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Similarity and congruence

Two triangles are said to be similar if every angle of one triangle has the same measure as the
corresponding angle in the other triangle. The corresponding sides of similar triangles have lengths
that are in the same proportion, and this property is also sufficient to establish similarity.

Some basic theorems about similar triangles are:

If and only if one pair of internal angles of two triangles have the same measure as each
other, and another pair also have the same measure as each other, the triangles are similar.

If and only if one pair of corresponding sides of two triangles are in the same proportion as
are another pair of corresponding sides, and their included angles have the same measure, then
the triangles are similar. (The included angle for any two sides of a polygon is the internal angle
between those two sides.)

If and only if three pairs of corresponding sides of two triangles are all in the same
proportion, then the triangles are similar.[note 3]

Two triangles that are congruent have exactly the same size and shape:[note 4] all pairs of
corresponding interior angles are equal in measure, and all pairs of corresponding sides have the
same length. (This is a total of six equalities, but three are often sufficient to prove congruence.)