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Once Upon a Story

Lesson Notes

A Unit on Elements of Plot


Natalie Lyons
Lesson Notes
Lesson Overview:
Week One
o Lesson One: Setting
o Lesson Two: Setting and Characters
o Lesson Three: Characters
o Lesson Four: Exposition
o Lesson Five: Setting, Characters, Exposition, and Storymap
Week Two
o Lesson Six: Main Events
o Lesson Seven: Main Events and Presentations
o Lesson Eight Climax
o Lesson Nine: Denouement and Presentations
o Lesson Ten: Main Events, Climax, Denouement, Storymap, and
Presentations
Week Three
o Lesson Eleven: Storymap and Theme
o Lesson Twelve: Theme
o Lesson Thirteen: Storymap, All Elements of Plot, and Presentations
o Lesson Fourteen: Storymap and All Elements of Plot
o Lesson Fifteen: All Elements of Plot and Presentations

Assignments Overview:
Activities
o Done in class usually the same day they are assigned
o May be finished up the next day in class
o May be assigned as homework if not finished in class that day
o Usually group activities
o Usually based on random stories
o The Journal, Vocabulary Cards, and Elements of Plot Notes are done
individually but are worked on in class every day
o Graded according to your standards
Homework
o Assignments that may be started in class but must be finished at home
o Usually based on random stories
o Graded according to your standards
Projects
o Bigger assignments that should be worth more of the students final grade
o One project for each elements of plot for a total of nine projects
o Based on each students own story
o All have rubrics
Assignments Chart

Assigned Type Description Due


Lesson One Activity Create Settings Lesson One
Lesson One Activity Create Altered Settings Lesson One/Two
Lesson One Activity Journal Lesson
Five/Ten/Fifteen
Lesson One Activity Vocabulary Cards Lesson Thirteen
Lesson One Activity Elements of Plot Notes Lesson Fourteen
Lesson Two Homework Character Table Lesson Four
Lesson Two Project Setting Project Lesson Seven
Lesson Three Activity Film Impersonations Lesson Three/Four
Lesson Four Activity Create Expositions Lesson Four
Lesson Four Homework Characters in Google Doc Lesson Six
Lesson Four Project Character Project Lesson Seven
Lesson Five Activity Storymap Lesson Five
Lesson Five Project Exposition Project Lesson Nine
Lesson Six Activity Film Main Events Lesson Seven/Eight
Lesson Seven Project Main Events Project Lesson Ten
Lesson Eight Activity Find Climaxes Lesson Eight
Lesson Nine Activity Create Alternate Lesson Nine
Denouements
Lesson Nine Project Climax Project Lesson Eleven
Lesson Ten Activity Storymap Lesson Ten
Lesson Ten Project Denouement Project Lesson
Twelve/Thirteen
Lesson Eleven Activity Storymap Lesson Eleven
Lesson Eleven Activity Identify Themes Lesson Eleven
Lesson Twelve Homework Theme Graphic Organizer Lesson Thirteen
Lesson Twelve Project Theme Project Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Twelve Project Storymap Project Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Thirteen Activity Storymap Lesson Thirteen
Lesson Thirteen Activity Create Survey Lesson Thirteen
Lesson Thirteen Homework Take Survey Next Week
Lesson Fourteen Activity Storymap Lesson Fourteen
Lesson Fourteen Activity Analyze Characters Lesson
Fourteen/Fifteen
Lesson Fifteen Activity Analyze Authors Worldview Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Fifteen Project Narrative Project In Two Weeks
Lesson Plan Layout:
Each of the fifteen lessons has its own full lesson plan
o Lesson Summary
o Assignments
o Standards
o Lesson Objectives
o Time Allotment/Context
o Materials/Resources
o Anticipatory Set
o Input
o Modeling
o Guided Practice
o Independent Practice
o Checking for Understanding
o Closure
o Student Grouping
o Differentiated Instruction
o Assessment
All of the support materials are listed with the lesson plans
o Examples
In the lesson plans
On the PowerPoint presentation
o PowerPoint presentation
o Rubrics
Hand out the rubrics to the students when each project is assigned
When the projects are due, have the students bring their rubric with
them to give to you
Use the rubric the students give you to grade them

Examples
Most ideas for elements of plot are based on current and well-known stories
o The students are more familiar with these
o The students are more interested in these
o The students can more easily activate prior knowledge and make
applications to their own lives if the stories are relevant and current
Short fairytales, like Grimms fairytales, are also a good resource
Standard literature textbooks usually include a unit about elements of plot
with short stories that apply to each element of plot
o Use the stories from the textbook for narratives that will directly correlate
with each element of plot to reinforce what is being taught in this unit plan

Timing:
The unit plan is created for fifteen lessons over three weeks
o Instruction, activities, and presentations are factored into this time
The final project, a narrative based on all of the other projects, is due
approximately two weeks after Lesson Fifteen
If more time is needed, feel free to extend the unit
o More review may be necessary
o Presentations may take longer
o Larger class sizes may require more time
o Additional instruction in technology may be necessary
o Technical difficulties may arise
o Life may interrupt
Use the unit plan as a guideline to customize and tailor your lessons for your
students

Potential Problems:
Students must take care of their vocabulary cards because they will be
graded at the end of the unit
Students must take care of their notes because they will be graded at the end
of the unit
Students must take care of their journal because it will be graded at the end
of the unit
Students must grasp the concept of theme
o This is a difficult idea because it requires abstract and critical thinking
o Spend the extra time to explain this topic
o Because there is not one right answer about a storys theme, students
often have a hard time with the open-ended nature of this type of
questioning
Students may need review lessons about quotation marks
o As a narrative, the students stories will most likely have a lot of dialogue
Students must understand the difference between activities/homework and
projects
o Activities/Homework
Usually group assignments done in class
Usually based on random, well-known stories
o Projects
Bigger, more long-term assignments done individually and at home
These must be based on each students own story that they will
make up throughout the unit
Each of the first eight projects will be about a different element of
plot
Students will create a setting, characters, an exposition,
three main events, a climax, a denouement, a theme, and a
Storymap
Each of these projects must be based on each students own
story that they will make up
Students must keep in mind that all of the eight projects are
about one story that they are making up
The ninth and final project is a narrative and presentation
All of the other eight projects contain the information that go
into the ninth project
The final narrative must contain all of the elements of plot
from the other eight projects
Once Upon a Story
Week One Lessons

A Unit on Elements of Plot


Natalie Lyons
Lesson One Setting
Week One Day One

Lesson Summary:
Setting Define what a setting is (the when and where a story takes place).
Students will write the definition using words, symbols, and pictures in their
Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards.
Students will work in groups of two using iPads or computers to find pictures of
three different settings from stories. Each group will share one example with the
rest of the class. Students will work in the same groups of two to point out how a
story would be different depending on the setting by creating in Photoshop or a
similar program a scene from a story with a setting that totally changes the story.
This last assignment will be finished in class tomorrow.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to create settings
Due: Today
o Students will work in groups to create altered settings
Due: Lesson Two
o Journal
Due: Lesson Five
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
Projects

Standards:
CA- California K-12 Academic Content Standards
Subject: English Language Arts
Grade: Grade Eight
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.
ISTE Technology Standards Addressed
1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify settings
Write notes about settings
Give examples of settings
Explain how settings affect a story
Analyze and compare settings of different stories
Create settings

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the beginning of the unit about Elements of
Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of settings
o Examples of settings that are changed and change the story
o iPads, one for each student, or adjust the groups to accommodate the
number of iPads
o Internet access for the iPads
o Flashcardlet or another similar app for the iPads
o Photoshop or another similar app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o White drawing paper, two pieces per group (if not using iPads)
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Colored pencils/markers/crayons
Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Why is the when and where of a story important? What
would happen to a story if you changed the when and the where?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask the students for examples of stories where the when and where is crucial
o For example
Titanic
1776
Gettysburg
A Christmas Story
Star Wars
Lead the students to realize that the when (time) and where (place) of a story
helps determine the events of the story and that even if there is not a specific
time or place, there is always a setting
o For example
Evening
8:56a.m.
A school
The dining room
The future
Tell the students that they will be taking notes about the Elements of Plot for
the next few weeks and that they need to keep all their notes safe and sound
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
setting on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of setting on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Setting
Setting
o The when and where a story takes place
o When = Time
Once upon a time
Today
Nighttime
1776
The future
Last summer
8:56p.m.
o Where = Place
School
A room
USA
Titanic
Panem
Gettysburg
Have the students write down the definition of setting on the iPad or index
card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Divide the students into groups of two and give each an iPad or two pieces of
paper if not using the iPad
They must create pictures on the iPad or draw pictures on the paper of the
when and where of a story of their choice without including words or
characters that give the picture away
o For example
They cannot put a sign that says Disneyland next to a calendar with
the date
They cannot put Batman next to some buildings to create Gotham
City
They will share one of the settings with the class by displaying it and having
the rest of the class figure out when and where the setting is
Instruct the students that, in their group of two, they will be using Photoshop
or another similar app or paper to create one altered setting that completely
changes a story
o For example
Titanic on land
The Little Mermaid in the desert
The Civil War in the year 2000
A scary story in the middle of the day in a crowded mall
The changed setting will be finished in class tomorrow

Modeling:
Show an example of the vocabulary card
Show an example of a picture that gives the when and where of a story and
explain it
Show an example of a picture from a story that has been changed because
the setting has been altered

