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Daniel

Ruiz
Lei 4724
Activity Title: Yoga Practice session
Source: Porter, H. R. (n.d.). Recreational therapy for specific diagnoses and conditions. Enumclaw, WA: Idyll
Arbor
Equipment: Yoga mat, Foam Muscle Roller, Yoga stretching strap, meditation music.

Activity Description: According to Dattilo description of Yoga, it is consider the oldest and most complete
system of traditions and personal development that focuses on the mind, body, and spirit.
1. Dattilo suggest the physical exercise associated with yoga is achieved through a series of asanas or body
posture designed to increase flexibility of the body and mind and static muscle strength.
2. A qualified teacher will lead the group yoga session lasting 60 minutes. The session begin with 10-15 minutes
of breathing practice.
3. Continue by a 30-minute opening stretches and relaxation postures. The session will end with 15 minutes of
guided relaxation.
4. The asanas this yoga activity will include are the following: Bharadvajas Twist, Big Toe Pose, cobra pose,
Bridge pose, and childs pose. The postures are combined and adapted to address individuals body types and
needs.

Leadership Consideration: CTRS functions as an instructor for this activity by providing instructions and
demonstrating yoga postures. Therapist will educate the clients in adaptations or necessary modification for the
clients to ensure appropriate yoga practice. 1) Session will begin by lying down supine on the mat wit eyes close.
2) Inhale and lift through the top of the sternum stimulating adequate breathing. 3) Switch to a sitting position of
the floor with legs in front of you. 4) Shift onto your right buttock, bend your knees, and swing your legs to the
left. 5) Perform the same procedures on the opposite side. 6) With every inhalation lift a little more through the
sternum, using the push of the fingers on the floor to help; with every exhalation twist a little more. 7) Stay
for 30 seconds to 1 minute, then release with an exhalation, return to the starting position, and repeat to
the left for the same length of time. 8) Big toe asana, stand upright with your inner feet parallel and about
six inches apart. 9) Contract your front thigh muscles to lift your kneecaps. Keeping your legs completely
straight, exhale and bend forward from your hip joints, moving your torso and head as one unit.
Adaptations: Participants with Heart disease: According to Porter, heart disease is an umbrella term that
includes a range of medical conditions that involve the heart in one-way or another. Porter and the American
Heart Association provide examples of common conditions like Blood vessel disease (Cardiovascular disease),
Heart arrhythmias, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, heart infections, and valvular heart disease among
the many disorders affecting the heart. The causes of the heart disease vary depending the type of disorder and
individual. Therapist considering yoga activity as a therapeutic recreation intervention should consider the
following adaptations. 1) Participants should be physically clear to participate. 2) A chair or wall can be use for
support for individuals with balance issues. 3) Therapist should walk around to assist participants adjusting poses.
4) Stretching strap be use to modify big toe pose to increase flexibility. 5) Foam muscle roller can be use to
modify cobra pose to increase lower back extension and torso flexibility. 6) On Inhalation, participant can inhale
additionally to have a more powerful exhalation that can generate a stronger push to raise torso. Childs pose
should not be adapted since is a natural pose. 7) Proper inhalation and exhalation should be encourage throughout
practice. 8) Practice of the activity can be perform 2 times per week for two months.
Adaptations: Participants with Diabetes Mellitus: According to Porter, diabetes mellitus is a complex disease
that occurs when insulin production is too low (or lacking entirely) or when the body is unable to effectively use
the insulin it produces because of defeats in the insulin receptors. Therapist considering yoga activity as a
therapeutic recreation intervention should consider the following adaptations: 1) Participants should be physically
clear to participate. 2) Participant should check their sugar levels before the practice. 3) Therapist should walk
around to assist participants adjusting poses. 4) Stretching strap be use to modify big toe pose to increase
flexibility. 5) Foam muscle roller can be use to modify cobra pose to increase lower back extension and torso
flexibility. 6) On Inhalation, participant can inhale additionally to have a more powerful exhalation that can
generate a stronger push to raise torso. Childs pose should not be adapted since is a natural pose. 7) Proper
inhalation and exhalation should be encourage throughout practice. 8) Practice of the activity can be perform 2
times per week for two months.