulded; or
(b) after 48 h from moulding where standard moist-curing is provided on site. The test
specimens may or may not be demoulded, depending on sequence and timing of
operations.
NOTE: Standard flexure test specimens are damaged more easily during demoulding and handling
than are cylindrical specimens and, therefore, require an extended period before demoulding.
Care should be taken when demoulding and handling the beam specimens to avoid any cracking
or other damage.

10 TRANSPORT OF SPECIMENS TO LABORATORY


When specimens are transported to a laboratory, they shall be carried in such a way that
physical damage is avoided, loss of moisture is minimized and temperature extremes are
prevented.
NOTE: Demoulded specimens that are to be transported to the laboratory should be protected
during transportation by wrapping in wet hessian or wet newspaper and packing in plastic bags
within stout containers.

11 RECORDS
The following information concerning the specimens shall be recorded:
(a) Identification of specimen.
(b) Date, time and location of moulding.
(c) Nominal dimensions of specimen.
(d) Job site or laboratory where specimens were moulded.
(e) Where the test sample has been sieved, the nominal maximum size of aggregate prior
to sieving and the sieve size used.
(f) Consistency and method of compaction.

www.standards.com.au Standards Australia


AS 1012.8.22000 6

(g) Curing history of specimens


(i) zone;
(ii) deviations from initial curing requirement, as detailed in AS 1012.8.1;
(iii) date and time of commencement of standard moist-curing; and
(iv) method and duration of standard moist-curing.
(h) Condition of specimen at the laboratory where applicable.
(i) Identification of the operator carrying out the test.
(j) Any apparent defect or damage on the specimen.

12 REPORT
The following information shall be included:
(a) Identification of specimen.
(b) Date and time of moulding.
(c) Nominal dimensions of specimen, if applicable, in accordance with Clause 5.3.
(d) Where the test sample has been sieved, the nominal maximum size of aggregate prior
to sieving and the sieve size used.
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

(e) Consistency and method of compaction.


(f) Curing history of specimen:
(i) Zone.
(ii) Length of time between moulding and commencement of standard moist-curing.
(iii) Duration of standard moist-curing.
(iv) The daily ambient maximum and minimum temperatures in the locality of the
initial curing when entry to standard moist-curing exceeds 36 h.
(g) Such other information contained in the sampling records (see AS 1012.1) as may be
requested.
(h) Reference to this Standard, i.e. AS 1012.8.2.

Standards Australia www.standards.com.au


Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

NOTES
AS 1012.8.22000
AS 1012.8.22000 8

This Australian Standard was prepared by Technical Committee BD/42, Methods of Testing Concrete. It was approved on behalf of the
Council of Standards Australia on 28 April 2000 and published on 18 May 2000.

The following interests are represented on Committee BD/42:


Association of Consulting Engineers Australia
AUSTROADS
Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Australian Pre-mixed Concrete Association
CSIROBuilding, Construction and Engineering
Cement and Concrete Association of Australia
Concrete Institute of Australia
National Association of Testing Authorities Australia
University of New South Wales
University of Technology, Sydney
Licensed to E.S.SURESH on 04 Jun 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

Keeping Standards up-to-date


Standards are living documents which reflect progress in science, technology and systems. To maintain their currency, all Standards are
periodically reviewed, and new editions are published. Between editions, amendments may be issued. Standards may also be withdrawn.
It is important that readers assure themselves they are using a current Standard, which should include any amendments which may have
been published since the Standard was purchased.
Detailed information about Standards can be found visiting the Standards Australia web site at www.standards.com.au and looking up the
relevant Standard in the on-line catalogue.
Alternatively, the printed Catalogue provides information current at 1 January each year, and the monthly magazine, The Australian
Standard, has a full listing of revisions and amendments published each month.
We also welcome suggestions for the improvement in our Standards, and especially encourage readers to notify us immediately of any
apparent inaccuracies or ambiguities. Contact us via email at mail@standards.com.au, or write to the Chief Executive, Standards
Australia International Ltd, PO Box 1055, Strathfield, NSW 2135.

Originated as part of AS A1031957.


Previous edition AS 1012.81986.
Revised and redesignated in part as AS 1012.8.22000.

This Standard was issued in draft form for comment as DR 98460.

COPYRIGHT
Standards Australia International
All rights are reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means, electronic or
mechanical, including photocopying, without the written permission of the publisher.
Published by Standards Australia International Ltd
PO Box 1055, Strathfield, NSW 2135, Australia
ISBN 0 7337 3390 5 Printed in Australia