Guided Practice:
When you get to the pictures of different settings, have the students tell you
the when and where of each
Have the students give examples of how stories can be changed if the setting
is changed
Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card
and take notes
The students will work in groups of two to create two settings for the class to
guess the when and the where
The students will work in groups of two to create one picture where the story
is changed because the setting is altered

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about settings
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of the when and where
of settings
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students for some of the pictures they are creating of changed stories
because of the altered settings

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, and class discussion
The students will be working in groups of two for creating settings
o You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Use words and characters in their pictures of settings
o Participate because of the open-ended nature of the questions
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Be asked to create specific, more difficult settings for either project

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about settings throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Five, Ten, and Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about settings (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work in groups of two to create two pictures that describe the
when and where of a setting without using words or characters to give the
settings away (Due: Today in class)
o Students will share one of their group pictures of a setting with the class
and the class will have to guess what the when and where is (Due: Today
in class)
o Students will work in groups of two to create pictures of stories that are
changed because the setting is altered (Due: Lesson Two)
Lesson Two Setting and Characters
Week One Day Two

Lesson Summary:
Setting and Characters Students will be given time to finish creating a scene in
Photoshop or a similar program with a setting that totally changes the story. Each
group of two will share their scene with another group. Define what characters
are and introduce what a protagonist (the main or leading character) and an
antagonist (the character that opposes or is against the protagonist) are.
Students will write the definitions using words, symbols, and pictures in their
Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards.
Students will create a character table on the iPad or a computer or on paper with
characteristics of protagonists and antagonists, and then they will work alone to
list five different characters of each type. Introduce Setting Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to create altered settings
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Five
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will create a character table
Due: Lesson Four
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Lesson Seven

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound
understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
Create and share pictures of altered settings
List, define, and identify protagonist and antagonist characters
Write notes about protagonist and antagonist characters
Give examples of protagonist and antagonist characters
Interpret the actions of protagonist and antagonist characters
Analyze, compare, and categorize the characteristics of protagonist and
antagonist characters

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the beginning of the unit about Elements of
Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of protagonist and antagonist characters
o iPads, one for each student, or adjust the groups to accommodate the
number of iPads
o Flashcardlet or another similar app for the iPads
o A spreadsheet app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Setting Project Rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Who is your favorite good guy in a story? Why? Who is
your favorite bad guy in a story? Why?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Give the students time, if needed, to finish up the pictures using Photoshop or
another similar app or paper to create one setting that completely changes a
story
o For example
Titanic on land
The Little Mermaid in the desert
The Civil War in the year 2000
A scary story in the middle of the day in a crowded mall
Ask the students for examples of good guys and bad guys in stories
o Good guys, for example
Ariel, from The Little Mermaid
Batman, from The Dark Knight Rises
Woody/Buzz, from Toy Story 3
Katniss/Peeta, from The Hunger Games
o Bad guys, for example
Ursula, from The Little Mermaid
Bane, from The Dark Knight Rises
Lotso, from Toy Story 3
President Snow, from The Hunger Games
List stories and ask the students to provide the good and bad guys from
those stories
o For example
Cinderella
The Avengers
UP
Finding Nemo
The Twilight Series
The Harry Potter Series
Tell the students that they will be taking notes about the Elements of Plot for
the next few weeks and that they need to keep all their notes safe and sound
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definitions
of protagonist and antagonist on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the
students to put the definitions of protagonist and antagonist on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Characters
Protagonist
o The main or leading character
Usually a good guy
The story is mainly about this character
The audience feels most connected to this character
Antagonist
o The person who is opposed to or is against the protagonist
Usually a bad guy
This is the villain of the story
The audience most dislikes this character
Have the students write down the definition of protagonist and antagonist on
the iPad or index card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of
Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Tell the students that they will be creating a table about characters
Have the students pull out a piece of paper to start the rough draft on
Show the students how to set up the table
o The Round, Flat, and Stock characters will be filled in tomorrow

Story Protagoni Antagonis Round Flat Stock


st t
Characteristics Main Opposes or
character is against
the main
character
The Dark Batman Bane
Knight Rises

The students must fill in the characteristics of a protagonist and antagonist


across row two
The students must list five different stories down column one
The students must list five protagonists down column two aligned with the
proper story
The students must list five antagonists down column three aligned with the
proper story
The students must create the table on the iPad or a computer or on paper, if
there is a class set of iPads, do this now, or have the students rotate with the
iPads and working on paper
Introduce the Setting Project and hand out the rubric
o Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at least
three different settings from their own story that they will make up
o Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawing, a painting,
still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation, computer-generated
images, etc.
o Students will be given a rubric to follow
o Due: Lesson Seven

Modeling:
Show an example of the vocabulary cards
When you get to the pictures of protagonist and antagonist characters, talk
about how they are the good and bad guys of the stories
Show an example of the character table and fill in some of the blanks
Show an example of the Setting Project

Guided Practice:
When you get to the pictures of different characters, have the students tell
you the if they are the protagonist or the antagonist
When you list different stories, have the students tell you the protagonist and
antagonist of each story
Have the students give examples of protagonists and antagonists from
different stories
As a class, fill in some of the blanks on the character table

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary cards,
take notes, and fill in the character table
The students will work in groups of two to finish creating one picture where
the story is changed because the setting is altered

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about characters
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of characters
Ask the students the difference between the protagonist and the antagonist
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students to share an admirable quality in a protagonist that they think
they should emulate
Ask the students to share an undesirable quality in an antagonist that they
think they should not emulate

Student Grouping:
The students will be working in groups of two for creating altered settings
o You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
cards, note taking, the character table, and class discussion

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Draw characters in their character table
o List fewer characters in their character table
o Participate because of the open-ended nature of the questions
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Be asked to list protagonists and antagonists from specific stories
o Be asked to list fewer protagonists and antagonists but also list
characteristics or attributes of those particular characters

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about characters throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Five, Ten, and Fifteen)
o Students will create flashcards about the protagonist and the antagonist
(Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work in groups of two to create pictures of stories that are
changed because the setting is altered (Due: Today)
o Students will create a character table (Due: Lesson Four)
Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
Lesson Three Characters
Week One Day Three

Lesson Summary:
Characters Define what round (characters that change or grow), flat
(characters that do not change or grow), and stock (characters based on a
stereotype) characters are and review what the protagonist and antagonist are.
Students will write the definitions using words, symbols, and pictures in their
Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards.
Students will fill in more information on the character table on the iPad or
computer with characteristics of round, flat, and stock characters, and then they
will work alone to list five different characters of each new type. Students will
share with a partner their characters. Students will work in groups of four to film
their impersonations of at least four different characters, with each student
presenting at least one impersonation. The video clips will be shown in class.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to film impersonations
Due: Today and tomorrow if necessary
o Journal
Due: Lesson Five
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will create a character table
Due: Lesson Four
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Lesson Seven

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify round, flat, and stock characters
Write notes about round, flat, and stock characters
Give examples of round, flat, and stock characters
Interpret the actions of round, flat, and stock characters
Analyze, compare, and categorize the characteristics of round, flat, and stock
characters
Impersonate the different types of characters from stories
Film impersonations of the different types of characters from stories

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the beginning of the unit about Elements of
Plot
Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of round, flat, and stock characters
o iPads, one for each student or at least on for each group of four students
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o Camera on iPad
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o The character table from Lesson Two

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: List at least five characters that are not the protagonist or
antagonist. Include in that list at least two characters that you would consider
a certain type of character that shows up in multiple stories.
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask the students to share some of the protagonists and antagonists they
wrote down on their character table from yesterday
Tell the students that they will be taking notes about the Elements of Plot for
the next few weeks and that they need to keep all their notes safe and sound
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
round, flat, and stock characters on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the
students to put the definition of round, flat, and stock characters on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Characters
Round Character
o Characters that change or grow
Usually main characters who are shaped and changed by conflict
Their attitudes and habits change
They become a different, usually better, person
Flat Character
o Characters who do not really change or grow
Their attitudes and habits stay mostly the same
They are supporting characters
They are often humorous in their sameness
Stock Character
o Fictional characters based on a stereotype
They are stereotyped for appearance, mannerism, speech, etc.
They provide a familiar character (round or flat)
The hero
The cheerleader
The mother-in-law
Flat AND stock characters
Are usually humorous
Are usually exaggerated
Have the students write down the definition of round, flat, and stock
characters on the iPad or index card, additional notes must be written in the
Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Have the students give examples of round, flat, and stock characters from
different stories
Tell the students that they will be filling in more on the table about characters
Have the students pull out their character table from yesterday

Story Protagoni Antagonis Round Flat Stock


st t
Characteristics Main Opposes or Characters Characters Characters
character is against that change that do not based on a
the main or grow change or stereotype
character grow
The Dark Batman Bane Catwoman Gordon Alfred
Knight Rises

The students must fill in the characteristics of a round, flat, and stock
character across row two
The students must list five round characters down column four aligned with
the proper story
The students must list five flat characters down column five aligned with the
proper story
The students must list five stock characters down column five aligned with the
proper story
The students must create the table on the iPad or a computer, if there is a
class set of iPads, do this now, or have the students rotate with the iPads and
working on paper
Divide the students into groups of four
o You can assign the groups ahead of time or let them choose
Instruct the students that they will be working in groups of four to film their
impersonations of four different types of characters, one for each student in
the group
o Inform students that all impersonations must be appropriate and clean in
content
o Tell the students to first decide
What story they will be choosing the characters from
Which character is protagonist, antagonist, round, flat, and stock
How each character will act
What each character will say
Who will do each impersonation
Who will film the impersonations
o Do not give them an iPad to begin filming until they have decided the
above
o Depending on the students and the rules, allow them the freedom to move
around the classroom, the hallways, even the school campus with a hall
pass
o Provide costumes and props is possible
o Show the impersonations when they are finished

