Sie sind auf Seite 1von 6

The Effects of Social Media on Adolescents

Social media is the cause to many mental illnesses among adolescents

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Depression and Anxiety are common mental illnesses. They are mainly found among adults, but the amount in adolescents seems to be growing. One of the proposed reasons behind this is the increased use and availability of social media among adolescents. One of the issues with social media accounts is that they can cause insecurities, anxiety, and eventually depression. Image 1 shows how social media networking is the number one activity

done online daily. According to Image 2, the use of social media among young adults has risen from 9% to 90% in 8 years.

The Effects of Social Media on Adolescents Social media is the cause to many mental illnesses

Image 1: Bar graph showing the online activity in the U.S. Social networks ranks number 1. (Facebook And Mental Health: Is Social Media Hurting Or Helping?)

Image 2: A line graph showing how the usage of social media has increased from 2005-2013

Image 2: A line graph showing how the usage of social media has increased from 2005-2013 (Facebook And Mental Health:

Is Social Media Hurting Or Helping?).

According to childmind.org in the

article How Using Social Media Affects Teenagers, it says “It’s also surprisingly easy to feel lonely in the middle of all that hyperconnection. For one thing, kids now know with depressing certainty when they’re being ignored. We all have phones and we all respond to things pretty quickly, so when you’re waiting

for a response that doesn’t come, the

silence can be deafening”(Ehmke). Teenagers can be found feeling very alone when using social media. Loneliness makes people wonder why they are alone. This then creates thoughts of insecurities, implying that there is something they do not have and that is why they are alone. Image 3 shows a pathway of mental thought after using social media. It can lead to obsessions which can lead to suicidal thoughts. It can also lead to insecurities, and feelings of worthlessness, which ultimately leads to depressed suicidal thoughts.

Image 3: A web chart showing the connection of mental thought with social media and mentalNesi and Prinstein ​ (2015) considered the role of technology-based “social comparison and feedback-seeking” (SCFS) in the development of depressive symptoms. They found that adolescents (8 ​ and 9 ​ graders) who reported engaging in more social comparison and feedback-seeking behavior online (e.g., “I use electronic interaction to see what others think about how I look”; “I use electronic interaction to compare my life with other people’s lives”) experienced more depressive symptoms a year later, even when accounting for earlier levels of depression as well as concurrent technology use” (Schacter). says the article ​ Me, Myselfie, and I: The Psychological Impact of Social Media Activity. ​ It is very interesting how the given feedback shows that many people do think insecurely while on social media applications. A survey was presented in the article “Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ)” written by ​ Ryan R. Landoll, Annette M. La Greca, and Betty S. Lai. ​ In this " id="pdf-obj-2-2" src="pdf-obj-2-2.jpg">

Image 3: A web chart showing the connection of mental thought with social media and mental illness (Rachel Hill).

“In a recent study of adolescents, Nesi and Prinstein(2015) considered the role of technology-based “social comparison and feedback-seeking” (SCFS) in the development of depressive symptoms. They found that adolescents (8th and 9th graders) who reported engaging in more social comparison and feedback-seeking behavior online (e.g., “I use electronic interaction to see what

others think about how I look”; “I use electronic interaction to compare my life with other people’s lives”) experienced more depressive symptoms a year later, even when accounting for earlier levels of depression as well as concurrent technology use” (Schacter). says the article Me, Myselfie, and I: The Psychological Impact of Social Media Activity. It is very interesting how the given feedback shows that many people do think insecurely while on social media applications. A survey was presented in the article “Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ)” written by Ryan R. Landoll, Annette M. La Greca, and Betty S. Lai. In this

survey 27% of adolescents answered that once or twice a peer posted an image of them on social media that they did not feel like they looked good in. A total of 18% have received a mean message once or twice before on social media and 24% had been excluded from a event or party over social media. (Landoll, 4) These percents are not extremely high, but should be lower. These kind of results show that there is a possible 23% of adolescents are negatively affected by social media and are most likely depressed after experiencing these things.

With all of this information we are found in a situation of wanting to help solve the problem, but how can that be done? In an interview about social media and it’s affects on high school

students, Casey Pehrson, Herriman High School’s psychologist said, “There needs to be an awareness and I think that there is in a way, but it is not something that is actually explicitly talked about, enough to where we need to have those conversations.” Bringing an awareness to social media’s effects can help adolescents and even adults cope with their feelings. The article “A Systematic Review of Social Media Use to Discuss and View Deliberate Self-Harm Acts” it states “Young people have reported that help-seeking can be undermined by not knowing whom to ask for help and concern that their trust will be betrayed, as well as fear of causing more problems for themselves, being labeled as attention seeking, and hurting loved ones. Studies

have also found that healthcare professionals tend to have a negative view of people who self-harm, and that when young people do disclose deliberate self-harm, despite significant difficulty in disclosure in many cases, they often do not feel listened to.” There needs to be a change in the approach to how mental illnesses are treated. Adolescents will be more willing to submit to help if they are able to see that they are not alone in their situation and if they understand that mental illnesses are natural to the human mind. On the website National Alliance on Mental Illness, it discusses that if mental illness is treated properly, people can understand their full potential and learn how to cope with the stresses of life. Mental illness is affected by the use

of social media and is sometimes caused by it. Mental illness is not necessarily a bad thing, but can become severe and cause damage to the mind, soul, and physical body. An awareness needs to be created to welcome mental illness as no longer taboo, but something that can be discussed. Being able to discuss mental illnesses and social media can help others to be able to see how they are personally affected by social media and how to cope with it.

Works Cited

“Facebook And Mental Health: Is Social Media Hurting Or Helping?” Mental Help Facebook and Mental Health Is Social Media Hurting or Helping

Comments. N.p.,n.d. Web 30 Mar.

2017.

Schacter, Hannah. “Me, Myselfie, and I:

The Psychological Impact of Social MEdia Activity.” Psychology In Action. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2017. Ehmke, Rachel. ”How Using Social

Media Affects Teenagers.” Child Mind Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar. 2017. “The Inner Monologue of BPD.” NAMI:

NAtional Alliance on Mental Illness/Learn more about mental

health. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Mar.

2017.

Landoll, Ryan R., et al. "Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking- Peer Experiences Questionnaire ( SN- PEQ)." Journal of Research on Adolescence (Wiley-Blackwell), vol. 23, no. 4, Dec. 2013, pp. 695-705. EBSCOhost. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. Dyson, Michele P., et al. "A Systematic Review of Social Media Use to Discuss and View Deliberate Self-Harm Acts." Plos ONE, vol. 11, no. 5, 18 May 2016, pp. 1-15. EBSCOhost. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. Pehrson, Casey. Interview.