Modeling:
Show an example of the vocabulary cards
When you get to the pictures of round, flat, and stock characters, talk about
who they are and their characteristics
Show an example of the character table and fill in some of the blanks
Show an example of a character impersonation

Guided Practice:
When you get to the pictures of different characters, have the students tell
you if they are round, flat, or stock characters
When you list different stories, have the students tell you round, flat, and
stock characters from each story
Have the students give examples of round, flat, and stock characters from
different stories
As a class, fill in some of the blanks on the character table
Help the students list and describe characters from stories to impersonate

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary cards,
take notes, and fill in the character table
The students will work in groups to film their impersonations of different
characters

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about characters
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of characters
Ask students the difference between the protagonist, antagonist, round, flat,
and stock characters
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Share the student impersonations

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
cards, note taking, the character table, and class discussion
The students will be working in groups of four to film the character
impersonations
o You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Draw characters in their character table
o List fewer characters in their character table
o Participate in the filming because of the creative nature of the assignment
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Be asked to list round, flat, and stock characters from specific stories
o Be asked to list fewer round, flat, and stock characters but also to list
characteristics of those particular characters

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about characters throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Five, Ten, and Fifteen)
o Students will create flashcards about round, flat, and stock characters
(Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will finish the character table (Due: Lesson Four)
o Students will work in groups of four to film impersonations of characters
(Due: Today and tomorrow if necessary)
Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
Lesson Four Exposition
Week One Day Four

Lesson Summary:
Exposition Define what an exposition is (the necessary information needed
before the rest of the story can make sense). Students will write the definition
using words, symbols, and pictures in their Elements of Plot Notes and on
Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards. Students will work in groups of
two to paraphrase the expositions of at least two different stories by rewriting
them in the ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app on the iPad. Students
will share one of their expositions with another pair. The students will fill in one
row of characters on the shared Google Doc on the class website. Introduce
Characters Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to film impersonations
Due: Today if necessary
o Students will work in groups to create expositions in ComicBook,
Toontastic, etc.
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Five
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will create a character table
Due: Today
o Students will fill in a row of characters on a shared Google Doc
Due: Lesson Six
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Due: Lesson Seven
Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Sentence Structure
Standard 1.1: Use correct and varied sentence types and sentence openings to
present a lively and effective personal style.
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.4: Edit written manuscripts to ensure that correct grammar is used.
Concept: Punctuation and Capitalization
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity
6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound
understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify expositions
Write notes about expositions
Give examples of expositions
Recreate expositions in ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app or on
paper

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the beginning of the unit about Elements of
Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of expositions
o iPads, one for each student, or at least one for each group of two
students, or adjust the groups to accommodate the number of iPads
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app for the iPad, or paper (if not
using iPads)
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Character Project Rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o The character table from Lesson Two

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: What do you expect to happen at the beginning of a story?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Show any leftover character impersonations from Lesson Three
Ask the students to share some of the round, flat, and stock characters they
wrote down on their character table from yesterday
Show the students how to share one row of characters on the shared Google
Doc on the class website
o Stress that they are not to alter or change or mess with the row of anyone
else
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
exposition on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of exposition on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Exposition
Exposition
o It sets the stage
o It is the background information you need to make sense of the rest of
story
o The setting and characters are introduced, maybe even the theme
o It is usually the first few pages or chapters or minutes of a story
Have the students write down the definition of exposition on the iPad or index
card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Show the video clip of an exposition
Discuss the video clip
Have the students give examples of expositions from different stories
Divide the students into pairs
o You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose
Instruct them to
o Choose two stories
o Figure out what the exposition is in each story
o Rewrite the exposition
o Create the rewritten exposition in ComicBook, Toontastic, or another
similar app on the iPad or on paper
o Include the setting (when and where), the protagonist, the antagonist, and
any other important background information about the story
o Share the created expositions with another group when they are done
Introduce the Character Project and hand out the rubric
o Students will choose or compose theme songs for at least three different
characters in their own story that they will make up
o The songs must match the characters and type of characters
o Students will be given a rubric to follow
o Due: Lesson Seven

Modeling:
Show an example of a row of characters on the shared Google Doc on the
class website
Show an example of a rewritten exposition in ComicBook, Toontastic, or
another similar app
Show an example of the Character Project

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of expositions
As a class, fill in some of the blanks on the shared Google Doc on the class
website
Rewrite an exposition as a class

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card
and take notes
The students will work in groups of two to rewrite an exposition and create it
in ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app, or on paper
Checking for Understanding:
Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about expositions
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of expositions
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
List some stories and ask the students to tell you what background
information is important to know to understand the rest of the story
o For example
The Hunger Games: You need to know about the Reaping and the
setting
Cinderella: You need to know that her father died and her
step-family abuses her
UP: Carls wife wanted to go on an adventure but never got to go
The Dark Knight: Joker is a crazy antagonist with no other motive
than to create chaos

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, and class discussion
The students will be working in groups of two to rewrite and create an
exposition in ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app, or on paper
o You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose
Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Draw pictures for rewriting the exposition
o Participate in creating the ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app,
or on paper exposition because of the creative nature of the assignment
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about expositions throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Five, Ten, and Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about exposition (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will fill in a row of characters on the shared Google Doc on the
class website (Due: Lesson Six)
o Students will work in groups of two to rewrite and create an exposition in
ComicBook, Toontastic, or another similar app, or on paper (Due: Today)
Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Students will compose or rewrite theme songs for at least three
different characters in their own story that they will make up
The songs must match the characters and type of characters
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
Lesson Five Setting, Characters, Exposition, and
Storymap
Week One Day Five

Lesson Summary:
Setting, Characters, Exposition, and Storymap Review the concepts of setting,
characters, and exposition. Introduce the idea of a Storymap (a graphic organizer
used to record the logical order of events of a story) and show the students how
to mark in the setting, characters, and exposition on a Storymap. Introduce
Exposition Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to create Storymaps
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Today
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will fill in a row of characters on a shared Google Doc
Due: Lesson Six
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Due: Lesson Seven
o Exposition Project
Due: Lesson Nine

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.
Area: Writing
Sub-Strand 1.0: Writing Strategies
Concept: Organization and Focus
Standard 1.1: Create compositions that establish a controlling impression, have
a coherent thesis, and end with a clear and well-supported conclusion.
Standard 1.2: Establish coherence within and among paragraphs through
effective transitions, parallel structures, and similar writing techniques.
Sub-Strand 2.0: Writing Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics)
Concept: Using the writing strategies of grade eight outlined in Writing Standard
1.0, students:
Standard 2.1: Write biographies, autobiographies, short stories, or narratives: a.
Relate a clear, coherent incident, event, or situation by using well-chosen details.
b. Reveal the significance of, or the writers attitude about, the subject. c. Employ
narrative and descriptive strategies (e.g., relevant dialogue, specific action,
physical description, background description, comparison or contrast of
characters).

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.4: Edit written manuscripts to ensure that correct grammar is used.
Concept: Punctuation and Capitalization
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify settings, characters, expositions, and Storymaps
Write notes about Storymaps
Give examples of settings, characters, expositions, and Storymaps
Identify, analyze, and categorize settings, characters, and expositions on a
Storymap
Draw a Storymap with organized elements of plot

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of Storymaps
o iPads, one for each student or at least on for each group of two students,
or adjust the groups to accommodate the number of iPads
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Storymap graphic organizer, one per student
o Exposition Project Rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Choose one of the stories below. List all of the necessary
background information and other information about the setting and
characters in the exposition that you need to know to understand the rest of
the story.
o The Little Mermaid
o UP
o Toy Story 3
o Finding Nemo
o The Avengers
o The Dark Knight
o Snow White
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Show and discuss the characters on the shared Google Doc on the class
website
Ask the students to define and give examples of settings, protagonists,
antagonists, round characters, flat characters, stock characters, and
expositions
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
Storymap on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of Storymap on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Storymap
Storymap
o A graphic organizer
o It helps you identify, analyze, and categorize the elements of plot
o Contains the elements of plot
Setting: When and Where
Characters
Exposition
Three Main Events
Climax
Denouement
Theme
Have the students write down the definition of Storymap on the iPad or index
card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Show the examples of Storymaps
Show the video clip about Storymaps
Discuss the video clip about Storymaps
Give each student one Storymap graphic organizer
Inform the students that, as a class, you are going to fill in the setting,
characters, and exposition for a story
Play the video clip from The Little Mermaid (or choose another story)
Fill in the Storymap with the students
o Title
The Little Mermaid
o Setting
When Once upon a time
Where Under the sea
o Characters
Protagonist Ariel
Antagonist Ursula
Round King Triton
Flat Flounder
Stock Sebastian
o Exposition
Ariel is adventurous, likes human things, is forgetful, can sing well
Six sisters
Sebastian works for King Triton
King Triton has a temper
Have the students create their own Storymap outline
If necessary, show another video clip exposition or read a story exposition
o Have the students fill in the setting, characters, and exposition for the new
video or story exposition
Have the students work individually to fill in the setting, characters, and
exposition about a story of their choice on a Storymap
Introduce the Exposition Project and hand out the rubrics
o Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will make up
o The exposition must include background information about the setting and
characters that will be necessary to understand the rest of the story
o Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
o Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
o Students will be given a rubric to follow
o Due: Lesson Nine

Modeling:
Show an example of a Storymap
Play an example of an Exposition Project podcast

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of settings, characters, expositions, and
Storymaps
As a class, fill in the setting, characters, and exposition on a Storymap

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card,
taking notes, and to fill in the setting, characters, and exposition about a story
of their choice on Storymap that they create

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about settings, characters,
expositions, and Storymaps
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of settings, characters,
and expositions
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students to share a bit of information from the exposition of their
story

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, the Storymaps, and class discussion

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Draw pictures for rewriting the exposition
o Draw pictures for the Storymap
o Fill in a partially completed Storymap
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about settings, characters, expositions,
and Storymaps throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Today, Ten, and Fifteen)
o Students will create flashcards (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will fill in the setting, characters, and exposition about a story on
Storymaps (Due: Today)

Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Students will compose or rewrite theme songs for at least two
different characters in their own story that they will make up
The songs must match the characters and type of characters
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due Lesson Seven
o Exposition Project
Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will
make up
The exposition must include background information about the
setting and characters that will be necessary to understand the rest
of the story
Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Nine
Once Upon a Story
Week Two Lessons

A Unit on Elements of Plot


Natalie Lyons
Lesson Six Main Events
Week Two Day One

Lesson Summary:
Main Events Define what the main events are (the rising action and conflicts).
Students will write the definition using words, symbols, and pictures in their
Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards.
List out loud examples of elements of plot learned about so far (setting,
characters, exposition, main events), and students will have to move around the
room to designated areas according to what element of plot they think is being
listed. Students will work in groups of five to film and edit a main event from a
story and add music.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to film main events
Due: Lesson Seven
o Journal
Due: Lesson Ten
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will fill in a row of characters on a shared Google Doc
Due: Today
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Due: Lesson Seven
o Exposition Project
Due: Lesson Nine

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify main events
Write notes about main events
Give examples of main events
Identify and differentiate between settings, characters, expositions, and main
events
Recreate and film main events
Time Allotment and Context:
One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of main events
o iPads, one for each group of five students, or adjust the groups to
accommodate the number of iPads
o iMovie app for the iPads
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Tape around the room eight pieces of paper, each with one of the
following words on it in large print
Setting
Protagonist
Antagonist
Round
Flat
Stock
Exposition
Main Event
o A list with the above categories and at least ten examples in each
category
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils

Anticipatory Set:
Play a video clip of a main event from a well-know story
Ask the students where the clip falls in the movie (beginning, middle, end)

Input:
Ask the students what they think the main events are
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
main events on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of main events on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at Main
Events
Main Events
o The rising action
o The series of events that LEADS to the climax
o The RELATED series of incidents that points toward the climax
o Each event builds more tension to the next event and, finally, the climax
o Usually the struggles and conflicts of the protagonist
Have the students write down the definition of main events on the iPad or index
card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Show the video clips on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the video clips on the PowerPoint slides
Inform the students that there are eight pieces of paper taped around the
room and that they will have to move to the proper place when you call out an
example of one of the elements of plot
o Read various examples of the elements of plot while the students move
around the room to the different designated areas
o Different examples may have more than one answer
For example, Batman is a protagonist (the main character), a round
character (he changes and grows throughout the story), and a
stock character (a hero)
o Have students explain their answers
Inform the students that you will be placing them in groups of five to film a
main event from a movie
o Pick the groups ahead of time
In their groups they must
o Work in groups of five
o Choose a well-known story
o Choose a main event from that story
o Decide who is going to be each character and what they will say and do
o Practice the scene
o Film the scene
o Edit the scene and add music and sound effects
o Present the film in class
Have the students get in their groups and work on practicing their main event
o Do not give them the iPad to film until they have practiced the scene
several times
Allow them to move around the room or campus if possible
Bring costumes and props if possible

Modeling:
Move around the room to show how to go to the proper taped paper with the
element of plot listed on it
Show an example of a filmed main event

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of main events
Have the students move around the room to the proper paper with the
element of plot listed on it
Have the students tell you what main event from what story they are filming

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card
and take notes
The students will participate as a whole-class group to move around the room
to the proper paper with the element of plot listed on it
The students will work in groups of five to film and edit a main event from a
story

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about main events
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of main events
The students will move around the room to the proper paper with the element
of plot listed on it
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
(Students will work on the film until the end of class)

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, and class discussion
The students will participate as a whole-class group to move around the room
to the proper paper with the element of plot listed on it
The students will work in groups of five to film a main event

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o Participate in moving around the room to the proper paper with the
elements of plot listed on them because they can follow the crowd even if
they do not fully comprehend the task
o Participate in filming because they can act out their parts
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Think outside the box for some answers regarding the papers with the
elements of plot listed on them because some examples have more than
one correct answer

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about main events throughout the lesson
o Students will move around the room to the proper paper with the element
of plot listed on it
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Ten and Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about main events (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work in groups of five to film a main event from a story
Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
o Character Project
Students will compose or rewrite theme songs for at least two
different characters in their own story that they will make up
The songs must match the characters and type of characters
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Seven
o Exposition Project
Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will
make up
The exposition must include background information about the
setting and characters that will be necessary to understand the rest
of the story
Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Nine
Lesson Seven Main Events and Presentations
Week Two Day Two

Lesson Summary:
Main Events and Presentations Students will finish creating the film of a main
event. Students will present their Setting Project and one character theme song
from the Character Project. Introduce Main Events Project. Show the main
events films.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to film main events
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Ten
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
Projects
o Setting Project
Due: Today
o Character Project
Due: Today
o Exposition Project
Due: Lesson Nine
o Main Events Project
Due: Lesson Ten

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
Present their Setting Project
Present one song from their Character Project
Recreate and film main events

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o iPads, one for each group of five students, or adjust the groups to
accommodate the number of iPads
o iMovie app for the iPads
o Main Events Project rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Setting Project Rubric
o Character Project Rubric

Anticipatory Set:
(Let the students finish filming their main events)

Input:
Give the students time to finish filming the main events if they did not finish
yesterday
Have the students present their Setting Projects
o Use the rubric that they bring up to grade them
o Display their Setting Project pictures on classroom bulletin boards
Have the students present part of one of their songs from the Character
Project
o Use the rubric that they bring up to grade them
Introduce Main Events Project and hand out rubrics
o Students will write at least three main events for their story
o Students will film all three main events for their story
o Students will edit and add music to the main events
o Students will be given a rubric to follow
o Due: Lesson Ten

Modeling:
(Presentations and group work)

Guided Practice:
(Presentations and group work)

Independent Practice:
The students will work in groups of five to film and edit a main event from a
story

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about their Setting Projects
and Character Projects

Closure:
(Presentations will take all of class time)

Student Grouping:
The students will work in groups of five to film a main event
The students will be working individually for their presentations

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Participate in filming because they can act out their parts
o Present modified projects
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the
assignments
o Use the extended rubric to work for a higher grade

Assessment:
Formal (Summative)
o Setting Project
Students will design and develop a presentation with pictures of at
least three different settings from their own story that they will make
up
Students must use some sort of visual, whether it be drawings, a
painting, still photographs, a video, a slideware presentation,
computer-generated images, etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Today
o Character Project
Students will compose or rewrite theme songs for three different
characters in their own story that they will make up
The songs must match the characters and type of characters
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Today
o Exposition Project
Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will
make up
The exposition must include background information about the
setting and characters that will be necessary to understand the rest
of the story
Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Nine
o Main Events Project
Students will write at least three main events for their story that they
will make up
Students will film all three main events for their story
Students will edit and add music to the main events
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Ten

Lesson Eight Climax


Week Two Day Three

Lesson Summary:
Climax Define what a climax is (the part of the most tension and suspense in a
story, the part where you do not know what is going to happen next). Students
will write the definition using words, symbols, and pictures in their Elements of
Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index cards. Students will
work individually to give examples of the climax for at least three different stories,
create a picture on the iPad or the computer or a paper to illustrate it, and list
three supporting facts of why it is the climax. Students will share with a partner
one of their examples with reasons.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to find the climaxes and supporting details
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Ten
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Fourteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fifteen
Homework
Projects
o Exposition Project
Due: Lesson Nine
o Main Events Project
Due: Lesson Ten
Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Punctuation and Capitalization
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify climaxes
Write notes about climaxes
Give examples of climaxes and explain their choices
Create pictures of climaxes

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of climaxes
o iPads, one for each student, or three pieces of paper for each student (if
not using iPads)
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Colored pencils/markers/crayons

Anticipatory Set:
Play the main events videos that the students made in class
Ask them where all the main events are leading to

Input:
Ask the students what they think the climax is
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
climax on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of climax on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Climax
Climax
o The point of the most tension and suspense
o The part where you do not know what is going to happen next
o The turning point of the story
o It usually comes right before the denouement
o It does not tell the ending of the story
Have the students write down the definition climax on the iPad or index card,
additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Play the video clips on the PowerPoint
Discuss the video clips on the PowerPoint
Inform the students that they will be working individually to come up with the
climax from three different stories
o Students will find or create three pictures, one for each climax, that
illustrate those climaxes
o Students will write down three supporting facts about why it is the climax
for each of the three climaxes
o Students will then share with a partner one of their examples with the
accompanying supporting facts
You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose

Modeling:
Show an example of a picture of a climax with supporting facts for why it is a
climax

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of climaxes
Have the students state reasons why the examples of climaxes show what a
climax is

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card,
take notes, identify three climaxes, find/create a picture for each of the three
climaxes, and list three supporting facts for each climax of why it is the climax
The students will work in groups of two to share their picture of a climax with
its three supporting facts

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about climaxes
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of climaxes
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students to share one of the climaxes they identified and
found/created a picture for

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, class discussion, identifying of climaxes, finding/creating
pictures of climaxes, and listing supporting facts for climaxes
The students will work in groups of two to share one picture of a climax with
its three supporting facts

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
o List one climax and create one picture for it
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about climaxes throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Ten and Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about climax (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work find/create three pictures, one each per three climaxes,
with three supporting facts about each defining why it is a climax (Due:
Today)
Formal (Summative)
o Exposition Project
Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will
make up
The exposition must include background information about the
setting and characters that will be necessary to understand the rest
of the story
Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Nine
o Main Events Project
Students will write at least three main events for their story that they
will make up
Students will film all of those three main events for their story
Students will edit and add music to the one main event
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Ten
Lesson Nine Denouement and Presentations
Week Two Day Four

Lesson Summary:
Denouement and Presentations Define what a denouement is (the resolution of
the story). Students will write the definition using words, symbols, and pictures in
their Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index
cards. Students will work in pairs to create in ComicBook or a similar app an
alternate denouement to a story. Introduce the Climax Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to create an alternate denouement
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Ten
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
Projects
o Exposition Project
Due: Today
o Main Events Project
Due: Lesson Ten
o Climax Project
Due: Lesson Eleven

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify denouements
Write notes about denouements
Give examples of denouements
Create alternate denouements
Present their Exposition Project

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot
Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of denouements
o iPads, one for each group of two students or paper for the groups to
create a comic strip on (if not using iPads)
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o ComicBook or another similar app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Climax Project rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Colored pencils/markers/crayons
o Exposition Project rubric

Anticipatory Set:
Play a How It Should Have Ended video clip
Ask the students what makes a good ending

Input:
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
denouement on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of denouement on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Denouement
Denouement
o When all the loose ends are tied up
o The final outcome
o The release of tension
o When conflicts are resolved
Physical: Usually the downfall of the antagonist
Emotional: Usually the fixing of a relationship
o When normal returns for the characters
o It usually happens very close to the end of the story
o (Some stories are To be continued, but there is still a denouement for
the story that was just finished)
Have the students write down the definition of denouement on the iPad or
index card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Play the video clips on the PowerPoint
Discuss the video clips on the PowerPoint
Inform the students that they will be working in groups of two to create an
altered denouement in ComicBook
o Each comic needs to have at least four panels
o It must alter the denouement of the original story
o Students will share their altered denouement with another group of two
You may pick the groups ahead of time or let them choose
o Introduce the Climax Project and hand out the rubrics
Students will create a set of six rules, three defining what a climax
is and three defining what a climax is not
Students will write their own climax for their story that they will
make up
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Eleven

Modeling:
Show an example of a picture of a denouement
Show an example of an altered denouement video
Show an example of a Climax Project

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of denouements
Have the students give examples of altered denouement ideas

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card
and take notes
The students will work in groups of two to create an altered denouement in
ComicBook

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about denouements
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of denouements
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students to share some of the altered denouements

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary card
and note taking
The students will work in groups of two to create an altered denouement in
ComicBook

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about denouements throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lessons Ten and Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about denouement (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work in groups of two to create an altered denouement (Due:
Today)
Formal (Summative)
o Exposition Project
Students will create an exposition for their own story that they will
make up
The exposition must include background information about the
setting and characters that will be necessary to understand the rest
of the story
Students will record their exposition as a podcast in Audacity
Students will post their exposition podcast on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Today
o Main Events Project
Students will write at least three main events for their story that they
will make up
Students will film all of those three main events for their story
Students will edit and add music to the one main event
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Ten
o Climax Project
Students will create a set of six rules, three defining what a climax
is and three defining what a climax is not
Students will write their own climax for their story that they will
make up
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Eleven

Lesson Ten Main Events, Climax, Denouement,


Storymap, and Presentations
Week Two Day Five

Lesson Summary:
Main Events, Climax, Denouement, Storymap, and Presentations Show the
students how to incorporate the main events, climax, and denouement onto the
Storymap as well as the setting, characters, and exposition. Review the concepts
of setting, characters, exposition, main events, climax, and denouement. The
students will present their Main Events Projects. Introduce the Denouement
Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to create Storymaps
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Today
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
Projects
o Main Events Project
Due: Today
o Climax Project
Due: Lesson Eleven
o Denouement Project
Due: Lessons Twelve and Thirteen

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify settings, characters, expositions, main events,
climaxes, denouements, and Storymaps
Write notes about Storymaps
Give examples of settings, characters, expositions, main events, climaxes,
denouements, and Storymaps
Identify, analyze, and categorize settings, characters, expositions, main
events, climaxes, and denouements on a Storymap
Draw a Storymaps with organized elements of plot
Present Main Events Project
Create Climax Projects

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Examples of Storymaps
o Denouement Project rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Main Events Project rubric

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: List the climax and denouement for three different stories.
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask the students to define and give examples of setting, protagonist,
antagonist, round character, flat character, stock character, exposition, main
events, climax, and denouement
Inform the students that, as a class, they are going to finish filling in the
setting, characters, exposition, three main events climax, and denouement for
a story
Play the video clip from The Little Mermaid (or choose another story)
Fill in the Storymap with the students
o Title
The Little Mermaid
o Setting
When Once upon a time
Where Under the sea
o Characters
Protagonist Ariel
Antagonist Ursula
Round King Triton
Flat Flounder
Stock Sebastian
o Exposition
Ariel is adventurous, likes human things, is forgetful, can sing well
Six sisters
Sebastian works for King Triton
King Triton has a temper
o Main Event One
Ariel saves Prince Eric from the shipwreck
o Main Event Two
Ariel trades her voice to Ursula for legs
o Main Event Three
Ursula disguises herself as a human and almost tricks Prince Eric
into marrying her
o Climax
Ursula almost kills Ariel with the trident
o Denouement
Physical Prince Eric kills Ursula by running a ship into her
Emotional Ariel becomes a human, and she and Prince Eric get
married
Have the students create their own Storymap outline
If necessary, show another video clip exposition or read a story
o Have the students fill in the setting, characters, exposition, three main
events, climax, and denouement for the new video or story
Have the students work individually to fill in the setting, characters, exposition,
three main events, climax, and denouement about a story of their choice on a
Storymap
Students will present their Main Events Project
Introduce the Denouement Project and hand out the rubrics
o Students will write the denouement for their own story that they will make
up (Due: Lesson Twelve)
o Students will trade their denouement with a partner, who will give
feedback on the following
Is there a physical denouement?
Is there an emotional denouement?
Is there anything that should be added?
Is there anything that should be removed?
Is there anything that should be changed?
Is there anything that is unclear?
Please give one suggestion.
o Students will repeat the process with another partner
o Students will revise their denouement
o Students will fill in the Denouement Form that is a Google Doc on the
class website (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Due: Lessons Twelve and Thirteen

Modeling:
Show an example of a Storymap
Play an example of a Denouement Project

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of settings, characters, expositions, main
events, climaxes, denouements, and Storymaps
Have the class fill in the setting, characters, exposition, main events, climax,
and denouement on a Storymap

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card,
take notes, and fill in the setting, characters, exposition, main events, climax,
and denouement about a story of their choice on Storymap that they create

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about settings, characters,
expositions, main events, climaxes, denouements, and Storymaps
Students will present their Main Events Project
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask students how they want their story to end

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary
card, note taking, the Storymaps, and class discussion

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for the Storymap
o Fill in a partially completed Storymap
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about settings, characters, expositions,
main events, climaxes, denouements, and Storymaps throughout the
lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Today and Lesson Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about settings (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work individually on their projects
Formal (Summative)
o Main Events Project
Students will write at least three main events for their story that they
will make up
Students will film one of those three main events for their story
Students will edit and add music to the one main event
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Today
o Climax Project
Students will create a set of six rules, three defining what a climax
is and three defining what a climax is not
Students will write their own climax for their story that they will
make up
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Lesson Eleven
o Denouement Project
Students will write the denouement for their own story that they will
make up (Due: Lesson Twelve)
Students will trade their denouement with a partner, who will give
feedback on the following
Is there a physical denouement?
Is there an emotional denouement?
Is there anything that should be added?
Is there anything that should be removed?
Is there anything that should be changed?
Is there anything that is unclear?
Please give one suggestion.
Students will repeat the process with another partner
Students will revise their denouement
Students will fill in the Denouement Form that is a Google Doc on
the class website (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
Due: Lessons Twelve and Thirteen
Once Upon a Story
Week Three Lessons

A Unit on Elements of Plot


Natalie Lyons
Lesson Eleven Storymap and Theme
Week Three Day One

Lesson Summary:
Storymap and Theme Review how to put all the elements of plot on the
Storymap. Define what the theme is (the moral of the story, what anyone can
learn from the story) and give examples of universal themes (family, sacrifice,
love, etc.). Students will write the definitions using words, symbols, and pictures
in their Elements of Plot Notes and on Flashcardlet on the iPad or on 3x5 index
cards. Students will work in groups of three to give examples of themes from at
least five different stories and explain those choices and create a descriptive
picture for each.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to create Storymaps
Due: Today
o Students will work in groups to identify and explain themes
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
Projects
o Climax Project
Due: Today
o Denouement Project
Due: Lessons Twelve and Thirteen

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions


Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.4: Edit written manuscripts to ensure that correct grammar is used.
Concept: Punctuation and Capitalization
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify themes
Write notes about themes
Give examples of themes with supporting reasons
Create pictures illustrating themes

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period in the middle of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of themes
o iPads, one for each group of three students or adjust the groups to
accommodate the number of iPads
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Climax Project rubric

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: What is the point of a story? Can we ever learn anything
from a story? What are some things we can learn from a story?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask the students what they think the moral of a story is
Pass out the iPads for the students to use Flashcardlet to put the definition of
theme on OR Pass out the 3x5 index cards for the students to put the
definition of theme on
Display the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Theme
Theme
o Conflicts:
Man vs. Self
An internal struggle
Man vs. Man
One person against another person
Man vs. Society
One person against a group of people, a government,
stereotypes, etc.
Man vs. Machine
One person against technology
Man vs. Nature
One person against the elements
Man vs. A Higher Power
One person against God, gods, chance, etc.
o Theme
The moral of the story
Fables teach this directly and obviously
The lesson we learn
Parables teach this directly and obviously
The worldview about life and people
Fiction does this, but you have to figure it out from what
happens and from how characters think, talk, and act
Find the common ground
Specifics may be different, but general, underlying truths will
apply to everyone
o Finding the Theme
Check out the title
Notice repeating patterns and symbols
Find any allusions
(references to other things)
Analyze the details of the story and the greater meaning they may
have
Theme is part of the plot as a whole
A story is usually not JUST about theme
o Possible Themes
Find the common ground
What ANYONE, ANYWHERE, at ANY TIME can learn from
the story and apply to his or her own life
The theme may be somewhat different for different people
A complex story may have multiple themes
o Universal Themes
Honesty Is the Best Policy
Bad is punished, good is rewarded
Blood Is Thicker than Water
Family comes first
Love Conquers All/Friendship
It is worth everything (good and bad)
Human Struggles/The Great Battle
The battle against society,
oneself, God, and finding peace
Live in the Present
Time is important, and enjoy life
The Great Journey
Discover of things along the way
Coming of Age
Characters grow up
The Noble Sacrifice
Giving yourself up for others
The Fall from Grace
Overreaching/rebellion lead to
consequences
The Capriciousness of Fate
Destiny or chance will prevail
Revenge
Sometimes its good
Sometimes its bad
The Big Trick
Characters con others
The Big Mystery
Characters must solve the unexplained circumstances
Death is Inevitable
Stages of life, grief, tragedy, and survival
Have the students write down the definition of theme on the iPad or index
card, additional notes must be written in the Elements of Plot notes
o Each vocabulary card must have the following
The word
The definition
A sentence correctly using the word in context and with its synonym
or definition incorporated into it
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Inform the students that they will be working in groups of three to find the
theme for at least five different stories
o They must explain why they chose each particular theme
o They must find/create five pictures illustrating the themes, one for each
theme

Modeling:
Show an example of a picture of themes
Show an example of a theme with a picture and supporting reasons for why
that is the theme of the story

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of themes
Have the students explain why the theme of a story is that particular theme

Independent Practice:
The students will work individually at their desks to fill in the vocabulary card
and take notes
The students will work in groups of three to find the theme from five different
movies, support those choices, and find/create a picture to illustrate each of
those themes

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about themes
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of themes
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students what the theme of their story is

Student Grouping:
The students will be working individually at their desks for the vocabulary card
and note taking
The students will work in groups of three to find the theme from five different
movies, support those choices, and find/create a picture to illustrate each of
those themes
Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes and vocabulary cards
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Find more themes but fewer pictures
o Give more supporting reasons for themes but fewer pictures
o Find themes from particular stories

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about themes throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lesson Fifteen)
o Students will create a flashcard about theme (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
The students will work in groups of three to find the theme from five different
movies, support those choices, and find/create a picture to illustrate each of
those themes (Due: Today)
Formal (Summative)
o Climax Project
Students will create a set of six rules, three defining what a climax
is and three defining what a climax is not
Students will write their own climax for their own story that they will
make up
Students will post their rules on the class website
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: Today
o Denouement Project
Students will write the denouement for their own story that they will
make up (Due: Lesson Twelve)
Students will trade their denouement with a partner, who will give
feedback on the following
Is there a physical denouement?
Is there an emotional denouement?
Is there anything that should be added?
Is there anything that should be removed?
Is there anything that should be changed?
Is there anything that is unclear?
Please give one suggestion.
Students will repeat the process with another partner
Students will revise their denouement
Students will fill in the Denouement Form that is a Google Doc on
the class website (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
Due: Lessons Twelve and Thirteen
Lesson Twelve Theme
Week Three Day Two

Lesson Summary:
Theme Students will work alone to create a graphic organizer on MindMeister
or on paper of at least three different themes. Each theme will have two
examples of stories that have that theme and three supporting details for each
story that show that particular theme. Students will work in groups to peer edit
their Denouement Projects. Introduce Theme Project and Storymap Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Journal
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Lesson Thirteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will work individually to create a graphic organizer about theme
Due: Lesson Thirteen
Projects
o Denouement Project
Due: Today and Lesson Thirteen
o Theme Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify themes
Write notes about themes
Give examples of themes with supporting reasons

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the end of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Examples of themes
o iPads, one for each student or paper for each student (if not using iPads)
o Flashcardlet app for the iPads
o MindMeister or another similar app for the iPads
o 3x5 index cards, one for each student (if not using iPads)
o Theme Project rubric, one per student
o Storymap Project rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: What is the theme of your story? How does your story
support the theme?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask the students how a story portrays a theme
Continue the PowerPoint presentation about Elements of Plot, starting at
Theme
Theme
o Conflicts:
Man vs. Self
An internal struggle
Man vs. Man
One person against another person
Man vs. Society
One person against a group of people, a government,
stereotypes, etc.
Man vs. Nature
One person against the elements
Man vs. A Higher Power
One person against God, gods, chance, etc.
o Theme
The moral of the story
Fables teach this directly and obviously
The lesson we learn
Parables teach this directly and obviously
The worldview about life and people
Fiction does this, but you have to figure it out from what
happens and from how characters think, talk, and act
Find the common ground
Specifics may be different, but general, underlying truths will
apply to everyone
o Finding the Theme
Check out the title
Notice repeating patterns and symbols
Find any allusions
(references to other things)
Analyze the details of the story and the greater meaning they may
have
Theme is part of the plot as a whole
A story is usually not JUST about theme
o Possible Themes
Find the common ground
What ANYONE, ANYWHERE, at ANY TIME can learn from
the story and apply to his or her own life
The theme may be somewhat different for different people
A complex story may have multiple themes
o Universal Themes
Honesty Is the Best Policy
Bad is punished, good is rewarded
Blood Is Thicker than Water
Family comes first
Love Conquers All/Friendship
It is worth everything (good and bad)
Human Struggles/The Great Battle
The battle against society,
oneself, God, and finding peace
Live in the Present
Time is important, and enjoy life
The Great Journey
Discover of things along the way
Coming of Age
Characters grow up
The Noble Sacrifice
Giving yourself up for others
The Fall from Grace
Overreaching/rebellion lead to
consequences
The Capriciousness of Fate
Destiny or chance will prevail
Revenge
Sometimes its good
Sometimes its bad
The Big Trick
Characters con others
The Big Mystery
Characters must solve the unexplained circumstances
Death is Inevitable
Stages of life, grief, tragedy, and survival
Discuss the topics on the PowerPoint slides
Discuss the pictures on the PowerPoint slides
Inform the students that they will be working alone to create a graphic
organizer on MindMeister or on a piece of paper
o They must pick three themes
o For each theme, they must pick two stories that show that theme
o For each story, they must list three supporting details from that story that
point to the theme
Students will work in groups of two to work on the Denouement Project
o Students will trade their denouement with a partner, who will give
feedback on the following
Is there a physical denouement?
Is there an emotional denouement?
Is there anything that should be added?
Is there anything that should be removed?
Is there anything that should be changed?
Is there anything that is unclear?
Please give one suggestion.
o Students will repeat the process with another partner
o Students will revise their denouement
o Students will fill in the Denouement Form that is a Google Doc on the
class website
o Due: Lesson Thirteen
Introduce Theme Project and hand out the rubrics
o Students will decide upon one of the universal themes for their own story
o Students will develop five ways that the theme can be supported in their
story using
Events
Symbolism
Characters motives, thoughts, words, actions
Etc.
o Students will incorporate the five theme supports into their own story
o Students will turn in the list of five supports
o Due: Lesson Fifteen
Introduce Storymap Project and hand out the rubrics
o Students will use the Storymap template on the class website
o Students will fill in the Storymap with the information from their own story
that they have been working on in the Setting, Characters, Exposition,
Main Events, Climax, Denouement, and Theme projects
o Due: Lesson Fifteen

Modeling:
Show an example of a picture of themes
Show an example of a graphic organizer from MindMeister about theme
Show an example of the Theme Project
Show an example of the Storymap Project
Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of themes
Have the students explain why the theme of a story is that particular theme
Have the students give supporting details from a story about the theme of that
story

Independent Practice:
Students will work individually at their desks to take notes and create a
graphic organizer about themes
Students will work in groups of two to peer edit their Denouement Projects

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about themes
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of themes
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students what kind of themes are usually in the stories they
read/watch

Student Grouping:
Students will work individually at their desks to take notes and create a
graphic organizer about themes
Students will work in groups of two to peer edit their Denouement Projects

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Draw pictures for notes
o Draw pictures for the graphic organizer about theme
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Give more supporting reasons for themes but fewer stories
o Find themes from particular stories
o Find particular themes

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about themes throughout the lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lesson Fifteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work individually to complete graphic organizers about the
theme (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
Formal (Summative)
o Denouement Project
Students will write the denouement for their own story (Due: Today)
Students will trade their denouement with a partner, who will give
feedback on the following
Is there a physical denouement?
Is there an emotional denouement?
Is there anything that should be added?
Is there anything that should be removed?
Is there anything that should be changed?
Is there anything that is unclear?
Please give one suggestion.
Students will repeat the process with another partner
Students will revise their denouement
Students will fill in the Denouement Form that is a Google Doc on
the class website (Due: Lesson Thirteen)
Due: Today and Lesson Thirteen
o Theme Project
Students will decide upon a theme for their own story
Students will develop five ways that the theme can be supported
during their story using
Events
Symbolism
Characters motives, thoughts, words, actions
Etc.
Students will incorporate the five theme supports into their own
story
Students will turn in the list of five supports
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Students will use the Storymap template on the class website
Students will fill in the Storymap with the information from their own
story that they have been working on in the Setting, Characters,
Exposition, Main Events, Climax, Denouement, and Theme projects
Due: Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Thirteen Storymap, All Elements of Plot, and
Presentations
Week Three Day Three

Lesson Summary:
Storymap, All, and Presentations Students will create a Storymap for a given
story. Students will consider and judge which element of plot is being listed out
loud by the teacher by moving throughout the room to designated areas, then
they must justify in their groups why they chose what they did. Students will
collaborate in groups of three and then as a whole class to create a survey in
Goolge Docs about stories and the elements of plot, post it to the class website,
and then they will take the survey.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to create Storymaps
Due: Today
o Students will work in groups to create a survey about stories and elements
of plot
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Vocabulary Cards
Due: Today
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Lesson Fourteen
Homework
o Students will work individually to create a graphic organizer about theme
Due: Today
o Students will take the survey that was created in class
Due: Some time next week after the unit is finished
Projects
o Denouement Project
Due: Today
o Theme Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen

Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
List, define, and identify elements of plot
Give examples of elements of plot
Create a survey about stories and elements of plot

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the end of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o Papers with one element of plot listed on each to tape around the room
Setting
Protagonist
Antagonist
Round
Flat
Stock
Exposition
Main Events
Climax
Denouement
Theme
o A list with above the categories and at least ten examples in each
category
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Denouement Project rubric

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Put the elements of plot in order of importance to you. Be
ready to justify your list.
o Setting
o Characters
o Exposition
o Main Events
o Climax
o Denouement
o Theme
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Inform the students that there are pieces of paper taped around the room and
that they will have to move to the proper place when you call out an example
of one of the elements of plot
o Read various examples of the elements of plot while the students move
around the room
o Different examples may have more than one answer
For example, Batman is a protagonist (the main character), a round
character (he changes a grows throughout the story), and a stock
character (a hero)
o Have students explain their answers
Inform the students that they will be working in groups of three to create at
least five survey questions with formatting (multiple choice, short answer,
choose from a list, etc.) about stories and the elements of plot
o For example
What is your favorite type of theme?
What is your least favorite type of theme?
What type of conflict is the best? Why?
Etc.
o Inform the students that as a class, their questions will be consolidated,
the best ones will be chosen democratically, put in a final survey in Google
Docs, and put on the class website for them to fill out
o Due: Some time next week

Modeling:
Move around the room to show how to go to the proper taped paper with the
elements of plot listed on it
Show an example of survey questions

Guided Practice:
Have the students move around the room to the proper paper with the
element of plot listed on it
Have the students give examples of survey questions

Independent Practice:
The students will participate as a whole-class group to move around the room
to the proper paper with the element of plot listed on it
The students will work in groups of three to create survey questions
The students will work as a class to choose which survey questions to include
on the final survey
Checking for Understanding:
Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about elements of plot
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of elements of plot
The students will move around the room to the proper paper with the element
of plot listed on it
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students some of the survey questions

Student Grouping:
The students will participate as a whole-class group to move around the room
to the proper paper with the element of plot listed on it
The students will work in groups of three and as a class to create survey
questions

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Participate in moving around the room to the proper paper with the
elements of plot listed on them
o Provide questions for the survey

GATE Students can


o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments
o Think outside the box for some answers regarding the papers with the
elements of plot listed on them because some examples have more than
one right answer
o Create unique survey questions

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about elements of plot throughout the
lesson
o Students will move around the room to the proper paper with the elements
of plot listed on them
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lesson Fifteen)
o Students will create flashcards about elements of plot (Due: Today)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Lesson
Fourteen)
o Students will work in groups of three and as a class to create survey
questions
o Students will take the survey that was created in class (Due: Some time
next week after the unit is finished)
Formal (Summative)
o Theme Project
Students will decide upon a universal theme for their own story
Students will develop five ways that the theme can be supported in
their story
Events
Symbolism
Characters motives, thoughts, words, actions
Etc.
Students will incorporate the five theme supports into their own
story
Students will turn in the list of five supports
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Students will use the Storymap template on the class website
Students will fill in the Storymap with the information from their own
story that they have been working on in the Setting, Characters,
Exposition, Main Events, Climax, Denouement, and Theme projects
Due: Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Fourteen Storymap and All Elements of Plot
Week Three Day Four

Lesson Summary:
Storymap, All Elements of Plot Students will create a Storymap for a given
story. Students will work in groups of four to judge if the characters in a given
story made good or bad decisions or if their motives were justified, to explain if
the students would have done something differently, to list what the Bible says
about the situation, and to record their conclusions in the form of an interview
video using the iPad and iMovie.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work individually to create Storymaps
Due: Today
o Students will work in groups to analyze and evaluate a characters
motives, thoughts, words, and actions
Due: Lesson Fourteen
o Journal
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Elements of Plot Notes
Due: Today
Homework
o Students will take the survey that was created in class
Due: Some time next week after the unit is finished
Projects
o Theme Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Due: Lesson Fifteen
Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
Identify, analyze, and categorize elements of plot
Create a Storymap with the elements of plot based on a given story
Analyze characters motives, thoughts, words, and actions
Evaluate whether or not a character did the right thing
Determine whether or not the students would have done the same thing, or if
they would do something different, define what they would have done
Compare and contrast the characters thoughts, words, actions, and motives
to what the Bible says and provide a verse with reference to back it up
Create an interview video about characters in a story and their motives,
thoughts, words, and actions, whether or not they did the right thing, what
students would have done the same or different, and what the Bible says
about the situation

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the end of the unit about Elements of Plot
Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o One iPad for each group of four students or adjust the groups to
accommodate the number of iPads
o iMovie app for the iPads
o Bibles, one for each group of four students
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Why do you think there are only a certain amount of
universal themes? Is there a responsibility of a storyteller to create stories
that have characters and a theme that somehow promotes good?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Inform the students that they will be working in groups of four to create an
interview about characters
o Assign each group a story where a character made controversial or bad or
debatable choices
Shirley Jacksons The Lottery might be a good one
o Tell the students they will be analyzing the motives, thoughts, words, and
actions of a character in the story
o Students must list at least three of the characters thoughts, words, and/or
actions that were controversial or debatable
o Students must list at least one motive for each of the three thoughts,
words, and/or actions listed above
o Students must judge if the characters thoughts, words, and/or actions,
based on their motives, were good or bad or something else and must
defend their answers with at least one reason
o Students will find out what the Bible has to say about the situation and list
verses with references that give the answer
o Students will determine what they would have done the same or differently
from the character and defend those ideas
o Students will film an interview of the character addressing all the points
above
o Students will edit the video in iMovie and add theme music and titles
o Students will present their videos at the end of class

Modeling:
Give examples of characters motives, thoughts, words, and actions, evaluate
if they were good or bad or something else, and determine if you would do the
same or something different
Have an example of an interview video of a character

Guided Practice:
Have the students give examples of a characters motives, thoughts, words,
and actions
Have the students evaluate whether or not a characters motives, thoughts,
words, and actions were right or wrong
Have the students determine if they would do the same thing or something
different than the character
Have the students give biblical principles for situations
Independent Practice:
The students will work in groups of four to create an interview video of a
character and their motives, thoughts, words, and actions, if they did the right
or wrong or something else thing, whether or not the students would do the
same thing or something different, and a Bible verse with reference pertaining
to the situation

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about characters motives,
thoughts, words, and actions
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of characters motives,
thoughts, words, and actions
The students will work in groups of four to create an interview video of a
character and their motives, thoughts, words, and actions, if they did the right
or wrong or something else thing, whether or not the students would do the
same thing or something different, and a Bible verse with reference pertaining
to the situation
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Watch the students interview videos

Student Grouping:
The students will work in groups of four to create an interview video of a
character and their motives, thoughts, words, and actions, if they did the right
or wrong or something else thing, whether or not the students would do the
same thing or something different, and a Bible verse with reference pertaining
to the situation

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Provide information about whether or not they would do the same thing or
something different than the characters
o Act in the interview video
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about elements of plot throughout the
lesson
o Students will be graded on completing the journal assignment (Due:
Lesson Fifteen)
o Students will write notes in their Elements of Plot notes (Due: Today)
o The students will work in groups of four to create an interview video of a
character and their motives, thoughts, words, and actions, if they did the
right or wrong or something else thing, whether or not the students would
do the same thing or something different, and a Bible verse with reference
pertaining to the situation (Due: Today)
o Students will take the survey that was created in class (Due: Some time
next week after the unit is finished)
Formal (Summative)
o Theme Project
Students will decide upon a universal theme for their own story
Students will develop five ways that the theme can be supported
during their story
Events
Symbolism
Characters motives, thoughts, words, actions
Etc.
Students will incorporate the five theme supports into their own
story
Students will turn in the list of five supports
Due: Lesson Fifteen
o Storymap Project
Students will use the Storymap template on the class website
Students will fill in the Storymap with the information from their own
story that they have been working on in the Setting, Characters,
Exposition, Main Events, Climax, Denouement, and Theme projects
Due: Lesson Fifteen
Lesson Fifteen All Elements of Plot and
Presentations
Week Three Day Five

Lesson Summary:
All Elements of Plot and Presentations Students will create a Storymap for a
given story. In pairs, students will apprise the theme in at least two different
stories, determine what the theme in each is, support those decisions with
examples from the story, judge what the authors worldview is, and compare and
contrast the authors worldview with a biblical worldview. Introduce the Narrative
Project.

Assignments:
In-Class Activities
o Students will work in groups to identify, analyze, and compare an authors
worldview to a biblical worldview
Due: Today
o Journal
Due: Today
Homework
o Students will take the survey that was created in class
Due: Some time next week after the unit is finished
Projects
o Theme Project
Due: Today
o Storymap Project
Due: Today
o Narrative Project
Due: In two weeks, after the unit is finished
Standards:
Area: Reading
Sub-Strand 1.0: Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development
Concept: Vocabulary and Concept Development
Sub-Strand 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis
Concept: Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
Standard 3.2: Evaluate the structural elements of the plot (e.g., subplots, parallel
episodes, climax), the plots development, and the way in which conflicts are (or
are not) addressed and resolved.
Standard 3.3: Compare and contrast motivations and reactions of literary
characters from different historical eras confronting similar situations or conflicts.
Standard 3.4: Analyze the relevance of the setting (e.g., place, time, customs) to
the mood, tone, and meaning of the text.
Standard 3.5: Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil)
across traditional and contemporary works.

Area: Writing
Sub-Strand 1.0: Writing Strategies
Concept: Organization and Focus
Standard 1.1: Create compositions that establish a controlling impression, have
a coherent thesis, and end with a clear and well-supported conclusion.
Standard 1.2: Establish coherence within and among paragraphs through
effective transitions, parallel structures, and similar writing techniques.
Standard 1.3: Support theses or conclusions with analogies, paraphrases,
quotations, opinions from authorities, comparisons, and similar devices.
Concept: Evaluation and Revision
Standard 1.6: Revise writing for word choice; appropriate organization;
consistent point of view; and transitions between paragraphs, passages, and
ideas.
Sub-Strand 2.0: Writing Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics)
Concept: Using the writing strategies of grade eight outlined in Writing Standard
1.0, students:
Standard 2.1: Write biographies, autobiographies, short stories, or narratives: a.
Relate a clear, coherent incident, event, or situation by using well-chosen details.
b. Reveal the significance of, or the writers attitude about, the subject. c. Employ
narrative and descriptive strategies (e.g., relevant dialogue, specific action,
physical description, background description, comparison or contrast of
characters).
Standard 2.2: Write responses to literature: a. Exhibit careful reading and insight
in their interpretations. b. Connect the students own responses to the writers
techniques and to specific textual references. c. Draw supported inferences
about the effects of a literary work on its audience. d. Support judgments through
references to the text, other works, other authors, or to personal knowledge.
Area: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Sub-Strand 1.0: Written and Oral English Language Conventions
Concept: Sentence Structure
Standard 1.1: Use correct and varied sentence types and sentence openings to
present a lively and effective personal style.
Concept: Grammar
Standard 1.4: Edit written manuscripts to ensure that correct grammar is used.
Concept: Punctuation and Capitalization
Standard 1.5: Use correct punctuation and capitalization.
Concept: Spelling
Standard 1.6: Use correct spelling conventions.

ISTE Technology Standards Addressed


1. Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct
knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes
b. Create original works as a means of personal or group expression

2. Communication and Collaboration: Students use digital media and


environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance,
to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
a. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a
variety of digital environments and media
b. Communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a
variety of media and formats

5. Digital Citizenship: Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues


related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.
a. Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and
technology
b. Exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration,
learning, and productivity

6. Technology Operations and Concepts: Students demonstrate a sound


understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
a. Understand and use technology systems
b. Select and use applications effectively and productively
c. Troubleshoot systems and applications
d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Lesson Objectives:
By the end of the lesson, the students will be able to
Identify, analyze, and categorize elements of plot
Create a Storymap with the elements of plot based on a given story
Analyze the theme of a story
Explain supporting details for the theme of a story
Judge what an authors worldview is and compare it to a biblical perspective
Create a table that lists the theme, supports for it, the authors worldview, and
the biblical perspective

Time Allotment and Context:


One fifty-minute class period at the end of the unit about Elements of Plot

Materials/Resources:
Teacher
o Computer
o Projector connected to the computer
o Program to connect the iPad to the projector
o Elements of Plot PowerPoint presentation
o One iPad for each group of four students or adjust the groups to
accommodate the number of iPads
o iMovie app for the iPads
o Bibles, one for each group of two students
o Narrative Project rubric, one per student
Students
o Lined notebook paper
o Writing utensils
o Theme Project rubric
o Storymap Project rubric

Anticipatory Set:
Journal Question: Which activity or project about elements of plot did you
most enjoy? If you had to do another project, what kind of project would you
like to do? Movie? Illustrated book? Podcast? Cartoon? Song? Comic book?
Give the students time to write in their journals
Discuss the journal question as a class

Input:
Ask questions about the elements of plot
Inform the students that they will be working in groups of two to do an activity
about theme
o Assign each group of two a story
o Students will Storymap the story
o Students will determine the theme of the story
o Students will list at least three supporting details for the theme of the story
o Students will determine what the authors worldview is
o Students will find out if the authors worldview agrees or disagrees with a
biblical worldview pertaining to that theme
o Students will give verses with references to back up the biblical worldview
Introduce the Final Narrative Project and hand out the rubrics
o Students will write a narrative, their own story that they will make up
o The story is based on all the other projects done throughout the unit
Setting Project
Characters Project
Exposition Project
Main Events Project
Climax Project
Denouement Project
Theme Project
Storymap Project
o The story must follow standard formatting rules
o The story must follow standard English mechanics rules
o Students will also create a showcase presentation of their story
o Students can choose from the following or other approved ideas
Illustrated book
Movie
Podcast
Cartoon
Comic book
Song
Etc.
o Students will be given a rubric to follow
o Due: In two weeks, after the unit is finished

Modeling:
Give examples of the table with a storys theme, supporting details, the
authors worldview, and the biblical perspective
Give an example of a Storymap
Give examples of a finished Narrative Project

Guided Practice:
Have students give examples of a storys theme
Have the students give examples of supporting details of theme for a story
Have the students give examples of the elements of plot

Independent Practice:
The students will work in groups of two to determine a storys theme,
supporting details for that theme, the authors worldview, and the biblical
perspective, and put it all on a table

Checking for Understanding:


Ask the students throughout the lesson questions about elements of plot
Ask the students throughout the lesson for examples of elements of plot
The students will work in groups of two to determine a storys theme,
supporting details for that theme, the authors worldview, and the biblical
perspective, and put it all on a table
Walk around the room during independent practice to check on students
work

Closure:
Ask the students what kind of project for the Narrative Project they might want
to do

Student Grouping:
The students will work in groups of two to determine a storys theme,
supporting details for that theme, the authors worldview, and the biblical
perspective, and put it all on a table

Differentiated Instruction:
ELL and Special Needs Students can
o Fill in a partially completed Storymap
o Use pictures to fill in the Storymap
GATE Students can
o Engage in creative thinking due to the open-ended nature of the questions
and the assignments

Assessment:
Informal (Formative):
o Students will provide feedback about elements of plot throughout the
lesson
o Students will be graded on elements of plot notes (Due: Today)
o The students will work in groups of two to determine a storys theme,
supporting details for that theme, the authors worldview, and the biblical
perspective, and put it all on a table (Due: Today)
o Students will take the survey that was created in class (Due: Some time
next week after the unit is finished)
Formal (Summative)
o Theme Project
Students will decide upon a theme for their own story
Students will develop five ways that the theme can be supported
during their story
Events
Symbolism
Characters motives, thoughts, words, actions
Etc.
Students will incorporate the five theme supports into their own
story
Students will turn in the list of five supports
Due: Today
o Storymap Project
Students will use the Storymap template on the class website
Students will fill in the Storymap with the information from their own
story that they have been working on in the Setting, Characters,
Exposition, Main Events, Climax, Denouement, and Theme projects
Due: Today
o Introduce the Final Narrative Project
Students will write a narrative, their own story
The story is based on all the other projects done throughout the unit
Setting Project
Characters Project
Exposition Project
Main Events Project
Climax Project
Denouement Project
Theme Project
Storymap Project
The story must follow standard formatting rules
The story must follow standard English mechanics rules
Students will also create a showcase presentation of their story
Students can choose from the following or other approved ideas
Illustrated book
Movie
Podcast
Cartoon
Comic book
Song
Etc.
Students will be given a rubric to follow
Due: In two weeks, after the unit is finished